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Successful bidders will be notified and invoiced within a few days of the auction. Prices realized will be published around the same time. Grades of preservation

Degrés de preservation

Gradi di conservazioni

Erhaltungsgrad

Grados de conservación

FDC Uncirculated

Fleur de coin (FDC)

Fior di conio

Stempelganz

FDC

Extremely fine Very fine

Superbe Très beau

Splendido Bellissimo

Vorzüglich Sehr schön

EBC MBC

Fine

Beau

Molto Bello

Schön

BC


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COINS OF THE CELTS

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1

1. Britannia. Trinovantes AV Stater. Circa 45-40 BC. Two crossed wreaths, crescents at centre; ornaments around / Horse right, surrounded by ornaments; wing-like object above left, wheel below. Van Arsdell 1487-1. 5.53g, 17mm, 1h. Very Fine.

500

2. Northern Gaul. Ambiani AV Stater. Circa 60-50 BC. Blank convex surface / Disjointed horse right; crescents and pellets around. D&T 239; Depeyrot, NC VI, 161; SCBC 11. 6.17g, 16mm. Extremely Fine.

500

Ex David Cassel Collection; Ex Goldberg Auction 47, 25 May 2008, lot 1214.

ETRURIA

COINS OF THE GREEKS A Very Rare Coin of Luca

3. Etruria, Luca (?) AR 10 Units. Circa 3rd Century BC. Hippocamp right; dolphin right and CC above, dolphin left below / Blank reverse. HN Italy 98; cf. I. Vecchi. “The Coinage of the Rasna” part V, SNR 78, 1999, 41 (unrecorded die). 5.05g, 17mm Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

2,500

Luca (Modern Lucca) was originally inhabited by a Ligurian population, 20 km inland from the Tyrrhenian Sea and located on an island in the river Auser (Serchio); its territory reached the Arno to the southeast and hence the Etruscan frontier. Numerous recent site finds of Ligurian and Etruscan material excavated by the local superintendency in the surrounding area point to an aggressive confrontation of the two cultures from the fifth century BC, probably with alternating Ligurian and Etruscan occupations. Etruscan coin finds from the nearby Gattaiola near Lucca, Ponte Gini in Orentano and Bora dei Frati in Versilia, make it virtually certain that by the third century BC Luca was an Etruscan city, the remains of which probably lie beneath the subsequent Roman and medieval town. The hippocamp series used a highly original system with value marks CC and C. It is struck on the same weight standard as Populonia’s second Gorgoneion series, but with the 10-units curiously expressed in two multiples of five, CC (5+5 = 10).

Fifth Known Example

4. Etruria, Populonia AR 10 Units. Early 3rd Century BC. Facing Metus wearing diadem; dolphins flanking X below / Blank reverse. HN Italy 117; Vecchi II, 1. 8.31g, 24mm. Very Rare - one of only five recorded examples. Very Fine.

2,000

The first silver Metus 10-unit series, with fractions 5 and 2.5, appeared on a weight standard based on the silver Euboeic-Attic didrachm or Corinthian stater. The mark of value X would seem to indicate the stater was denominated at ten silver units, similar to Siclian litrae of about 0.86g.

1


5. Etruria, Populonia AR 20 Units. Circa 300-250 BC. Youthful head of ‘Hercle’ facing, wearing lion-skin headdress; X on either side / Blank reverse. HN Italy 155; I. Vecchi, SNR 69 (1990), p. 23, 75.20 (this coin); Dewing Coll. 76 (these dies); SNG ANS 89 (these dies); SNG Florence 431 (these dies); H. Troxell, The Norman Davis Collection, ANS 1969, #2 (this coin). 9.07g, 21mm. Very Fine.

3,000

Ex Norman Davis Collection. At some point in the third century the second facing youthful head of Hercle (Herakles) series was issued on the Euboeic-Attic weight standard, but with didrachms bearing the mark of value XX (= 20) drachms - X exactly double that of the previous Gorgoneion issue. This may have been an attempt to reconcile the silver value of the central Italian bronze As unit. The whole issue is on the same standard and seems to anticipate the Roman Denarius multiple-As system introduced during the Second Punic War in about 211.

CAMPANIA A Rare and Attractive Specimen of Nuceria Alfaterna

6. Campania, Nuceria Alfaterna AR Didrachm. Circa 250-225 BC. Head of Karneios left with horn of Ammon, Oscan legend ‘nukrinum alafaternum’ around / Dioscouros standing facing, head turned to left, beside his horse, holding the reins and a thyrsos. HN Italy 608; SNG ANS 560. 7.15g, 19mm, 10h. Rare. Very Fine.

1,500

LUCANIA

7. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Diobol. Circa 470-440 BC. Poseidon standing right wielding trident, chlamys draped over both arms; olive branch behind / Bull standing left, barley grain below. HN Italy 1119; SNG ANS 700. 1.11g, 13mm, 2h. Very Fine.

150

Ex CNG E-Auction 63, 23 April 2003, lot 5.

8. Lucania, Poseidonia AR Nomos. Circa 445-420 BC. Poseidon standing right wielding trident, chlamys draped over both arms; POSEI before / Bull standing left, POMES DA (retrograde) above. HN Italy 1116; Lockett 443; SNG ANS 662. 7.81g, 21mm, 1h. Rare. Good Very Fine. Ex Athos D. Moretti Collection; Ex NAC Auction O, 13 May 2004, lot 1151.

2

480


9. Lucania, Poseidonia Æ19. Circa 350-290 BC. Poseidon standing right wielding trident, chlamys draped over both arms; POSEIDANI behind / Bull charging right, dolphin above. HN Italy 1174, SNG ANS 711-712 var. 5.86g, 19mm, 11h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

500

Ex HD Rauch 87, 8 December 2010, lot 45.

Beautiful and Rare Early Didrachm of Velia Ex Santamaria, March 1910

10. Lucania, Velia AR Didrachm. Circa 460-420 BC. YELH; female head right, wearing stephane / Lion standing right, preparing to pounce; LH in exergue. R.T. Williams, Silver Coinage of Velia, 219 (this coin); SNG Copenhagen 1528; SNG München 839. 7.67g, 20mm, 9h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

4,000

Ex Triton I, 2 December 1997, lot 144; Ex M&M Auction 10, 22 June 1951, lot 175; Ex Santamaria Auction, 7 March 1910, lot 337.

11. Lucania, Velia AR Didrachm. Circa 305-290 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing winged, laureate and crested Attic helmet / Lion standing right, Φ-Ι above, bunch of grapes between; ΥΕΛΗΤΩΝ in exergue. Williams, Velia 496 (these dies). 7.50g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine. Attractively toned.

500

Ex M&M Auction 25, 18 October 2007, lot 2105.

12. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 400-350 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla; ΙΔ behind neck guard / Bull charging right, ΘΟΥΡΙΩΝ above; fish right in exergue. HN Italy 1805; Noe, Thurian F28; SNG Lloyd 486; Pozzi 229; Jameson 359 (all from these dies). 15.65g, 27mm, 12h. Very Fine. Pleasantly toned; of fine style.

3

2,500


4


A Thourioi Distater of Superb Style

13. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla; ΣΑΝ behind neck guard / Bull charging right, ΘΟΥΡΙΩΝ ΕΥΦΑ above; fish right in exergue. HN Italy 1823; Noe, Thurian J6-J8 (these dies). 15.72g, 26mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

5,000

A head of Athena engraved in the finest classical style, superbly detailed throughout, with facial features that convey a femininity rarely seen on the coins of this series. Golden toning around the devices highlight the detail on the coin. Ex Manhattan Sale I, 5 January 2010, lot 15.

14. Lucania, Thourioi AR Distater. Circa 350-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla hurling rock / ΘOYPION, bull charging right, cornucopiae and H-GA in exergue. HN Italy 1858; Noe, Thurian N14. 15.51g, 28mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Struck on a very broad flan.

2,550

Ex Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection

15. Lucania, Thourioi AR Didrachm. Circa 350-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla / Bull charging right, ΘΟΥΡΙΩΝ and SIM above; fish right in exergue. HN Italy 1843; SNG ANS 1090 (these dies). 8.01g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

2,000

Ex Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection; Ex Sotheby´s, 19-20 June 1991, lot 41.

16. Lucania, Thourioi AR Didrachm. Circa 350-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet decorated with Skylla / Bull charging right, ΘΟΥΡΙΩΝ above; fish right in exergue. SNG ANS 1038; SNG Copenhagen 1438. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

5

1,500


17. Lucania, Herakleia AR Didrachm. Circa 281-272 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet decorated with Skylla; E behind / Herakles standing facing, holding club, bow and lion skin; owl to left. SNG ANS 77ff. 7.69g, 20mm, 9h. About Very Fine.

2,000

18. Lucania, Metapontum AR Didrachm. Circa 320-280 BC. Head of Demeter right, wearing grain wreath and pendant earring / Ear of barley, lotus flower to right, META to left. Johnston -. 8.02g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine and attractively toned.

1,500

Privately purchased from Münzhandlung Ritter in 2003.

19. Lucania, Metapontion AR Didrachm. Circa 280 BC. Head of Demeter left, wearing grain wreath; Δ behind / Ear of barley, distaff to right, META to left. Johnston D1.1 (these dies). 8.00g, 21mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

1,200

Ex Gorny & Mosch 133, 11 October 2004, lot 28.

APULIA

20

21

20. Apulia, Arpi Æ15. Circa 325-275 BC. Laureate head of Zeus left / Horse galloping left, eight rayed star above, ARPI monogram below. HN Italy 644; SNG ANS -. 2.86g, 16mm, 4h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

300

Ex Negrini Auction 31, 10 June 2010, lot 27. 21. Apulia, Venusia Æ Semis. Circa 268-217 BC. Draped bust of Hermes right, wearing petasos / Winged boot, S and kerykeion before. SNG ANS 770; Weber coll. 272; SNG München -; Lindgren -; SNG Copenhagen -. 3.66g, 16mm, 10h. Extremely Rare. Good Very Fine. Excellent condition for the type.

500

Ex Negrini Auction 45, 10 June 2010, lot 45.

22. Apulia, Venusia Æ Teruncius. Circa 215 BC. Head of Jupiter left, three pellets behind / Three crescents and stars. HN Italy 714; SNG ANS 755. 18.42g, 26mm, 11h. Rare. Very Fine.

6

300


CALABRIA Outstanding Style Ex Comte De Briailles Collection, Bourgey 1959

23. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 390-385 BC. Nude warrior on horseback left, holding reins in right hand, small round shield on left arm; A below / Taras astride dolphin left; P and ΤΑΡΑΣ below. Vlasto 379; SNG ANS 900 (but with A on obv. and P on rev. intact). 7.84g, 21mm, 10h. Extremely Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

10,000

A stunning and statuesque obverse from one of the briefest but most beautiful series in Tarentine coinage. Deep, attractive old cabinet tone. Ex Comte Chandon De Briailles Collection; Ex Bourgey, 17 June 1959, lot 15.

24. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 355-340 BC. Warrior on horseback right, shield on left shoulder, |- below / Taras astride dolphin left over waves, holding seashell; P below, ΤΑΡΑΣ behind. Vlasto 448; HN Italy 878; SNG France 1750; F.B. 673m (this coin). 7.80g, 21mm, 9h. Good Very Fine. A reverse of wonderful style.

520

Ex Athos D. Moretti Collection; Ex NAC Auction O, 13 May 2004, lot 1069. On the coins of Tarentum, the facial features of Taras are usually the first part of the die to wear out or become clogged. On this piece we see a carefully rendered face in which the die cutter must have invested significant care and attention.

25. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 281-270 BC. Warrior on horseback left, holding shield in left hand; ΣΙ in right field, ΦΙΛΟΚΛΗΣ below / Taras astride dolphin left, holding wreath in right hand and resting left on dolphin’s back; ΤΑΡΑΣ behind, ΛΥ below. Vlasto 688ff. 7.74g, 21mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

26. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 280 BC. Warrior on horseback right, holding shield and two spears, preparing to cast a third; ΣI behind, ΔEINOKPATHΣ below / Taras astride dolphin left, holding small dolphin; ΤΑΡΑΣ behind. Vlasto 692-3; HN Italy 967. 7.83g, 23mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

7

1,000


27. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 281-270 BC. Rider dismounting from horse left, holding spear and shield; E[Y] in right field, [NIK]ΩΝ below horse / Taras astride Dolphin left, holding barley ear in right hand and resting left on dolphin’s back; API before, TAPAΣ behind, spearhead below. Vlasto 701; HN Italy 969; SNG ANS 1078. 7.75g, 21mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Of pleasing style, and nicely toned.

2,000

The city of Tarentum was renowned throughout the ancient world for the quality of its horsemen, who served as mercenary cavalry for many foreign kings including Antigonos I, Demetrios I and Alexander of Epirus. The horsemen of Tarentum served as hippokontistai (mounted javelinmen), or in their specific case, elaphroi (skirmishing cavalry which throw javelins and dismount for hand to hand combat), but such was their fame that the term Tarantinoi came to mean any such skirmishing cavalry unit, regardless of their origin. Indeed, Asklepiodotos mentions Tarantinarchos (leader of Tarentines) as a military rank in Hellenistic Athens. The scene depicted here is from an equestrian event of the Hyakinthia (the ceremonial games of Hyakinthian Apollo) which celebrated those special skills necessary in war. The armed rider would dismount at full gallop, run alongside his horse, and then remount in stride. The Tarentine didrachm was reduced from approximately 7.5g to 6.5g after 281 BC to help pay for Pyrrhus’ campaigns against the Romans. Noting that the spearhead on the reverse is an Epirote symbol, this is one of the last coins struck on the old standard.

28. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 281-270 BC. Horseman galloping right, holding reins with both hands; SU in left field, NIKODAMOS below horse / Taras astride dolphin left, holding kantharos and distaff; TAPAΣ before, IOR and gazelle below. Vlasto 704 (these dies); SNG ANS 1079; SNG France 1886. 7.84g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex NAC 54, 24 March 2010, lot 14.

29. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Circa 281-276 BC. Nude warrior on horseback left, wearing helmet and carrying shield, EY (retrograde) before, NIKOΔΑΜΟΣ below / Taras astride dolphin left, holding bunch of grapes and distaff; ΤΑΡΑΣ before, cockerel behind, ΑΓΑ below. Vlasto 707; HN Italy 970; Jameson 168 (this obverse die); Boston 80 (this obverse die). 7.88g, 21mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

8

1,000


9


An Exceptional Campano-Tarentine Didrachm

30. Calabria, Tarentum AR Nomos. Campano-Tarentine issue. Circa 281-228 BC. Diademed head of the nymph Satyra left wearing triple-drop earring / Nude youth on horseback right, crowning horse with raised left foreleg; TA and dolphin below, cornucopiae behind. Vlasto 1038ff; SNG ANS 1288. 7.00g, 21mm, 12h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine, and the best example offered for sale in many years.

2,000

The Campano-Tarentine series dates to around the middle of the 3rd century BC, and are usually said to have been struck somewhere in Campania or Lucania. The obverse displays not the usual dolphin rider, but instead a nymph resembling those on the coinage of Neapolis. Furthermore, the coins are struck on the standard not of Tarentum, being 0.8 grams lighter on average, but of those cities on the west coast of Magna Graecia, hence the credence given to this theory. However, the question of where these coins were struck and which region they were intended for, was addressed by J.G. Milne (An Exchange-Currency of Magna Graecia), who convincingly argues that it was more likely they were produced in Tarentum for circulation in or trade with the Greek cities of Bruttium, and that they should therefore be properly referred to as Bruttio-Tarentine coinage.

BRUTTIUM A Beautiful Tetradrachm of Rhegion

31. Bruttium, Rhegion AR Tetradrachm. Circa 435 BC. Facing lion’s head / Iocastus seated left on diphros, holding staff in right hand and resting left on back of seat, RECINON (retrograde) around, all within olive wreath border. Herzfelder 42A. 17.32g, 30mm, 12h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

10,000

Well centred obverse of good style, attractively highlighted with gold iridescent toning. Ex Peter Guber Collection. The lion on the obverse of Rhegion’s coinage is the sacred animal of Apollo, patron god of colonisation. The seated figure on the reverse has no distinctive attributes that aid identification, however current interpretations attribute him as being Iocastos, son of Aiolos, and who was king over much of the toe of Italy. That he died from the effects of a snake-bite we learn from Heraclides, a pupil of Plato: “Rhegion was founded by Chalcidians who had left Euripas on account of a pestilence; they were aided by Messenians, who settled down first near the grave of Iocastos, one of the sons of Aiolus, whom they say died from the bite of a snake.” The fact that his brothers Pheraimon and Agathurnos were commemorated on coins of Messana and Tyndaris renders it likely that Iocastos should likewise be made the subject of a type.

32. Bruttium, Rhegium AR Litra. Circa 415-387 BC. Facing lion’s head / Olive sprig, PH to right. Herzfelder pl. XI, Jβ; HN Italy 2499. 0.71g, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

10

300


Fine Style Apollo

33. Bruttium, Rhegion AR Tetradrachm. Circa 356-351 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, hair falling loosely behind neck; ΡΗΓΙΝΟΣ before / Lion’s head facing, eyes looking to left. Herzfelder 115 (D71/R97). 17.18g, 24mm, 5h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine; a few minor marks, but otherwise in excellent condition. Beautifully toned.

40,000

Ex NAC 29, 11 May 2005, lot 63; Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XXVII, 4 December 1991, lot 7. On this stunning type we witness the transferral of the traditional lion’s scalp from the obverse to the reverse, evidently to make way for a portrait of Apollo engraved with consummate skill. The sheer elegance and beauty of this type have ensured that it has long been regarded as one of the masterpieces of Magna Graecian art.

Ex Berlin Museum Collection

34. Bruttium, Terina AR Drachm. Circa 300 BC. Head of nymph Terina left, wearing triple-drop earring and pearl necklace; TERINAIWN to left, triskeles behind / Nike, wearing chiton and himation, seated left on square cippus, dove alighting on her extended right hand; star to left. SNG Lockett 680 (this reverse die); Holloway & Jenkins 114. 2.46g, 17mm, 3h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

5,000

Beautiful old tone over good metal, with appealing iridescent highlights around the devices. Ex Dove Collection; Ex Berlin Museum Collection; Ex Leu 54, 28 April 1992, lot 19; Ex Ars Classica 15, 2 July 1930, lot 262; Ex Hirsch 26, 1910, lot 358.

35. Bruttium, Kroton AR Stater. Circa 525-515 BC. Tripod with legs ending in lion’s feet; two snakes emerging from base, QPO to left / The same type incuse without snakes or legend. HN Italy 2075; De Luynes 702; SNG ANS 241; Gorini 1. 7.82g, 28mm, 12h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

11

2,000


12


13


SICILY A Masterpiece of Siculo-Punic Art

36. Sicily, ‘Cape of Melkart’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 360-330 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving galloping quadriga right, Nike flying above left to crown charioteer; Punic legend RSMLQRT in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing wreath of grain-ears, triple-pendant earring and necklace; three dolphins around. Jenkins, Coins of Punic Sicily, 37 (O14/R28); Jameson 597 (these dies); de Luynes 920 (these dies). 17.03g, 28mm, 9h. Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

20,000

Ex Prospero Collection, NY Sale XXVII, 4 January 2012, lot 200. Privately purchased from Spink. This piece bears an incredibly vivid iridescent tone, present on both obverse and reverse, but especially pronounced on the reverse. The aquamarine hues, interspersed with gold and violet flashes, are overlaid on a highly lustrous flan and are perfectly fitting for this depiction of the nymph Arethusa, around whom we see dolphins playing, seemingly in their element. This reverse die far outshines its contemporary issues in the quality of the engraving, being neither heavily stylised, nor displaying exaggerated features as are common in this series. The gentle, feminine visage that is portrayed here in fine Greek, not Punic, style is perhaps suggestive of this being the work of a highly talented engraver not normally present at this mint.

37. Sicily, Selinos AR Didrachm. Circa 540-515 BC. Selinon leaf / Incuse punch. Arnold-Biucchi 2; Selinus Hoard 20; SNG ANS 670 var. 9.02g, 25mm. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful old tone with iridescent highlights.

5,000

38. Sicily, Selinos AR Litra. Circa 530-500 BC. Selinon leaf / Selinon leaf in incuse circle. SNG ANS 687. 0.60g, 12mm, 7h, Rare. Very Fine.

14

300


A Tetradrachm of Selinos of Sculptural Quality

39. Sicily, Selinos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 466-415 BC. Artemis driving slow quadriga right, holding reins in both hands, Apollo standing on her right, discharging an arrow; barley grain in exergue / River-god Selinos standing left, sacrificing with patera over flaming altar, holding laurel branch in left hand, cock before altar, bull behind to left, standing on pedestal decorated with laurel garland, surmounted by selinon leaf; ΣΕΛΙΝΟΝΤΙΟΝ around. W. Schwabacher, Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Selinunt, MBNG 43, 1925, 18 (Q8/S23); ANS 698; Rizzo 3, pl. XXXIII. 16.88g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Beautiful old tone with gold highlights around the devices.

10,000

40. Sicily, Entella. Siculo-Punic AR Tetradrachm. Circa 320-310 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing grain wreath, triple-drop earring and pearl necklace; four dolphins around / Horse’s head, palm tree behind; legend ‘MMHNT’ below. Jenkins, Punic Sicily III, pl. 11, 171 (these dies). 17.17g, 27mm, 7h. Good Very Fine. Attractively toned.

4,000

41. Sicily, Panormos AR Tetras (Trionkion). Circa 400 BC. Horned head of bearded Pan right / P-A-N and three pellets around. G. Manganaro. “Dai mikrà kermata di argento al chalkokratos kassiteros in Sicilia nel V. sec. a. C.” in JNG 34, 1984, 29 and pl. 5, 68. 0.20g. 7mm, 4h. Extremely Rare. Mint State.

3,000

42. Sicily, Panormos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 360-340 BC. Charioteer driving fast quadriga left, Nike flying above right, crowning charioteer; Punic script beneath double exergual line / Head of Arethusa right, wearing triple-drop earring and necklace; four dolphins around. Jenkins 50. 17.23g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine. Pleasing old tone. Ex Rauch 71, 28 April 2003, lot 83.

15

2,500


43. Sicily, Panormos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 300 BC. Head of Tanit right, wearing grain wreath, pendant earring and necklace; three dolphins around / Charioteer driving fast quadriga right, Nike flying above to crown charioteer, Punic characters in exergue. Jenkins, pl. 19, 51 (this reverse die). 16.61g, 25mm, 10h. Very Fine.

1,000

44. Sicily, Akragas AR Didrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Eagle with folded wings standing right, AKRA around / Crab, male head below, flanked by CA-S, all within shallow circular incuse. Jenkins group III-pl. 37, 18 (same dies); SNG ANS-959 (same dies). 8.70g, 20mm, 5h. Obverse somewhat off-centre, otherwise Good Very Fine. Pleasantly toned.

750

45. Sicily, Akragas AR Tetradrachm. Circa 460-446 BC. Sea eagle standing left on Ionic capital, AKRACANTOS around / Crab; spiral floral ornament below; all within shallow incuse circle. SNG ANS 982 var; Lee Group II; SNG Lockett 696. 17.23g, 25mm, 2h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine. Attractively toned. Ex Tkalec Auction, 17 May 2010, lot 3.

4,000

46. Sicily, Akragas AR Litra. Circa 450 BC. Eagle standing left on Ionic capital, AKRA (retrograde) around / Crab, ΛΙ below. SNG ANS 990. 0.65g, 10mm, 8h. Rare. Very Fine.

16

200


An Extremely Rare AV ‘Diobol’ of Akragas

47. Akragas AV ‘Diobol’. Emergency issue, circa 406 BC. Eagle with closed wings perching on rock to right, tearing at serpent; on rock, two pellets / Crab, SILANOS below. Dewing 569-571 var. (eagle left); Gulbenkian 171 var. (eagle left); Rizzo, pl. III, 8 (same dies); SNG ANS 998-999 var. (eagle left). 1.36g, 11mm, 11h. Extremely Rare, one of possibly as few as three known examples. Extremely Fine.

5,000

The vast majority of the known gold pieces of Akragas display an eagle facing left. On the reverse we see the magistrate’s signature, Silanos, which is also found on tetradrachms (SNG ANS 1000). Gold coinage in Sicily was usually issued in extremis, and we can tie this, the last issue of Akragas, to the period shortly before the capture and sack of the city by the Carthaginians in 406 BC. The exodus of refugees from the Punic-ravaged cities including Akragas led directly to the rise of the tyrant Dionysios the Elder, the establishment of Syracusan hegemony over much of Sicily, and the striking of gold coinage for the first time at Syracuse.

48. Sicily, Himera AR Chalkidian Drachm. Circa 520-482 BC. Rooster standing left / Mill sail pattern incuse design. SNG Lockett 779; Kraay, The archaic Coinage of Himera, 103 (D74/R61). 5.46g, 20mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned and superb for the type.

5,000

The Chalkidian colony of Himera, one of the first cities to begin coining in Sicily, followed the monetary standard of its mother city Chalkis, in Euboea. There the basic denomination was the stater of approximately 17.4 grams; the heaviest fractions being third staters. While neither Himera nor the other Chalkidian colonies Naxos or Zankle minted Euboean standard staters, they did strike smaller fractions, including the third, which are referred to as Chalkidian drachms.

49. Sicily, Himera AR Hemilitron. Circa 470-420 BC. Forepart of winged, horned monster with human head and lion’s legs right /Olive leaf between six pellets. Manganaro pl. 5, 57; Cammarata pl. IA, 15a. 0.34g, 9mm, 7h. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine, exceptional for the type.

150

50. Sicily, Himera AR Litra. Circa 430 BC. Bearded head right, wearing diadem / Corinthian helmet decorated with spiral ornament; IMEPAN (partially retrograde) around; all within circular incuse. SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd 1028 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXI, 13; Basel -; Gulbenkian -. 0.73g, 12mm, 7h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

17

750


51

52

51. Sicily, Himera AR Litra. Circa 430 BC. Bearded head right, wearing diadem / Corinthian helmet decorated with spiral ornament; IMEPAN (partially retrograde) around; all within circular incuse. SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd 1028; Rizzo pl. XXI, 13; Basel -; Gulbenkian -. 0.57g, 10mm, 1h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

750

52. Sicily, Himera AR Litra. Circa 430 BC. Helmeted male head right / Helmet. SNG ANS -; SNG Lloyd 1029; Jameson 905. 0.71g, 10mm, 10h. Very Rare. Very Fine.

400

53. Sicily, Himera AR Tetradrachm. Circa 409-408 BC. Signed by the artist MAI(...). The nymph Himera driving a galloping quadriga right, Nike flying left above, holding wreath and tablet inscribed MAI; hippocamp left in exergue / The nymph Himera, wearing a long chiton and peplos, standing left, holding a phiale in her right hand and raising her left; to left, horned altar; to right, satyr standing right, showering in a fountain with a lion’s head spout. Basel 306; Guttmann & Schwabacher 20; Kraay-Hirmer 71; Arnold-Biucchi 22. 17.35g, 29mm, 3h. Mint State. Very pleasantly toned.

10,000

Ex Peus 395, 7 May 2008, lot 46. The reverse of this coin shows the nymph Himera at the city’s principle altar, which was likely to have been that of Asklepios. The satyr to r. bathes in the warm waters of the spring at Himera. The tablet on the obverse of this coin is the only known die signed by the artist ‘MAI...’; it is very possible that the career of this evidently talented artist was cut short by the complete destruction of Himera at the hands of the Carthaginian general Hannibal Mago.

54. Sicily, Himera Æ Hemilitron. Circa 400-380 BC. Head of nymph three-quarters facing, wearing broad ampyx, hair flying to sides / shrimp left, six pellets (mark of value) above, IME below. Calciati I, 36; SNG Morcom 601; Basel 308; Gabrici pl. ii, 12. 1.83g, 14mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Very well preserved for the type.

750

55. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, CELAS above. SNG ANS 39. 17.30g, 25mm, 3h. Very Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

18

7500


19


A Superb Tetradrachm of Gela

56. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 420-415 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow biga right; above, Nike flying left, crowning charioteer; stork taking flight in exergue / Forepart of man-headed bull right, GELAS above. SNG ANS (O92/R94). 17.44g, 28mm, 7h. Extremely Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

40,000

Some unobtrusive die rust on obverse. A truly magnificent coin of incredible aesthetic appeal. Perfect, lustrous surfaces and sound metal. While the tetradrachms of Gela normally display a heavily worn obverse die, this coin was, despite a lightly de-centred strike, minted from fresh dies, as evidenced by the very high level of detail present on the elegantly rendered exergual stork, viewed in the moment it impels itself from the ground, its wings poised to lift the bird skywards. The city of Gela was jointly founded by colonists from Crete and Lindos, Rhodes, 45 years after the foundation of Syracuse, around 688 BC. The city took its name from the nearby river, which itself was given the appellation Gela on account of the icy coldness of its waters, the word gela meaning ‘ice’ in the languages of the Opici and Siculi, as it does in Latin. Virgil applies the epithet immanis to Gela, which some believe is in reference to the river, others the city. The latter is more correct, and is an allusion to the horned, man-headed bull depicted on their coinage which is a personification of the river Gela itself. This image of the river-god is derived from that of Achelous, the ‘father of all rivers’. Those who apply the epithet to the river make it signify ‘cruel’ or ‘monstrous’, and consider this a reference to the number of perilous whirlpools in its waters, whence Ovid remarks ‘Et te vorticibus non adeunde Gela’ (Fasti, 4, 470) - ‘And you, Gela, whose whirlpools must not be approached’. This coin dates from the high period of die engraving at Gela. Though the prosperity of the city was severely dimished when Gelon removed a large part of its inhabitants to Syracuse, many inhabitants subsequently returned and the city regained a part of its power, until the Carthaginian destruction of Gela’s colony Akragas forced the citizens to turn to Dionysios I of Syracuse for help. The latter delayed, and Gela was left to defend itself, wherein the inhabitants made a valiant defence with even the women toiling to repair the battered walls at night. At last Dionysios arrived to lift the siege, but following an initial defeat, he resolved to abandon the city and under cover of night he removed his army and the population of the city to Syracuse. The city thus fell to the Carthaginians and was thoroughly sacked, the spoils including a famous statue of Apollo which was carried away to Tyre.

20


57. Sicily, Gela AR Tetradrachm. Circa 420-415 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying left, crowning charioteer with wreath / Forepart of man-headed bull right, GELAS above. SNG ANS 96 (these dies). 17.16g, 28mm, 7h. Worn obverse die, but otherwise Very Fine.

1,500

58. Sicily, The Sikeliotes AR 4 Litrai. Morgantina, circa 214-213 BC. Wreathed and veiled head of Kore-Persephone left, poppy behind / Nike driving fast quadriga left, MT monogram above; SIKELIWTAN in exergue. Burnett, Enna Hoard 10, 111; SNG ANS -. 3.33g, 18mm, 7h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Ex Dr. Hartmann Collection; Ex Lanz 42, 23 November 1987, lot 98.

2,000

59. Sicily, Herbessos AR Litra. Circa 340 BC. Wreathed head of Sikelia right / Diademed, bearded male head right. SNG ANS -; SNG MĂźnchen -; Campana, Herbessos 1. 0.63g, 10mm, 6h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

500

An Exceptional Litra of Kamarina

60. Sicily, Kamarina AR Litra. Circa 461-435 BC. Nike flying left, swan below, all within wreath / Athena standing left holding spear, shield at feet. SNG ANS 1212 (these dies); McClean 2149 (these dies). 0.69g, 13mm, 2h. Rare. Extremely Fine; beautifully toned.

1,000

Ex Hess-Divo 314, 4 May 2009, lot 1025. Certainly among the finest known examples of this type, which are remarkably difficult to find in good condition.

61. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Didrachm. Circa 470 BC. Nude rider on horseback right / Lion’s head left, LEONTINO (retrograde) and four grains of barley around. SNG ANS 209 (these dies); SNG Lloyd 1044. 8.38g, 20mm, 7h. Very Rare. Very Fine. Ex Kunker 124, 16 March 2007, lot 7855.

21

700


Ex Moretti Collection

62. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 440 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Lion’s head right, with open jaws and tongue protruding; four barley grains and LEONTINON around. Rizzo pl. XXIII, 1 (this obverse die); SNG ANS 222 (this obverse die); SNG Lloyd 1055 (this obverse die); Gulbenkian 217; Boheringer, Leontini 41 (this obverse die). 17.37g, 24mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Superb, lustrous metal with iridescent flashes.

10,000

Ex Athos D. Moretti Collection; Ex NAC 38, 24 March 2010, lot 38.

63. Sicily, Leontinoi AR Tetradrachm. Circa 430-420 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, / Lion’s head left, with open jaws and tongue protruding; four barley grains and LEONTINON around. Rizzo pl. XXIIII, 4 (these dies); SNG ANS 257 (these dies). SNG München 559 (these dies). 17.46g, 25mm, 4h. Good Extremely Fine. Sound, lustrous metal with attractive iridescence.

3,000

Dies by the Maestro Della Foglia

64. Sicily, Piakos Æ Hemilitron. Circa 425-420 BC. Dies by the ‘Maestro della foglia’. Laureate head of river-god left; P-I-A-K-I-N and six pellets before / Hound attacking fawn right; acorn to left, oak leaf to right. Jenkins, Coinages p. 92; CNS III 1; Rizzo pl. 60, 13 (these dies); SNG ANS -; SNG Morcom -. 5.57g, 18mm, 1h. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine; among the finest known examples.

