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24. Etruria, Populonia AR Drachm of 5 Units. 4th century BC. Head of Turms left, wearing winged petasos, Λ behind / Blank. EC I, 12.5-11 (same die); HN Italy 123; Sambon 91. 3.73g, 22mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

From the VCV Collection.

25. Etruria, Populonia AR Drachm of 5 Units. 4th century BC. Head of Turms left, wearing winged petasos, Λ behind / Blank. EC I, 12.13 (this coin); HN Italy 123; Sambon 91. 3.91g, 16mm. Good Very Fine. Very Rare.

2,000

From the VCV Collection.

2x 26. Etruria, Populonia AV 10 Units. Early 3rd century BC. Male head right, X before chin / Blank. EC I, 29.23 (this coin); HN Italy 135; Sambon 7. 0.55g, 9mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,500

From the VCV Collection. The third and most extensive coin phase of Populonia consists of gold coins with marks of value of 50, 25, 12.5 and 10 (series 20-36) on a weight standard of a single gold unit of about 0.06g, very close to the standards of the gold litra of Sicily at the time of Agathokles from 304-289 BC, and the Roman gold Mars/eagle issues of c. 211 (Crawford 44/2-4) of 0.056g, one series of which is attributed to a mint in Etruria (Crawford 106/2).

2x 27. Etruria, Populonia AV 10 Units. 3rd century BC. Male head right, X behind / Blank. EC I, 31.19 (this coin); HN Italy 136; Sambon 7. 0.68g, 8mm. Extremely Fine. Very Rare.

2,500

From the VCV Collection; Ex Artemide 37, 8 December 2012, lot 4.

28. Etruria, Populonia AR 20 Asses. 3rd century BC. Facing head of Metus, tongue protruding, hair bound with diadem, X:X below / Blank. EC I, 37 (O1); HN Italy 101. 6.20g, 19mm. Very Fine.

500

From the VCV Collection. The second silver Metus group is the most extensive of all Etruscan groups and consists of denominations similar to the first Metus group, but with value marks of exactly the double: 20, 10, 5, 2.5, 1 and possibly a half unit (series 37-111). The average weight of the 20 unit pieces clusters around 8.4 g, but enough examples weigh over 8.5 g to indicate that their theoretical intended weight may have been a stater of 8.6 grams, close to that of the Corinthian type staters current in southern Italy and Sicily in the early 3rd century. This denomination is divided by 20 units, presumably Roman libral cast asses, dominant throughout central Italy from the 280s BC, rendering a silver unit of about 0.43g, close to the standard of Rome’s earliest 10-as denarii. Although similar in weight standard, they seem only to anticipate the Roman denarius of c. 211 BC, since the chronological evidence from both the Populonia (1939) and Ponte Gini (1986) finds point to a burial date of the first half of the 3rd century BC.

9

Roma Numismatics Auction X  

Roma Numismatics Auction X