3,000

Rizzo suggested that the famed artist who produced the magnificent Apollo-head issues at Katane, known as the ‘Maestro della foglia’, was also responsible for engraving the dies of this issue. Jenkins, in his later analysis, concurs with Rizzo’s observation that the style on this very rare type is strikingly similar to that found on the famous Katane coins, and that the stylistic link, along with the occurrence of the ‘signature’, is evidence of the same hand at work. Calciati notes that Rizzo’s argument is the only chronological evidence useful for dating the type.

65. Sicily, Piakos Æ Tetras. Circa 425-420 BC. Head of river-god left, Π-I-A-K and three pellets before / Hound attacking fawn right, barley grain before. CNS III 2. 2.58g, 20mm, 5h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine. An obverse of outstanding quality, engraved in fine style and perfectly preserved. Reverse much better in hand.

22

1,250


66. Sicily, Piakos Æ Tetras. Circa 425-405 BC. Laureate head of river-god left; Π-I-A-K and three pellets before / Hound attacking fawn right; acorn and leaf at sides. CNS III 2; Jenkins, Coinages, pl. 7, 2b. 2.56g, 16mm, 5h. Near Extremely Fine.

750

67. Sicily, Piakos Æ Onkia. Circa 425-420 BC. Laureate head of river-god left, ΠIAK before / Hound crouching right, two oak leaves above. CNS III p. 199, 3; SNG ANS -. 0.73g, 11mm, 2h. Extremely Rare - only two examples known to Calciati. Extremely Fine. A few spots of bronze disease.

750

A Beautiful Didrachm of Syracuse

68. Sicily, Syracuse AR Didrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Circa 485-478 BC. Nude rider on horseback right, leading a second horse on far side / Head of Arethusa right within thin linear circle, wearing hair-tie, earring and necklace, hair falling simply behind; SVRAQOSION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 51 (V28/R34); SNG ANS 11 (these dies); Antikenmuseum Basel 429 (these dies); Rizzo pl. XXXIV, 16 (these dies); Jameson 745 (these dies); SNG Lloyd 1282 (these dies). 8.64g, 20mm, 1h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal, lightly toned with vivid iridescent flashes.

7,500

Ex Giessener Münzhandlung 46, 30 October 1989, lot 36. This beautiful archaic didrachm dates to the time of Gelo, Tyrant of Syracuse, under whom Syracuse expanded and prospered greatly both in economic and military terms. By forcing wealthy families of conquered cities to move to Syracuse, and by initiating grand civil building programmes, Syracuse soon became extraordinarily prosperous and the greatest Greek city in the west. Gelo’s fortifications and formation of a powerful mercenary army ensure the safely of the city and indeed very probably all of Sicily. Upon the Carthaginian invasion of the island that coincided with the Persian assault on mainland Greece, Gelo led an army of 55,000 to Himera and the aid of his ally Theron, winning a decisive victory and keeping Sicily safe from Cathaginian invasion for the next seventy years.

69. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Deinomenid Tyranny. Circa 480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right, Nike flying above right, crowning horses / Head of Arethusa right, wearing pearl diadem and necklace, SURAKOSION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 138. 17.13g, 25mm, 8h. Extremely Fine. Pleasantly toned. Ex Aufhäuser 8, 1991, lot 33; Ex Aufhäuser 6, 1989, lot 37.

23

3,000


70. Sicily, Syracuse AR Hemilitron. Second Democracy, ‘barbaric issue.’ Circa 460-440 BC. Head of Arethusa right / Wheel of four spokes. Boehringer pl. 30, B57. 0.37g, 10mm, 12h. Very Rare. Very Fine.

250

71. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy. Circa 450 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right; Nike flying above right, ketos below / Head of Arethusa right, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace; SURAKOSION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 512; SNG ANS 164; SNG Copenhagen 646; Boston 367 (all from these dies). 17.22g, 25mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

5,000

Privately purchased from Spink, 1 April 1966.

72. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy. Circa 450-440 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow quadriga right, Nike flying above right, crowning horses; ketos in exergue / Head of Arethusa right, wearing headband, pendant earring, and pearl necklace with pendant; ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ and four dolphins around. Boehringer 554; SNG ANS 180 (same obverse die); Rizzo plate 37, 13 (same obverse die). 17.35g, 27mm, 2h. Rare. Extremely Fine; the best example to be offered in at least a decade.

10,000

73. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Second Democracy. Circa 440-430 BC. Charioteer driving fast quadriga left; Nike above, flying right and crowning charioteer; ketos left in exergue / Diademed head of Arethusa right; SURAKOSION and four dolphins around. Boehringer 604 (V296/ R410); SNG ANS 198-9; Jameson 775 (these dies). 17.02g, 25mm, 5h. Rare. Extremely Fine and attractively toned. Ex David Freedman Collection. Engraved in wonderful style, the usual die break detracts nothing from the beauty of the artistry we observe here.

24

7,500


25


Unsigned Work by Parmenides

74. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Dionysios I. Unsigned work by Parmenides. Circa 410-395 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving fast quadriga left, about to turn left, Nike flying above right, crowning charioteer; ear of grain beneath double exergual line, on which a broken chariot wheel / Head of Arethusa left, hair in ampyx and sphendone ornamented with stars, wearing triple-pendant earrings and necklace; SURAKOSIWN and four dolphins around, one emerging from bust truncation. Tudeer 74 (these dies); Jameson 838 (these dies); SNG ANS 284 (these dies). 17.50g, 27mm, 8h. Very Rare and possibly the finest known. Extremely Fine. Well struck, centrally, on a very broad flan. Excellent metal, lightly toned.

60,000

Ex NAC 10, 9 April 1997, lot 148. The obverse of this coinage stands in stark contrast to the static, two dimensional designs of the previous century. Gone is the slow pacing quadriga, replaced by a revolutionary new style that is fluid and dynamic. We are presented with a scene from a chariot race, as the charioteer is in the process of effecting a turn; the broken chariot wheel of a competitor lies underneath, evidence of the sometimes dangerous nature of these races.

26


27


Fine Style Dekadrachm

75. Sicily, Syracuse AR Dekadrachm. Dionysios I. Unsigned dies in style of Euainetos. Circa 405-400 BC. Charioteer driving fast quadriga left, holding kentron and reins, Nike flying above right to crown charioteer; cuirass, shield, greaves, helmet, and horizontal spear below heavy exergual line / Grain-wreathed head of Arethusa left, wearing necklace and triple-drop earring, raised dot before neck, ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ and four dolphins around. Gallatin R.XXI I/ J.VIA. 41.87g, 38mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Ex Tony Hardy Collection; Ex Triton IX, 11 January 2006, lot 703. Good Extremely Fine. A masterpiece of classical art, the reverse depicting a portrait of Arethusa in the finest style, flawless apart from the unobtrusive and entirely forgiveable die break. An impressive and captivating piece.

28

30,000


76. Sicily, Syracuse AR Litra. Dionysios I. Circa 405-395 BC. Head of Arethusa left; SURAKOSIWN before, dolphin downwards behind / Octopus. SNG ANS 293-4. 0.76g, 11mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan; some light porosity.

400

77. Sicily, Syracuse AR Hemilitron. Dionysios I. Circa 405-400 BC. Diademed head of Arethusa left / Wheel of four spokes, SU-RA in upper quarters, dolphins in lower. Boehringer, Münzprägungen pl. II, 19; SNG ANS 301ff; SNG Copenhagen 669. 0.42g, 10mm, 3h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

78

400

79

78. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemilirtron. Dionysios I. Circa 405-400 BC. Head of Arethusa left; laurel branch behind / Dolphin right; cockle shell below, SURA between. CNS 24; SNG ANS 417. 2.78g, 18mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

79. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemilitron. Dionysios I. Circa 405-400 BC. Female head left, hair in ampyx and sphendone, no earrings; leaves behind / Dolphin right, shell below; SURA between. CNS II, 558, 24. SNG ANS 415-25. 3.18g, 18mm, 7h. Very Fine.

400

80. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemidrachm. Time of Timoleon. Circa 344-338 BC. Head of Zeus Eleutherios right, wearing laurel wreath; ZEYΣ EΛEYΘEPIOΣ around / Upright thunderbolt; barley grain to left; ΣYPAKOΣIΩN around. CNS 71; SNG Morcom 724–5; SNG ANS 474–6; SNG Lloyd 1460. 17.79g, 26mm, 1h. Very Fine.

300

81. Sicily, Syracuse Æ Hemilitron. Time of Timoleon. 344-336 BC. Head of Pan left, SURAKOSIWN around / Syrinx with nine pipes within oak wreath. SNG ANS 490-491; Calciati II p. 212, 94; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Morcom 727; Favorito 76; Laffaille -; Virzi 1421. 2.47g, 13mm, 2h. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

500

82. Sicily, Syracuse. Agathokles Æ16. Circa 317-310 BC. Head of Persephone left, torch / Bull charging left, NI in exergue. CNS II, 236, 107. 3.50g, 17mm, 10h. Good Very Fine.

29

500


30


83. Sicily, Syracuse AV 50 Litrai. Agathokles. Circa 317-311 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Charioteer driving fast biga right, triskeles below, SURAKOSIWN around. Bérend, ‘De l’or d’Agothocle’ in Studies Price, pl. 9, 1; BAR issue 1; SNG ANS 552. 4.31g, 15mm, 11h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal.

5,000

84. Sicily, Syracuse AR Tetradrachm. Agathokles. Circa 308-305 BC. Wreathed head of Kore right, wearing single-pendant earring and necklace / Nike standing right, erecting trophy; triskeles to lower left. SNG ANS 670-9; BAR issue 23. 17.18g, 26mm, 5h. Near Very Fine.

500

85. Sicily, Syracuse AV 50 Litrai. Agathokles. Circa 304-289 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left, driving galloping biga right; triskeles below horses, EY monogram in exergue. Bérend, pl. 9, 11; Gulbenkian 337. 2.68g, 12mm, 1h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

2,000

This lot is ostensibly of the same denomination as lot 83. The marked difference in size and weight can be attributed to a revaluation of the currency by Agathokles some time between 310 and 304 BC, which saw the introduction of electrum coinage, and the gold being re-tariffed against the silver litra. This was no doubt on account of his failed campaign against Carthage and the massive expense it incurred, leaving the coffers depleted. Yet in 304 BC, as Agathokles conferred upon himself the title of King of Sicily, his renewed efforts at dominating the Greek cities of the island again necessitated the striking of currency to pay the mercenaries he would employ, hence the new issues of ‘Alexander’ (see the following lot) and ‘Philip’ style gold coinage.

86. Sicily, Syracuse AV 100 Litrai. Agathokles. Circa 304-289 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with griffin / AGAQOKLEOS BASILEOS, winged thunderbolt; monogram above. SNG ANS 705; Jameson 867; Gulbenkian 340 (all from the same dies). 5.69g, 17mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

5,000

Privately purchased from Spink, 30 June 1965. This coin is from a short-lived issue known from only six obverse and seven reverse dies with numerous interlinkings, which suggest a specific occasion for its striking. Three alternatives proposed are the assumption of the royal title by Agathokles in 304 BC, the marriage of his daughter to Pyrrhos of Epiros in 297, or renewed preparations for war against Carthage, the last of which seems the most plausible; indeed we again see here a type familiar to Greek mercenaries that at once recalls the gold staters of Alexander III of Macedon, and the silver staters of Alexander of Epiros.

87. Sicily, Syracuse AV 25 Litrai. Agathokles. Circa 295 BC. Head of Persephone left, wearing wreath of grain ears / Bull walking left, SURAKOSIWN around. Bérend, l’or pl. 9, 14; SNG ANS 707; SNG Lloyd 1475; SNG Copenhagen 752. 1.41g, 10mm, 9h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

31

1,000


Fine Style, Lustrous 50 Litrai of Hiketas

88. Sicily, Syracuse. Hiketas AV 50 Litrai. Circa 287-278 BC. Head of Persephone left, wearing grain wreath, pendant earring and necklace; long torch behind, SURAKOSIWN before / Nike, holding kentron and reins, driving fast quadriga right, moon above, Q below horses; EPI IKETA in exergue. Buttrey 3/D; SNG ANS 776; SNG Lloyd 1523. 4.27g, 15mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Traces of mounting.

5,000

Privately purchased from Spink, 30 June 1965.

Attractive and Rare 50 Litrai of Hieron II

89. Sicily, Syracuse. Hieron II AV 50 Litrai. Circa 217-215 BC. Wreathed head of Persephone left; crescent behind / Charioteer driving fast biga left; A and IERWNOS below. Carroccio 80; BMC 515. 4.25g, 24mm, 9h. Very Rare with this symbol. Extremely Fine.

4,000

90. Sicily, Syracuse Æ18. Fifth Democracy. Circa 214-212 BC. Jugate busts of the Dioskouroi left, dolphin behind / Dioskouros on horseback right, SURAKOSIWN below. SNG Copenhagen 890. 3.51g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

500

91. Sicily. Syracuse Æ15. Fifth Democracy. Circa 214-212 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left, ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ / Tripod with fillets hanging down from the volute handles. CNS II, 419, 212. 2.90g, 15mm, 2h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

500

92. Sicily, Syracuse Æ15. Roman rule, after 212 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Long torch, SUR-AKO SI-WN in two lines acoss. CNS 221; SNG ANS 1080-2. 3.44g, 15mm, 11h. Rare. Good Very Fine. Exceptional for the type.

32

500


93. Sicily, Zankle-Messana AR Chalkidian Drachm. Circa 520-493 BC. Dolphin swimming left within sickle shaped harbour of Zankle, DANKLE above / Scallop shell within incuse pattern. SNG ANS 298-303; Kraay-Hirmer 49; Jenkins 97; Rizzo pl. 25, 4. 5.49g, 23mm, 4h. Extremely Fine.

7,500

Ex Leu 2, 25 April 1972, lot 88.

94. Islands off Sicily, Lipara Æ Tetras. Circa 425-400 BC. Head of Aiolos right wearing pileos, dotted border around / LIPARAION around three pellets, all within dotted border. CNS I, 5; SNG Copenhagen 1086; SNG München 1679. 25.36g, 32mm, 8h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine. Struck on a very broad flan, and exceptionally well preserved for the type.

6,000

95. Islands off Sicily, Lipara Æ Tetras. Circa 425-400 BC. Head of Aiolos right wearing pileos, dotted border around / LIPARAION around three pellets, all within dotted border. CNS I, 5; SNG Copenhagen 1086; SNG München 1679. 21.85g, 30mm, 11h. Very Rare. Very Fine.

1,000

ZEUGITANIA

96. Zeugitania, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-270 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-drop earring and necklace / Horse standing right; three pellets on exergual line. Jenkins & Lewis Group VI, 317ff. 7.41g, 19mm, 11h. Very Fine. Fine style.

33

2,000


97. Zeugitania, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-drop earring and necklace, dot before / Horse standing right on single ground line; four pellets below ground line. Jenkins & Lewis group V, 298 (same dies); MAA 12; SNG Copenhagen 136. 7.32g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Good style.

2,000

98. Zeugitania, Carthage EL Stater. Circa 310-290 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-drop earring and necklace; pellet in field before neck / Horse standing right on single ground line; pellet in field before forelegs. Jenkins & Lewis Group V, 253 (these dies). 7.73g, 18mm, 12h. Near Very Fine.

1,000

Very Rare Quarter Stater of Carthage

99. Zeugitania, Carthage AV 1/4 Stater. Circa 264-241 BC. Head of Tanit left, wearing wreath of grain / Horse walking right. Jenkins Group 18, pl. 24, 196,1. 3.02g, 13mm, 1h. Very Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

ILLYRIA

100. Illyricum, Dyrrhachium AR Stater. Circa 350-300 BC. Pegasos flying right, Y below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; club and DYP around. Pegasi 33. 8.65g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone with hints of iridescent colour around the devices.

1,500

AKARNANIA

101. Akarnania, Leukas AR Stater. Circa 350 BC. Pegasos flying right; L below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; Ithyphallic herm right, caduceus, and L behind. Pegasi 102. 8.49g, 20mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

34

1,500


An Extremely Rare Drachm of Anaktorion

102. Akarnania, Anaktorion AR Drachm. Circa 300 BC. Pegasos flying left, head of Aphrodite left, long hair falling behind neck, monogram behind. BCD Akarnania 417; SNG Copenhagen 154; BMC (Corinth) p. 145, 25 und pl. 39, 16 (this reverse die). 1.70g, 14mm, 12h. Extremely Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

Engraved in fine style and high relief. An extremely difficult issue to find, especially so in this condition. Indeed, the drachms of Anaktorion are very rare, and are hard to come by in any grade.

103. Akarnania, Argos Amphilochikon AR Stater. Circa 340-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, A below / Head of Athena left wearing Corinthian helmet; AMFI above, ABP and spear behind. BMC 15; Pegasi 33; Imhoof-Blumer 31. 8.42g, 22mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Pleasing old tone.

750

Ex M&M Auction 23, 18 October 2007, lot 138; Ex Negrini Auction 3, 1996, lot 13.

104. Akarnania, Argos Amphilochikon AR Stater. Circa 340-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, A below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet and necklace; ΑΡΓΕΙ before, small crested Corinthian helmet behind. BMC 8; Pegasi 11; BCD 132. 8.48g, 20mm, 9h. Extremely Fine.

500

THESSALY

105. Thessaly, Pelinna Æ Chalkous. Circa 4th Century BC. Horseman right, striking hoplite with javelin / Warrior advancing left, holding shield and two spears. Rogers 426; BCD Thessaly 1228.1 var. (horseman left). 2.05g, 14mm, 6h. Rare. Good Very Fine.

35

300


36


An Exceptional Drachm of Phalanna

106. Thessaly, Phalanna AR Drachm. Circa 360-340 BC. Young male head right / Bridled horse right at the trot; ΦAΛANNAIΩN around. Papaevangelou-Genakos 1 var. (orientation of legend); BCD Thessaly 1250 var. (same); SNG Copenhagen 199 var. (same). 5.59g, 19mm, 11h. Rare. Fleur De Coin.

7,500

107. Thessaly, Phalanna AR Drachm. Circa 400-344 BC. Young male head right / Bridled horse right at the trot; ΦΑΛΑΝΝΑΙΩΝ around. Papaevangelou-Genakos 1; Dewing 1414 (these dies); cf. BMC Thessaly 1; SNG Copenhagen 199; SNG Lockett 1590; and SNG Fitzwilliam 2431–2433. 5.40g, 20mm, 6h. Rare. Good Very Fine.

2,000

Ex Manhattan Sale II, 4 January 2011, lot 154.

A Remarkable Portrait of the Nymph Larissa

108. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 400-350 BC. Head of the nymph Larissa left, wearing pearl necklace and triple-drop earring, her hair raised and bound / Bridled horse trotting right, tail curling upwards; ΛΑΡΙΣΑΙΩΝ around. Obolos 7, p. 22 (pl. 3), 23 (these dies). 6.09g, 20mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

6,000

Given not only the extraordinary beauty of the portrait we see here, but also the fact that it appears to be only one of two known coins struck from this obverse die, it is easy to forgive the light double striking on the reverse and the tiny metal flaw on the cheek of Larissa. The latter, far from detracting from the beauty of the piece, lends a certain charm to the artist’s fine vision of serene, noble beauty.

109. Thessaly, Larissa Æ Dichalkon. Circa 400-344 BC. Head of nymph Larissa left, wearing triple-pendant earring / Horse grazing left, LARI below, SAIWN above. BCD 382; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; SNG München -. 4.63g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

37

750


38


110. Thessaly, Larissa AR Drachm. Circa 395-350 BC. Head of nymph Larissa facing three-quarters left / Horse grazing right, LARISA above. SNG Copenhagen 130 var; F. Herrmann, ZfN 35, Plate VI 2f. var. 6.26g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Beautiful style and attractively toned.

2,000

A Well Centred and Attractive Pharsalos Drachm Signed by Telephantos

111. Thessaly, Pharsalos AR Drachm. Late 5th-mid 4th century BC. Signed on the obverse and reverse by the engraver Telephantos. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with raised cheek pieces, [TH behind] / Thessalian cavalryman riding horse prancing to right, wearing petasos, chlamys and chiton, and holding a lagobolon over his right shoulder; ΦΑΡΣ around, ΤΗ below. Lavva 101. 6.10g, 20mm, 12h. Very Rare in this grade. Extremely Fine.

5,000

Engraved in excellent style, well centred on the flan and with an attractive light tone. These dies were evidently held in high regard by the artist himself, as he has signed both obverse and reverse die.

LOKRIS

112. Lokris, Lokris Opuntii AR Stater. Circa 360-50 BC. Head of Persephone left, wearing grain wreath, triple-pendant earring, and necklace / Ajax advancing right over two spears, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, holding short sword and shield adorned with palmette and griffin; star below, ΟΠΟΝΤΙΩΝ to left. Gulbenkian 491 (this reverse die); BCD 58 (this reverse die); cf. Dewing 1477; BMC 27. 12.29g, 24mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

7,500

Ajax of Lokris led his countrymen against Troy in forty ships and was counted among the great heroes of the Greeks, but for his offence against Athena he was wrecked and killed in a storm as he made his way home from the war. Nonetheless, so great was the faith of the Lokrians in their national hero that whenever their army drew up for battle, one place was always left open for Ajax, whose spirit they believed would stand and fight with them.

39


SIKYONIA

113. Sikyon AR Stater. Circa 350-330 BC. Chimera advancing left, right paw raised, SE below, wreath above / Dove flying left, N below beak; all within laurel wreath. BMC 57; SNG Copenhagen 48; BCD 218. 12.25g, 24mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a large flan, well centred and magnificently toned.

5,000

Ex Gemini V, 6 January 2009, lot 114; Privately purchased from Harlan J. Berk, July 1988.

114. Sikyonia, Sikyon AR Drachm. Circa 340-335 BC. Dove alighting left; ÎŁ before, I behind / Dove flying left; E above tail; all within wreath. BCD Peloponnesos 224 (these dies). 5.65g, 19mm, 3h. About Very Fine.

750

ARKADIA

115. Arkadia, Tegea AR Tetartemorion. Circa 423-400. Helmeted head of Athena left / T within shallow incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos 1721; HGC 5, 1054. 0.19g, 7mm, 10h. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

200

CORINTHIA

116. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 400-375 BC. Pegasos walking left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; dolphin above, S behind. Pegasi 342; Pozzi 1683; cf. BMC 386; BCD -. 8.61g, 20mm, 3h. Very Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex SBV Auction 38, 12 September 1995, lot 180. A beautiful example of the type, and a particularly fine rendering of Pegasos in the scarcer walking pose, which presents us with a very sculptural depiction of the mythical steed.

40


117. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left; Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; E and rose behind. Pegasi 374; Ravel 997; BCD Corinth 97; SNG Copenhagen 102. 8.44g, 22mm, 4h. Good Very Fine. Toned.

750

118. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; Δ below, head of Helios behind. Pegasi 393; BCD Corinth 100; Ravel 1006; SNG Copenhagen 83. 8.53g, 21mm, 2h. Near Extremely Fine. Hints of iridescent toning around the devices. Fine style.

750

119. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left; Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; A-P below, eagle standing left behind. Pegasi 426; Ravel 1008; BCD Corinth 101; SNG Copenhagen 73-4. 8.63g, 21mm, 2h. Good Very Fine. Pleasing tone.

750

120. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 375-300 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Helmeted head of Athena left; Δ-I flanking; behind, Artemis Phosphoros advancing left. Pegasi 453; BCD Corinth -; Ravel 1077; cf. SNG Copenhagen 98. 8.67g, 22mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned with golden iridescent flashes.

1,000

121. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left; Q below / Laureate, helmeted head of Athena left; A-P below, plough behind. Pegasi I 441; Ravel 1022b. 8.54g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive, old tone.

41

750


122. Corinthia, Corinth AR Stater. Circa 345-307 BC. Pegasos flying left, Q below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; head of gorgon Medusa to left, behind. Pegasi p. 300, 252-427. 8.60g, 21mm, 2h. Very Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

750

ATTICA

123. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet and earring, hair in tight curls about forehead / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and berry in upper left field, AQE to right. SNG Copenhagen 20. 17.27g, 22mm, 2h. Very Rare. Very Fine.

6,000

A Superb Drachm of Athens

124. Attica, Athens AR Drachm. Circa 470-460 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, round earring with central boss and pearl necklace / ΑΘΕ, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig behind. SNG Berry 676 (these dies); Svoronos pl. VIII, cf. 34-38; Seltman pl. XXII, ωω; Starr 85 (these dies). 4.29g, 14mm, 10h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Attractive old tone.

25,000

Ex NAC 52, 7 October 2009, lot 131.

125. Attica, Athens AR Hemiobol. Circa 460 BC. Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves over the visor and spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing to right, head facing; behind, olive leaf and berry. Starr Group IV/V. Svoronos pl. 9, 47-51. 0.35g, 6mm, 11h. Rare. Good Fine.

42

300


126. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 455 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, round earring with central boss and pearl necklace / ΑΘΕ, owl standing right with head facing; to left, crescent and olive sprig; all within incuse square. Starr Group V.B. 16.95g, 26mm, 4h. Near Extremely Fine. Obverse die a little worn, reverse struck in exceptional depth, well framed in a high-bordered flan.

8,000

127. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 454-430 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, round earring with central boss and pearl necklace / ΑΘΕ, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind. Cf. Starr pl. xxii, 6’. Cf. Svoronos pl. 12, 16; pl. 13, 5–9. 17.17g, 24mm, 1h. Fleur De Coin.

8,000

Uncommonly high relief, exceptional detail in the finest style and simply outstanding toning. Displayed at Cincinnati Art Museum, 1994–2008, no. 25. Privately purchased from Harlan J. Berk, December 1990.

128. Attica, Athens AR Drachm. Circa 454-404 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet and earring / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. SNG Copenhagen 41-3; Kroll 10. 4.15g, 15mm, 3h. Good Fine.

500

129. Attica, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Obol (8mm, 0.68 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig behind; all within incuse square. Svoronos pl. 12, 37-42; SNG Copenhagen 53-6. 0.68g, 10mm, 11h. Very Fine.

43

200


Third Known

130. Athens, in the style of, AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain mint (possibly in the Levant). Circa 4th century BC. Head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring with central boss / AQE, owl standing three quarters right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, bull’s head before; all within incuse square. Cf. Svoronos pl. 17, 1 = De Luynes Coll. 2048 pl. 77, 2040 [sic] = W. Weiser, Zeitschrift fur Papyrologie und Epigraphik 76 (1989), p. 268, no. 9, pl. 16. 17.33g, 27mm, 9h. Extremely Rare – the third known example. Extremely Fine.

10,000

Two other specimens of this exceedingly rare issue are known – one in France (De Luynes), the other offered for sale at NAC Auction 46, April 2008, lot 296. The bull’s head on the Paris specimen had been interpreted as symbolizing the island of Samos, and the coin was therefore dated to 365 BC when the Athenians reconquered that island. However, a further type displaying an incuse bull’s head, now known from two specimens including one at Gemini in January 2011 and a further example that has come to light since, suggests by virtue of the fact that the die likely had a protruding element to create the incuse symbol, that in fact this was more likely to have been struck at a mint somewhere in the Levant where there was experience of creating such partially incuse designs. Indeed, Gitler and Tal describe many varieties of Athenian-style coinage produced in Philistia in their recent work. While most of the issues they describe are small fractions, they do note the existence of locally produced tetradrachms in Athenian style, some with symbols and others with letters in the fields to distinguish them as local issues and not those of the regular Athenian mint.

Rare Early Issue

131. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. New Style Coinage, circa 154-3 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with vine tendril and Pegasos / Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; AQE across, monograms flanking, caps of the Dioskouroi to right; all within wreath. Thompson 61 (this obv. die). 17.05g, 34mm, 12h. Rare early issue. Very Fine. Beautifully toned.

1,000

An obverse die of excellent style, vastly superior to the usual New Style tetradrachms. In approximately 165 BC, Athens introduced a new series of silver tetradrachm, referred to today as “New Style Coinage”. At the time, it represented a landmark change in the coinage of Athens. Although the types had not changed, and still depicted Athena on the obverse and an owl on the reverse, this new coinage also saw a marked change in the artistic styles employed in the engraving. The traditional, more archaising devices that had been the norm during the previous three centuries were replaced with a contemporary interpretation of the Athena Parthenos of Pheidias, wearing her triple-crested Attic helmet adorned on its visor with the foreparts of four or more horses, and a flying Pegasos on the bowl. On the reverse, the owl was now shown standing on a horizontal amphora, with a profligacy of magistrates’ names, symbols, and other letters occupying every available space, all enclosed within a large olive wreath. These new depictions were facilitated by, or more likely the result of, the coins’ oversized flans which were broader and thinner, offering the engraver a larger canvas upon which to work, while also requiring some innovative thinking to make use of the space. The new coinage was produced on a large scale, and this apparent improvement in Athens’ economy is attributed to the city’s recovery of the port of Delos in 166 BC. As with the fifth century issues, the new coinage became an important and respected trade currency, as attested by the hoard deposits throughout the Mediterranean, and indeed the broad, thin flan also gained favour at other cities, which began to issue similar tetradrachms in imitation. The series reached a zenith in the early first century BC, but Sulla’s capture of Athens in the spring of 86 BC was a severe shock to the city’s prosperity, and caused a dramatic reduction in the issue of coinage. Until this point, the coins had been produced in an unbroken annual cycle, but there were thereafter only a few sporadic issues, and the series ceased entirely in 50-40 BC.

44


45


132. Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Circa 133-2 BC. Polycharmos, Nikogenes, and Demosthenes, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with vine tendril and Pegasos / Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora, AQE across, ΠΟΛΥ-ΧΑΡΜ, ΝΙΚΟΓ, DEMOSQE in right field, winged caduceus in left field, B on amphora, ΣΦ below, all enclosed within wreath. Troxell 376b; Svoronos pl. 49, 24. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful old tone with light golden highlights.

1,000

Ex Spink Smythe Sale 234, 2 December 2003, lot 1017.

The Finest Known

133. Islands off Attica, Aegina AR Stater. Circa 530-525 BC. Proto-tortoise seen from above, shell divided into into thirteen segments, head turned slightly to right / Square incuse punch divided into eight triangles. Traité III, 110, pl. CXCIV ; Milbank pl. I, 12; Robinson, Pseudoaeginetica, 3, pl. IX, 3 ; Arnold-Biucchi, Selinus, 123-124. 12.37g, 21mm. Very Rare. Mint State; the finest known example.

25,000

Robinson attributed these proto-tortoise coins, which bear an animal displaying features of both turtles and tortoises, to Cydonia in Crete. It was Holloway’s study of the early Aeginetan coinage which conclusively demonstrated that they belonged to that mint, not Cydonia. They are now recognized as being a rare variant type that was used alongside the normal ‘T-back’ sea turtle type. It appears that the latter was produced in large numbers, as indicated by numerous specimens struck from very worn obverse dies. In contrast however, this proto-tortoise with its segmented shell is usually found having been struck from fresh dies, and it is likely that very few were ever struck, implying that the type had a special significance or was produced for a specific purpose.

134. Islands off Attica, Aegina AR Stater. Circa 440-380 BC. Tortoise / Incuse square punch partitioned by three lines. SNG Lockett 1988; SNG München 567. 12.53g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine, very good for the type with a pleasing old tone.

46

4,000


BOEOTIA

135. Boeotia, Thebes AR Stater. Circa 425-395 BC. Boeotian shield, club across upper half / Bearded head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath; all within square incuse. BCD Boiotia 436 (same rev. die). 12.19g, 26mm, 4h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

4,000

Ex BCD Collection; Ex Hess-Leu, 24 March 1959, lot 200.

136. Boeotia, Thebes AR Stater. Circa 390-382 BC. Eche.., magistrate. Boeotian shield / Amphora, ivy leaf hanging from each handle; club left above; EX-E in two lines across field; all within incuse circle. BCD Boiotia 482 (this rev. die); Hepworth 46 (this rev. die). 12.10g, 22mm, 2h. Very Fine.

520

137. Boeotia, Thebes AR Stater. Circa 368-364 BC. Arka.., magistrate, Boeotian shield / Amphora with ivy leaves at handles, magistrates name AP-KA at sides. BCD 537. 12.30g, 22mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

MACEDON

138. Macedon, Bottiaea AR Pentobol. Circa 185-168 BC. Macedonian shield / Prow of galley right, ΘΕ below. BMC Macedonia p. 64, 3; SNG Evelpidis 1207. 1.82g, 14mm. Good Very Fine. A good example of the type. This type was struck by Philip V of Macedon on behalf of the Bottiaeans.

47

300


139. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetradrachm. Olynthos, circa 355-352 BC. Ariston, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo right / ΧΑΛΚΙΔΕΩΝ around Lyre with six strings; ΕΠΙ ΑΡΙΣΤΩΝΟΣ below. Gulbenkian 422; Robinson & Clement 134; SNG ANS 497. 14.47g, 27mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. A beautiful portrait; struck on a broad flan and pleasantly toned.

10,000

A truly stunning tetradrachm, engraved in fine style and struck on a very broad flan. Subtle iridescent hues highlight the handsome classical portrait of Apollo. Olynthos took its name from the Greek olunthos – a fig which matures too early, for the area abounded with this fruit. Olynthos, son of Herakles, was according to tradition the founder of this city which rose to prominence as head of the Chalkidian League during the Peloponnesian War. Philip II of Macedon deprived the city of its League by both diplomacy and force, then undertook to besiege the city itself in 348 BC. Through the treachery of the city’s two leading citizens Euthycrates and Lasthenes, the city was betrayed to Philip, who sacked the city, razed it to the ground and sold all those within, including an Athenian garrison, into slavery.

140. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 432-348 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Kithara, XALKIDEWN around; all within shallow incuse square. SNG ANS 535 (these dies); Robinson & Clement Group I, 88 (A59/P58). 2.39g, 17mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal and fine style.

1,000

141. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 432-348 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Kithara, XALKIDEWN around; all within shallow incuse square. SNG ANS 525-533. 2.42g, 15mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

750

142. Macedon, Chalkidian League AR Tetrobol. Olynthos, circa 432-348 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Kithara, XALKIDEWN around; all within shallow incuse square. Cf. SNG ANS 537. 2.38g, 13mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

300

143. Thrace, Ainos AR Diobol. Circa 427-424 BC. Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos / Goat standing right; vine tendril before. May, Ainos 176-204; SNG Copenhagen 405. 1.33g, 11mm, 3h. Good Fine.

48

100


144. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 480-470 BC. Lion right, biting into the hindquarter of a bull standing left; pellet-in-circle above, floral ornament in exergue / Quadripartite incuse square. Desneux 79 var. (D77/R- [unlisted rev. die]); AMNG III/2, 4; SNG ANS 10; BMC 3 (same obv. die); ACGC 455 = SNG Ashmolean 2202. 16.87g, 27mm. Extremely Fine. An excellent example of a beautiful archaic style from this mint, centrally struck on a broad flan.

7,500

145. Macedon, Akanthos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 430-390 BC. Lion right, biting into the hindquarter of a bull standing left; PO in exergue / Quadripartite design, AKANQION around, all within incuse square. Desneux 121; SNG ANS -. 14.40g, 25mm, 10h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

4,000

146. Macedon, Akanthos AR Hemiobol. Circa 480 BC. Calf’s head right / Irregular incuse square. Traité 1710, pl. 54, 18; H. Weber coll. 1886; McClean pl. 114, 11; SNG Lockett 1291. 0.39g, 8mm. Very Fine.

147

100

148

147. Macedon, Neapolis AR Hemidrachm. Circa 424-350 BC. Facing gorgoneion / Head of nymph right, NEPW around. SNG ANS 425 (these dies); SNG Copenhagen 226. 1.86g, 14mm, 9h. Very Fine.

300

Ex Giessener Münzhandlung, 25 May 1982, lot 80. 148. Macedon, Argilos AR Tetrobol. Circa 495-477 BC. Forepart of Pegasos right / Quadripartite incuse square. Liampi 48d (O41/R40); SNG ANS -. 2.37g, 15mm. Rare. Very Fine.

300

149. Kingdom of Macedon, Archelaos I AR Didrachm. Aigai, circa 413-399 BC. Rider, wearing a kausia and a chlamys and holding two spears, on horseback galloping to left / APXEΛAO, forepart of goat right, head left, within linear border, all within incuse square. Westermark, ‘The Staters of Archelaus. A die study’, group I; AMNG III, pl. XXIX, 10 (this reverse die); SNG ANS 64. 10.45g, 26mm, 9h. Rare. Very Fine. A good example of the first coinage of Archelaos. Ex Gorny & Mosch 125, 13 October 2003, lot 110.

49

2,000


50


Four Attractive Tetradrachms of Philip II

150. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 336-328 BC. Struck under Alexander III. Laureate head of Zeus right / Nude youth on horseback right, holding palm in right hand and reins in left; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, spear head below. Le Rider 388 (D203/R312); SNG ANS 417-8. 14.34g, 25mm, 4h. Extremely Fine. Attractive portrait of Zeus; well struck on a large flan.

3,000

151. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Struck under Philip III. Laureate head of Zeus right / Nude youth on horseback right, holding palm in right hand and reins in left; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, thunderbolt and H below, dolphin before. Le Rider pl. 48, 4; SNG ANS 812. 14.38g, 26mm, 10h. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful style, and attractively toned.

3,000

152. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 323-315 BC. Struck under Philip III. Laureate head of Zeus right / Nude youth on horseback right, holding palm in right hand and reins in left; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, Aphlaston and Π below. Le Rider pl. 46, 18. 14.30g, 25mm, 10h. Mint State. Pleasant light toning.

1,500

153. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 307-297 BC. Struck under Kassander. Laureate head of Zeus right / Nude youth on horseback right, holding palm in right hand and reins in left; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, Λ, torch and monogram below. Le Rider pl. 47, 23; SNG ANS 794; SNG München 137. Good Extremely Fine. Stunning golden toning.

51

3,000


52


One of the Earliest Alexander Staters

154. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AV Stater. Lifetime issue. Tarsos, circa 332-327 BC. Struck under Balakros or Menes. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand and cradling stylis in left arm; AΛEΞANΔPOY to left, kerykeion below right wing. Newell, Sidon 2, obv. die H; Price 3458 (this obverse die); SNG München –; SNG Alpha Bank –; SNG Saroglos –. 8.56g, 17mm, 4h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine. A beautiful example from the earliest series of staters issued by Alexander.

2,000

For the reattribution of the early undated Alexander staters of Sidon to the mint of Tarsos, see G. Le Rider, Alexander the Great: Coinage, Finances, and Policy. Balakros and Menes were the first and second satraps, respectively, who oversaw Cilicia under Alexander.

155

156

155. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Lifetime issue. Tarsos, circa 327-323 BC. Struck under Menes or Philotas. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre and eagle; plough in left field, globule in inner right. Price 3016. 17.20g, 26mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

500

156. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Lifetime issue. Myriandros, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, seated left, holding sceptre and eagle; monograms in left field and below throne. Price 3228 (this obverse die); SNG München 720-722. 17.24g, 29mm, 3h. Near Extremely Fine. Well centred on a large flan, with full bordering present on the obverse.

500

A Beautiful Alexander Distater

157. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AV Distater. Amphipolis, circa 330-320 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand and cradling stylis in left arm; ΑΛΕΧΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, kantharos to left. Price 167; Müller 192. 17.22g, 22mm, 5h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

15,000

A beautiful example of this sought-after denomination. Struck from dies of fine style, well centred on a broad flan with all details intact.

158. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 325-315 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre and eagle; axe before, serpent below throne. Price 246 var. (axe blade upwards). 17.26g, 26mm, 2h. Very Rare. Fleur De Coin. Lightly toned, lustrous metal. Uncommonly fine style.

53

3,000


159. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AV Stater. Miletos, circa 323-319 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with griffin, and necklace / Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand and cradling stylis in left arm; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right, monogram to left, double-headed axe below right wing. Price 2114. 8.55g, 18mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous metal; well centred and struck on a broad flan.

3,000

Artistic Die

160. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AV Stater. Sardes, circa 322-318 BC, under Menander or Kleitos. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike alighting left, holding wreath and stylis; BASILEWS to left, ALEXANDROU to right; torch below left wing, pellet-in-A below right wing. Price 2633; ADM I Series XV 300 (this obverse die). 8.57g, 18mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Handsome, lustrous metal.

3,000

An exceptionally graceful and elegant rendering of Nike, who we view at the moment of her alighting, wings still spread in their final beat to complete her descent, the delicate folds of her chiton billowing out behind her.

Finest Style Alexander Tetradrachm

161. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Kaunos, circa 300-280 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; double headed axe before, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ behind. Price 2074; Müller 1128. For the reattribution to Kaunus, see R.H.J. Ashton, “Kaunos, not Miletos or Mylasa,” NC 2004, pp. 33–46. 17.06g, 30mm, 1h. Rare. Light contact mark to torso, otherwise Mint State.

8,000

This exceptional coin is struck from dies of the most extraordinary style, having been conceived and executed in such a manner as to render all other tetradrachms of Alexander that came before or after it mere caricatures by comparison. The head of Herakles is almost startling in its realism, his robust features conveying at once a certain humanity and a divine serenity. Zeus meanwhile is truly sculptural in his rendering, with an appearance we might better expect from a marble frieze than a coin - great attention has been paid to perspective, proportionality and geometry. That this posthumous tetradrachm represents the very finest style to be found on any such coin in the name of Alexander should be beyond refute. When one compares these dies to the contemporary issues of the type from this mint, which are uniformly of poor style and execution, it is not perhaps implausible to conceive of this having been a special issue intended for some specific purpose or occasion, such is its medallic quality. It is often suggested that certain posthumous issues in the name of Alexander were intended to display his features in the guise of Herakles, and whether one accepts the idea or not, the similarities here to other known profiles are striking. Regardless, it is clear that this particular example is no ordinary tetradrachm, certainly being the work of a master engraver.

54


162. Kingdom of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Kabyle, civic issue, circa 230-218 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre and eagle; to inner left, Artemis Phosphoros standing facing. Price 882. 32mm, 16.90 g, 11h Good Very Fine.

1,000

Ex CNG Electronic Auction, 1 July 2009, lot 78.

163

164

163. In the name of Alexander III ‘The Great’. Imitative AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain Greek or Macedonian mint, circa 325-310 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre and eagle; F in left field. Price 796. 16.30g, 26mm, 2h. Very Fine.

250

Ex Lanz Auction 141, 26 May 2008, lot 226. 164. In the name of Alexander III ‘The Great’. Imitative AR Tetradrachm. Uncertain Greek or Macedonian mint, circa 310-275 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left holding sceptre and eagle; dolphin in left field, arrow between legs of throne, thunderbolt below. Price 857. 17.04g, 24mm, 10h. Good Very Fine.

250

Ex Gorny & Mosch 165, 17 March 2008, lot 1193.

165. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip III AV Stater. Abydos, circa 323-316 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent / Nike alighting left, holding wreath and stylis; FILIPPOU to right, monogram, pentagram and cornucopiae to left. Price P36; Thompson, Abydos 171a. 8.59g, 19mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful, lustrous metal.

3,000

166. Kingdom of Macedon. Demetrios I Poliorketes AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis, circa 291-290 BC. Diademed and horned head of Demetrios right / Poseidon Pelagaios seated left on rock, holding aplustre and trident; monograms to inner left and right, BASILEWS to right, DHMHTRIOU to left. Cf. M&M 72, 1987, lot 577 (these dies); Newell p. 110ff (obverse die XCIX), this monogram not listed. 17.19g, 29mm, 2h. Rare. Extremely Fine, two edge knocks. Attractive old tone.

5,000

Ex Sotheby’s Auction, 26 October 1993, lot 39. Around 292-1 BC Demetrios replaced the Alexandrine coin types in use in the Kingdom of Macedon with personal designs. It is his portrait that appears on the obverse of this coin, wearing the royal diadem and adorned with bull’s horns. The bull was sacred to his divine patron Poseidon, and the horned portrait symbolizes the apotheosis of the king. We know that Demetrios received divine honours in his lifetime, and his coinage clearly illustrates the first example of the deification of a reigning Hellenistic king.

55


167. Kingdom of Macedon. Philip V Æ23. Circa 221-179 BC. Radiate head of Helios right / BASILEWS FILIPPOU above and below winged thunderbolt; monogram DI above; all within oak wreath. A. Mamroth, Die Bronzemünzen des Königs Philippos V. von Makedonien, ZfN 42 (1935), 244, 24. AMNG III/2, 193, 25. 9.23g, 24mm, 7h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine. Attractive green patina.

500

168. Macedon, under Roman Rule, Æ21. Uncertain mint, circa 166-165 BC. Facing mask of Silenos wearing ivy wreath / MAKE-DONWN in two lines, D above; all within wreath of ivy. MacKay pg. 8; Touratsoglou, Macedon, pl. 7, 25; AMNG III pg. 8, 6; SNG Copenhagen 1324. 7.03g, 21mm, 12h. Rare. Good Very Fine, exceptional for the type.

750

THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES

169. Thraco-Macedonian tribes, the Bisaltai. AR Diobol. Circa 480 BC. Fore-part of horse right, the truncation dotted / Quadripartite incuse square. Tzamalis NX 18, 81; cf. SNG ANS 922 (different incuse pattern). 1.26g, 12mm. Extremely Fine.

500

170. Thraco-Macedonian tribes, the Mygdones or Krestones. AR Stater. Circa 480-470 BC. Goat kneeling right, head reverted; A•Λ above / Quadripartite incuse square. Lorber, Goats, group 7a (this coin); HPM -; SNG ANS -. Very Rare; C. Lorber could locate only one example of this type. Very Fine. Attractively toned.

2,500

Ex Giessener Münzhandlung 69, 18 November 1994, lot 146.

171. Thraco-Macedonian region, ‘Siris’. AR 1/8 Stater - Trihemiobol c. 525-480. Satyr without tail crouching right / Rough incuse square. Svoronos 12; cf. SNG ANS (‘Lete’) 969 var. 1.15g, 10mm. Very Fine.

56

150


THRACE

172. Thrace, Thasos AR Trihemiobol. Circa 404-350 BC. Satyr running left, holding kantharos / Amphora, QASIWN around. SNG Copenhagen 1029. 1.01g, 11mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

250

173. Thrace, Thasos AR Trihemiobol. Circa 404-340 BC. Satyr kneeling left, holding kantharos / Amphora, QASIWN around. SNG Copenhagen 1030. 0.85g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Light blue iridescence around the devices.

250

Ex NAC 54, 24 March 2010, lot 779.

174. Thrace, Thasos AR Trihemiobol. Circa 404-340 BC. Satyr running right, holding kantharos / Amphora, QASIWN around. SNG Copenhagen 1031. 0.75g, 11mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

250

Ex NAC 52, 7 October 2009, lot 122.

Third Known

175. Thrace, Abdera AR Stater. Circa 411-385 BC. Griffin seated left with right paw raised / Horse standing right, APISTWNAX around. May -; BMC -; ANS -; BN -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; Cf. Spink 5014, 28 September 2005, lot 80 and Gorny & Mosch 134, 11 October 2004, lot 1161 (both coins described as unique and unpublished). 12.69g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Rare.

4,000

The third known example, not in May’s comprehensive work on the coinage of Abdera, and missing from every institutional collection. Ex Hirsch 176, 1989, lot 97.

176. Thrace, Abdera AR Tetrobol. Circa 411-385 BC. Nymphagores, magistrate. Griffin pouncing left, ΑΒΔΗ above / Dolphin in dotted square, EPI ΝΥΜΦΑΓΟΡΗΣ around. May 377; SNG Copenhagen 335; Jameson 1038. 2.84g, 14mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

57

350


177. Thrace, Abdera AR Stater. Circa 385-375 BC. Griffin preparing to pounce left, ABDHRI above / Apollo standing left holding patera and laurel branch, at his feet, a deer; EPI KALLIANAKTOS around; all within linear border and incuse square. May 451. 11.42g, 23mm, 6h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex Peus 338, 27-29 April 1994, lot 394.

178. Thrace, Abdera AR Tetrobol. Circa 360-350 BC. Athenes, magistrate. Griffin pouncing left / Stag standing left, AQHNES above in two line. May, Abdera 452 (A303/P359); SNG Copenhagen 339 (these dies). 2.83g, 16mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

300

179. Thrace, Abdera AR Stater. Circa 336-311 BC. Hipponax, magistrate. Griffin lying left, raising forepaw; ABΔH above, PITEΩN below / Laureate head of Apollo right; shell below, EΠI IΠΠΩ-NAKTOΣ around. May, Abdera 543; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Ashmolean 2506-7. 10.70g, 23mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Pleasant light tone.

180

2,750

181

180. Thrace, Dikaia AR Diobol. Circa 492-475 BC. Cock standing right / Incuse horse’s head left within obliquely striated border. Schönert-Geiss -; cf. Rauch Auktion 77, 2006, 144 corr. and DNW A6 (2008), 5430. 1.14g, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Rare, unpublished in the standard references. Very Fine.

250

181. Thrace, Trieros AR Hemiobol. Circa 400 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Laurel branch in linear square, Τ-P-Η-I around; all within incuse square. Weber coll. 2399; Pozzi 758; Klein coll. 99; cf. BMC p. 181, 4ff.; SNG Fitzwilliam 1792. 0.35g, 8mm, 12h. Good Fine.

100

Early Coinage of Lysimachos

182. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos, as satrap, AR Diobol. Amphipolis, circa 317-305 BC, under Kassander. Diademed head of Apollo right / Rider on horseback right; ΛY above, forepart of lion below. Price 434A. 2.21g, 14mm, 7h. Extremely Rare. Nearly Extremely Fine.

58

200


59


An Unpublished Lysimachos Stater of Excellent Style

183. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AV Stater. Uncertain mint, circa 305-281 BC. Head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing diadem and horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, shield resting against base of throne; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙMΑXOY to left, Θ below right hand. SNG Copenhagen 2082-5 var; Müller, Lysimachus -; SNG Fitzwilliam -; Thompson -. 8.47g, 18mm, 1h. Unpublished. A few light marks, otherwise As Struck, and lustrous.

5,000

A beautiful gold stater of Lysimachos, with a portrait of Alexander engraved in excellent style.

184. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AV Stater. Uncertain mint, circa 305-281 BC. Head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing diadem and horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, shield resting against base of throne; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙMΑXOY to left, monogram below right hand, uncertain symbol in exergue. Müller, Lysimachus 483 var. (without symbol in exergue). 8.48g, 18mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

2,000

185. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lysimacheia, circa 305-281 BC. Head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing diadem and horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, shield decorated with Medusa’s head resting against base of throne, on which monogram, spear resting behind; lion’s head below right hand, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙMΑXOY to left. Thompson 16. 17.15g, 30mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine. Old cabinet toning with iridescent highlights over incredibly lustrous metal.

60

5,000


186. Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm. Lampsakos, circa 297-281 BC. Head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing diadem and horn of Ammon / Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, shield decorated with Medusa’s head resting against base of throne, spear resting behind; monogram and crescent to left. Thompson 57 var. (no crescent); Müller 392 var. (monogram); SNG France -. 17.12g, 31mm, 1h. Very Fine.

600

The obverse die used for this coin was engraved by the same hand as SNG France 2544 and 2549.

Unique Tetradrachm of Skostokos

187. Kings of Thrace. Skostokos AR Tetradrachm. In the name of Lysimachos. Uncertain central Thracian mint, possibly Kabyle, after circa 279 BC. Head of the deified Alexander right, wearing diadem and horn of Ammon; K below / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, shield decorated with Medusa’s head resting against base of throne, spear behind; pellet in inner left field. W. Fischer-Bossert. “Die Lysimachaeier des Skostokos” in RBN CLI, 2005, 18 (O6/R15 [recut]). 16.71g, 29mm, 11h. Unique. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

Ex LHS Numismatic 103, 5 May 2009, lot 67; Ex Lanz 141, 26 May 2008, lot 101. This unique coin is the product of an unfinished reverse die, possible due to the emergency caused by the Celtic incursion into the region in 279 BC. Tetradrachms of Skostokos, in his name and that of Lysimachos, usually display in the inner left field a herm surmounted by a round cult object, and the name of Skostokos in the exergue - cf. U. Peter, Die Münzen der Thrakischen Dynasten, Berlin 1997, p. 218; SNG Copenhagen 1171; SNG Ashmolean 3779.

188. Thracian Dynasts. Koson AV stater. Circa 44-42 BC. Roman consul (L. Junius Brutus?) walking left, accompanied by two lictors, monogram before, KOSON in exergue / Eagle with spread wings standing left on sceptre, clutching laurel wreath in right talon. RPC 1701; BMC Thrace p. 208, 2. Fleur De Coin. Sharp strike on a broad flan, highly lustrous.

1,000

MOESIA

189. Moesia, Istros AR Drach, Heads of the Dioskouroi, one inverted / Eagle standing on dolphin left, ISTRIH above, monogram below. SNG BM 247ff. 4.87g, 18mm, 2h. Good Very Fine.

61

300


CRETE

Attractive Coin of Knossos Depicting the Labyrinth

190. Crete, Knossos AR Stater. Head of Demeter or Ariadne left, wearing earring and necklace, hair rolled and bound with corn-wreath / Maeanderpattern Labyrinth, in centre of which five pellets, incuse square punch in each corner; all within shallow incuse circle. BMC 9; Svoronos 39; Le Rider, Monnaies Crétoise, 23. 11.00g, 25mm, 2h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

5,000

191. Aeolis, Kyme AR Tetradrachm. Kallias, magistrate. Circa 160-140 BC. Reduced Attic standard. Diademed head of the Amazon Kyme right / Horse standing right, left foreleg raised, one-handled cup (emblem of Kyme) below, ΚYMAIΩN to right, KΑΛΛΙΑΣ in exergue; all within laurel-wreath. Cf. J.H. Oakley, The Autonomous Wreathed Tetradrachms of Kyme, Aeolis, ANSMN 27, 1982, 24 s. no. 12 (these dies). 16.78g, 33mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

1,000

TROAS

192

193

192. Troas, Thymbra Æ16. Circa 4th Century BC. Laureate head of Zeus Ammon left / Eight-rayed star, Θ-Y above. BMC Troas pg. 89, 4; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock 1584. 5.12g, 16mm, 12h. Rare. Extremely Fine. 100 193. Troas, Assos AR Drachm. Circa 350 BC. Helmeted head of Athena left / Bucranium, ΑΣΣΙOΝ around. SNG München 151; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen 226-7. Rare. Some scrapes, otherwise Extremely Fine.

500

IONIA

194

195

196

194. Ionia, uncertain mint. EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 650-600 BC. Milesian standard. Flattened striated surface / Incuse square punch. BMC 19; SNG Kayhan 682; SNG von Aulock -; Weidauer -. 0.62g, 5mm. Good Very Fine.

1,000

195. Ionia, uncertain mint. EL 1/24 Stater. Circa 650-550 BC. Raised Swastika / Incuse square punch. SNG von Aulock 1778; Boston 1782 Taf. 84; Bodenstedt, Taf. 11,11 (‘incertum’); Rosen Coll. 365. 0.66g, 7mm. Extremely Fine. 300 196. Ionia, uncertain mint. EL 1/48 Stater. Circa 650-550 BC. Raised Swastika / Incuse square punch. SNG von Aulock -; cf. Boston 1782 (1/24 Stater); cf. above lot. 0.40g, 6mm. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

62

200


63


Fifth and Finest Known

197. Ionia, uncertain mint. EL 1/12 Stater. Circa 5th Century BC. Siren standing right, holding tympanon (tambourine) / Bucranium with fillets hanging from each horn. Rosen 369. 1.00g, 8mm, 6h. Extremely Rare, only the fifth recorded specimen, and the finest by far. A few light contact marks, but otherwise Mint State.

35,000

This type, which is known from just five examples including the current piece, was encountered for the first time in only 1957 when a specimen appeared for sale at the Hess-Leu auction in Luzern on April 16 of that year. That piece, lot 271, now resides in Oxford. Two further examples were sold by Münzen & Medaillen, one on 6 October 1987 (lot 131), which was the Rosen specimen. Jeffrey Spier inexplicably wrote (Numismatic Chronicle 1988, p.221) that that example was ‘gold rather than electrum’, though it is clearly not. Another was sold on 22 March 2002 (lot 72); the last example was sold at The New York Sale 25 on 5 January 2011 (lot 97). All were heavily worn and/or incomplete. The current piece is the only known example in this grade. The mythical Sirens are best known to us from two ancient epics: the ‘Argonautica’ by Apollonios in which Jason and the Argonauts have to travel pass them on their quest for the Golden Fleece, and Homer’s ‘Odyssey’, where they are portrayed as a pair of dangerous creatures that lure passing sailors to their deaths with their sweet music (Odyssey XII, 40). They are supposed to have inhabited an island with a particularly rocky shoreline onto which sailors would be drawn by their desire to hear the Sirens sing, leading to shipwreck. Speaking to Odysseus and warning him of the dangers he would encounter further into his journey, Queen Circe describes the Sirens as sitting in a meadow, with around them “a great heap of bones of mouldering men” (XII, 45). Although later depicted as women with wings, feathery tails and scaly bird-like feet, and eventually as mermaids, whose bodies were as seductive as their voices, depictions of the Sirens in early Greek art were as they appear on this coin, combining the body of a bird with the head of a woman, as can be seen on the ‘Siren Vase’, now in the British Museum, decorated in c. 480-470 BC and roughly contemporaneous with this coin.

64


198. Ionia, uncertain satrap of the Persian Empire. Circa 4th century BC. Persian king or hero in kneeling-running position right, holding spear and bow / Two concentric squares, a line projecting out from one side of outer square. SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock 7810 (Memnon); SNG T체bingen 2754. 1.44g, 12mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

200

The interpretation of the reverse type is open to debate. Some scholars interpret it as the depiction of a military camp, whereas others identify it as the plan of a fire altar.

Extremely Rare EL Stater of Chios

199. Ionia, Chios El Stater. Circa 525-510 BC. Sphinx seated right / Incuse square punch. Baldwin 1; Mavrogordato 3. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

8,500

This series was dated to the late 6th century BC by Nicholas Hardwick (The Coinage of Chios from the VIth to the IVth Century B.C., in: Hackens (Hrsg.), Proceedings of the 11th International Numismatic Congress, September 8-13, 1991, Volume I, Louvaine-la-Neuve 1993, S. 211-222). The electrum staters of Chios are extremely rare; indeed, Nicholas Hardwick could only locate 18 examples. 14.06g, 19mm. In 546 BC Chios came under the dominion of the Persian Empire, from which period this coin dates. Chios joined the Ionian Revolt of 499 BC against the Persian hegemony, and as a primarily naval power, the city sent a strong fleet of one hundred ships - the largest single Ionian naval contingent - to join the armada in the defence of Miletos. At the ensuing Battle of Lade in 494 BC, the Samian ships treacherously deserted, causing panic in the western wing of the Ionian battle line, which rapidly disintegrated as more and more ships took to flight. Only the large Chian navy, perhaps accompanied by a few other ships, held its ground. Despite a valiant effort, the Chians were eventually forced to retreat in the face of overwhelming numbers and appalling casualties. The loss of the battle and the subsequent extermination of the Milesians by the Perians ended the revolt, and Chios would remain under Perian rule until the Battle of Mycale in 479 BC. When the Athenians formed the Delian League Chios joined as one of the few members who did not have to pay tribute but instead supplied ships to the alliance.

Unpublished EL Hemihekte of Erythrai (?)

200. Ionia, Erythrai (?) EL 1/12 Stater. Circa 500-520 BC. Floral pattern with central pellet / Quadripartite incuse square. Unpublished in the standard references, cf. Tkalec September 2008, 34 = Lanz 151, 2011, 461 (same dies); Tkalec September 2008, 35; Hauck & Aufh채user 20, 2007, 103; Gorny & Mosch 159, 2007, 176. 1.32g, 8mm. Extremely Rare and apparently unpublished. Good Very Fine.

5,000

The tentative attribution of this issue is based on the distinct similarity to the floral patterns on the reverses of some of the early silver of Erythrai, cf. BMC Ionia: Erythrea 20, pl. 15, 2.

65


Unpublished and Possibly Unique

201. Ionia, uncertain mint. EL 1/24th Stater. Phokaian standard. Circa 6th Century BC. Head of lion with open jaw, protruding tongue left / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Weidauer -; Traité I -; SNG Kayhan -; SNG von Aulock -; Boston MFA -; cf. CNG 88, 14 Sept. 2011, 361 (head left, attributed as Milesian standard). 0.67g, 6mm. Unpublished and possibly Unique. Extremely Fine.

500

Unpublished

202. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Seal swimming left, Θ below / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 1.4 var. (head reverted); CNG MBS 82, 16 September 2009, 616. 2.60g, 10mm. Extremely Rare. Unpublished, and possibly only the second known example. Good Very Fine.

5,000

203. Ionia, Phokaia. EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of griffin left; behind, seal swimming upwards / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 12 (a/α). 2.57g, 10mm. Very Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

2,000

204. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of lion with open jaw left, protruding tongue / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 13 (a/α). 2.53g, 10mm. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

3,000

Fifth Known

205. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of lioness left, collar ornamented with double row of pearls, [seal swimming in upper field left], border of dots / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 26 (a/α). 2.59g, 10mm. Extremely Rare - the fifth known example. Good Extremely Fine.

5,000

206. Ionia, Phokaia AR Diobol. Circa 500-480 BC. Head of griffin right / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. SNG Kayhan 514 = SNG von Aulock 2116. 1.26g, 9mm. Rare. Good Very Fine.

66

300


Second Recorded Example

207. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 500 BC. Panther’s head facing, small seal to right above / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Rosen collection, Münzen und Medaillen 72, 1987, 75 = Rosen 312 = ATEC 339 (these dies); Bodenstedt -. 2.59g, 10mm. Extremely Rare - the second recorded example. Good Extremely Fine.

4,000

The small seal above the head was off the flan in Copenhagen, missed by Münzen und Medaillen and the type was not known to Bodenstedt.

208. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 480 BC. Forepart of man-headed bull left, collar with row of pearls; behind, seal swimming upward / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 35 (b/β). 2.58g, 10mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. A pleasing example of this type.

2,000

209. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Laureate head of Zeus left / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt -; cf. 76; Boston 1916; Traité 2124, pl. 158, 41. 2.55g, 11mm. Extremely Rare.

5,000

210. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of Attis in Phrygian cap left / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 64; BMC 33. 2.55g, 10mm. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

4,000

Attis was of Phrygian origin and thus he is always represented in a Phrygian costume such as he wears here. He was the Phrygian god of vegetation and consort of the mother-goddess Cybele.

211. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of Hermes left, wearing winged petasos, behind neck seal swimming downward / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 82 (e/δ). 2.53g, 10mm. Rare. Good Very Fine.

1,700

212. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of young satyr with ivy wreath left, beneath seal swimming / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 87 (c/β). 2.54g, 10mm. Rare. Good Very Fine.

67

750


Unpublished and Possibly Unique

213. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 440-400 BC. Head of Athena left, crested Attic helmet adorned with laurel branch / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt -. 2.50g, 10mm. Unpublished and possibly Unique.

4,000

Unpublished in the standard references and unrecorded by Bodenstedt. The helmeted head of Athena was a popular coin type in Phokaian coinage in electrum, silver and bronze. This novum has a distinctive laurel wreathed helmet, the crest of which has a split segment exactly as seen on the silver staters and distaters of Thurium, dated to c. 440-400, cf. ACGC 728-730 and HN Italy 1757-1775.

214. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 400 BC. Female head, her hair bound with a sphendone / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 90 (c/β). 2.57g, 10mm. Good Very Fine.

500

215. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 400 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing earring, her crested Attic helmet adorned with a Pegasos on the bowl / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 91 (d/δ). 2.54g, 10mm. Good Very Fine.

1,000

216. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 400 BC. Head of nymph left, her curly hair bound in an ampyx with a net behind, wearing pendant earring / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 94 (c/γ). 2.51g, 11mm. Good Very Fine.

750

217. Ionia, Phokaia EL Hekte. Circa 360 BC. Head of Queen Omphale left, wearing Herakles’ lion-skin headdress and ear pendant, club over shoulder; beneath, seal / Irregular quadripartite incuse square punch. Bodenstedt 107 (a/α). 2.55g, 10mm. Extremely Fine.

2,500

For his murder of Iphitus, the great hero Heracles was commanded by the Delphic Oracle Xenoclea to remand himself as a slave to Queen Omphale of Lydia for the period of a year, during which time he was made to perform women’s tasks and even wear women’s clothing and hold a basket of wool while Omphale and her maidens did their spinning. Ovid (Fasti) tells us that Omphale even wore the skin of the Nemean Lion and carried Heracles’ olive-wood club.

218. Ionia, Phokaia AR Hemidrachm. Circa 360 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested helmet decorated with wreath / Head of griffin left, Φ-Ω across, AB monogram below. Winterthur no. 3102 (these dies); Imhoof-Blumer, KM I 92 no. 2; BMC -; SNG von Aulock -. 2.10g, 13mm, 12h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

68

300


219. Ionia, Teos AR Stater. Circa 500 BC. Griffin seated right, raising left paw / Quadripartite incuse square. J.M.Balcer, The Early Silver Coinage of Teos, SNR 47, 1968, 24,3 pl. XI 3. 11.71g, 19mm. Very Fine.

520

220. Ionia, Teos AR Stater. Circa 478-449 BC. Female Griffin crouched right on ornamented line, left forepaw raised; panther’s head below paw, O between legs, THION around / Quadripartite incuse square. J.M. Balcer, The Early Silver Coinage of Teos, SNR 47, 1968, 24, 3 pl. XI 3. 11.68g, 24mm. Good Extremely Fine. A superior example of the type, well struck on a very broad, well rounded flan.

5,000

Ex Lanz 30, 26 November 1984, lot 267.

221. Ionia, Ephesos. Phanes EL 1/24 Stater. Forepart of a deer right, looking back / Square incuse punch with raised lines. SNG von Aulock 7773; Weidauer 37 (var., Hemihekte); Linzalone Coll. 1105. 0.54g, 5mm. Very Rare. Fine.

250

222. Ionia Miletos 1/8 AR Stater. Circa 510-494 BC. Lion-mask facing, dotted square / Double square lattice frame, within which stellar design with four points, all within incuse square. SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Kayhan 455. 1.60g, 10mm. Very Fine.

300

Ex Aufhäuser 7, 9 October 1990, lot 168.

223. Ionia, Miletos AR Hemidrachm. Circa 352-325 BC. Proxenos, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo left / Lion standing left, head right, MI monogram to left, star above, ΠPOΞENOΣ below. Deppert-Lippitz, 248; SNG von Aulock -; SNG München 723. 1.70g, 12mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

300

224. Ionia, Miletos AR Didrachm. Circa 259-246 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Lion standing left, its head turned back to face to right, MI monogram to left, below second monogram, a star above, in exergue ...ΩNIΔHΣ. Deppert-Lippitz, Period IV, vgl. 500-502 (magistrate’s name not listed). 10.59g, 27mm, 11h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

69

3,000


A Set of Magnesian ‘Cavalryman’ Coins

225. Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum AR Tetradrachm. Circa 350-325 BC. Rhodian standard. Lycomedes, magistrate. Helmeted and cuirassed cavalryman on horseback, galloping right, holding lance in right hand, cloak flowing behind / Bull charging left; ΜΑΓΝ above, ΛΥΚΟΜΗΔ below; all within circular maeander pattern. Imhoof-Blumer (1901) p. 76, 3; SNG Kayhan 409 (but magistrate’s name differently arranged). 15.10g, 25mm, 11h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully vivid iridescent toning.

5,000

Ex Tkalec Auction, 18 February 2002, lot 62.

226. Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum AR Didrachm. Circa 350-325 BC. Diopeites, magistrate. Helmeted and cuirassed cavalryman on horseback, galloping right, holding lance in right hand, cloak flowing behind / Bull charging left; ΜΑΓΝ above, ΔIOΠEITHΣ below; all within circular maeander pattern. SNG Kayhan 410 var (no grain stalk); SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; BMC -. 7.13g, 20mm, 11h. Rare. Near Extremely Fine, attractive old tone.

2,000

Privately purchased from Hirsch, 1997.

227. Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum AR Didrachm. Circa 350-325 BC. Lycomedes, magistrate. Helmeted and cuirassed cavalryman on horseback, galloping right, holding lance in right hand, cloak flowing behind / Bull charging left; ΜΑΓ above, ΛΥΚΟΜ below; all within circular maeander pattern. SNG Kayhan -; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG München -; for magistrate’s name cf. Kayhan 409; lot 217 above. 3.59g, 16mm, 12h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ex Giessener Münzhandlung, 11 October 1995, lot 158.

228. Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum AR Tetradrachm. Reduced Attic standard. Circa 160-150 BC. Head of Artemis Leukophryene right, wearing stephane; bow and quiver over shoulder / Apollo standing left, holding branch and resting elbow on tripod, ΑΠOΛΛOΔΩPOΣ KAΛΛIKPATOY MAΓΝHTΩN around, all within wreath. N.F. Jones, ‘The Autonomous Wreathed Tetradrachms of Magnesia on-Maeander’, ANS MN 24, 1979, 101 no. 3a (these dies). Rare. Extremely Fine.

70

1,500


LESBOS

229. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Lion’s head right / Incuse cockerel’s head left, collar of five pearls. Bodenstedt 7 (a/α). 2.55g, 10mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

230. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Lion’s head right / Incuse cockerel’s head left, collar of five pearls. Bodenstedt 7 (b/δ). 2.56g, 10mm, 2h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

231. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Lion’s head right / Incuse calf’s head right. Bodenstedt 13; SNG Copenhagen 301. 2.54g, 9mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

232. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 500-480 BC. Lion’s head right / Incuse calf’s head left. Bodenstedt 13 (f/ζ). 2.58g, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

1,500

233. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 480-450 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Head of bull right within slight incuse circle. Bodenstedt 29 (a/α). 2.50g, 10mm, 10h. Extremely Fine.

2,500

234. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 450-425. Diademed head of youthful river-god right, small horn over forehead / Bearded head of old river-god right in archaic style, wearing wreath of reeds. Bodenstedt 52 (d/δ). 2.54g, 10mm, 9h. Very Fine.

500

235. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Diademed head of youthful river-god right, small horn over forehead / Head of nymph right, hair bound in sakkos. Bodenstedt 85 (a/α). 2.54g, 11mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

71

500


236. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Athena three-quarters facing, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet, earring, and pearl necklace / Head of Hermes right, chlamys around shoulders and petasos behind neck, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 86 (g/ι). 2.55g, 11mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Highly lustrous metal.

237

1,500

238

237. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of Artemis right, hair bound in sphendone, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 100 (l/o). 2.57g, 10mm, 11h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

238. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Laureate head of Poseidon right / Forepart of Ketos right within square linear frame. Bodenstedt 96 (h/λ). 2.51g, 10mm, 12h. Off-centred strike on short flan, but otherwise Extremely Fine.

239

500

240

239. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Dioskouros right, wearing wreathed pilos; two stars in field / Head of Persephone right, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 99 (l/γ). 2.54g, 10mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

500

240. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Dioskouros right, wearing wreathed pilos; two stars in field / Head of Persephone right, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 99 (h/θ). 2.55g, 10mm, 6h. Very Fine.

241

300

242

241. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of Artemis right, hair bound in sphendone, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 100 (l/o). 2.56, 10mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. 750 242. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of Artemis right, hair bound in sphendone, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 100 (l/o). 2.57g, 10mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

243. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Meilichios right, [forepart of small serpent before chin] / Draped bust of Nike right, two stars flanking above, all within linear frame. Bodenstedt 101 (d/δ). 2.55g, 10mm, 1h. Very Fine.

700

244. Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Apollo Karneios right / Eagle standing right, head left, within linear frame. Bodenstedt 104 (d/δ). 2.53g, 10mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

72

500


Exceptional Stater of Mytilene

245. Lesbos, Mytilene AR Stater. Circa 350-300 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara with fillet attached, plectron to left, MY-T-I around; all within linear frame. BMC 28-31; SNG Copenhagen 375; SNG von Aulock 7751-52; SNG M端nchen 727. 11.15g, 23mm, 11h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

5,000

Exceptional condition for the type, which is otherwise quite uniformly found heavily corroded. Ex Peus 343, 26 April 1995, lot 140.

MYSIA

246. Mysia, Lampsakos AR Tetrobol. Circa 500-480 BC. Forepart of Pegasos right / Quadripartite incuse square. A. Baldwin, Lampsakos: The Gold Staters, Silver and Bronze Coinages, AJN 53, 1924, pl. 5, 2; SNG BnF 1116. 2.06g, 10mm. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

200

247. Mysia, Lampsakos AR Obol. Circa 500-490 BC. Female janiform head / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, all within incuse square. Baldwin pl. V, 16; SNG von Aulock 7390; SNG France 5, 1126; Rosen Coll. 524. 1.24g, 9mm, 6h. Very Fine.

100

248. Mysia, Pergamon. Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-250 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / FILETAIROU, Athena enthroned left, holding shield; spear behind, ivy leaf to inner left, bow to right, A on throne. Westermark, Philetairos, group III (see pl. 3 V.XXV). 17.10g, 29mm, 1h. Good Extremely Fine. Good style and superb, very high relief.

73

4,500


249. Mysia, Pergamon. Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 263-250 BC. Laureate head of Philetairos right / FILETAIROU, Athena enthroned left, holding shield; spear behind, ivy leaf to inner left, bow to right, A on throne. Westermark, Philetairos, group III (see pl. II V.XX). 17.01g, 28mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Good style and metal.

4,000

250. Mysia, Pergamon. Pseudo-Autonomous Æ16. Circa AD 40-60. ΘЄΩΝ ϹVNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right / ΘЄAN PΩMHN, turreted bust of Roma right. SNG Paris, Mysie no. 1964ff; RPC 2374. 3.46g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

200

251. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500 BC. Winged head of Amazon left, tunny fish behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 18; SNG von Aulock 1186; cf. SNG Paris 193 (stater); Boston 1449 (stater). 2.66g, 11mm. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

2,000

252. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500 BC. Sphinx seated left, tunny fish left beneath / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 26; SNG France 5, 201-202. 2.67g, 11mm. Good Very Fine.

2,000

253. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500 BC. Forepart of lioness left, with collar of pearls, tunny fish swimming upward behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 39; SNG France 178. 2.76g, 11mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine; seldom encountered in this grade.

4,000

254. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500 BC. Forepart of lioness left, with collar of pearls, tunny fish swimming upward behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 39; SNG France 178. 2.65g, 11mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

74

3,000


255. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Boar standing left, tunny fish below left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 45; SNG von Aulock 7275; SNG France 5, 226; Hurter-Liewald, Neue Nominale in der Elektronprägung von Kyzikos, SNR 83 (2004), pl. 6, 90; Rosen Coll. 468. 2.62g, 12mm. Very Rare. Good Fine.

750

256. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of winged stag left, tunny fish swimming upward behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 50; SNG France 189. 2.69g, 11mm. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

4,000

257. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Head of Athena left, wearing crested helmet, tunny fish left beneath / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 67; SNG France -. 2.66g, 11mm. Extremely Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

258. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Bearded facing head of Silenus, tunny fish swimming upwards on either side / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 77; SNG France 208; SNG von Aulock 7269; Rosen Coll. 455. 2.69g, 12mm. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

5,000

259. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-400 BC. Forepart of galley with wolf’s head prow left, beneath, tunny fish left / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 80 (staters); Hurter-Liewald, SNR 83 (2004), p. 33, 80, pl. 6. 2.65g, 10mm. Very Rare.

1,500

260. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Dog standing left, tunny fish left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 93; SNG France 5, 231. 2.65g, 10mm. Very Rare. Very Fine.

1,200

261. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of wolf left, head reverted, tunny fish swimming upward behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 102; SNG France 241. 2.68g, 10mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

75

3,000


262. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Forepart of wolf left, head reverted, tunny fish swimming upward behind / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 102; SNG France 241. 2.66g, 10mm. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

2,000

A Great Rarity in Perfect Condition

263. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Female head left, wearing circular earring and necklace, hair bound in Kekryphalos or sphendone, tunny fish left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 106. 2.68g, 11mm. Extremely Rare. Fleur De Coin.

20,000

264. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 112; SNG Paris 5, 253 (stater). 2.69g, 10mm. Rare. Good Very Fine.

3,000

265. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Nude youth kneeling left, holding tunny fish / Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. Von Fritze 112; cf. SNG France 253 (stater). 1.31g, 9mm. Rare. Extremely Fine.

1,000

266. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Stater. Circa 500-450 BC. Naked youth kneeling right, holding tunny fish in left hand and knife in right / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze 113; SNG France 5, 254. 16.13g, 21mm. Rare. Very Fine.

4,000

Exceptional Double Sphinx

267. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Double-bodied sphinx with one head facing, tunny fish swimming left below / Quadripartite incuse square; traces of undertype. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 128; SNG France 5, 280. 2.62g, 14mm. Extremely Rare. Fleur De Coin; beautifully lustrous metal.

76

10,000


268. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Double-bodied sphinx with one head facing, tunny fish swimming left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 128; SNG France 5, 80. 2.54g, 10mm. Extremely Rare. Good Very Fine.

3,000

269. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 500-450 BC. Gorgoneion with mouth open and tongue protruding, six serpents on top of head, another below each ear, tunny fish below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 129. 2.71g, 10mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

2,000

270. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hekte. Circa 450 BC. Naked boy (Taras?), seated astride a dolphin to left, holding a tunny by the tail in his extended right hand, a tunny below / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze -; Rosen Coll. 487. 2.67g, 12mm. Very Rare. Very Fine.

5,000

Two Extremely Rare Hemihektes

271. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of Attis facing right, wearing ornamented Phrygian cap, [tunny fish below] / Quadripartite incuse square. Boston 1523; W. Greenwell, ‘The Electrum Coinage of Kyzikos’, NC 1887, 56, pl. III, 5; cf. Von Fritze, Nomisma VII, 142 (stater and hekte); SNG France 291 (stater and hekte). Extremely Rare - possibly only the third known specimen. Fleur De Coin.

5,000

272. Mysia, Kyzikos EL Hemihekte. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of bearded Silenos left, wearing ivy wreath; tunny fish swimming to left below / Quadripartite incuse square. Hurter & Liewald, Neue Nominale in der Elektronprägung von Kyzikos, SNR 83 (2004) p. 34, 91; cf. Fritze 191; BMFA 1564; Gulbenkian 662-664; SNG von Aulock 7319 (all Staters). 1.32g, 10mm. Extremely Rare - one of perhaps as few as three known examples. Very Fine.

4,000

This head of Silenos is stylistically very close to those found on the gold staters of Pantikapaion, and the engraver of the latter may well have been influenced by the type as found on this coin and its larger stater counterpart when creating the dies for their own coinage. Given the close commercial ties between the two regions and the ‘relatively’ short timespan between the likely issue date of this series and the earliest staters of Pantikapaion, this would not be surprising.

77


273. Mysia, Kyzikos AR Obol. Circa 450-400 BC. Forepart of boar left; to right, tunny upward / Head of roaring lion left within incuse square. Von Fritze II 9; SNG France 361–72; SNG von Aulock 1213; SNG Kayhan 54. 0.87g, 9mm, 8h. Fleur De Coin.

500

274. Mysia. Kyzikos AR Tetradrachm. Circa 400-350 BC. Veiled head of Kore Soteira facing left, wearing earring and necklace, hair wreathed in grain; ΣΩTEIPA behind / Lion’s head left, tunny fish below. BMC 125; H. Von Fritze, Die Silberprägung von Kyzikos, Nomisma IX (1914) pl. V 33. 15.26g, 24mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

4,000

Ex Giessener Münzhandlung 76, 22 April 1996, lot 167.

Fifth and Possibly Finest Known

275. Pordosilene Nasos AR Phokaian Hemidrachm. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of Apollo wearing taenia right / Panther standing right, ΠOPΔ above, all within incuse square. O. Hoover, Handbook of Coins from the Islands, HGCS 6, 2010, 1097; J. Stauber & M. Barth, Die Bucht von Adramytteion II, Bonn 1996, 299, 2 a-b. 2.01g, 11mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Good Very Fine. Well centred and preserved; good metal. Very possibly the finest known.

500

The above authors list only two examples in a private collection; two more have since appeared at auction, both of poor quality. Unpublished in all the major references, and missing from all public collections. Pordosilene Nasos was located on the island today called Alibey Adasi in the Hekatonnesoi archipelago, to the north of the strait which divides Lesbos from the mainland of Mysia. It is described as a polites in the plural in recognition of its two communities of Pordosilene (the unhappily named ‘farts of Silenos’) and Nasos (island dwellers), both nominated on its coinage. Cf. IACP 823.

276. Islands off Mysia, Pordosilene AR Obol. Circa 450-400 BC. Head of Apollo wearing taenia right / Crab within incuse square, ΠOPΔ above. Stauber & Barth, 300, 3a-b. 0.58g, 8mm, 5h. Extremely Rare. Good Very Fine. Like the above piece, this coin is an extreme rarity and missing from all major collections.

78

300


79


LYDIA

AN IMPORTANT COLLECTION OF ALYATTES ELECTRUM The small but incredibly important denominational set of the coins of Alyattes presented here consists of only four pieces, but all of these are superlative examples in their own right. This collection not only adds to our understanding of the series, it also forces a reinterpretaion of the legends they bear. Coming under the hammer for the first time, it is the collector’s hope that by publishing them together thus, they will further discussion and study of ancient Lydian coinage - a field which, it seems, still has surprises to share.

An Unpublished Trite of Alyattes

277. Kings of Lydia. Alyattes (610-560 BC) EL Trite - 1/3 Stater. Sardes, circa 600 BC. Lion’s head right with open jaws and protruding tongue, solardisk above forehead, confronting open jaws of lion’s head left; between the two, upwards Lydian legend ALYA; granular field / Two square punchmarks. For similar issues with Lydian legends cf. Weidauer groups XVII (‘VALVEL’) and XVIII (‘..KALIL..’); ATEC pp. 215-216, groups a and b; Kraay ACGC p. 24, 63 (WELVES) or (WELVET). 4.71g, 11mm. Unpublished.

125,000

From a private German Collection. The Lydians were commercial people, who, according to Herodotus, had customs like the Greeks and were the first people to introduce the use of gold and silver coins, and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations (Herodotus I, 94). The kingdom reached its zenith during the reign of Alyattes, the fourth Lydian king of the house of Gyges, son of Sadyattes and father of Kroisos. He is seen as the founder of the Lydian Empire and continued the war begun by his father against powerful Miletos, though hewas soon obliged to turn his attention towards the Medes and Babylonians. On 28 May 585 BC, during the Battle of Halys fought against Kyaxares, king of Media, a solar eclipse took place; hostilities were suspended, peace concluded, and the Halys fixed as the boundary between the two kingdoms. He proceeded to drive the Kimmerians out of Phrygia, thus securing the trade route with the east. In the west he was able subdue the Karians, and took several important Ionian cities including Smyrna and Kolophon, enabling him to consolidate a Mediterranean trading outlet. The earliest electrum coinage of Lydia has been the subject of much scholarly debate and variously attributed to the reigns of Gyges, Sadyattes and Alyattes. In a well thought out article ‘KUKALIṂ, WALWET, and the Artemision deposit’, in Agoranomia, Studies in Money and Exchange Presented to John H. Kroll, ANS New York 2006, R.W. Wallace not only corrects the reading of the two previously known legends, ‘VALVEL’ and ‘..KALIL..’, but convincingly demonstrates that the two series, with their several die links, belong to the same period during the reign of Alyattes, datable to about 600 BC. However, Wallace’s interpretation of WALWET as the Lydian name of Alyattes is put seriously in doubt by the appearance of the above ALYA issue, a legend much closer to the Hellenized form of Alyattes. WALWET may be connected to the Luwian word ‘walwi’, ‘lion’ and ‘KUKALIṂ’ may be translated as ‘I am of Kukas’. These legends are probably the names of moneyers, mint-officials or regal titles appertaining to Alyattes. The ALYA issue was struck at 1/3 of a stater on the so-called Lydo-Milesian weight standard of 14.1 grams in alluvial electrum, a naturally occurring gold-silver alloy found in abundance in the washings of the Pactolus river which runs from the slopes of Mount Tmolos, through Sardis and empties into the Hermus. According to legend, King Midas divested himself of the golden touch by washing himself in the river (Ovid, Met. 11.140-144). The variable composition of electrum rendered it a difficult commodity to trade without a seal of guarantee of value, unlike pure gold or silver which had been merely weighed throughout the middle east for millennia. The seal of guarantee initially chosen was the image of a lion’s head, the personification of royal authority, strength, courage, wisdom, justice, protection, fire and gold (‘subterranean sun’), all attributes that the ambitious kings of Lydia would have been keen to emphasise. The lion, with its golden-brown coat and radiate mane was principally the personification of the sun itself, and hence it is found as a symbol of eastern sun-gods such as Mithras. The zodiac sign Leo was occupied by the Sun in the hottest part of the year, July 22 to August 22, and it was probably on account of this that it was believed that the lion was able to gaze directly at the sun without blinking. In Egypt the male lions were the guardians of the eastern and western horizons, and hence sun-rise and sun-set. It is not by chance that the head of the lion of this coin has a disk on the forehead, which can only be the solar disk, later replaced by a radiate setting or rising sun on the anonymous 1/3-staters (trites), usually attributed to Alyattes, hardly a wart ‘Warz’ as suggested by Weidaur for group XV. The very name of Anatolia suggests the “east” or land of “[sun]rise”.

80


81


278. Kings of Lydia. temp. Alyattes EL Trite - 1/3 Stater. Sardes, circa 610-560 BC. Lion’s head right with open jaws and protruding tongue, solar-disk above forehead, confronting open jaws of lion’s head left; WALWET (in Lydian retrograde script) between / Two incuse square punches. Weidauer Group XVII; SNG von Aulock 8204. 4.72g, 13mm. Very Rare. Very Fine; all six letters present.

30,000

From a private German Collection. This issue was struck with an obverse die that featured two lions, but without exception, one lion is always missing or only partially visible. Due to the incompatibility in size of the die and flan, it is also almost always the case that the legend WALWET is only partially visible, with one or (usually) more letters completely missing. On this exceptional example though, we have the complete legend, with all six letters present on the flan.

279. Kings of Lydia. temp. Alyattes EL Hekte - 1/6 Stater. Sardes, circa 610-560 BC. Lion’s head left with open jaws, solar-disk above forehead, confronting open jaws of lion’s head right; WALWET (in Lydian retrograde script) between / Two incuse square punches. Weidauer 99. 2.37g, 10mm. Rare. Very Fine; exceptional for the type.

25,000

From a private German Collection. As with the trites (see above), the hektes bear two lions’ heads, though like their larger counterparts they normally suffer from being struck on flans too small for the dies, and consequently it is usual to only find one lion and and a partial legend. On this example however, we see a significant portion of the second lion’s head, and five out of six letters of the legend.

280. Kings of Lydia. temp. Alyattes EL Hemihekte - 1/12 Stater. Sardes, circa 610-560 BC. Lion’s head left with open jaws, solar-disk above forehead, confronting open jaws of lion’s head right; WALWET (in Lydian retrograde script) between / Incuse square punch. Weidauer 111 var; cf. Weidauer 99; lot 225 above (same dies). 1.17g, 7mm. Extremely Rare. Clear and with a legible inscription, with parts of both lions. The most complete example known.

20,000

From a private German Collection. It has traditionally been assumed that the hemihektes of Alyattes bore only one lion. However, as this incredible example clearly shows, the types are the same as those of its larger cousins, with two confronting lions and a legend between. With all six letters of the legend clearly displayed on the coin, this example possibly bears the most complete legend of any known Alyattes hemihekte, and is almost certainly the only specimen to show parts of both lions.

82


281. Kings of Lydia. temp. Alyattes EL Trite - 1/3 Stater. Sardes, circa 610-560 BC. Head of lion right, solar disk above forehead / Double-square incuse punch. Weidauer 59. 4.51g, 12mm. Good Very Fine.

750

282. Kings of Lydia. temp. Alyattes EL Trite - 1/3 Stater. Sardes, circa 610-560 BC. Head of lion right, solar disk above forehead / Double-square incuse punch. Weidauer 70; Pozzi Coll. 2469. 4.71g, 13mm. Good Very Fine. Particularly pleasing appearance.

750

283. Kings of Lydia. temp. Alyattes EL Hemihekte - 1/12 Stater. Sardes, circa 610-560 BC. Sardes mint. Head of lion right, solar disk above forehead / Incuse square punch. Weidauer 81. 1.18g, 6mm. Good Very Fine. Very attractive example of the type.

500

284. Kings of Lydia. Kroisos AV 1/24 Stater. Sardes, circa 550-546 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Incuse square punch. SNG von Aulock -; SNG M端nchen 9. 0.66g, 7mm. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

2,000

285. Kings of Lydia. Kroisos AR Siglos. Sardes, circa 545-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Two incuse squre punches of unequal size. SNG Cop. 456; SNG von Aulock 2877-79; SNG Kayhan 1025; Rosen Coll. 663. 5.28g, 17mm. Very Fine.

450

286. Kings of Lydia. Kroisos AR Siglos. Sardes, circa 545-520 BC. Confronted foreparts of lion and bull / Two incuse squre punches of unequal size. SNG von Aulock 2876. 4.92g, 16mm. Very Fine.

83

450


84


KARIA

A Unique and Unpublished Archaic Stater of Karia

287. Karia, uncertain mint. AR Stater. Circa 500 BC. Forepart of lion with open jaws standing left before sunburst; in front, forepart of boar with legs extended left / Irregular rough incuse markings. 9.94g, 22mm. Unpublished and Unique.

10,000

The ancient district of Karia in south-western Anatolia was one of the most thoroughly Hellenized areas in Asia Minor, with Greek cities along its Aegean coast; a mountainous interior surrounded by Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia and Lykia was populated by the non-Greek Karians, mentioned by Homer (Iliad 2.867ff) who considered themselves autochthonous, formerly calling themselves Leleges - the pre-Hellenic population of the Aegean who inhabited its islands and served in the navy of Minos. They claimed kinship with the Lydians and Mysians, with whom they shared a common worship. By 546, under Cyrus II the Great, most of Asia Minor was incorporated into the Achaemenid empire and Karia was placed under Lydian satrapy. However, the region was allowed the freedom to trade so long as it paid tribute to Persia. Electrum and silver coinage had already been circulating in Ionia and Lydia for at least one hundred years on various weight standards. This Karian coin seems to be on the Persian silver standard, theoretically about 10.9 to 11.2 grams, struck just before or at the time of the Ionian revolt (499494), in which the Karians took part. The iconography used by its issuing authority seems to have been stylistically influenced by the uncertain mint Karian mainland lion/incuse staters (ACGC 99; Traite II 1, 735 pl. 19, 11; SNG von Aulock 2077; 284, 13; BMC Ionia, pl. 21, 1) on the Aeginetan silver standard of about 12.2 grams, and the lion/incuse staters (ACGC 100; Rosen coll. 613; SNG Kayhan 930; SNG Keckman 64 [Kaunos] also on the Persian standard). This remarkable new addition to the archaic coinage of western Anatolia (a word symbolically suggesting “east” or “[sun]rise”) depicts a totally original scene: a lion and a boar facing left before a sunburst. In myth the lion has always been associated with the sun and it was believed to be able to gaze at the sun without blinking, as can be seen on the electrum 1/3 staters (trites) attributed to Alyattes (see lot 253-259 of this catalogue; Weidauer group XV, 63-75; ATEC group d, 14-25), which are characterized by a sunburst on the forehead of the lion. The boar is a primordial symbol of strength, fearless aggression and resolute courage, whose ferocity aroused fear, admiration and reverence amongst the peoples of Anatolia. It was the slayer of Adonis and an attribute of Demeter, goddess of the earth and of fertility. Both these symbols were widely used as coin types throughout Ionia, Lydia, Lykia and the Aegean islands.

85


288. Karia, Myndos AR Hemidrachm. Circa 180-150 BC. Amphyktion, magistrate. Head of young Dionysus right, wearing mitre and ivy wreath / Winged thunderbolt, ΜΥΝΔΙΩΝ above, ΑMΦYKTIΩN below; cornucopiae in exergue. SNG Keckman - ; SNG Cop. -; BMC - ; SNG Aulock -. 2.24g, 14mm, 3mm. Extremely Rare.

300

289. Karia, Knidos AR Drachm. Circa 465-449 BC. Forepart of lion right, jaws open and tongue protruding / Head of Aphrodite right, wearing diadem, earring and necklace; all within an incuse square. Cahn 48, 77 (V38/R456) pl. 6 ; SNG Keckman 129; SNG Kayhan -; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Cop. 235. 6.10g, 16mm, 9h. Very Fine - Good Very Fine.

300

290. Satraps of Karia, Maussolos AR Tetradrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 377-353 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, three quarters facing / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding axe and spear, ΜAYΣΣΩΛΛO to right. SNG München 3; SNG Kayhan 872. Extremely Fine. Lightly double struck on reverse. An exceptionally fine style for this issue, beautifully toned.

3,000

Ex Tkalec Auction, 29 February 2000, lot 150.

Good Style for Hidrieos

291. Satraps of Karia, Hidrieos AR Didrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 351-343 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, three quarters facing / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding axe and spear, E between foot and spear; IDRIEWS to right. Traité II 101 note; SNG Keckman 277; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 2; SNG Kayhan 881; SNG von Aulock 2366. 6.84g, 21mm, 1h. Extremely Fine. Uncommonly good style for Hidrieos.

2,000

292. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Didrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 351-344/43 BC. Laureate head of Apollo three quarters facing / ΙΔPI around starlike floral pattern. SNG Keckmann 279. 0.77g, 10mm, 5h. Rare. Good Fine.

86

200


87


Exceptional Pixodaros Didrachm

293. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Didrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 340-334 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, three quarters facing, drapery at neck / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double-axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre; ΠIΞOΔAPOY to right. Pixodaros 12 (A1/P1); Traité II 111-2; SNG Keckman 280; SNG Copenhagen 596-7. 6.96g, 21mm, 10h. Good Extremely Fine. Excellent metal and superb style.

7,500

From 395 to 334 BC the rulers of Caria were members of the family of Hekatomnos of Mylasa, whose sons Maussolos, Idrieos and Pixodaros all succeeded him in their turn. Pixodaros as the youngest, was the last member of the family to rule Caria, and but for the indignant interference of Philip II of Macedon, would have given the hand of his daughter in marriage to Alexander III. This stunning didrachm, though from dies the product of which are not themselves excessively rare, is here found to be in a condition far surpassing the majority of those of its brothers that have survived to the present day. The coins struck from these dies are of a rare, sculptural quality that is matched by only one other set of dies for the didrachm issues, and one set of tetradrachm dies. The others are, much in common with the coins of his siblings, of a style that is often weak-featured and insipid. Here however, we are presented with a portrait bearing a bold chin, proud cheekbones and strong nose; all of this is cunningly rendered in carefully wrought relief.

294. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Didrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 340-334 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, three quarters facing, drapery at neck / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double-axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre; ΠIΞOΔAPOY to right. Pixodaros 28; SNG von Aulock 2376; SNG München 15. 7.00g,21mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Beautiful iridescent toning.

1,500

295. Satraps of Karia, Pixodaros AR Didrachm. Halikarnassos, circa 340-334 BC. Laureate head of Apollo, three quarters facing / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding axe and spear, ΠIΞOΔAPOY to right. BMC 10; SNG Kayhan 892; CH IX (2002), p. 225, pl. 34, 18a-h. 7.09g, 19mm, 11h. Very Fine.

88

400


296. Karia, Kaunos AR Stater. Circa 410-390 BC. Iris with curved upturned wings in kneeling-running position to left, head turned right, wearing long chiton, holding a kerykeion and a wreath in her outstretched hands / Conical baetyl, Δ and Γ above, all within shallow incuse square. K. Konuk, ‘The Early Coinage of Kaunos’, in: Essays to Price, 212, 109 (O48/R49), pl. 49; SNG von Aulock -; SNG München -; SNG Keckmann -; SNG Kayhan -. 11.74g, 20mm, 12h Rare. Good Very Fine. Attractive style.

1,200

297. Karia, Kaunos AR Drachm. Circa 166-150 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Winged thunderbold, K-AY across, ΜΕΓIΣTOΣ above, star of six rays to right. R.H.J. Ashton, The Hellenistic Hemidrachms of Kaunos, RBN 145 (1999), p. 146, 1 (A1/P1). 3.03g, 15mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

150

From the Pixodaros Hoard of 1978

298. Islands off Karia, Kos AR Tetradrachm. Athamas, magistrate, circa 345-340 BC. Head of bearded Herakles (with features of Maussolos?) right, wearing Nemean lion skin headdress / Veiled head of Demeter (with features of Artemisia?) left, AQAMA to right, KWION below. Ingvaldsen 7a (this coin); Pixodaros 8c (this coin). 15.13g, 23mm, 12h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Struck on a very broad flan, well centred, and with a beautiful old tone.

7,500

From the Pixodarus Hoard of 1978 (CH 9, 421); Ex Leu 91, 10 May 2004, lot 166; Ex CNG XIV, 20 March 1991, lot 169; Ex Leu 45, 26 May 1988, lot 227. It has been suggested that the reverse portrait is that of Artemisia in the guise of Demeter, based on similarities between her features as they appear on the statue of Aretmisia from the Mausoleum, now in the British Museum, and those as they appear on the coinage. If that were the case, then almost certainly the obverse portrait we see would be that of Mausollos himself as Hercules.

299. Islands off Karia, Kos AR Didrachm. Biton, magistrate, circa 345-340 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Veiled head of Demeter left, BITWN to right, KWION below. Pixodaros 27a; SNG Keckman 289; SNG von Aulock 2751-2; SNG Copenhagen 621; Jameson 1545 (this obv. die). 6.98gm 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Superbly toned, with golden iridescence over highly lustrous metal around the devices; even grey tone in fields.

89

3,000


90


300. Islands off Karia, Rhodos. Kamiros AR Stater. Circa 500-480 BC. Fig leaf / Rectangular incuse divided lengthwise by a thick band. BMC 2; SNG Cop. 712; SNG von Aulock 2779. 10.23g, 20mm. Rare. Good Very Fine. Well centred.

1,500

301. Islands off Karia, Rhodos. Rhodos AR Didrachm. Circa 340-316 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud right, ΡOΔION above, bunch of grapes in field left, E below. SNG Keckmann 439(var.); Ashton, RN 30 (1988) Serie 1 A, p. 88, pl. XV 21(var.). 6.93g, 20mm, 12h. Rare. Slightly rusted dies, but otherwise Extremely Fine.

2,000

A Rhodos Didrachm of Outstanding Style Ex Niggeler Collection

302. Islands off Karia, Rhodos. Rhodos AR Didrachm. Circa 304-275 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right, ΡOΔION above, grape cluster and EY to left. Ashton, Rhodian Series 2, pl. XVI, 33; SNG Helsinki 459; BMC Caria p. 233, 35; SNG Copenhagen 729 var. (E-Y flanking stem); SNG von Aulock 2789 var. (same). 6.86g, 18mm, 12h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Ex Walter Niggeler Collection; Ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005; Ex Leu-Münzen und Medaillen (Niggeler I), 4-5 December 1965, lot 416.

10,000

This beautiful coin engraved in masterly style and high relief dates to the period after Demetrius’ siege of Rhodes in 305 BC that aimed to break the Rhodo-Egyptian alliance that controlled trade throughout the Aegean. Demetrius’ ignominious withdrawal left behind a vast quantity of military equipment and provisions, including a 40m, 160 tonne siege tower. The Rhodians sold much of this and used the funds to, among other things, erect the colossal statue of Helios that earned the city eternal fame. Possessed of majestic, handsome features, it is easy to imagine that in this coin we see may see a glimpse of that great Wonder.

303. Islands off Karia, Rhodos. Rhodos AR Didrachm. Mnasimachos, magistrate, circa 250-230 BC. Radiate head of Helios, three-quarters facing / Rose with bud to right, ΜNAΣIMAXOΣ above, P – O below; to left, Athena standing left, helmeted, holding aplustre. BMC 143; SNG Cop. 765; SNG von Aulock 2807(var.); Ashton, RN 30 (1988) p. 89, pl. XVII 59; Ashton, NC 1989, p. 6 note 10 and pl. 5 J (var.). 6.77g, 21mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

91

2,000


304. Islands off Karia, Rhodos AR Tetradrachm. Ameinias, magistrate, circa 229-205 BC. Radiate head of Helios, three-quarters facing / Rose with bud to right, ΡΟΔΙΟΝ above; to left, prow of galley right; ΑΜΕΙΝΙ-ΑΣ across. Ashton 212; SNG Copenhagen 759; SNG Keckman 542; SNG con Aulock 2799. 13.49g, 25mm, 12h. Very Fine.

1,500

LYCIA

305. Lycia, uncertain dynast. AR Stater. Circa 525-475 BC. Forepart of boar running right / Quadripartite incuse punch. SNG von Aulock 4043; SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 367. 9.39g, 23mm. Good Fine.

500

An Interesting Set of Coins of the Lycian League 306

307

306. Lycia, Kadyanda as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials K-A on either side of a kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above, helmet left; all within shallow incuse square. Cf. Troxell, 46 pp., no. 8. 3.15g, 16mm, 10h. Extremely Rare. Only 3 coins of Kadyanda in Troxell. The helmet mintmark is hitherto unknown. Extremely Fine.

200

Kadyanda lies almost equidistant from the upper Xanthus River and the Gulf of Telmessus in the mountains of northwest Lycia. 307. Lycia, Kyaneai as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials K-Y on either side of a kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above, sword in scabbard (with strap) behind shield to left; all within incuse square. Troxell, 54, no. 25. 2.90g, 16mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Troxell records only one specimen (in London, but from different dies). Extremely Fine.

200

Kyaneai lay in Middle Lycia, some few miles inland from the coast between Myra and Phellos on a table mountain.

308

309

308. Lycia, Limyra as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials Λ-Ι on either side of a kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above, helmet to left; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 59, no. 36. 2.96g, 15mm, 12h. Rare. Troxell lists only 5 examples with the helmet mintmark, but this reverse die is new.

200

Limyra was the most important city of Eastern Lycia. It was located on the coast near the mouth of the Limyrus river. 309. Lycia, Myra as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials M-Y on either side of a kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above, winged caduceus to left; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 58, no. 34. 3.01g, 15mm, 11h. Rare. Troxell lists only 7 plinthophoric drachms of Myra with the winged caduceus mintmark. Good Very Fine. Myra was located in Middle Lycia at the mouth of the river Myros; it was one of the six largest cities of Lycia. In Late Antiquity it came to prominence as the bishopric of St. Nicholas.

92

200


310

311

310. Lycia, Olympos AR Drachm. Circa 167-81 BC. Pseudo-League coinage. Laureate head of Apollo right / Kithara, OΛVΜΠΗ above, palm branch to left, trophy to right, all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 64, no. 45. 2.84g, 15mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine.

200

Olympos (as well as its neighbour Phaselis) in Eastern Lycia minted coins similar to the League coinage, though not on behalf of the League: on the reverse we read the abbreviated name of the Olympe(noi) in place of that of the Lycians, suggesting that at this time Olympos was economically well connected to the League but not a member of it. 311. Lycia, Patara as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. Circa 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / City initials Π-Α on either side of kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 59, no. 36. 2.52g, 14mm, 1h. Rare; Troxell lists only 3 plinthophoric drachms of Patara without mintmark. Extremely Fine.

200

Patara was an important city of Lycia, possessing an oracle of Apollo and a good harbour, now silted up.

312

313

312. Lycia, Pinara as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. Circa 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials Π-Ι on either side of kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 45, no. 7. Extremely Rare; only 2 drachms of Pinara were known to Troxell. Good Very Fine.

200

This reverse die is new, whereas the obverse die is linked to no. 7.2. Pinara is located in the middle Xanthos valley and is today one of the most impressive sites of ancient Lycia. 313. Lycia, Rhodiapolis as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. Circa 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials P-O on either side of a kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above, unidentified object (a lance?) to left; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 62, no. 40. 2.76g, 14mm, 1h. Rare. Troxell lists 18 examples, most of them housed in museums. Extremely Fine.

200

Rhodiapolis was a town 4 km to the north of the modern Turkish district capital Kumluca. Scholars suppose that it was originally founded by Rhodian colonists. The minting of these plinthophoric drachms started after the liberation of Lycia from Rhodian rule and was continued until the Mithridatic war.

314

315

314. Lycia, Rhodiapolis as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. Circa 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials P-O on either side of a kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above, unidentified object (a lance?) to right; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell, 62, np. 40, 1a. 2.93g, 17mm, 12h. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

200

Troxell identified only one specimen, which was housed in London and struck from these same dies. 315. Lycia, Xanthos as a member of the Lycian League AR Drachm. Circa 167-81 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver over shoulder / City initials Ξ-Α on either side of kithara, ΛVKIΩΝ above; all within shallow incuse square. Troxell 41, 5. 3.64g, 16mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

200

Xanthos was the capital of Lycia with a strong acropolis beside the river Xanthos. The city controlled the federal sanctuary of the Lycian League, the Letoon.

CILICIA

316. Cilicia, Satraps. Autophradates AR Stater. Soloi or Mallos, circa 365-361 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin around neck / Head of satrap right, wearing Persian headdress. SNG Levante 153; cf. Winzer 10.4 (Tiribazos). 10.21g, 21mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

93

1,000


94


In Imitation of Kimon

317. Cilicia, Satraps. Datames AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 378-372 BC. Facing female head turned slightly left (in imitation of the famous facing head of Arethusa on Kimon’s Syracusan Tetradrachm) / Bearded male head (Ares?) right, wearing crested helmet, Aramaic ‘Datames’ before (SNG Levante 79; SNG France 260), 10.75g, 23mm, 2h. Good Extremely Fine.

5,000

So great was the admiration throughout the ancient world for Kimon’s famous facing-head tetradrachm, that many contemporary engravers attempted, with varying degrees of success, to emulate his work. The most numerous of these Kimon-inspired coins were struck at Larissa, though other cities such as Tarsos also experimented with the concept. This beautiful stater of Tarsos goes some way to capturing the nuances of Kimon’s style, while retaining a distincly ‘eastern’ flavour. Iridescent tones in and around the full bordered-design highlight the portrait beautifully.

318. Cilicia, Satraps. Mazaios AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios; monogram below. SNG Levante 106 (these dies). 10.65g, 23mm, 7h. Good Extremely Fine. Well detailed and struck on a broad flan.

2,000

319. Cilicia, Satraps. Mazaios AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes in right hand, lotus-headed sceptre in left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below seat / Lion attacking a bull to left, Aramaic legend above ‘MZDI’ = Mazaios. SNG France 2, 335; SNG Levante 100ff. 11.02g, 25mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Well detailed and struck on a broad flan.

1,000

320. Cilicia, Satraps. Mazaios AR Stater. Tarsos, circa 361-334 BC. Baaltars seated left, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle, ear of corn and bunch of grapes to left, Aramaic legend ‘BLTRZ’ = Baaltars, to right, Aramaic letters on left and below the seat / Lion to left, pouncing on back of bull to right, two rows of crenellated walls, each with four towers, below, Aramaic legend around ‘MZDI ZI’L’BRNH RAWHLK’ = Mazaios Governor of Transeuphrates and Cilicia. SNG France 2, 355; SNG Levante 113; SNG von Aulock -. 10.58g, 25mm, 6h. Scarce. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

95

1,250


321. Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater. Circa 400-380 BC. Draped Aphrodite seated left on throne, holding phiale in her outstretched right hand; Eros flying left holding wreath, to crown her / ΝAΓIΔEΩN, Dionysos standing left, holding thyrsos and bunch of grapes with tendrils; letter or symbol above and Θ below to left. Cf. BMC Cilicia 111 no. 12; cf. W. Leschhorn, Lexicon of Greek Coin Inscriptions, Wien 2009, 1043 (magistrate name apparently unlisted). 10.15g, 25mm, 8h. Very Rare - apparently unlisted magistrate. Near Very Fine.

500

322. Cilicia, Kelenderis AR Hemiobol. Persic standard. Circa 425-400 BC. Gorgoneion of archaic style / Forepart of winged Pegasos right, row of pellets on wing; all within shallow incuse square. BN 112-4; SNG Levante 247 var. (rev. type right); SNG Copenhagen 80 var. (same); SNG von Aulock 5616 var. (same). 0.36g, 6mm, 10h. Rare. Good Very Fine.

100

323. Cilicia, Soloi AR Stater. Circa 400-350 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet adorned with griffin on bowl / Bunch of grape on stalk with two tendrils and vine leaves; ΣΟΛION and crescent below. BMC Cilicia, 147, no. 19. 9.87g, 21mm, 6h. Rare with this legend. Very Fine.

750

324. Cilicia, Mallos AR Stater. Circa 425-385 BC. Beardless male winged figure in kneeling-running stance right, holding disc with star in both hands; ΜAΛP behind / Swan standing left, dolphin swimming upwards before, MAP and ‘ankh’ behind. SNG Copenhagen 164; SNG France 2, 378; SNG Levante 124. 10.44g, 23mm, 12h. Good Fine.

750

BITHYNIA

325. Bithynia, Herakleia Pontika AR Drachm. Circa 415-364 BC. Head of Herakles left, wearing lion skin headdress / ΗPAK-ΛEIA, bull charging left within round incuse, in field right monogram. SNG von Aulock 350(var.); SNG Copenhagen 405(var.). 5.29g, 18mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine. Ex Hirsch 179, 21 September 1993, lot 343.

96

2,000


PISIDIA

326. Pisidia, Selge AR Stater. Circa 325-250 BC. Two wrestlers grappling, AL between / Slinger standing right; triskeles and club in right field, SELGEWN to left. SNG France -; SNG Von Aulock -; Weber 7424. 10.82g, 25mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine, attractive iridescenct toning.

1,500

PHRYGIA Beautiful Drachm of Kibyra

327. Phrygia, Kibyra AR Drachm. Circa 166-84 BC. Young male head right, wearing crested helmet / Helmeted and cuirassed horseman galloping right, wielding spear and shield; M and KIBURATWN below. SNG von Aulock 3709; SNG Copenhagen 267. 2.89g, 12mm, 12h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

Struck in fine style and remarkably well preserved. One of the finest known. Ex Giessener Münzhandlung 46, 30 October 1989, lot 303.

PONTOS

328. Kings of Pontos. Mithradates VI Eupator AR Tetradrachm. Circa 86-85 BC. Diademed head of Mithradates VI right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΙΘΡΑΔΑΤΟΥ ΕΥΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ, Pegasos standing left, star within crescent in field left, date ΒIΣ to right, month E (Year 212, month 5) in exergue; all within ivy wreath. Callataÿ D66-R1a. 16.51g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine.

500

PHOENICIA

329. Phoenicia, Tyre AR 1/24 Shekel. Circa 390-377 BC. Dolphin swimming right / Owl standing right, head facing, crook and flail over shoulder. Betlyon 15; SNG Copenhagen -. 0.43g, 8mm, 5h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

97

200


Unusually Complete

330. Phoenicia, Sidon AR Dishekel. Time of Baalshallim I, circa 425-402 BC. Galley left in front of city walls of Sidon, five towers visible; two pouncing lions in exergue / King of Persia and driver in chariot drawn by two galloping horses left, incuse goat running left below. Elayi & Elayi 195 (D2/R2); Betlyon 7; SNG Copenhagen 191. 28.48g, 33mm, 12h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Unusually well preserved and detailed for the type.

5,000

331. Phoenicia, Byblos. Ainel AR 1/16 Stater. Circa 333 BC. Galley left, containing two hoplites with helmets and round shields, hippocamp below left / Lion attacking bull left, Phoenician inscription above. BMC 8-9, pl. XII, 2 (reverse). 0.69g, 11mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

332. Phoenicia, Arados AR Drachm. Circa 174–110 BC. Bee with straight wings, seen from above, monograms to left and right / Stag standing right in front of palm tree, ΑPAΔIΩN to right. BMC 150-151. 4.16g, 19mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

JUDAEA Extremely Rare Year 37 of Herod Philip

333. Judaea, Herodians. Herod IV Philip Æ11. Caesarea Philippi (Panias) mint. Dated CY 37 (AD 33/4). Bare head of Herod Philip right / L ΛZ within wreath. Hendin 1235. 1.56g, 11mm, 12h. Extremely Rare, possibly Unique. Very Fine. Green-brown patina. Earthen repatination.

5,000

Ex J.S. Wagner Collection. This coin was incorrectly described as Hendin 1232 in the Wagner collection, which would have made it year 34 (LΛΔ), but it is clearly (LΛZ ) year 37. This is also probably the first known example to display a retrograde Z. Herod Philip was the first Jewish ruler to place his own portrait on coins. Hendin (p. 257) notes: “Philip was able to immortalise his face on his coins largely because so few Jews lived in the territories over which he ruled. Jews would have taken this act as an insult and violation of the Mosaic Law against graven images.”

98


334. Syria, Chalkis. Herod V (Herod of Chalkis) Æ25. Dated RY 3 (AD 43/4). Diademed head of Herod of Chalkis right / KΛAVΔI-Ω KAIΣAPIΣEBAΣ-TΩETT in four lines within linear circle; all within wreath. RPC I 4778.5 (this coin); Meshorer TJC 362 (this rev. die); Hendin 1252; 13.01g, 25mm, 12h. Extremely Rare. Good Fine. Pleasant dark patina; earthen repatination.

5,500

Ex J.S. Wagner Collection. Continued Herodian support for the Romans allowed the dynasty to extend its influence beyond Jewish territories. Herod V, the grandson of Herod the Great, was granted the kingdom of Chalkis by Claudius in 41 upon the request of Agrippa I, and all of his rare coins name the emperor. His friendship with and loyalty to the emperor continued to benefit him; following the death of Agrippa in 44, Claudius extended to him authority over affairs at the Temple in Jerusalem, a right he retained until his death some four years later.

335. Judaea, First Jewish War. AR Shekel. Dated year 2 (AD 67/68). Hebrew script (SHKL YSHRAL) “Shekel of Israel”, and date (SH B) = year two above Omer cup with beaded rim / Hebrew script ( YROSHLM H GDSHEH) “Jerusalem the Holy”, sprig of three pomegranates. Meshorer AJC II p. 260, 8; Hendin 1358. 14.15g, 23mm, 11h. Good Very Fine. Beautifully toned.

2,500

336. Judaea, Jewish War AR Shekel. Dated year 3 (AD 68/9). Hebrew script (SHKL YSHRAL) “Shekel of Israel”, and date above Omer cup with beaded rim / Hebrew script ( YROSHLM H GDSHEH) “Jerusalem the Holy”, sprig of three pomegranates. Meshorer TJC 202; AJC 18; Hendin 1361; Kadman 20; Bromberg 68–70. 14.24g, 22mm, 11h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

3,000

337. Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt AR Sela Tetradrachm. Undated year 3 (AD 134/5). Hebrew script (SHMO’N) = Simon, Temple facade, the Ark of the Covenant within; star above / Hebrew script (LHROT YROSHLM) = for the freedom of Jerusalem, Lulav, no etrog. Mildenberg 58 (O13/R44); Meshorer TJC 270; Hendin 1412. 14.25g, 25mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Nicely toned. Overstruck on an earlier tetradrachm.

99

3,000


100


EGYPT

Unpublished Stater of Ptolemy as Satrap

338. Ptolemaic Egypt. Ptolemy, as satrap, AV Stater. In the name and types of Alexander III. Memphis or Alexandria, circa 323-310 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet adorned with twice-coiled serpent on the bowl, pendant earring and pearl necklace / Nike standing left with wings spread, holding laurel wreath in her right hand and stylis in her left; ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔPOY to right; no symbols or monograms. Cf. Price 3991 (uncertain eastern mint); cf. also Price 3968 and 3982 (Memphis and Alexandria, this helmet symbol). 8.62g, 19mm, 11h. Apparently Unique and Unpublished. Lightly double struck; Fleur De Coin.

10,000

The stylistic device employed on the bowl of Athena’s helmet is unusual in that we see the coiled serpent, an oft-used symbol on the staters of Alexander, but twice coiled rather than simply once, as is normal. This double-coiled serpent only seems to appear on the Egyptian issues 3968 and 3982 that Price attributes to Memphis and Alexandria respectively, which may be separated in time by as much as twenty years. Price 3968 was amongst the earliest issues of Alexander struck between 332-323 BC, a series that is sometimes inexplicably attributed to Ptolemy by some dealers, though in fact at this time it was Kleomenes who was entrusted with the guardianship of Egypt and the construction of the city of Alexandria. Ptolemy only gained the satrapy after Alexander’s death in 323 BC, and probably left the minting facilities in Memphis for a time, since Ptolemy himself set up his court at Memphis, one of Egypt’s old royal cities, and did not move it to Alexandria until around 312 BC. The mint was almost certainly located with the court and would have moved to Alexandria at the same time as Ptolemy. This coin displays a refinement of style not seen in the early Egyptian staters in the name of Alexander; indeed, it is so unlike the earliest staters (Price 3961-3966) in the manner of both Athena and Nike’s depiction, that is must be placed later in the series (Price 3969-3982), which from 3973 onwards are attributed to Ptolemy after 323 BC, and from 3980 onwards, to the Alexandria mint. The highly artistic engraving of Nike deserves special mention, as unlike the vast majority of staters in the name of Alexander, this piece shows us a composition rich in feminine charm, with intricate and delicate features throughout - Nike’s face is exceptionally well detailed, her wings likewise, and she clasps the laurel wreath delicately between thumb and index finger as she gazes reverentially at it. One of the most beautiful of all the staters ever struck in the name of Alexander.

101


102


339. Ptolemaic Egypt. Ptolemy, as satrap. In the name and types of Alexander III. Memphis, circa 323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, drapery about legs and waist, holding sceptre and eagle; ALEXANDROU to left, rose before, moneyer’s signature DI-O beneath. Price 3971. 17.23g, 28mm, 11h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

3,000

Alexander tetradrachms marked with the rose symbol and the letters DIO have long been admired as one of the most beautiful issues of his coinage. They were struck in Egypt, probably not long after Alexander’s death on 10 June 323 BC. Without Alexander’s leadership, and with no clear or legitimate heir to the vast empire he had created, Alexander’s generals fought amongst themselves and fractured the empire, dividing it into satrapies which they nominally managed on behalf of Alexander’s successor, his feeble-minded half-brother Philip Arrhidaeus. Ptolemy took Egypt, recognising its great potential. He initially retained Cleomenes, the caretaker Alexander had left in place in Egypt, as his deputy, though subsequently removed him on account of his many excesses and mismanagements, and appropriated the 8,000 talents Cleomenes had accumulated in his treasury. A part of this treasure was turned into new coin, like the present piece, and used to fund Ptolemy’s military ambitions.

340. Ptolemaic Egypt. Arsinoë II, wife of Ptolemy II AV Oktadrachm. Alexandria, circa 253-246 BC. Veiled head right, wearing stephane, lotus sceptre behind, horn of Ammon below ear; K behind / Double cornucopiae bound with fillet, ARSINOHS FILADELFOU around. Svoronos 475; Troxell, Arsinoe, group 3, pl. 7, 3 (this obv. die); SNG Copenhagen -; Boston MFA 2268. 27.74g, 28mm, 12h. Good Very Fine. Beautiful deep red toning.

7,000

341. Ptolemaic Egypt. Ptolemy III Euergetes AV Oktadrachm. Alexandria, circa 221-205 BC, under Ptolemy IV. Bust of the deified Ptolemy III right, wearing radiate diadem and aegis; trident over left shoulder, middle prong ending in lotus finial / Radiate and filleted cornucopia, ΔI below; BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY around. Svoronos 1117; SNG Copenhagen 196; Noeske 137; Boston MFA 2283; Kraay & Hirmer 803. 27.80g, 27mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine

8,000

The complex identification of Ptolemy–Helios-Poseidon-Zeus on Ptolemy III’s posthumous coin portraits show the king with radiate diadem, trident-sceptre, and chlamys-shaped aegis. The king retains his own character and features, while the attributes express various divine powers, without the image actually having to define the nature of his relationship with the gods. Here the attributes are most clearly royal-divine, rather than simply divine, because each is formally adapted on its nearest analogue among the purely royal insignia: aegis-chlamys, trident-sceptre, radiate crown-diadem. The gold oktadrachms honouring Ptolemy III are among the most remarkable of all the series of Ptolemaic coinage.

103


PERSIA

342. Persia, Achaemenid Kings AV Daric. Time of Darius I to Xerxes II, circa 485-420 BC. Great King with kidaris and kandys in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Oblong incuse punch. BMC 40 pl. XXIV, 24. 8.33g, 16mm. Good Very Fine.

1,000

343. Persia, Achaemenid Kings AV Daric. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II, circa 420-375 BC. Great King with kidaris and kandys in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow, and apple-tipped spear over right shoulder with point downwards, quiver at left shoulder / Oblong incuse punch. BMC 43 pl. XXIV, 26. 8.33g, 17mm. Good Very Fine.

1,000

Ex Sotheby’s Zurich, 27 October 1993, lot 742.

344. Persia, Achaemenid Kings AR Siglos. Circa 375-440 BC. Great King with kidaris and kandys in kneeling-running attitude on exergual line to right, holding strung bow and short dagger (akinakes) with arrowshaped blade, three annulets on breast of kandys / Oblong incuse punch. BMC 176 pl. XXVII, 19. 5.60g, 15mm. Near Extremely Fine.

500

Very Rare Stater of Peithon as Satrap

345. Persia, Alexandrine Empire. Peithon, as satrap, AV Stater. In the name and types of Alexander. Babylon, circa 315-311 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet adorned with serpent on the bowl, pendant earring and pearl necklace / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, wings spread, holding laurel wreath [MYP monogram within] and stylis; H to left. Price 3703. 8.56g, 20mm, 1h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan; wonderfully lustrous metal with dark reddish tone.

4,000

The son of a Macedonian nobleman, we learn from Arrian in his ‘Anabasis’ that Peithon was a successful commander in Alexander’s army, and following the campaign against the Mallians was appointed Satrap of the Indus in 325 BC (Anabasis, VI, 15, 1), a position confirmed to him after the death of Alexander at the Partition of Babylon. Left to command the rearguard of the army after Alexander moved on, Peithon was dispatched to quell an uprising led by King Musicanos at the head of the Indus: Peithon captured the rebel king and sent him to Alexander. After the death of Alexander the sources are unclear as to what happened in the Indus, but there is the suggestion that Peithon also became Satrap of Punjab. Leaving to travel west in 316, Peithon was appointed satrap of Babylon by Antigonos, joining his forces in the fight against Kassander and Ptolemy in 314. He was killed at the Battle of Gaza in 312, when the forces of Antigonos under Demetrios were defeated by Ptolemy.

104


346. Persia, Alexandrine Empire. Peithon, as satrap, AV Stater. In the name and types of Alexander. Babylon, circa 315-311 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet adorned with serpent on the bowl, pendant earring and pearl necklace / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike standing left, wings spread, holding, wreath and stylis; MYP monogram within wreath below, HP monogram to left. Price 3716 var. (sphinx, not serpent on helmet). 8.56g, 20mm, 1h. Very Rare. Fleur De Coin. Engraved in fine style; highly lustrous metal.

4,000

A very rare stater of Peithon as satrap, a type of which only six examples have been offered for sale in the past decade.

SYRIA

Early Stater of Seleukos

347. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator, as satrap, AV Stater. Babylon, circa 311-305 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin / Nike alighting left, holding wreath and stylis, BASILEWS to left, ALEXANDROU to right; H and MYP monogram within wreath in left field. Price -, cf. 3749 (MI instead of H). 8.54g, 17mm, 5h. Rare, this variety not listed by Price. Extremely Fine.

3,000

Privately purchased from Spink, 30 June 1965. After Ptolemy’s victory over Demetrios, son of Antigonos, at the Battle of Gaza in 312 BC, in which it is probable that Seleukos took a leading role, and during which Peithon (see above lots) was killed, Seleukos seized the opportunity to return to Babylon from whence he had fled some three years earlier, fearing the wrath of Antigonos, one of whose officers he had punished without seeking permission. Ptolemy provided Seleukos with 800 infantry and 200 cavalry. During his march Seleukos recruited additional levies from the colonies he passed, and arrived at Babylon with around 3000 soldiers under his banner. Peithon’s commander in Babylon Diphilus barricaded himself inside the ciy’s fortress, though this was quickly conquered, giving Seleukos complete control of Babylon. His return to Babylon was thereafter officially regarded as the birth of the Seleukid Empire, and that year, 311 BC, as being the first of the Seleukid Era dating system.

348. Seleukid Kingdom. Seleukos I Nikator AR Tetradrachm. Susa, circa 305-295 BC. Head of Seleukos/Alexander right, wearing Attic helmet covered in panther skin and ornamented with bull’s horns and ears / BASILEWS SELEUKOU, Nike standing right, erecting trophy consisting of cuirass, helmet, shield and greaves set on pole, Boiotian shield between, I-E and monogram in outer fields. SC 173.1; Hoover 20; 17.05g. 28mm, 11h. Extremely Fine. A bold portrait of fine style, and a well detailed and preserved reverse for the type.

5,000

The trophy series of Seleukos was issued over an extended period, and used 67 obverse dies and at least 93 reverses that we are aware of. The type commemorates the victories of Seleukos as he pushed eastwards into India, occupying territory as far as the Indus, and eventually waging war against the Mauryan Empire. This campaign against Chandragupta Maurya was however a failure. While there is no record of what transpired to prevent Seleukos achieving his aims, the two leaders eventually reached an accord whereby Seleukos ceded some of his easternmost territory in exchange for a gift of 500 war elephants. The massive beasts were to play a significant role in the coming wars of the Diadochi, in particular at the Battle of Ipsos in 301 BC.

105


349. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, circa 112-110 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right, diadem ends falling straight behind; all within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, monograms in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2302. 16.53g, 30mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

350

1,000

351

350. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, M in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2335. 16.68g, 31mm, 1h. Very Fine.

500

351. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Grypos AR Tetradrachm. Ake-Ptolemais, circa 121-113 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos right within fillet border / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑNTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Zeus Ouranios, draped, standing facing, head to left, holding star in outstretched hand and long sceptre, crescent above, monogram in field; all within laurel wreath border. SC 2336, 2. 16.91g, 30mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

BAKTRIA

352. Baktria, Demetrios I AR Tetradrachm. Circa 200-190 BC. Head of Demetrios right, wearing elephant skin headdress and diadem / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ – ΔHMETPIOY, Herakles standing facing, crowning himself with right hand, holding lion skin and club, monogram to left. Mitchiner I, Type 103; Bopearachchi 164 ser. 1F. 16.92g, 32mm, 12h. Very Fine.

106

2,000


107


The Finest Known

353. Baktria, Agathokles AR Tetradrachm. Circa 190-180 BC. Diademed bust of Agathokles right / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑΓAΘOKΛEOYΣ, Zeus standing facing, holding long sceptre in left hand and statuette of Hecate with two torches in right; monogram to left. Mitchiner I, 77, Type 137; O. Bopearachchi, Monnaies Gréco-Bactriennes et Indo-Grecques, 1991, 172 no. 1. 16.84g, 30mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin.

15,000

Struck in superb high relief on a broad flan, and displaying a near complete border. Beautifully lustrous metal with a medallic appearance.

354. Baktria, Agathokles AR Tetradrachm. Circa 190-180 BC. Diademed bust of Agathokles right / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ ΑΓAΘOKΛEOYΣ, Zeus standing facing, holding long sceptre in left hand and statuette of Hecate with two torches in right; monogram to left. Mitchiner I, 77, Type 137; Bopearachchi, 172, 1. 17.00g, 31mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin.

3,000

Medallic Flan

355. Baktria, Eukratides ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 170-145 BC. Helmeted and diademed bust of Eukratides right / ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATIΔOY, The Dioskouroi with palms and spears on horseback right, monogram to right. Mitchiner I, Type 177ee; Bopearachchi 203 ser. 6E. 16.99g, 36mm, 12h. Mint State. Struck on a massive flan of medallic proportions; well centred with full borders.

108

3,000


109


356. Baktria, Eukratides I ‘The Great’ AR Tetradrachm. Circa 170-145 BC, Attic tetradrachm. Diademed bust of king right / The dioskuroi with palms and spears on horseback right, ΒAΣΙΛEΩΣ above, EYKPATIΔOY below, monogram to right, D to left. Mitchiner I, Type 168c; Bopearrachchi 199 ser 1F. 16.91g, 31mm, 1h. Circulation marks, otherwise Extremely Fine. Very well preserved reverse detail.

3,000

PARTHIA Exceptional Orodes I Tetradrachm

357. Parthian Kings. Orodes I AR Tetradrachm. Seleukia, circa 90-80 BC. Bust of Orodes I left, wearing diadem and richly decorated mantle / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΘΕΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΕΥΣΗΒΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ, Archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow, monogram above. Petrowicz Coll. 6 (Phraates II); Sellwod 30, 7 (unknown king); Shore 130. 16,06g, 31mm, 1h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine. Beautifully toned.

25,000

Ex Peus 376, 29 Octobre 2003, lot 635.

358. Sasanian Kings. Ardashir I AR Drachm. Ctesiphon, circa AD 224-240. Bust of Ardashir I right, wearing investiture crown / Fire altar with fluted shaft adorned with diadems; no attendants. SNS Type V(4a)/3c(2c), A31 = Göbl type IV/2; Paruck -; Saeedi -. 4.39g, 25mm, 3h. Very Rare. Good Fine.

110

1,000


359. Sasanian Kings. Shapur I AR Drachm. Ctesiphon, circa AD 240-244. Bust of Shapur I right, wearing diadem and decorated tiara terminating in eagle head / Fire altar flanked by two attendants wearing diadems and mural crowns; pellet to left of altar shaft. SNS type Ib/1a, style A; Gรถbl type IV/1; Paruck 97; Saeedi 77-8. 4.26g, 26mm, 9h. Extremely Rare. Good Fine.

8,000

360. Sasanian Kings. Azarmidokht AR Drachm. WYHC (Weh-az-Amid-Kavad) mint, AD 631. Bust of Khosrau II right, wearing mural crown with frontal crescent, two wings, and star set on crescent; star-in-crescents in border / Two attendants flanking fire altar with ribbons; star and crescent flanking flames; star-in-crescents in border. Gรถbl -; Mochiri 505; Saeedi -. 4.09g, 33mm, 2h. Extremely Rare. Good metal; Near Extremely Fine.

8,000

361. Sasanian Kings. Ardashir III, AR Drachm. AD 628-630. Bust of Ardashir III right wearing winged diadem decorated with crescent and korymbos / Two attendants beside fire altar. SNS, Israel, no. 161, pl. 11. Gรถbl type I/1; Mochiri 699; Paruck -; Saeedi -. 4.19g, 33mm, 3h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Sound Metal.

111

500


112


THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

362. Anonymous AR Didrachm. 234-231 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Horse prancing left, ROMA above. Crawford 26/1; Sydenham 27. 6.66g, 19mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine. Iridescent toning.

8,000

After the victory over the Samnites, the Senate instated a new, standardised monetary system. For the first two decades, bronze bars were the predominant issues, after which point silver coinage began to appear. This type is from what H. Mattingly describes as ‘Mint D’ which he locates either at Apulia or Beneventum. The legend on the older design (struck from 269 BC onwards) was ROMANO which had been shortened to ROMA by the time this type was struck, however the significance of this is unclear. Showing distinct Greek influence, this is a fine example of early Roman silver coinage. Cf. Mattingly, H, The First Age of Roman Coinage, The Journal of Roman Studies 35, Parts 1 and 2 (1945), pp. 65-77. Ex Tkalec Auction, 28 October 1994, lot 144.

363. Anonymous Æ Uncia. Rome, 217-215 BC. Facing, draped bust of Sol, pellet to left / Crescent, two stars, and pellet above; ROMA below. Crawford 39/4; Sydenham 96. 16.10g, 25mm, 6h. About Very Fine.

364

300

365

364. Anonymous Æ Sextans. Sicily, 214-212 BC. Head of Mercury right, two pellets above / Prow right, ROMA and corn-ear above, two pellets below. Crawford 42/3; Sydenham -. 14.64g, 26mm, 6h. Very Fine.

300

365. Anonymous Æ Sextans. Rome, after 211 BC. Head of Mercury right, two pellets above / Prow right, ROMA above, two pellets below. Crawford 56/6; Sydenham 143d. 8.48g, 27mm, 9h. Near Extremely Fine.

366

300

367

366. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, after 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri riding right, stars above, ROMA in ex. RSC 3; Crawford 48/1. 2.19g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

300

367. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, after 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri riding right, stars above, ROMA in ex. RSC 3; Crawford 48/1. 2.31g, 16mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

113

300


368. Anonymous AR Quinarius. Rome, after 211 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, V behind / The Dioscuri riding right, stars above, ROMA in linear frame below. Crawford 45/2; Sydenham -. 2.25g,16mm, 3h. Extremely Fine.

350

369. S. Afranius AR Denarius. Rome, 150 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind / Victory in biga right, SAFRA below horses, ROMA in in linear frame below. Afrania 1; Crawford 206/1; Sydenham 308. 3.95g, 19mm, 2h. Extremely Fine. Lightly toned.

250

370. M. Atilius Saranus AR Denarius. Rome, 148 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, SARAN ligate behind, X below chin / The Dioscuri riding right, M. ATILI below horses, ROMA in ex. Atilia 8; Crawford 214/1c. 3.87g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

300

A Superb Denarius of Q. Marcius Libo

371. Q. Marcius Libo AR Denarius. Rome, 148 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right. X below chin, LIBO behind / The Dioscuri riding right, Q. MARC below horses, ROMA in linear frame below. Marcia 1; Crawford 215/1; Sydenham 395. 3.88g, 21mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin. Struck on a broad flan and with a lovely golden tone.

2,000

In Greek mythology, The Dioscuri were the twin sons of Leda, wife of King Tyndaris of Sparta. They were honoured on Roman coinage for their legenday assistance in the fight against the Latins and Tarquinus Superbus at the Battle of Lake Regillus, where they were seen mounted and fighting at the head of the legions.

372. M. Baebius Q. f. Tampilus AR Denarius. Rome, 137 BC. Helmeted head of Roma left, X below chin, TAMPIL behind / Apollo in quadriga right, holding bow, arrow, and branch, ROMA below horses, M. BAEBI Q. F in ex. Baebia 12; Crawford 236/1c; Sydenham 489. 3.99g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

114

300


373. M. Marcius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, star below chin, modius behind / Victory in biga right, M. MARC ROMA in two lines below horses, divided by two ears of corn. Marcia 8; Crawford 245/1; Sydenham 500. 3.99g, 19mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

400

This moneyer was the son of Mn. Marcius, who during his aedileship in 154 BC, was the first to distribute corn to the people at one As per modius.

374. C. Aburius Geminus AR Denarius. Rome, 134 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, GEM behind, XVI monogram below chin / Mars in quadriga right, C. ABVRI below horses, ROMA in ex. Aburia 6; Crawford 250/10; Sydenham 487. 3.87g, 19mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractively toned; lustrous.

400

375. P. Maenius Antiaticus AR Denarius. Rome, 132 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram behind / Victory in quadriga right, P MAE ANT ligate below horses, ROMA in ex. Maenia 7; Crawford 249/1; Sydenham 492. 3.97g, 20mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful lustre.

400

376. M. Acilius M. f. AR Denarius. Rome, 130 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, M. ACILIVS M. F around within two dotted lines / Hercules, holding trophy and club, walking right in quadriga, ROMA in ex. Acilia 4; Crawford 255/1; Sydenham 511. 3.92g, 20mm, 9h. Extremely Fine. Attractive golden toning; highly lustrous.

600

377. Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus AR Denarius. Rome, 128 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram below chin, corn-ear behind / Victory in biga right, ROMA above, man spearing a lion below, CN. DOM in ex. Domitia 14; Crawford 261/1; Sydenham 514. 3.91g, 19mm, 3h. Good Extremely Fine.

115

400


An Attractive Denarius of T. Didius

378. T. Didius AR Denarius. Rome, 113-112 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, XVI monogram below, monogram of ROMA behind / Two soldiers fighting, one attacking with a whip, the other defending with a sword, T. DEIDI in ex. Didia 2; Crawford 294/1; Sydenham 550. 3.94g, 20mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. A superb example of this type, struck on a broad flan.

1,000

Babelon suggests that the reverse type refers to the moneyer’s ancestor T. Didius, who was sent to Sicily in 138 BC to quash a slave result that was ultimately the precursor to the first of the three Servile Wars. Crawford disagrees, suggesting that the reverse depicts a scene one would expect to witness at the games T. Didius promised to put on during his time as aedile, making this issue an example of electoral propaganda.

Exceptional M. Herennius Denarius

379. M. Herennius AR Denarius. Rome, 108-107 BC. Head of Pietas right, PIETAS behind / Amphinomus, walking right, carrying his father Nisos, X in right field, M. HERENNI behind. Herennia 1a; Crawford 308/1b; Sydenham 567a. 4.10g, 18mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin.

2,000

There are two possible interpretations of this reverse design, each with merit. The first is that the moneyer M. Herennius, who perhaps had a connection with Sicily, chose to illustrate a local example of Piety: the brothers Amphinomus and Anapias, who are supposed to have saved their parents from an eruption of Mt Etna by carrying them from danger on their shoulders. The second interpretation reaches back to the mythological founding of Rome; Aeneas, during the fall of Troy, carried his father Anchises from the burning ruins of the city. Romulus and Remus, the founders of the city of Rome, through their descendence from him, made Aeneas progenitor of the Roman people. Long before Virgil makes reference to ‘pious Aeneas’ in his Aeneid, the Roman concept of piety was threefold; duty to the gods, to one’s homeland and to one’s family, which neatly links the reverse type with the obverse on this coin.

380. L. Thorius Balbus AR Denarius. Rome, 105 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right wearing goat’s skin, I. S. M. R. (IVNO SISPES MATER REGINA) behind / Bull charging right, X above, L. THORIVS below, BALBVS in ex. Thoria 1; Crawford 316/1; Sydenham 598. 4.00g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces, blue toning on obverse.

400

This moneyer was from Lanuvium, where there was a cult of Juno Sospita. Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was no pleasure, no matter how rare, that he did not enjoy. The charging bull is a punning allusion to the moneyer’s name.

381. L. Manlius and L. Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Sulla, 82 BC. Helmeted head of Roma right, L. MANLI before, PRO. Q behind / Sulla in quadriga right, L. SVLLA IM in ex. Manlia 4; Crawford 367/5; Sydenham 757. 4.02g, 17mm, 7h. Near Extremely Fine. Iridescent toning.

400

We learn from Plutarch that L. Manlius Torquatus was one of Sulla’s generals. This type was struck during Sulla’s political campaign to be elected dictator, following his return to Rome after his victory against Mithridates. Prior to the Mithridatic Wars, L. Manlius Torquatus had been Sulla’s quaestor - a post he had resigned to assume his military role; hence on this issue he is proquaestor.

116


382. C.Valerius Flaccus AR Denarius. Massalia, 82 BC. Bust of Victory right, wreath behind / Legionary eagle between two standards inscribed H and P, C. VAL. FLA behind, IMPERAT before, EX S.C below. Valeria 12; Crawford 365/1a; Sydenham 747a. 3.75g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. A very good example of this type.

500

This type is one of the earliest denarii struck outside of Rome; the earliest being that of Sulla, which was probably struck in Greece (Crawford 359). Valerius Flaccus was an ally of Sulla, and Pro-Consul in Gaul where this coin was minted. In 86 BC Valerius Flaccus was made governor of transalpine Gaul, and sometime between that year and 83 BC he won a victory there which he celebrates on his coinage by depicting Victory on the obverse sand honouring the Roman legions on the reverse. The type influenced the later legionary issues of Marc Antony, and was one of the Republican coins restored by Trajan (BMC 679). The H in the left standard honours the Hastati, the first line of infantry in the Republican order of battle, while the P in the right standard recognises the Principes, the second and more experienced line of infantry who would take up the fight once the hastati had tired. The eagle standard - the Aquila - was borne by the Aquilifer who took his place in battle with the Triarii - the third, final and most experienced line in the legion. Cf. Speidel, M. P., Centurial Signs and the Battle Order of the Legions, Zeitschrift f端r Papyrologie und Epigraphik 154, (2005), pp. 286-292

383. C. Poblicius Q. f. AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 80 BC. Draped bust of Roma right, helmet decorated with corn-ears and control mark above head, ROMA behind / Hercules strangling the Nemean lion, club at his feet, bow and arrow on left, C. POBLICI. Q. F on right. Poblicia 9; Crawford 80/1; Sydenham 768. 3.91g, 20mm, 3h. Extremely Fine. Lustrous.

400

384. L. Furius Brocchus AR Denarius. Rome, 63 BC. Head of Ceres between two ears of corn, III VIR across fields / Curule chair between fasces, L. FVRI CN. F in two lines above. Furia 23; Crawford 414/1; Sydenham 902a. 3.75g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Golden tone on obverse, a choice example of this type.

400

385. Cn. Plancius AR Denarius. Rome, 55 BC. Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, CN. PLANCIVS AED CVR S.C / Cretan ibex standing right, bow and quiver behind. Plancia 1; Crawford 432/1; Sydenham 933. 3.93g, 18mm, 4h. Choice Extremely Fine. The depiction on the reverse type makes reference to when the moneyer served in Crete under the proconsul Q. Metellus.

117

400


386. Q. Sicinius AR Denarius. Rome, 49 BC. Diademed head of Fortuna right, P. R behind, FORT before / Palm-branch and caduceus crossed, laurel wreath above, III VIR across fields, Q. SICINIVS below. Sicinia 5; Crawford 440/1; Sydenham 938. 3.89g, 18mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine. Pleasant blue tone on reverse.

300

387. Q. Sicinius and C. Coponius AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Pompey, 49 BC. Diademed head of Apollo right, XVI monogram below, III VIR behind, Q. SICINIVS before / Club of Hercules surmounted by lion’s skin between arrow and bow, PR. S. C on left, C. COPONIVS on right. Sicinia 2; Crawford 444/1b; Sydenham 939b. 3.92g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Attractive iridescent toning.

300

Ex Künker 143, 6-7 October 2008, lot 422.

A Superior Example

388. L. Plautius Plancius AR Denarius. Rome, 47 BC. Mask of Medusa facing, hair dishevelled with serpents at sides of face and horns in hair above forehead, L. PLAVTIUS below / Aurora flying right, leading the four horses of the sun, PLANCVS below. Sear 29; Plautia 15a; Crawford 543/1b; Sydenham 959a. 3.79g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre and golden toning.

1,000

This moneyer was adopted into the Plautia gens. Sear suggests that the reverse type may be related to a picture by Nichomachus of Thebes which was placed in the Capitol by L. Munatius Plancus as a part of the celebrations of his Gallic triumph. In his Fasti, Ovid relates the origin of the festival of the lesser Quinquatria Minerva. He states that an aedile exiled Rome’s flute-players to Tibur, and that the moneyer’s adopted ancestor C. Plautius, who was consul that year, smuggled them back into Rome to appease the citizens. The flute-players wore masks to conceal their identities and this became a tradition of the annual festival.

A Very Rare Denarius of C. Numonius Vaala

389. C. Numonius Vaala AR Denarius. Rome, 41 BC. Bare head of Numonius Vaala right, C. NVMONIVS before, VAALA behind / A warrior armed with a shield and sword advancing left, attacking a rampart which is defended by two soldiers, VAALA in ex. Numonia 2; Crawford 514/2; Sydenham 1087. 4.21g, 20mm, 12h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

7,500

The reverse type no doubt depicts the deeds of an ancestor which resulted in the cognomen Vaala. The first soldier to breach the enemy rampart (vallum) was awarded the corona vallaris. The details of this particular instance are not known to history. Ex Münzen und Medaillen 93, 16 December 2003, lot 71; Privately purchased from Leo Hamburger, Munich, 9th August 1907.

118


119


COINS OF THE IMPERATORS

390. Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 49-48 BC. Elephant walking right, trampling on serpent, CAESAR in ex. / Simpulum, aspergillum, axe (surmounted by wolf’s head), and apex. Sear 9; Crawford 443/1; Sydenham 1006. 3.83g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Beautifully lustrous surfaces.

750

391. Q. Metellus Pius Scipio AR Denarius. Military mint in Africa, 47-46 BC. Laureate head of Jupiter right, Q. METEL PIVS / Elephant walking right, SCIPIO above, IMP in ex. Sear 45; Caecilia 47; Crawford 459/1; Sydenham 1046. 3.96g, 18mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractive golden tone.

800

Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio’s connection by marriage to Pompey the Great earned him the consulship in 52 BC, with the price that he target Julius Caesar through actions in the Senate. As a result, Scipio introduced legislation calling for Caesar to relinquish his command in Gaul and to disband his legions. Caesar ignored the demand and when he crossed the Rubicon in January of 49, Scipio fled with Pompey. Scipio then took up his promised governorship in Syria, where he raised two legions. He commanded with Pompey at Pharsalus, and following their defeat he fled to North Africa to assume command of the Pompeian refugees at Utica. It was here that Scipio struck this type. Shortly after Caesar defeated the Pompeians at Utica and Thapsus in 46, Scipio committed suicide.

Two Denarii of C. Cassius Longinus and M. Junius Brutus C. Cassius Longinus and M. Junius Brutus, who had been two of the leading conspirators in the assassination of Julius Caesar, raised 17 legions in their struggle against Marc Antony and Octavian. P. Cornelius Spinther was a former ally of Pompey, who after the defeat at Pharsalus, aligned himself with Cassius Longinus and Brutus. The following two types were struck shortly before the battle of Philippi where they were defeated by the combined forces of Octavian and Marc Antony.

392. C. Cassius Longinus & P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AR Denarius. Smyrna, 43-42 BC. Diademed head of Libertas right, LEIBERTAS before, C. CASSI. IMP behind / Jug and lituus, LENTVLVS SPINT in two lines below. Sear 221; Crawford 500/3; Sydenham 1307. 3.68g, 21mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Golden toning and lustrous surfaces.

1,000

393. M. Junius Brutus & P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther AR Denarius. Smyrna, 43-42 BC. Sacrifical axe, simpulum and sacrifical dagger, BRVTVS below / Jug and lituus, LENTVLVS SPINT below. Sear 198; Crawford 500/7; Sydenham 1310. 3.64g, 19mm, 12h. Fleur De Coin. The symbols accompanying P. Lentulus Spinther’s inscription are of the Augurate, to which he had been elected in 57 BC. The symbols on the obverse are those of the College of Pontifs of which Brutus was a member. Ex Gorny & Mosch 180, 12 October 2009, lot 326.

120

2,000


394. Octavian AR Denarius. Rome, 42 BC. C CAESAR III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right / L LIVINEIVS REGVLVS, Victory, naked to the hips, standing right, holding wreath in extended right hand and palm-branch over her shoulder in left. Crawford 494/25; Sydenham 1107; BMC 4260. 3.87g, 18mm, 2h. Rare. Very Fine.

300

Two Denarii of Marc Antony and Octavian The following type was part of a series struck by M. Barbatius, a general of Marc Antony who accompanied him as he settled affairs in the East, following the Battle of Philippi. Plutarch relates that during his time at Ephesus, Antony appropriated vast sums from several wealthy cities which funded both his extravagance and the minting of an extensive series of coinage to which the following two lots belong.

395. Marc Antony, Octavian, and M. Barbatius AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian, with slight beard, right. Sear 243; Crawford 517/2; Sydenham 1181. 3.77g, 19mm, 12h. About Extremely Fine. Attractively toned.

2,000

396. Marc Antony, Octavian, and M. Barbatius AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Ephesus?), 41 BC. M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right. Sear 243; Crawford 517/2; Sydenham 1181. 3.82g, 21mm, 11h. Very Fine. Light iridescent toning.

1,500

Antony’s Armenian Victory

397. Marc Antony AR Denarius. Antioch, 37 BC. ANTONIVS. AVGVR.COS. DES. ITER. ET. TERT, bare head right / IMP TERTIO III VIR R. P. C, Armenian crown, decorated with three stars over crossed bow and arrow. Sear 297; Crawford 539/1; Sydenham 1205. 3.66g, 20mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

5,000

Sear suggests that this type marks the successful invasion of Armenia in 37 BC by Antony’s general Canidius Crassus, which was undertaken as a prelude to the Triumvir’s attack on Parthia in the following year. This issue has a celebratory nature that was ultimately to be superseded by Artavasdes’ betrayal of the Romans at a most critical juncture, resulting in a disastrous defeat for Marc Antony. Sear also comments that the fine style of the engraving tends to suggest that this issue was struck by Antony at his headquarters in Antioch, rather than by a military mint travelling with Canidius Crassus in Armenia.

121


An Attractive Series of Marc Antony Legionary Denarii The legionary denarii of Marc Antony were the last major series of coinage he issued before his defeat by Octavian at Actium in 31 BC. These were minted in the east in vast quantity, to pay the troops during preparations for the battle. As a result of being struck in debased metal, some of these coins remained in circulation for centuries to come. Cf. Sear, D. Coins of the Imperators, p229 ff.

398. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military Mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG II, Aquila between two standards. RSC 27; Crawford 544/14; Sydenham 1216. 3.50g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan with full borders. Rare in such good condition.

1,000

399. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG III, Aquila between two standards. RSC 28; Crawford 544/15; Sydenham 1216. 3.48g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

500

400. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG VI, Aquila between two standards. RSC 33; Crawford 544/19; Sydenham 1223. 3.77g, 18mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

401. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG IX, Aquila between two standards. RSC 37; Crawford 544/23; Sydenham 1227. 3.53g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

122

500


402. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG XIV, Aquila between two standards. Sear 369; Crawford 544/29; Sydenham 1234. 3.59g, 16mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

500

403. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG XV, Aquila between two standards. Sear 371; Crawford 544/30; Sydenham 1235. 3.67g, 16mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

300

404. Marc Antony Legionary AR Denarius. Military Mint moving with Antony (Patrae?), 32-31 BC. ANT. AVG. III. VIR. R. P. C, praetorian galley to right / LEG XVI, Aquila between two standards. Sear 372; Crawford 544/31; Sydenham 1236. 3.60g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

Final Issue of Marc Antony

405. Marc Antony and L. Pinarius Scarpus AR Denarius. Cyrene, 31 BC. Head of Jupiter Ammon right, M. ANTO. COS III IMP IIII around, pellet below chin and truncation / Victory, naked to the waist, walking right, ANTONIO AVG before, SCARPVS IMP behind. Sear 390; Crawford 546/2a; Sydenham 1280. 3.73g, 20mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Vivid iridescent toning. Rare in such good condition.

2,000

Lucius Pinarius Scarpus was the grandson of a sister of Julius Caesar, and a general for Antony in the war against Brutus and Cassius. Shortly before the battle of Actium he was placed in charge of Cyrene with the command of four legions. The obverse type refers to his new position as Zeus was the chief deity of Cyrene and featured prominently on their old coinage. This is the last issue struck in Marc Antony’s name before his defeat at Actium and subsequent suicide.

123


406. Octavian AR Denarius. Possibly Brundisium or Rome, 32-29 BC. Bare head left / CAESAR DIVI F left and right of Victory, draped, standing eft, on globe, holding wreath in right hand, palm branch in left over shoulder. RIC 254b; BMC 603. 3.74g, 22mm, 11h. Scarce. Extremely Fine.

1,000

This coin was struck to commemorate Octavian’s victory over Marc Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium, which left him the sole and undisputed ruler of the Roman world. The reverse legend CAESAR DIVI F(ilius) makes reference to the fact that Octavian was the adopted son of Julius Caesar, who had been deified in 42 BC. The Julia gens also traced their ancestry back, through Iulus, to Aeneas and thus Venus. This type suggests that Octavian sought to present himself as not only the undisputed ruler of Rome, but also the rightful one.

407. Octavian AR Denarius. Possibly Brundisium or Rome, 29-7 BC. Bare head right / IMP CAESAR on architrave of arch surmounted by facing statue of Octavian in quadriga. RIC 267; BMC 624. 3.83g, 19mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

A coin struck to commemorate Octavian’s victory at the Battle of Actium over the forces of Marc Antony and Cleopatra, the reverse probably depicts the triumphal arch erected in the forum in Rome to honour Octavian, circa 29 BC.

408. Octavian AR Denarius. Possibly Brundisium or Rome, 29-7 BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / IMP CAESAR, Octavian, veiled and draped, ploughing with yoke of oxen to right, brandishing a whip in left hand. RIC 272; BMC 638. 3.82g, 19mm, 3h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

The reverse depicts Octavian as city founder of Nicopolis in Epirus. The city boundary was marked by a pomerium or sacred furrow.

409. Octavian AR Denarius. Possibly Brundisium or Rome, 29-7 BC. Bare head right / IMP CAESAR on architrave of temple with colonnaded base; Victory on globe at apex of pediment, and warriors at the angles. RIC 266; BMC 631. 3.65g, 21mm, 9h. Good Very Fine.

124

1,000


125


126


A COLLECTION OF THE TWELVE CAESARS IN GOLD

410. Julius Caesar AV Aureus. Lifetime issue. Rome, 46 BC. C CAESAR COS TER, Veiled head of a female figure, possibly Vesta, right / A HIRTIVS PR, capis between lituus to left, axe to right. Sear 56; Calico 37b. 8.05g, 21mm, 12h. Very Fine.

3,000

The reverse incription relating to Aulus Hirtius, who had served Caesar as a legate in Gaul, securely dates this type to 46 BC, as at this time Hirtius was praetor and responsible for overseeing the minting of this coinage. After Caesar’s victory against the Pompeians at Pharsalus, he returned to Rome and a series of coinage was struck to pay his loyal troops. The veiled female head on the obverse is widely regarded to be that of Vesta, the Roman goddess of the hearth and home. The rites of Vesta were in the care of the Pontifex Maximus, the highest religious office at Rome, to which Caesar had been elected in 63 BC. The reverse type features a lituus, a tool of the Augurs, and a capis and axe, used by the Pontifices in sacrificial rituals. At Rome, each political action needed to be sanctioned by favourable omens declared by the Augurs and Pontifs, and so for Caesar to feature their ritual symbols upon his coinage only strengthens the notion that the Republic’s highest religious office was intensely political. In the same year as this type was struck, the Senate declared Caesar dictator for a further ten years.

411. Octavian AV Aureus. Military mint travelling with Octavian, Northern Italy, 43 BC. C CAESAR COS PONT AVG, Bare head of Octavian, right / C CAESAR DICT PERP PONT MAX, Laureate head of Julius Caesar, right. Sear 132; Calico 52. 7.82g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

30,000

After the battle of Mutina in 43 BC, at which he had provided the Senate with much-needed assistance against Marc Antony, Octavian marched on Rome with eight legions to demand the consulship. He was able to extort it from the Senate for both himself and his uncle Q. Pedius, as the original consuls for the year, Hirtius and Pansa, had been killed in battle against Antony. Octavian struck this issue to pay his troops and the type commemorates his consulship whilst reminding the bearer of his status as the sole heir of Julius Caesar, under whom the majority of his soldiers had served. Through the obverse legend, Octavian cites his membership of the College of Priests and advertises his newly acquired consulship; the reverse legend bears Caesar’s titles of dictator perpetuus and pontifex maximus. The religious references are remniscent of the aureus Caesar struck following his victory against Pompey at Pharsalus. Ex William H. Williams Collection, NAC 46, 2 April 2008, lot 444.

127


412. Augustus AV Aureus. Lyon, 14-2 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head right / Bull charging right, left forefoot raised, IMP X in ex. RIC 166a; BMC 450; Calico 212. 7.85g, 20mm, 3h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

15,000

The charging bull or heifer is a reference from the famous type of Thurium, a city to which the Octavian family had a connection: Suetonius relates that Gaius Octavius, Augustus’ father, defeated a Spartacist army near the town. Due to the high regard in which the family was held in the town Augustus was granted the surname Thurinus, and thus the type has primarily a personal illusion to him. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 6; Privately purchased from Ratto in 1961.

413. Tiberius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 14-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, female figure, probably Livia as Pax, seated right, on chair with ornamented legs and single line below, with feet on stool, right hand holding inverted spear, a laurel branch in left hand. RIC 29; BMC 46; Calico 305c. 7.85g, 20mm, 7h. About Extremely Fine.

8,000

This reverse type was struck over the greater part of the reign of Tiberius, with the PONTIF MAXIM continuing the obverse title and celebrating Tiberius as the head of the Roman state religion. The seated figure on the reverse is usually taken to be his mother Livia, and on this series she holds a laurel branch and is represented as Pax. Ex Hess Divo 307, 7 June 2007, lot 1560; Ex G. Apparuti, Modena collection, sold by F. Sternberg XIX 1987, lot 530.

414. Caligula AV Aureus. Lyon, AD 37-8. C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT, laureate head of Caligula right / AGRIPPINA MAT C CAES AVG GERM, bust of Agrippina, draped. RIC 13; BMC 14; Calico 326. 7.75g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan with full borders.

20,000

Agrippina had died in exile during the reign of Tiberius, and in striking her portrait after her death, Caligula had found opportunity to bolster opinion of himself. It was a display of his pietas and simultaneously a reminder of his own descent from Augustus. Caligula also minted a series of sestertii in Agrippina’s, the first issue of Roman coinage that ever devoted both obverse and reverse to a woman alone (RIC 55). Cf. Wood, S. Diva Drusilla Panthea and the Sisters of Caligula, American Journal of Archaeology 99, No. 3 (July 1995), p.457ff. Ex Michael F. Price Collection, Stacks, December 1996, lot 119; Ex NAC 41, 20 November 2007, lot 46.

128


415. Claudius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 46-7. TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG PM TR P VI IMP XI, laureate head right / CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI, Constantia seated facing left, on curule chair, feet on stool, right hand raised towards mouth. RIC 31; BMC 30; Calico 340 (this coin); Biaggi 200 (this coin). 7.79g, 20mm, 3h. Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

25,000

The unusual personification on the reverse of this coin has a special reference to Claudius. Constantia represents courage or perserverance in civil life, the quality that had enabled Claudius to bear the trials of his early years; he was ostracised by his family because he was afflicted with a limp, a stammer, and slight deafness. Suetonius writes that his mother, Antonia, described him as “portentum hominis” (“monster of men”). Despite such disdain from his kin, Claudius was popular with the Roman people, and enjoyed a reign of thirteen years; far longer than his contemporaries seem to have expected. Dio Cassius also reports that in AD 47, Asinius Gallus conspired against Claudius and was banished, rather than executed (LX . 27). The reverse type may be alluding to the strength of Claudius’ resolve in the face of this betrayal. Ex NAC 49, 21 October 2008, lot 139; Ex Biaggi Collection, privately purchased in 1954.

416. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 62-3. NERO CAESAR AVG IMP, bare head right / PONTIF MAX TR P VIIII COS IIII P P, Virtus standing left, helmeted and in military dress, with right foot on cuirass and right hand holding parazonium on knee, left hand holding vertical spear, EX S C across fields. RIC 36; BMC 40; Calico 435. 7.72g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Beautiful lustre.

5,000

Depicting the most important quality by which the Emperor and Empire endured, Virtus is the spirit of valour, manly energy and courage, but she is also the Roman goddess of war and the counterpart of the protecting goddess of the city, Roma. The inclusion of EX S C rather than the more regular S C found on Æ coinage, signifies that Nero, by decree of the Senate was able to strike coinage, rather than the type itself being consecrated by the Senate. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 17; Privately purchased from Leu in 1956.

417. Galba AV Aureus. Rome, AD 68-9. IMP SER GALBA AVG, bare head right / SPQR OB C S, in two lines in oak wreath. RIC 164; Calico 509. 7.34g, 19mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine.

15,000

Whilst Galba was governor of Tarraconesis he became an ally of Vindex in the revolt against Nero. Following Nero’s suicide, Galba marched on Rome and was declared emperor by the Senate. Dio Cassius relates that Galba put great emphasis on how the Senate had bestowed power on him, and that he had not claimed it for himself. Dio Cassius also comments on Galba’s heavy taxation of the Empire, and his contrasting thriftiness which made him unpopular with the people. He refused to pay the Praetorians, on account of his aversion to ‘buying loyalty; despite having promised to do so, which caused a rift between the emperor and his guards. Otho seized the opportunity created by this hostility, and bribed the Praetorians to murder Galba which they did in January 69, after a reign of seven months. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 19; Ex Mazzini Collection I, plate LXII, 286.

129


130


418. Otho AV Aureus. Rome, AD 69. IMP M OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P, bare head right / PAX ORBIS TERRARVM, Pax, draped, standing left, holding olive branch in right hand and caduceus in left. RIC 3; BMC 1; Calico 524. 7.28g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine. A portrait of fine style struck in high relief.

100,000

According to the accounts of Plutarch and Suetonius, Otho was sent to Lusitania in AD 68 because Nero had became enamoured of his wife Poppaea Sabina. The two were divorced, and Otho’s bitterness at his estrangement from his wife, paired with his relocation to Hispania, made him a natural ally for Galba, the governor of neighbouring Tarraconensis, in his revolt against Nero. Support for Nero waned, and he fled to the villa of his freedman Phaon where he took his own life, while Galba, accompanied by Otho, marched on Rome and was declared emperor. Otho expected to be named Galba’s heir as a result of his loyalty, but when Galba nominated L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus, Otho’s disappointment manifested itself as anger and he formented a revolt amongst the Praetorians, who murdered Galba. Otho was hailed emperor on 15 January 69, however, his reign was not destined to be lengthy. Whilst he had the support of Egypt, Africa and the legions of the Danube, support for Vitellius was strong among the legions of the Rhine and conflict became inevitable. Otho committed to a battle before his reinforcements from Dalmatia were able to reach him, and he suffered a defeat at the Battle of Bedriacum. Ignoring the entreaties of his generals to await his reinforcements and offer battle once again, Otho took his own life, after just three months as emperor, giving his reason as to avoid further bloodshed. His suicide was widely recognised by his contemporaries as an honourable act. The poet Martial later wrote in his Epigrams VI. XXXII “Sit Cato, dum vivit, sane vel Caesare maior, dum moritur, numquid maior Othone fuit?” (“Cato while he lived, he was greater than Caesar himself, when he died, was he at all greater than Otho?”). Given the nature of the circumstances of his death, it seems fitting that the legend on the reverse of this rare type should be PAX ORBIS TERRARVM, since despite the violence of his short reign, through his suicide Otho had steered Rome away from further conflict. Ex NAC 39, 16 May 2007, lot 109; Privately purchased from Harlan J.Berk.

419. Vitellius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate head right / SPQR OB C S, in three lines in oak wreath. RIC 82; BMC 14; Calico 574. 7.36g, 19mm, 6h. Scarce. Extremely Fine.

20,000

Following his victory at the Battle of Bedriacum and Otho’s subsequent suicide, Vitellius was acclaimed emperor by the Senate. Upon his accession, Vitellius adopted the cognomen Germanicus rather than Caesar, as evident in the obverse legend. Although by now a normal type of Senatorial recognition, it is to be noted that for Vitellius the Senate issued the usual formula of ‘ob cives servatos’ without waiting for his arrival in Rome, at which point the obverse legend is changed in the third issue to include the title of Augustus, which he had accepted on 18th July AD 69. That the Senate was prepared to make this move in advance could be taken as a sign of their hope that, after the recent quick succession of emperors, stability might finally be returning to Rome. However, it was not meant to be since the legions of the Eastern provinces had declared another emperor, Vespasian. A direct confrontation was not necessary; supporters of Vespasian assassinated Vitellius after a reign of just eight months. According to Suetonius, he was dragged through the streets and tortured, before his body was thrown into the Tiber. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 21.

131


420. Vespasian AV Aureus. Rome, AD 76. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / COS VII, legend high in field, heifer standing facing right. RIC 840. Calico 622. 7.50g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

7,500

The heifer depicted seems to reference a statue of Myron, which was acquisitioned by Augustus and brought to Rome from Athens following his victory at Actium. Vespasian later ransferred the statue to the Temple of Pax. Augustus also struck an issue of aurei depicting the heifer (Calico 170) and Vespasian’s imitation of the type draws a parallel between the restoration of peace brought by Augustus following the fall of the Republic and Vespasian’s similar intentions following the brief and tumultuous reigns of his three predecessors. Vespasian died of natural causes in AD 79, after a reign during which he furthered the beautification of Rome, which included the commissioning of her greatest monument, the Colosseum, which would be completed under the reign of his son, Titus. Ex. F. Martin Post Collection; Ex Freeman & Sear 13, 25 August 2006, lot 446.

421. Titus, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 75. T CAESAR IMP VESAPASIAN, laureate head right / PONTIF TR P COS IIII, Victory standing facing left, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and branch in left, on cista mystica flanked by snakes. RIC 785; Calico 750. 7.22g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Well-centred and with beautiful lustrous surfaces.

15,000

When Titus succeeded as Emperor, he continued his father’s legacy, completing the construction of the Colosseum and commissioning new public baths. His reign was one without major military or politcial conflicts, although in 79, towards the end of his reign, Mt. Vesuvius erupted. The ancient sources indicate that Titus’ response was exemplary, and that he provided relief funds from the treasury without additional taxation. The reverse type of this coin is taken directly from an eastern quinarius of Augustus (BMC 670). The use of designs which imitated coins of Augustus was a device employed by Titus’ father, Vespasian, an example of which is seen in the previous lot. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 24; Ex Mazzini Collection I, plate LXXXI, 163.

422. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, AD 76-7. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, Laureate head right / COS IIII, legend across fields, cornucopiae with ribbons hanging down each side. RIC 918; Calico 817. 7.29g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre.

10,000

When he succeeded his older brother, Domitian established himself as much more of an autocrat than Titus or their father Vespasian had been. Although sources such as Tacitus and Suetonius portray Domitian as a tyrant, it would seem that his rigid administration in fact laid the foundations for the peace and stability that would follow in the 2nd century. The cornucopiae reverse of this coin harks back to a type issued in 42 BC during the Second Triumvirate by L. Mussidius Longus, and is a design unique to Domitian in this period. This continues the Flavian tradition of using types of the late Republican and early Imperial periods. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 27; Privately purchased from Ratto in 1961.

132


COINS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE

423. Augustus AR Denarius. Samos (?) 21-20 BC. CAESAR, bare head right / AVGVSTVS, young bull standing facing right, head erect. RIC 475; BMC 663. 3.67g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

424. Augustus AR Denarius. M. Durmius, moneyer. Rome, 19- 8 BC. M DVRMIVS III VIR HONORI, Head of Honos right / CAESAR AVGVSTVS SIGN RECE, Kneeling, bare headed Parthian to right holding signum to which is attached a vexillum marked X. RIC 315 (variant); BMC 58 (variant). 3.83g, 18mm, 5h. Rare. Rare. Near Extremely Fine.

1,500

Ex Paul Tinchant Collection; Ex UBS 78, 9 September 2008, lot 1300.

Commemorating the Ludi Saeculares of 17 BC

425. Augustus AR Denarius. Uncertain mint, 17 BC. CAESAR, youthful head right (possibly Gaius Caesar), within oak-wreath / AVG VST, to left and right of candelabrum, ornamented with rams’ heads, within wreath entwined with bucrania and paterae. RIC 540; BMC 684. 3.86g, 17mm, 6h. Very Rare - R2. Extremely Fine. Lustrous surfaces.

2,000

The reverse type commemorates the Ludi Saeculares of 17 BC. The sacrifical ceremonies took place over three days and three nights, and the candelabra, bucrania, and paterae allude to the sacrifice of two bulls on the first night. Augustus, as Pontifex Maximus, had a prominent role in the proceedings. The portrait is sometimes regarded as Gaius Caesar, grandson of Octavian, but the legend CAESAR makes this unlikely since this usually accompanies portraits of Augustus himself. Cf. Sunderland, The date and the significance of the candelabrum coins of Augustus, Classical Review 54, 1944, pp 46 ff. Ex Gorny & Mosch 176, Munich 2009, lot 2074.

426. Augustus AR Denarius. Lugdunum, 7-6 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, Laureate head right / AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, Gaius and Lucius Ceasar standing left and right, each togate and resting hand on shields to front; a spear behind each shield; above and between spears, a simpulum and a lituus. C L CAESARES in ex. RIC 207; BMC 533. 3.76g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

427. Livia Æ Dupondius. Restoration issue under Titus. Rome, AD 80-1. IVSTITIA, bust of Livia as Justitia, draped, right, wearing stephane / IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M, TR P P P COS VIII RESTITVIT around large SC. RIC 406. 12.89g, 28mm, 6h. Rare. Very Fine.

133

500


428. Agrippa Æ As. Rome, struck under Caligula (AD 37-41). M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown / Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind and over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand and vertical trident in left. RIC 58 [Gaius]; BMC 161 [Tiberius]. 10.95g, 29mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

429. Tiberius AR Denarius. Lugdunum, AD 14-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated facing right, holding branch in left hand, sceptre in right hand, the chair with ornamented legs and a single line below. RIC 30; BMC 48. 3.81g, 20mm, 10h. Good Very Fine.

500

430. Tiberius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 14-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / MAXIM PONTIF, Livia as Pax seated facing right, holding vertical spear in right hand and branch in left, on throne with plain legs above a double line. RIC 25; Calico 305d. 7.63g, 19 mm, 11h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

8,000

431. Claudius Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 41-50. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, laureate head right / SPES AVGVSTA, Spes, draped, standing left, holding flower in right hand and raising hem of skirt with left, SC in ex. RIC 99; BMC 124. 25.60g, 34mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

1,000

432. Claudius Æ As. Rome, AD 50-4. TI CLAUDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left / LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, draped, standing facing, head right, holding pileus in right hand and with left outstretched, S C across fields. RIC 113; BMC 204. 9.14g, 29mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine. Struck in high relief; very well preserved.

134

2,000


A Rare Denarius of Divus Claudius

433. Divus Claudius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 54-64. DIVVS CLAVDIVS AVGVSTVS, Laureate head left / Ornamental slow quadriga right, surmounted by minature quadriga flanked by Victories on either side, EX S C in ex. RIC 4 [Nero]; BMC 4 [Nero]. 7.68g, 19mm, 7h. Rare. Good Very Fine.

10,000

This type depicts a richly decorated triumphal chariot, decreed in honour of Claudius by his adopted son Nero, and dates to after the Senate’s vote to deify Claudius in AD 54. Suetonius says ‘He was buried with all the formality of Empire and enrolled among the gods: an honour which Nero first neglected and then annulled, but which was later restored by Vespasian.’ (Divus Claudius, 45.) Nero’s apparent disregard for his adopted father’s deification is in keeping with the general disinterest, and indeed even mockery, of the Roman people towards the Cult of the Divine Claudius. In his satirical drama Apocolocyntosis Divi Claudii, Seneca the Younger, who was a tutor of Nero in his youth, describes Claudius’ ascent to Olympus, his trial by the gods and his subsequent downfall to Hades as a result of his short-comings.

434. Nero AR Tetradrachm. Antioch, AD 63. NERWN KAISAR SEBASTOS, laureate bust right, wearing aegis / ETOUS BIR.I, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, wings spread, palm to right. Prieur 89; RPC 4189. 15.10g, 25mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Colourful iridescent toning.

2,000

Ex Sierra Collection; Ex Ponterio 117, 18 January 2002, lot 326.

435. Nero AV Aureus. Rome, AD 64-5. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / IVPPITER CVSTOS, Jupiter, bare to the waist, seated on a throne facing left, holding a thunderbolt in right hand and a long sceptre in left. RIC 52; Calico 412; BMC 67. 7.34g, 20mm, 6h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Attractive ‘Boscoreale’ toning.

10,000

436. Nero AR Denarius. Rome, AD 64-5. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / IVPPITER CVSTOS, Jupiter, bare to the waist, seated on a throne facing left, holding a thunderbolt in right hand and a long sceptre in left. RIC 53; BMC 74. 3.55g, 20mm, 6h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Pleasant tone.

135

2,000


437. Nero AR Denarius. Rome, AD 65-6. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / SALVS, Salus seated left on throne holding patera in right hand, left resting at her side. RIC 60; BMC 90. 3.10g, 18mm, 6h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Attractive old cabinet tone.

1,000

Ex Marchand Collection.

438. Nero Æ Sestertius. Rome AD 65. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right/ Roma, helmeted and in military dress, seated left on cuirass, holding Victory in right hand and with left hand resting on parazonium, around and behind various shields, S-C across fields, ROMA in ex. RIC 273 var. (no aegis); BMC 173. 27.77g, 36mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

5,000

439. Galba AR Denarius. Possibly Narbo, AD 68. SER GALBA IMPERATOR, laureate head right / VICTORIA P R, Victory, draped, standing on globe facing, head left, holding wreath in right hand and palm branch in left. RIC 111; BMC 227. 3.74g, 18mm, 8h. Very Rare - R2. Near Extremely Fine.

1,000

Though the design of this coin is one that is found in various guises on Roman coinage, this type is embellished by the presence of the globe on which Victory stands, a reference to Rome’s dominion over the known world by the time of Galba’s reign.

440. Vitellius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate head right / LIBERI IMP GERMAN, busts of Vitellius’ son, on the left, and daughter, on the right, both bare headed and draped, facing each other. RIC 79. 2.99g, 19mm, 6h. Rare. Good Very Fine.

800

441. Vespasian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 69-70. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / Judaea seated in attitude of mourning right, to right of trophy, resting head on left hand, IVDAEA in ex. RIC 2. 2.93g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

136

500


442. Vespasian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 71. IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right / VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory standing right with left foot on helmet, inscribing shield set on palm tree, with Judaea, mourning, seated below to right; SC in ex. RIC 221. 27.05g, 32mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

443

5,000

444

443. Vespasian AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 72-3. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right / Vespasian in military dress to the left of a palm tree, holding a spear in right hand, parazonium in left, and with foot resting on helmet; to the right, sitting on the ground below the palm tree, Judaea in attitude of mourning. RIC 1558. 3.54g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

750

444. Vespasian AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 72-3. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right / Vespasian in military dress to the left of a palm tree, holding a spear in right hand, parazonium in left, and with foot resting on helmet; to the right, sitting on the ground below the palm tree, Judaea in attitude of mourning. RIC 1558. 3.25g, 17mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

750

445. Vespasian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 73. IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated facing right, on a curule chair, with sceptre in right hand and branch in left. RIC 545. 3.59g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine. Attractively toned; superb lustre.

500

446. Vespasian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 77-8. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head left / COS VIII, prow facing right, with eight pointed star above. RIC 942. 3.36g, 18mm, 7h. Good Very Fine.

750

Decidedly antiquarian in nature, this reverse design is borrowed from the coinage of L. Domitius Ahenobarbus, which was struck for Marc Antony circa 40 BC. Vespasian was keen to recall the coinage of the late Republic, and his Flavian successors, Titus and Domitan, also favoured such imagery. The star above the prow is a type used to denote success in naval matters or the success of an admiral, and is here being applied to Vespasian as a part of the continued propaganda campaign that was promoted throughout his reign. Much of the coinage struck during Vespasian’s reign celebrated a military triumph or newly-brokered peace. According to B. W. Jones, over a quarter of the coinage of Vespasian listed in Cohen had a reverse type alluding to Mars, Victoria or Pax (cf. Jones, B. W, Some Thoughts on the Propaganda of Vespasian and Domitian, Classical Journal 66 no. 3, March 1971, p 251)

137


138


447. Domitian, as Caesar, AV Aureus. Rome, 77-8 AD. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / She-wolf sucking infants Romulus & Remus, COS V above, boat in ex. RIC 241; Calico 820; Cohen 50. 7.48g, 21mm, 5h. Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan with full borders.

15,000

This is the first time the she-wolf and twins appear on Roman imperial coinage and the reverse type symbolises the rebirth of Rome under the Flavians. Cf. BMCRE II, xli. Ex Bolla Collection, Tkalec Auction, 28 February 2007, lot 28; Ex Hess-Leu, 16 April 1957, lot 353.

448. Domitian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 79. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated facing left, holding Palladium in right hand and sceptre in left. RIC 1087 (Vespasian). 3.08g, 19mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

300

449. Domitian Æ27 of Caesarea Maritima. AD 81-96. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI, radiate head of Domitian right / Seven-branched palm-tree with two bunches of dates; around, IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P. RPC 2307. 16.09g, 28mm, 6h. Rare. Good Very Fine. Pleasant desert patina.

1,500

450. Domitian AR Denarius. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII, laureate head right with aegis / IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P, Minerva standing left with spear in right hand. RIC 339. 3.45g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare - R2. Extremely Fine.

500

451. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 87. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, laureate head right / IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, with spear in left hand and shield in right, owl at feet to right. RIC 507. 3.43g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

139

300


452. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 88. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, laureate head right / COS XIIII, Minerva standing facing, head left, with thunderbolt in right hand, spear in left hand, shield at feet to her left. RIC 554. 3.25g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare - R2. Good Extremely Fine.

500

453. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 90. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII, laureate head right / IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva facing, head left, with thuderbolt in right hand and spear in left, shield at her feet to right. RIC 691. 3.45g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

150

454. Domitian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 91. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI, laureate head right / IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva advancing right with shield in left hand and spear held aloft in right. RIC 724. 3.65g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

150

The Apotheosis of Domitian’s Son

455. Domitia AR Denarius. Rome, AD 82-3. DOMITIA AVGVSTA IMP DOMIT, draped bust right, with hair massed in front and in long plait behind / DIVVS CAESAR IMP DOMITIANI F, Domitian’s son as naked infant boy seated on a globe surrounded by seven stars. RIC 153. 3.49g, 19mm, 5h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

10,000

Domitia was daughter of the general Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo, and wife of Domitian. It is attested that Domitia bore a daughter and then a son, whose name is unknown, and who died in his infancy. Domitian subsequently deified the boy, and the reverse type illustrates this with the legend DIVVS CAESAR IMP DOMITIANI F and the depiction of the boy seated on a globe surrounded by the seven stars of the Ursa Major. Shortly after this type was struck, in AD 83 there was a brief hiatus in the marriage when Domitian exiled Domitia for unknown reasons. Suetonius relates that Domitia’s exile was a result of her affair with an actor named Paris, who was murdered on the orders of Domitian. Cf. Suetonius, Domitianus 3.

140


456. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II P P, laureate head right / CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM, clasped hands, holding legionary eagle resting on prow. RIC 3. 3.72g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

500

457. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS II P P, laureate head right / AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopiae in right. RIC 1. 3.44g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

458. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right / SALVS PVBLICA, Salus seated facing left, holding ear of corn in outstretched right hand. RIC 20; Cohen 134. 3.46g, 19mm, 6h. About Extremely Fine.

500

459. Nerva AR Denarius. Rome, AD 96. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right / SALVS PVBLICA, Salus seated facing left, holding ear of corn in outstretched right hand. RIC 20; Cohen 134. 3.49g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

500

460. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 104-11. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Dacia seated right in a mournful attitude on a shield, with a curved sword below. RIC 219. 3.35g, 19mm, 6h. Scarce. Extremely Fine.

141

500


461. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 107-10. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Fortuna standing left holding cornucopiae and rudder resting on prow. RIC 500; Cohen 477. 28.71g, 34mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine. Lovely dark patina.

2,000

462. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 111-3. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate bust right / COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC, Roma seated left, holding Victory and spear. RIC 116; Cohen 69. 3.51g, 19mm, 7h. Fleur De Coin. Highly lustrous.

500

463. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 112-4. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate, draped bust right / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Mars, nude, walking right, with spear in right hand and trophy in left over shoulder. RIC 269. 2.92g, 20mm, 7h. Extremely Fine.

300

464. Trajan Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 114-117. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIM AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate draped bust right / SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae, S-C across fields. RIC 672; Cohen 352. 30.42g, 34mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Dark green and brown patina.

142

1,000


465. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 114-7. IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC, Laureate draped bust right / P M TR P COS VI P P SPQR, Genius standing facing, nude, head left, holding patera in right hand and ears of corn in left. RIC 347. 3.14g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

Trajan’s Parthian Victory In AD 113, Trajan left Rome to embark upon his Parthian campaign. Osroes despatched an embassy from the Parthian court which finally met the emperor in Athens, by which point it was too late for him to turn back, and as R. P. Longden so eloquently writes, ‘their apprehensive humility would have no doubt only sharpened his zest for the enterprise’. (Cf. Longden, R.P., Notes on the Parthian Campaigns of Trajan, The Journal of Roman Studies 21, (1931), pp. 1-35). The following year, Trajan invaded Armenia, deposed its king, Parthamasiris, and annexed it as a Roman province. In 115, Trajan also annexed Northern Mesopotamia, and later the same year he captured the Parthian capital of Ctesiphon. Following the conquest of Ctesiphon, Trajan accepted the title ‘Parthicus’ in AD 115-6. which features as the reverse legend on the types below; the bust of Sol, who rises in the East, may symbolise Roman dominance over the region. Trajan’s glory was short-lived, however, since in late AD 116 revolts broke out in Armenia and Northern Mesopotamia, forcing Trajan to abandon his campaign to increase the territory of the Rome and consolidate that which he had already gained. Dio Cassius relates that on looking out towards India, Trajan lamented that his age prevented him from following in the footsteps of Alexander (LXVIII 28.1).

466. Trajan AV Aureus. Rome, AD 116-117. IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GERM DAC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; seen from behind / PARTHICO P M TR P P COS VI P P SPQR, radiate, draped bust of Sol right. RIC 329; Calico 1038; BMC 621. Extremely Fine. Attractive lustre around the devices.

10,000

467. Trajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 116-7. IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GERM DAC, laureate and draped bust right / PARTHICO P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R, Sol, radiate and draped, right. RIC 326; BMC 642. 3.20g, 19mm, 7h. Scarce. Good Very Fine. Pleasant old cabinet tone.

500

Ex The New York Sale III, December 2000, lot 675.

468. Plotina AR Denarius. Rome, AD 112-5. PLOTINA AVG IMP TRAIANI, Draped bust of Plotina right, with double stephane / CAES AVG GERMA DAC COS VI P P, Altar adorned with figure of Pudicitia, ARA PVDIC in ex. RIC 733. 2.64g, 22mm, 7h. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

143

1,000


144


469. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 117. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, draped bust right / P M TR P COS DES II, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopiae. RIC 18; Cohen 744. 3.24g, 20mm, 8h. Good Very Fine.

200

470. Hadrian AR Quinarius. Rome, AD 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / P M TR P COS III, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm. RSC 103; BMC 222; RIC 103. 1.66g, 20mm, 7h. Scarce. Very Fine.

250

471. Hadrian Æ As. Rome, AD 132-4. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, bare-headed draped bust left / FELICITATI AVG, galley under oar to left, with five rowers and helmsman, S-C across fields, COS III P P in ex. RIC 719. 12.95g, 27mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Exceptional for the type.

5,000

This extremely well preserved As, depicting Hadrian’s galley, was issued in celebration of the emperor’s safe return to Rome after having nearly been wrecked in a storm. Sharply detailed, with good metal throughout, this coin is a remarkable specimen that would be very difficult to match.

472. Hadrian Æ As. Rome, AD 132-4. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, bare-headed, draped bust right / FELICITATI AVG, galley under oar to left, with five rowers and helmsman, S-C across fields, COS III P P in ex. RIC 719. 10.62g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

500

473. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-8. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / FELICITATI AVGVSTI, galley under oar to left, with five rowers and helsman. RIC 240. 3.37g, 19mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

145

250


474. Hadrian AR Denarius. Rome, AD 134-8. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / SALVS AVG, Salus standing left, sacrificing out of patera over altar at feet to left, and holding sceptre in left hand. RIC 268; Cohen 1328-30. 3.57g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

400

475. Hadrian Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right / FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing left, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae, S-C across fields. RIC 759; Cohen 763. 24.33g, 33mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Pleasant dark green patina.

750

476. Hadrian Æ As. Egypt, AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate, draped bust right / AEGYPTOS, Egypt recling left, holding sistrum and resting left elbow on basket of fruit or corn, ibis on column at feet. RIC 839; Cohen 113. 11.83g, 26mm, 6h. Scarce. Good Very Fine.

1,500

Much of Hadrian’s coinage commemorates his visits to many of the important Roman provinces and served to propagandise his willingness to travel and devote his direct attention to the running of the disparate parts of the Empire. Struck towards the end of his reign and when Hadrian had returned to Rome, this coin falls into the ‘Province’ category, a remarkable series of issues marking Hadrian’s achievements and highlighting that Rome and Italy were no longer the centre of the world. Egypt is shown in female form and with the distinguishing attributes of the sistrum of Isis and an ibis at her feet, while the basket of fruit or corn on which she leans could be taken to reference the corn ships that regularly sailed from Egypt back to Italy.

477. Aelius Caesar Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 137. L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right / TR POT COS II, Spes advancing left, holding flower in right hand and raising skirt with left, S C across fields. RIC 1055; Cohen 56. 22.97g, 33mm, 6h. Scarce. Good Very Fine.

146

2,000


147


148


478. Antoninus Pius Æ As. Rome, AD 143-4. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right / IMPERATOR II, two ancilia, S C across fields, ANCILIA in ex. RIC 736a; Cohen 30. 11.00g, 27mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

500

479. Antoninus Pius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 147-8. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XI, laureate head right / COS IIII, Annona standing facing, head left, holding ears of corn in right hand over modius at feet, with left hand resting on anchor to right. RIC 162; Cohen 283. 3.26g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

100

480. Antoninus Pius AV Aureus. Rome, AD 158-9. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head right / VOTA SVSCEPTA DEC III, Antoninus, veiled, standing facing, head left, sacrificing with patera over tripod, left arm at side, COS IIII in ex. RIC 294a, d; Calico 1714. 7.30g, 20mm, 6h. Scarce. Good Extremely Fine.

8,000

The ‘Vota Suscepta’ on the reverse of this coin makes reference to the undertaking of the vows for the third decennium of Antoninus’ rule and is a type that is common to the coinage of this year and the preceeding, along with a theme commemorating the restoration of the temple of Divus Augustus.

481. Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 148-9. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG P II F, bare head right / TR POT III COS II, Providentia standing facing, head left, resting left arm on column and holding sceptre, pointing with right hand to globe at feet to left. RIC 446; Cohen 628 (var). 2.84g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

100

482. Marcus Aurelius AR Denarius. Rome, AD 174. M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVIII, laureate head right / IMP VII COS III, Roma standing left, holding Victory and spear. RIC 305; Cohen 340. 3.33g, 20mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

149

300


483

484

483. Marcus Aurelius Æ As. Rome, AD 174-175. M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXIX, laureate head right / IMP VII COS III S C, Tiber reclining left, resting hand on boat. RIC 1142; BMC 1498; Cohen 348. 12.61g, 25mm, 5h. Very Fine. Pleasant green patina.

250

On this type of Marcus Aurelius the figure of the river-god has been taken to be Tiber. However, coming as it does in a period of anxiety about the corn supply from Egypt during the rebellion of Cassius, it has also been suggested by Mattingly that the river-god might in fact be Nilus, though he lacks any distinguishing features to support this. It can be surmised though, that Tiber here is referencing the river itself and essential corn supply on which Rome relies. 484. Marcus Aurelius Æ As. Rome, AD 176-177. M ANTONINVS AVG GERM SARM TR P XXXI, laureate head right / IMP VIII COS III, galley with four rowers and Neptune under arch on the stern holding trident, FELICITATI AVG P P above. RIC 1196; Cohen 191. 9.86g, 26mm, 12h. Very Fine.

500

Issued to mark the safe return of the Emperor to Rome after an extensive period abroad, first campaigning in Germanica and then settling affairs in the east after the rebellion of Cassius, this type shows a galley augmented with the presence of Neptune standing at the stern. Storms endangered the safe passage of the Emperor’s galley during the journey (Scriptores Historiae Augustae Marcus, 27.2), hence the emphasis on the happy return of the Emperor to Rome and the depiction of Neptune accompanying the ship.

485. Divus Marcus Aurelius Æ Sestertius. Struck under Commodus. Rome, AD 192. DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS, bare head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle flying right and carrying a thunderbolt in its talons, bearing aloft Marcus Aurelius, who holds a sceptre; S C across fields. RIC 660; BMC 394; Cohen 94. 25.36g, 32mm, 6h. Rare. Near Extrememly Fine.

2,000

486. Divus Lucius Verus AR Denarius. Struck under Marcus Aurelius. Rome, AD 169. DIVVS VERVS, bare head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right, head left. RIC 596a; Cohen 55. 3.37g, 19mm, 6h. Scarce. Extremely Fine.

300

487. Commodus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 183-184. M COMMODVS ANTON AVG PIVS BRIT, laureate head right / TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P, Fides standing right, holding bowl of fruit and corn, S-C across fields. RIC 413; Cohen 936. 21.95g, 30mm, 12h. Very Fine.

150

750


151


A Superb Aureus of Commodus

488. Commodus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 184-5. M COM MANT AVG P BRIT FEL, laureate, draped bust right / P M TR P X IMP VII COS IIII P P, Commodus standing left on platform, holding sceptre, right hand raised, addressing three soldiers standing right, FID EXERC in ex. RIC 110b; Calico 2250 (var). 7.13g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

15,000

This type, widely employed on all denominations and metals (see lot 489, below), recalls Commodus’ entreaty to the army to exclude factious quarreling and unite in loyalty under him after the execution of Sextus Tigidius Perennis, a prefect of the Praetorian Guard. We learn from Herodian (1, 9, 7) that Perennis was implicated in a plot to murder the emperor by soldiers who had taken coins, already struck with the prefect’s portrait, from his son: both were executed. A second suggestion, from the Scriptores Historiae Augustae Commodus (6, 2), is that the soldiers had in fact travelled from the province of Britannia, where Perennis “had dismissed certain senators and had put men of the equestrian order in command of the soldiers” perhaps in an attempt to win favour and build up a force with which to challenge Commodus.

489. Commodus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 184-5. M COM MANT AVG P BRIT FEL, laureate head right / P M TR P X IMP VII COS IIII P P, Commodus standing left on platform, holding sceptre, right hand raised, addressing three soldiers standing right, FID EXERC in ex. RIC 110c; BMC 160. 3.22g, 18mm, 6h. Rare. Very Fine.

300

Victoria Britannia

490. Commodus Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 185-6. M COMMODVS ANTON AVG PIVS BRIT, laureate, draped bust right / P M TR P X IMP VII COS IIII P P, Victory seated right on shields, inscribing shield set on knee, S-C across fields, VICT BRIT in ex. RIC 452 (var); BMC 560; Cohen 946 (var). 24.13g, 31mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Very Fine. An exceptionally fine example.

2,000

In the last months of Marcus Aurelius’ life there was a serious incursion by the northern tribes into the province of Britannia; the wall was overrun and possibly even the governor himself was lost in battle. The wall in question is likely to have been the Hadrianic frontier, the Antonine wall having been already abandoned. Ulpius Marcellus was therefore dispatched to Britain and by AD 184 had secured a victory for the now sole emperor Commodus. This type was struck in commemoration of that victory.

491. Commodus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 187-8. M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT, laureate head right / P M TR P XIII IMP VIII COS V P P, Fortuna seated facing left, holding a rudder on a globe in right hand, and cornucopiae in left. RIC 166; Cohen 540. 3.60g, 18mm, 5h. Good Very Fine.

152

100


153


An Outstanding Aureus of Commodus

492. Commodus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 190-1. M COM MANT P FEL AVG BRIT P P, laureate, draped bust right / HERC COM P M TR P XVI COS VI, Commodus, as Hercules, standing left, sacrificing with patera in right hand over lit altar and holding cornucopiae in left hand, club to left at feet, and tree, on which hangs lion-skin and quiver of arrows, to left. RIC 221; BMC 300; Calico 2255. 7.21g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare. Fleur de Coin.

50,000

By AD 190 the growing megalomania of Commodus had permeated all areas of Roman life, as is witnessed in the material record by his coinage and the innumerable statues erected around the empire that had been set up portraying him in the guise of Hercules. The literary accounts that survive from writers such as Dio Cassius and Herodian paint a picture of Commodus’ infatuation that might be disbelieved if it were not for confirmation from so much physical evidence. However, there can be no question that late in his life Commodus believed Hercules was his divine patron, and that he worshipped him so intensely that eventually he came to believe himself an incarnation of the mythological hero, reinforcing the image of Commodus as a demigod who, as the son of Jupiter, was the representative of the supreme god of the Roman pantheon. Struck in the last years of Commodus’ reign, the reverse of this superb aureus is full of the symbolic allusion to Hercules with which the Emperor had surrounded himself in the latter part of his reign, and although the pose of the figure depicted is that of the youthful genio populi Romani with cornucopiae and patera, this image is also clearly bearded and therefore conceivably that of another version of Commodus’ Hercules. The coin depicts familiar instruments of the hero, such as the club and quiver with arrows, as well as the lion-skin he is traditionally presented with. In myth, Hercules fashioned his knotted club from a wild olive tree that he tore from the soil of Mount Helicon and subsequently used to kill the lion of Cithaeron when he was only 18 years old. An alternative suggestion, however, is that the lion-skin is supposed to be that from the Nemean lion that he killed for the first of the twelve labours, while the quiver of arrows alludes to Hercules’ sixth labour, the shooting of the Stymphalian birds. Further mythological imagery is also evident: the figure appears to have an apple in the patera he holds, as well as the cornucopiae in his other hand. The apple makes reference to the eleventh of the twelve labours which Hercules undertook, in which he was to steal the golden apples that Hera had given to Zeus as a wedding gift and were guarded by the Hesperides. During this labour, Hercules had to take the sky on his shoulders to relieve Atlas, who was the father of the Hesperides and could therefore persuade them to give up the apples. However, as property of the gods the apples had to be returned to the garden from which they had been removed, a task that Athena completed on Hercules’ behalf. Perhaps then the figure seen sacrificing on this reverse is in the act of passing the apple back to the gods for return to the Garden of the Hesperides. An account of the origin of the cornucopiae can be found in Ovid’s Metamorphoses (9. 87-88), which tells us that Hercules fought the river-god Achelous for the hand of the nymph Deianeira. Finding that he was no match for Hercules, Achelous resorted to turning himself into other creatures, and it was whilst in the form of a bull that he was finally thrown to the ground by Hercules and overpowered. During this final moment of the tussle Hercules tore a horn from the head of Achelous, which was given to the Naiads and transformed into the corucopiae.

154


493. Pertinax AR Denarius. Rome, AD 193. IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right / PROVID DEOR COS II, Providentia standing facing, head left, holding right hand up to star in top left field, with left hand on breast. RIC 11a; BMC 13; Cohen 42. 2.90g, 17mm, 6h. Very Rare - R2. Good Very Fine.

500

494. Didius Julianus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 193. IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder in lowered right hand above globe at feet to left, and cornucopiae in left hand. RIC 2; BMC 4; Cohen 8. 2.67g, 17mm, 6h. Very Rare - R3. Good Very Fine.

1,000

495. Didius Julianus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 193. IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder in lowered right hand above globe at feet to left, and cornucopiae in left hand. RIC 2; BMC 4; Cohen 8. 2.59g, 18mm, 6h. Very Rare - R3. Good Very Fine.

1,000

496. Septimius Severus AR Tetradrachm. Laodikeia ad Mare, AD 193-211. AYT · KAI · · CEOYHPOC · CE ·, laureate, draped bust right / ·DHMAPX·EZ·VPATOC·TO·G·, eagle standing facing, head left, wreath in beak; star between legs. Bellinger 52; Pieur 1149; SNG Copenhagen 360. 14.17g, 27mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

155

500


156


Two Beautiful Herculean Aureii of Septimius Severus

497. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 194. L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP II, laureate head right / DIS AVSPICIB TR P COS II P P, Hercules on left, standing left, holding club and with lion’s skin draped over arm, and Liber on right, standing left, holding oenochoe over panther. RIC 25; Calico 2446. 7.26g, 20mm, 12h. Very Rare. Fleur De Coin. Beautiful lustre.

30,000

This type celebrates Septimius Severus’ accession to the purple with a depiction of the Di Auspices Hercules and Liber, who were the guardian deities of Severus’ hometown Leptis Magner. The divine augurs mark the beginning of a new era, which began in this case when Severus deposed Didius Julianus the previous year. Hercules and Dionysus later became the patron deities of Caracalla and Geta, and this affinity of the Severans to the two deities is reflected in their coinage.

498. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 197. L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP X, laureate head right / HERCVLI DEFENS, Hercules standing right, resting right hand on club, holding bow in left hand, lion’s skin draped over left arm. RIC 111; Cohen 213; Calico 2460. 7.15g, 21mm, 12h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

15,000

The obverse of this coin makes reference to Hercules who, as one of the chief gods of Severus’ hometown of Leptis Magna, blessed his undertakings. Here he is characterised as ‘Defensor’ and is presented with the familiar attributes of club, bow, quiver of arrows and the lion skin, referencing his mythological feats and conferring similar prestige on Severus as protector of the Roman Empire. Hercules was also later adopted by Caracalla as his special patron.

Apparently Unique and Unpublished

499. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Eastern mint, AD 198-202. L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / P MAX TR P VIII COS II P P, Victory advancing left, holding wreath in right hand and palm in left. RIC -; BMC -; Calico -; for this type with different reverse legend (COS II P P), cf. RIC 125b; for the same reverse legend attributed to an eastern mint cf. RIC511, BMC 712-714. 7.06g, 21mm, 11h. Apparently Unique and Unpublished. Extremely Fine.

10,000

The eleventh acclamation of Severus as imperator marked the end of the campaign against the Parthians, which concluded with the capture of their capital Ctesiphon in 198.

157


Two Exceptional Aureii of Septimius Severus

500. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / VICTORIA PARTHICA MAXIMA, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm. RIC 297; Cohen 747; Calico 2567. 7.22g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

20,000

Septimius Severus’ Parthian campaign was concluded in 198 with the capture of the Parthian capital of Ctesiphon. On this occasion Septimius was acclaimed imperator for the eleventh time, and he received the title Parthicus Maximus. His successful campaign was celebrated on coinage over the next few years, and an arch was erected in Rome in commemoration of the event in 203. In the wake of his great triumph, Septimius elevated Caracalla, who had campaigned with him in the east, to co-augustus.

501. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, 205 AD. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / LIBERALITAS AVGG V, Liberalitas standing left holding abacus and cornucopiae. RIC 277; Cohen 295; Calico 2478. 6.59g, 20mm, 5h. Rare. Extremely Fine. Beautiful lustre and subtle red toning.

15,000

A congiarium was a liberal distribution of oil, wine, grain or money that were given to the people by a beneficent emperor. This type commemorates the fifth such allocation by Septimius Severus and Caracalla, and is personified by Liberalitas, the spirit of imperial generosity. She is depicted holding an ‘abacus’ for counting the gift that was to be given to each citizen, and a cornucopiae, the symbol of plentiful bounty.

502. Septimius Severus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 206. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / LAETITIA TEMPORVM, the spina of the Circus Maximus decorated as a ship facing left, with the turning posts at its prow and stern, a sail mounted on the central obelisk, and the spina’s other monuments visible in between; around the ship, four quadrigas racing left; below, seven animals: an ostrich at left and bear at right; between them a lion and a lioness chasing a wild ass and a panther attacking a bison. RIC 274; BMC 343. 2.84g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare - R2. Extremely Fine.

1,000

This very rare type commemorates the chariot races and animal hunt which took place on the last day of Septimius Severus’ Ludi Saeculares in AD 204, as described in the inscriptional acts of those games found in Rome in the 1870s. Dio Cassius describes that the spina of the Circus Maximus was fitted out as a ship from where the animals came, and around which the chariot racing took place. This design was repeated in later years by Caracalla (see lot 509) and Geta.

158


159


Restitvtor Vrbis

503. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 207. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left, holding Victory and sceptre, shield behind. RIC 288; Cohen 605; Calico 2529; BMC 358. 7.35g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Fleur De Coin - struck on a broad flan and with a beautiful mint lustre.

20,000

Septimius Severus was credited with restoring stability to the Roman Empire after the tumultuous reign of the emperor Commodus and the civil wars that erupted in the wake of his murder, and by the time this coin was struck he had enlarged the Empire in the east and strenghtened the southern borders through the expansion of the Limes Tripolitanus, a frontier zone of defensive forts in north Africa. The improved security of the Empire enabled Septimius to undertake restorative works in Rome itself, the theme of this coin reverse. Roma, protecting goddess of the city of Rome, is here represented referencing Septimius’ beneficient rule as founder of peace and restorer of the city. Septimius is known to havae had constructed the ‘Septizodium’, an interesting if unexplained building, at the place where the Via Appia ascends the Palatine Hill. Ammianus Marcellinus erroneously credits the builing to Marcus Aurelius (15.7.3), and implies that it was intended as a nymphaeum of imposing size and importance.

Superb and Well-Detailed Aureus

504. Septimius Severus AV Aureus. Rome, AD 210. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Victory advancing right, head left, carrying trophy and leading captive by hand. RIC 237; Cohen 544; BMC 23; Calico 2517. 7.14g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine - struck on a broad flan; lustrous.

15,000

In AD 210 when this coin was struck, Septimius Severus was campaigning in the province of Britannia with the intention of conquering the Caledonians. It was to be his last campaign, however, as he fell ill and died in York in 211, leaving his son Caracalla to make an unfavourable deal that involved ceding territory to the Caledonians and restricting the edge of the Empire to the line of Hadrian’s Wall. This reverse type, featuring Victory leading a captive enemy, must be interpreted as a propagandist issue aimed at elevating the prestige of Severus and his sons, whilst also garnering continued support for the campaign in Britannia, as up to this point the gains made were overshadowed by the hardships faced by the army. Although he made advances into territory beyond the Antonine Wall, Herodian relates that the Roman army found the terrain difficult in comparison to the local tribesmen, who were able to slip away (3, 14, 10).

160


Celebrating Septimius’ Caledonian Campaign

505. Septimius Severus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 210-211. SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right / VICTORIAE BRIT, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm. RIC 334; Calico 2564. 7.12g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

20,000

This issue was likely struck to celebrate the peace which Septimius Severus concluded with the tribesmen of Caledonia early in 210. Dio Cassius mentions that Severus and Caracalla rode forward together “in order to receive their arms and discuss the details of the truce” (77, 14, 3.), but goes on to explain that the peace did not last long. Although Severus was determined to defeat the Caledonians, the illness that eventually took his life had confined him to his quarters, preventing him from leading the army further. After the death of his father in 211, Caracalla made a deal with the Caledonians on less-than-favourable terms that required the Romans to withdraw to Hadrian’s Wall, which would serve as the border.

A Very Rare Aureus of Caracalla

506. Caracalla AV Aureus. Rome, AD 202-204. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / COS LVDOS SAECVL FEC, Liber on left, standing right, holding cup and thrysus, Hercules on right, standing left holding club and lion’s skin, panther at feet of Liber. RIC 74b; Calico 2668. 7.20g, 21mm, 12h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine. Struck on a broad flan, with full borders.

15,000

This aureus was issued to commemorate the Ludi Saeculares games held in 204 by Caracalla’s father Septimius Severus. In comparison to other issues relating to the games it is unusual: rather than depicitions of the games themselves (cf. lots 502 and 509), it references the divine patrons of Severan dynasty, Hercules and Liber, who were the guardian deities of Severus’ hometown of Leptis Magna and are found on many issues of the Severan era, having been taken up by Caracalla and Geta as their own patron deities, a their father had done before them.

161


507 508 507. Caracalla Æ19. Ilium, AD 196-217. AVK MAV ANTON CI, laureate, draped bust right / Athena Ilias standing right, holding spear in right hand and spindle in left, ILIE-WN across fields. BMC -; SNG Copenhagen -; 3.55g, 19mm, 6h. Very Rare. Near Very Fine.

250

508. Caracalla AR Drachm. Caesarea, AD 196-217. AYK MAYPH ANTWNINOC, laureate, head right / MHTP KAICA NE..., bust of female figure (Artemis?) left, holding spear and patera, ET - P across fields. SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Fitzwilliam -. 3.07g, 18mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Very Fine.

509

300

510

509. Caracalla AR Denarius. Rome, AD 206-10. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / LAETITIA TEMPORVM, the spina of the Circus Maximus decorated as a ship facing left, with the turning posts at its prow and stern, a sail mounted on the central obelisk, and the spina’s other monuments visible in between; around the ship, four quadriga’s racing left; below, seven animals: an ostrich at left and bear at right; between them a lion and a lioness chasing a wild ass and a panther attacking a bison. RIC 157; BMC 508; Cohen 118. 2.65g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare - R3. Good Very Fine.

500

Commemorating the Ludi Saeculares held by Septimius Severus in 204, this design is a type that was used by Septimius Severus himself (see lot 502), as well as his sons Caracalla and Geta. This very rare type depicts a scene described by Dio Cassius, with the Circus Maximus fitted out with a ship from which were released a selection of rare and interesting animals. 510. Caracalla AR Denarius. Rome, AD 215. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate head right / P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P, Pax standing facing, head left, holding palm branch in right hand and leaning on sceptre in left. RIC 268; Cohen 314. 3.11g, 19mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

511

300

512

511. Macrinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 217-218. IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate, cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt in right hand and sceptre in left. RIC 73; BMC 66. 3.06g, 20mm, 5h. Extremely Fine.

250

512. Macrinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 218. IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt in right hand and sceptre in left. RIC 72; BMC 17. 3.60g, 20mm, 5h. Fleur De Coin. Superb example of this type.

513

500

514

513. Diadumenian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. Rome, AD 208-18. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, draped bust right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing front, head right, holding standard in right hand and sceptre in left, with two standards to the right. RIC 102; BMC 90; Cohen 3. 3.41g, 20mm, 6h. Scarce. Near Extremely Fine.

400

Diadumenian, the nine year old son of Macrinus, was afforded only two reverse designs and is here depicted as ‘Prince of the Youth’ and is surrounded by the normal military attributes, including standards of actual soldiering and the sceptre of majesty. It is unfortunate then that the only military campaign of his father, against the Parthian Atrabanus, ended ingloriously. 514. Elagabalus AR Denarius. Antioch, AD 218-22. ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped bust right / FELICITAS TEMP, ship with sail and seven rowers and pilot; standard and acrostolium on stern, furled sail at prow. RIC 188; BMC 277. 3.18g, 19mm, 12h. Scarce. Extremely Fine.

162

500


Third Known Example

515. Severus Alexander AV Quinarius. Rome, AD 224. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped bust left / P M TR P III COS P P, Pax standing left, holding olive branch and sceptre. RIC 39; BMC 166; C. 253; Blacas Coll., 1867. 3.45g, 16mm, 10h. Extremely Rare - R4. Good Extremely Fine.

20,000

Showing the Emperor with young, smooth features, this extremely rare quinarius of Severus Alexander is the third known of its type. Struck early in his reign, and when he was still under the watchful eye of his mother, Julia Mamaea, the reverse depicting Pax was probably intended to instil a sense of calm in the Empire after the succession of assasinated emperors that had characterised the turbulent years of his predecessors.

516. Severus Alexander AV Aureus. Rome, AD 226. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped bust right / P M TR P V COS II P P, Emperor standing left, sacrificing over tripod and holding scroll in left hand. RIC 54; Calico 3107. 6.38g, 21mm, 12h. Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

10,000

517. Severus Alexander AR Denarius. Rome, AD 228-231. IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate bust right with slight drapery on far shoulder / VIRTVS AVG, Roma seated left, holding branch and inverted spear, shield behind. RIC 221; Cohen 580. 3.55g, 19mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

100

518. Balbinus AR Denarius. Rome, AD 238. IMP C D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PROVIDENTIA DEORVM, Providentia standing left, holding a wand in lowered right hand over a globe at feet to left, and cornucopiae in left hand. RIC 7; Cohen 23. 2.74g, 21mm, 12h. Scarce. Good Very Fine.

800

519. Gordian III AR Denarius. Rome, AD 241-3. IMP GORDIANVS FEL PIVS, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / AETERNITATI AVG, Sol, radiate and draped over left shoulder and arm, standing facing, head left, raising right hand and holding globe in left. RIC 111; Cohen 39. 3.27g, 21mm, 10h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

163

100


164


520. Gordian III AR Denarius. Rome, AD 241-3. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / LAETITIA AVG N, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath in right hand and anchor in left. RIC 113; Cohen 120. 3.06g, 21mm, 5h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

100

Apparently Unique and Unpublished

521. Lycaonia, Iconium. Gordian III Æ 35mm. AD 238-244. IMP CLE M LNT COPDILNVS LVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Gordian III right / COL L-EL HL-D ICONIHS, Emperor rides down a Sassanian warrior near Ceylanopinar, SR harpa (the sickle weapon) of Perseus in ex. SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; 29.18g, 30mm, 6h. Apparently unique and unpublished. About Extremely Fine.

1,000

When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia in early 243 AD, Gordian III opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the very last time in Roman history, and sent an enormous army to the east. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and finally defeated in the Battle of Resaena which took place near Ceylanopinar, in south-eastern Turkey. This unique and remarkable adventus (arrival) issue of Iconium, identifiable by the harpa of Perseus (an emblem of the city of Iconium) below the exergual line, refers to the upcoming battle and suggests that Gordian III visited the city. It was likely struck in anticipation of a Roman victory, serving as propaganda intended to boost confidence among both the soldiers and citizens of threatened cities.

522. Syria, Antioch. Philip I AR Tetradrachm. AD 244-9. AYTOK K M IOYL FILIPPOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / DHMAPX EXOVCIAC S-C, eagle standing facing, wings spread, head left with wreath in its beak, MON VRB below. BMC 507. 11.22g, 25mm, 12h. Good Very Fine.

150

523. Syria, Antioch. Philip I AR Tetradrachm. AD 244-9. AYTOK K M IOYL FILIPPOY CEB, radiate and cuirassed bust right / DHMAPX EXOVCIAC VPATO D, eagle standing facing, wings spread, head left with wreath in its beak, ANTIOXIA SC below. Prieur 430a. 13.39g, 28mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

250

524. Syria, Antioch. Philip I AR Tetradrachm. AD 244-9. AYTOK K M IOYL FILIPPOY CEB, radiate bust left / DHMAPX EXOVCIAC VPATO G, eagle standing, head right, holding wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA SC below. Prieur 350. 12.04g, 26mm, 6h. Near Extremely Fine.

165

250


525. Syria, Antioch. Philip I AR Tetradrachm. AD 244-9. AYTOK K M IOYL FILIPPOY CEB, laureate, cuirassed bust left / DHMAPX EXOVCIAC VPATO A, eagle standing left, holding wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA SC below. Prieur 461. 14.36g, 28mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

250

526. Philippopolis Arabiae. Divus Julius Marinus Æ23. Struck under Philip I, circa AD 244-9. ΘEW MARINW, bare-headed bust right supported by eagle / ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛITΩN KOΛΩNIAΣ, helmeted Roma standing left, holding patera in outstretched right hand and long spear in left, with oval shield at feet left. BMC 2. 8.58g, 23mm, 12h. Very Rare. Very Fine.

2,000

In addition to promoting his living relatives, Philip also conferred honours upon his deceased father, Julius Marinus, whom he deified. Philip’s family hailed from a somewhat obscure town in Arabia Trachonitis, and he took full advantage of his new position as emperor to also honour his hometown, which he elevated to a Roman colonia and renamed Philippopolis. The coinage of Philippopolis was an isolated series, as no coins had been struck there before Philip’s reign, and none were produced afterward.

527. Otacilia Severa Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 244-9. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG, diademed, draped bust right / PIETAS AVGVSTAE, Pietas standing facing, head left, raising right hand and holding box of perfume in left, S C across fields. RIC 208; Cohen 47, 47. 19.95g, 31mm, 12h. Extremely Fine.

500

528. Syria, Antioch. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. AD 247-9. AYTOK K M IOYL FILIPPOY CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / DHMAPX EXOVCIAC VPATO G, eagle standing, head right, holding wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA SC below. Prieur 415; McAlee 1028. 11.16g, 27mm, 1h. Extremely Fine.

250

529. Syria, Antioch. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. AD 247-9. AVTOK K M IOYL FILIPPOY CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left / DHMARX EXOVCIAC VPATO D, eagle standing right, wings open, holding wreath in its beak, ANTIOXIA S C below. Prieur -; cf. CNG 146, 23 August 2006, lot 151. 13.25g, 27mm, 1h. Good Very Fine.

166

250


530. Syria, Antioch. Trajan Decius AR Tetradrachm. AD 249-51. Antioch. AVT K G ME KV TPAIANOC DEKIOC CEB, bust right, laureate, wearing paludamentum and cuirass; two pellets below / DHMAPX EXOVCIAC, Eagle standing right on palm branch, wings spread, wreath in beak; S C in ex. BMC 580. 13.46g, 26mm, 12h. Near Extremely Fine.

250

531. Mysia, Parium. Cornelia Supera Æ21. AD 253. CORNEL SVPERA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane / Capricorn right, globe between forelegs, cornucopiae behind back, CGIHP in ex. SNG Paris 1519. 3.47g, 21mm, 6h. Rare. Fine.

300

532. Phoenicia, Tyre. Salonina Æ27. AD 254-68. CORNEL SALONINA AVG, diademed, draped bust right / COL T..., Astarte standing facing, holding transverse sceptre, erecting trophy to left, crowned by Nike on column to right, all within the arched central bay of a tetrastyle temple; palm tree, altar & murex shell before temple steps. SNG Cop -; BMC -.; for the same reverse type attributed to Tyre, cf. SNG Cop. 366, 374 and BMC 451. 15.84g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Apparently Unique and Unpublished.

1,000

533. Tacitus Silvered Æ ‘Double’ Aurelianus. Gaul, AD 275-6. IMP C M CL TACITVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and curiassed bust right / PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, holding olive branch in right hand and sceptre in left. RIC 44 var. 7.32g, 23mm, 6h. Extremely Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

Until Aurelian’s coinage reform of circa AD 271, the weight and silver content of the antoninianus had gradually decreased to virtually nothing on account of successive debasements, contributing to inflation and causing economic stagnation throughout the empire. Under his reforms, the antoninianus was increased in weight and silver content, with the new coins being tariffed at four denarii, or two pre-reform antoniniani, and thus creating in essence a new denomination – the aurelianus. This extremely rare specimen of 7.32g appears to be a double unit of this denomination.

534. Probus Æ30 Medallion. AD 276-82. IMP PROBVS PF AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear forward and shield decorated with scene of profectio / MONETA AVG, three Monetae standing facing, heads left, each holding scales in their right hands above a stack of coins at their feet, and cornucopiae in their left hands. Gnecchi II p.118, 24; Cohen 376. 21.13g, 30mm, 5h. Very Rare. Very Fine.

2,500

535. Probus Æ Antoninianus. Siscia, AD 276-82. IMP C PROBVS PF AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield, with horse’s head in left field / ADVENTVS AVG, Emperor riding left, right hand raised, left holding sceptre, XXIS in ex. RIC 627. 4.12g, 22mm, 11h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

167

750


Issues of the Tetrarchy

536. Diocletian AR Argenteus. Rome, circa AD 295-7. DIOCLETIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four Tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod, outside six-turreted enclosure with dot in archway, B in ex. RIC 40a. 3.88g, 20mm, 12h. Scarce. Good Extremely Fine.

400

537. Maximianus AR Argenteus. Ticinum, AD 294. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four Tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod, outside six-turreted enclosure with dot in archway. RIC 27b. 2.77g, 19mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

538. Maximianus AR Argenteus. Antioch, AD 296. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, three-turreted camp-gate, seven layers, open arch, no doors, H in right field, ANT in ex. RIC 35b. 3.29g, 19mm, 5h. Extremely Rare - R4. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

539. Constantius I, as Caesar, AR Argenteus. Rome, AD 295-7. CONSTANTIVS CAES, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four Tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod, outside six-turreted enclosure, A in ex. RIC 42a. 3.12g, 19mm, 5h. Scarce. Good Extremely Fine.

400

540. Constantius I AR Argenteus. Serdica, AD 305-6. CONSTANTIVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, three-turreted camp-gate, seven layers, with open arch and no doors, ∙SM∙SDΔ∙ in ex. RIC 11a. 3.14g, 19mm, 1h. Extremely Rare - R4. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

541. Constantius I and Galerius Æ ‘Medallion’. FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, radiate and cuirassed bust right / IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right. 6.90g, 22mm, 6h. Near Very Fine.

168

300


169


Beautifully Detailed and Lustrous

542. Galerius AV Aureus. Aquileia, AD 303. MAXIMIANVS CAESAR, laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing facing, head left, wearing chlamys that falls behind, holding thunderbolt in right hand and vertical spear in left, SMAQ in ex. RIC 9; Calico 4915. 5.31g, 20mm, 12h. Very Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

20,000

This remarkable coin was struck in the same year that the Great Persecution of Christians began, and is conspicuous for its depiction of Jupiter, the legend clearly implying that the security of the empire rests in the old religion, and specifically in the hands of the ‘true gods’ of Rome. The style of the head of Maximian on this piece is a marked departure from the normal tetrarchic ‘standardised’ portrait that we usually see - here instead we are confronted with an image displaying strong individualistic features. Engraved in fine style and struck on a broad flan. Ex Noble Numismatics Pty, Auction 98, 22-25 Nov 2011, lot 4999.

543 544 543. Severus II Æ Follis. Ticinum, AD 306. SEVERVS NOB CAESAR, laureate head right / VIRTVS AVGG ET CAESS NN, Mars, helmeted, advancing right, holding a transverse spear in right hand and trophy in left hand over left shoulder, TT in ex. RIC 60a. 8.76g, 28mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

500

544. Severus II Æ Follis. Trier, AD 307. FL VAL SEVERVS NOB CAES, laureate, cuirassed bust right / GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing facing, head left wearing towered crown, left shoulder and loins draped, holding patera in right hand and cornucopiae in left. RIC 660. 10.55g, 28mm, 6h. Scarce. Good Extremely Fine.

500

545 546 545. Maximinus II Æ Follis. Aquileia, AD 305-6. MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, with sceptre over right shoulder and decorated shield on left arm / VIRTVS AVGG ET CAESS NN, Prince on horseback, with shield on left arm, galloping right and spearing kneeling enemy, second enemy prostrate on ground, AQG in ex. RIC 68b. 9.65g, 28mm, 12h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

750

546. Maximinus II Æ Follis. Antioch, AD 309-10. MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, with sceptre over right shoulder and decorated shield on left arm / VIRTVS EXERCITVS, Virtus standing facing, head left, in military dress, right hand resting on shield, left hand holding vertical spear, marks across fields, ANT in ex. RIC 125 var. 6.16g, 27mm, 11h. Very Rare - R2. Very Fine.

300

547. Constantine I AE Follis. Arles, AD 313-5. IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, laureate bust left, wearing trabea, with eagle-tipped sceptre in right hand / VTILITAS PVBLICA, Soldier holding Victory on globe in left hand, recieving Utilitas standing on prow, holding cornucopiae in left hand and scales in right, PARL in ex. RIC 51. 2.49g, 22mm, 5h. Extremely Rare - R5. Near Very Fine.

170

500


171


548. Constantine I AV Solidus. Ticinum, AD 313-15. CONSTANTINUS P F AVG, Laureate head right / PM TRIB P COS IIII P P PROCOS, Emperor seated facing left, togate, on curule chair, short sceptre in left hand and globe in right. RIC 30. 4.32g, 19mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

12,000

549. Constantine I Pseudo-Argenteus. Trier, AD 318-9. IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, cuirassed bust left, wearing high-crested helmet, with spear across right shoulder / VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP, two Victories standing facing each other, holding between them a shield inscribed VOT PR above an altar, PTR in ex. RIC 208a. 2.21g, 17mm, 10h. Very Rare - R3. Good Very Fine.

300

550. Constantine I with Crispus and Constantine II, as Caesars, AR Miliarense. Sirmium, AD 320-4. CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, bare head right / CRISPVS ET CONSTANTINVS CC, confronted, bare-headed busts of Crispus and Constantine II, SIRM in ex. RIC 14. 4.34g, 22mm, 11h. Extremely Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

4,000

During his reign Constantine I made reforms to the monetary system that started with the introduction of a new gold coin, the solidus, and was followed by the reestablishment of pure silver coinage in place of the debased coins in circulation. This example, weighing 4.34g, is classified as a miliarense, which is the name applied to the pure silver coins of similar weight struck after 325. It could, therefore, be an early prototype as it was struck during the four year period that Constantine I used the city of Sirmium as his capital before moving to Nicomedia in AD 324.

551. Constantine I AV Solidus. Thessalonica, AD 326. Head right, with plain diadem, looking upwards / CONSTANTINVS CAESAR, Victory advancing left, holding wreath in right hand and branch in left, SMTS in ex. RIC 147. 4.50g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

15,000

This coin was issued to mark the visit of Constantine I to Thessalonica at the beginning of AD 326, when he was journeying to Rome. As with other types issued around the same time, it is a design made from a prototype of Nicomedia, which was Constantine’s interim capital until he declared Byzantium the new capital in 330, renaming the city Constantinopolis.

172


552. Constans AV Solidus. Trier, AD 347-8. CONSTANS AVGVSTVS, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG, two Victories facing one another, holding between them wreath inscribed VOT X MVLT XX, TR in ex. RIC 135. 4.67g, 22mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,500

553. Valentinian I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 367-75. DN VALENTINIANVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory seated facing right on cuirass, writing VOT V MVLT X on shield placed on small column, O-B across fields, CONS* in ex. RIC 26a. 4.44g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare - R3. Good Extremely Fine.

3,500

554. Gratian AR Siliqua. Trier, AD 378-83. DN GRATIANVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VIRTVS ROMANORVM, Roma seated facing, on throne, head left, holding globe in right hand and spear in left, TRPS in ex. RIC 58a. 1.90g, 17mm, 6h. Extremely Fine.

300

555. Valentinian II AV Solidus. Antioch, AD 378-83. DN VALENTINIANVS IVN PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory seated facing right on cuirass, writing VOT V on shield held on knee, Chi-Rho symbol in right field, ANOBS in ex. RIC 39a, mint-mark 1. 4.24g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare - R2. Good Extremely Fine.

173

4,000


BYZANTINE COINS

556. Theodosius II AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 430-40. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, bust facing, wearing plumed helmet, diademed, cuirassed, spear in right hand over right shoulder and behind head, on left arm shield decorated with scene of a horseman riding down an enemy / VOT XXX MVLT XXXX A, Constantinopolis enthroned facing left, holding globus cruciger in right hand and sceptre in left; by throne a shield, with star in right field, CONOB in ex. RIC 257. 4.50g, 21mm, 7h. Scarce. Extremely Fine; scratches in fields.

1,000

557. Aelia Pulcheria AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 441-50. AEL PVLCHERIA AVG, pearl-diademed bust right, wearing necklace and earrings / IMP XXXXII COS XVII P P, Constantinopolis enthroned facing left, holding globus cruciger in right hand and sceptre in left, COMOB in ex. RIC 288. 4.53g, 22mm, 12h. Extremely Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

2,000

Two Rare Coins of Valentinian III

558. Valentinian III AV Solidus, Ravenna. Circa AD 435. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, consular bust left, wearing pearl-diadem, holding mappa in right hand and cruciform sceptre in left / VOT X MVLT XX, Valentinian enthroned facing, wearing crown and richly jewelled imperial consular robe, holding mappa in right hand and cruciform sceptre in left, R V across fields, COMOB in ex. RIC 2036; Depeyrot 14/1; Ranieri 99. 4.45g, 21mm, 6h. Very Rare. Extremely Fine.

3,000

This coin was struck to celebrate the joint consulate of Valentinian III with eastern emperor Theodosius II, at the same time as the decennial vows in AD 435. At no time during Valentinian’s long and turbulent reign were the affairs of state personally managed by him, who in his minority ruled first under the control of his mother Galla Placidia, and from 437, the magister militum Flavius Aetius.

559. Valentinian III AR Siliqua. Rome, AD 455. D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VRBS ROMA, Roma seated facing left on cuirass, holding Vicory on globe in right hand, inverted spear in left, RMPS in ex. RIC 2079; RSC 46b. 2.09g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Rare - R4. Good Extremely Fine. Exceptional condition for the issue, struck in good metal on a and thick broad flan. One of the finest known.

174

3,500


560. Justin II AV Light Weight Solidus. Antioch, AD 565-78. D N IVSTINVS PP AVI, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globe surmounted by Victory, and shield / VICTORIA AVGGG ӨS, Constantinopolis seated facing, head right, holding globe in right hand and vertical spear in left, OB*+* in ex. Sear 376. 4.10g, 20mm, 6h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

300

561. Phocas AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 602-610. D N FOCAS PERP AV, bust facing, wearing consular robes and crown without pendilia / VICTORIA AVGG Є, angel standing facing, holding in right hand long staff surmounted by christogram and globus cruciger, CONOB in ex. Sear 623. 4.27g, 21mm, 7h. Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

300

562. Justinian II, First Reign, AV Tremissis. Constantinople, AD 685-95. D. IΥSΤINIANYS PЄ. AV., bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger in right hand / VICTORIA AVGYS, Cross potent, CONOB in ex. Sear 1255. 1.31g, 16mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

300

The last emperor of the Heraclian dynasty, Justinian II had been on the throne for ten years when he was overthrown in a revolt and replaced by Leontius. He spent a further ten years in exile, during which time the throne passed into the hands of Tiberius III in a second revolt, before returning at the head of an army of Slavs and Bulgars and reclaiming his throne.

563 564 563. Justinian II, Second Reign, AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 705-11. Bust of Christ facing, with curly hair and close beard, and cross behind head, wearing pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding codex in left hand / Bust of Justinian facing with short beard, wearing crown and loros, holding cross potent on three steps in right hand and patriarchal cross on globe in left hand. Sear 1413; cf. MIB 26; DOC 21; BMC 53 (1st reign). 4.45g, 18mm, 6h. Extremely Rare. Extremely Fine.

5,000

Justinian II was the first emperor to place an image of Christ on his coinage, thus showing his religious devotion.

564. Justinian II, Second Reign, AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 705-11. d N IhS ChS RЄX RЄGNANTIUM, bust of Christ facing, with cross behind head, with curly hair and short beard, wearing pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding codex in left hand / D N IUSTINIANUS ЄT TIbЄRIUS P P A’, crowned half-length figures of Justinian, on left, and smaller figure of Tiberius, on right, both wearing divitision and chlamys, jointly holding with their right hands a cross potent on two steps. Sear 1414, 4.35g, 20mm, 6h. Extremely Fine. Ex SKA Monetarium Zurich. List May 1991. No. 90.

175

3,000


565. Leo III AV Semissis. Constantinople, AD 717-41. dNO LЄON P. A. MUL, facing bust of Leo, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger in right hand and akakia to chest in left / d CONSTANTINVS, facing bust of Constantine V, beardless, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding cross potent on globus and akakia. Sear 1506. 2.09g, 17mm, 6h. Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

600

566. Constantine VI and Irene AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 780-97. ConSTAnTInOS CA, facing busts of Constantine VI, on left, and Irene, on right, both crowned and with a cross between their heads; Constantine, beardless, wears chlamys and holds globus cruciger in right hand; Irene wears loros and holds globus cruciger in right hand, cruciform sceptre in left hand; pellett in field between their faces / SVN IRI AGOVSTI MITRI AV, Leo III, Constantine V and Leo IV seated facing, each wearing crown and chlamys. Sear 1593. 4.41g, 21mm, 6h. Rare. Good Extremely Fine.

5,000

This coin, issued under Constantine VI and his mother Irene, commemorates on the reverse the previous emperors of the dynasty: the founder, Leo III, his son Constantine V and his son Leo VI. It is an excellent propaganda piece, neatly removing the usurper Artavasdus, who defeated Constantine V in battle soon after the previous emperor’s death, took possesion of Constantinople, and ruled for approximately six months before being challenged and deafeated by Constantine V.

567. Constantine VI and Irene AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 780-97. COnSΤAnTInOS bAS’ Θ, bust of Constantine VI facing, beardless, wearing crown and chlamys, holding globus cruciger in right hand and akakia to chest in left / IRInH AGOVSTI, bust of Irene facing, wearing crown and loros, holding globus cruciger in right hand and cruciform sceptre in left. Sear 1594. 4.47g, 20mm, 6h. Very Rare. Fleur De Coin. Exceptional in this grade. Perfect, lustrous surfaces.

10,000

568. Michael III AR Miliaresion. Constantinople, AD 842-67. IhSUS XRISTUS ηICA, Cross potent on three steps, with dot below, surrounded by triple border / + MIXA HL PISTOS MEGAS BASILEUS ROMAION in five lines, with triple border. Sear 1692. 2.98g, 24mm, 12h. Good Extremely Fine.

176

400


569. Basil I AV Solidus. Constantinople, AD 867-86. + IhS XPS RЄX RЄGNANTIUM *, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and raising right hand in benediction, with codex in left hand / bASILIOS ЄT COnSTANT’ AUGG’ b’, facing busts of Basil, with short beard, wearing loros, to left, and his son Constantine, beardless, wearing chlamys, to right, both crowned and holding between them patriarchal cross. Sear 1704. 4.32g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

800

570. Constantine VII and Romanus I AR Miliaresion. Constantinople, AD 913-59. Cross crosslet on three steps, small globus beneath, X at centre of cross, surrounded by triple border with sixteen equally spaced globules / + COnST’ τ’ PORFVROG’ CЄ ROmAnO Єn Xω ЄVSЄb’ b’ RωmЄOn in five lines, surrounded by triple border as on obverse. Sear 1757. 2.31g, 24mm, 12h. Very Fine.

400

571. Basil II AV Tetarteron Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 976-1025. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTInM, nimbate bust of Christ facing, wearing pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, codex in left hand; two pellets in each cross arm of nimbus / + bASIL C CONSTΛnT Ib R, crowned facing busts of Basil II in loros of square pattern on left, and Constantinus VII in V-shaped overgarment ornamented with pearls; together and between them they hold a partriarchal cross with X on shaft. Sear 1806. 4.21g, 20mm, 6h. Good Extremely Fine.

1,000

Ruling the Byantine Empire for almost half a century, Basil II vastly increased its borders through the incorporation of the Bulgarian Empire in AD 1014, enlarging the state to its greatest territorial extent in four centuries. This was, however, not to last. On his death he was succeed by his brother Constantine VIII, a man more interested in the pleasures of life and under whom decline once again set in.

Very Good Style

572. Constantine VIII AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1025-28. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTInm, bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown (ornamented with two crescents in its upper quarters), pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding codex in left hand, surrounded by triple border / + CωnSτAnτIn bASILЄUS ROm, bust facing, with long beard, wearing crown and loros, holding labarum with pellet on shaft in right hand and akakia in left hand, surrounded by triple border. Sear 1815. 4.41g, 26mm, 6h. Rare. Fleur De Coin. Excellent Style.

177

2,000


573. Romanus III AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1028-34. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTInM, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding codex in left hand / ΘCЄ bOHΘ’ RωMAnω, the Virgin, nimbate, on right, wearing pallium and maphorium, with her right hand crowns Romanos, on left, bearded, wearing saccos and loros and holding globus cruciger in left hand; M Θ between their heads in field. Sear 1819. 4.44g, 23mm, 6h. Fleur De Coin.

2,000

Ex Harlan Berk Auction 46, 16 Dec 1986, lot 216.

574. Constantine IX AV Tetarteron Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1042-55. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTInm, bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, holding codex in left hand, surrounded by single border / + CωnSτAnτn bASILЄUS Rm, bust facing, bearded, wearing crown and jewelled chlamys, and holding sceptre with trefoil top in right hand across chest, with globus cruciger in left hand. Sear 1832. 4.01g, 18mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

1,000

575. Theodora, Second Reign, AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1055-6. + IhS XIS RЄX RЄGNANTInm, Christ standing facing on footstool , wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, holding codex in both hands, surrounded by double border / + θЄOΔωPA AVGOVCTA, Theodora, to left, wearing crown, saccos and loros, and the Virgin, on right, nimbate and clad in pallium and maphorium, with M and Θ either side of Her shoulders, both standing facing, holding between them labarum, surrounded by double border. Sear 1837. 3.97g, 24mm, 5h. Rare. Extremely Fine.

1,500

576. Issac I AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1057-59. + Ihs XIS RЄX RЄGNANTInm, Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbuc crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in left, surrounded by double border / +ICAAKIOC RACIΛЄVC PωM, Issac, bearded, standing facing, wearing crown and military attire (cuirass, tunic, cloak, and high boots), holding in right hand a drawn sword, with left resting on sheath, surrounded by double border. Sear 1843. 4.43g, 25mm, 5h. Good Extremely Fine.

178

1,000


577. Romanus IV AV Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1068-71. + PωMAN’ ЄVΔOKIA, Christ standing facing, on footstool, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, and crowning Romanos to left and Eudcoia to right, both standing facing, wearing saccos and loros, and holding globus cruciger; on either side of Christ’s head, IC XC, double border / KωN MX ANΔ, Michael in centre, Constantius to left and Andronicus to right, all standing facing; Michael wears crown, loros and saccos, and holds labarum in right hand, akakia in left; his brothers both hold globus cruciger and akakia, below a dotted exergual band, double border. Sear 1861. 4.39g, 27mm, 6h. Good Very Fine.

200

578. Alexius I AR Histamenon Nomisma. Constantinople, AD 1081-92. Christ enthroned facing, on square-backed throne, wearing nimbus crown, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, holding codex in left hand, IC and XC across fields / AΛЄIIω ΔЄPOT, Tω KM, bust facing, wearing crown and jewelled chlamys, holding sceptre surmounted by pelleted star in right hand, and globus cruciger in left. Sear 1893. 3.19g, 31mm, 5h. Near Very Fine.

250

579. Theodore II, Ducas-Lascaris, AR Trachy. Magnesia, AD 1254-58. St. Tryphon, beardless and nimbate, standing facing, holding cross in front of chest / Crowned figure of Theodore standing facing, wearing divitision and chlamys, holding labarum and globus surmounted by patriarchal cross. Sear 2138. 2.67g, 28mm, 5h. Very Fine.

150

580. Byzantine Æ Weight. ELA FPON in two lines / +PA AAIONO AOTPA XON in four lines. 4.27g, 19mm, 6h.

200

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END OF SALE

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Roma Numismatics Auction III