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2013 National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE)

Presented to Rollins College By the Siena College Research Institute (SRI) January 13, 2014

515 Loudon Road Loudonville, NY 12211


Table of Contents Guide to your NASCE Report

3

NASCE Quick Facts

4

Introduction

5

POP Scores: The NASCE’s unique measure of service Overview: Service at Rollins

6

Servicing Needs at Rollins: Individual POP Scores Civic Participation

7

Economic Opportunity

8

Elder Care

9

Environmental

10

Health

11

Homelessness

12

Hunger

13

Religious

14

Youth

15

Frequency Data Demographics and Weighted Data

16

Comparative POP Scores

18

Service Participation & Service Awareness

19

Service Motivations, Volunteer Attitudes, & Institutional Promotion

20

Service Leadership & Club Involvement

22

Summary and Recommendations

23

Using POP for Strategic Impact

Appendix 1

Detailed Explanation of the POP Scores

Appendix 2

Implementation Details

Appendix 3

Glossary of Terms

Appendix 4

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Guide to Your NASCE Report 1. The NASCE provides you with a unique measurement – the POP Score – for your entire institution as well as each of nine areas of need. The POP score, based upon the Percent of the Possible service performed by your students provides a quick and understandable assessment of a) how many students are serving, b) how often they are serving and c) with what depth they are serving. All three of those factors are included in the development of the POP Score. • Impressive Service: Students serve frequently and maintain substantive connections with service sites beyond individual projects. Your institution is Impressive making a difference. 60+

40-60 High

• High Level Service: Students are engaged. Small gaps in participation, frequency, or depth hinder peak service. Potential for greater contribution exists.

• Moderate Level Service: Students are serving; however, significant gaps in student participation, frequency, or depth present opportunity for improvement. Moderate Data and the POP scores identify areas of weakness. 20-40

0-20 Low

• Low Level Service: Little student involvement. Service takes the form of "oneshot" activities with little commitment. If the school wishes to expand its service contribution, data points the way.

A more complete explanation of POP score development and interpretation can be found in Appendices 1 and 2. 2. The NASCE also gives you a visual measure of students’ Capacity Contribution. The graphic, found on the Overview and Individual Area Needs Detail Pages (pages 6-15) represents the cumulative percent of the total service score across your student population. A severe curve points to disproportional service by a select few students while a line approaching flat indicates equal participation among those students who serve, a “culture of service”. Additionally, the Capacity Contribution curve shows the percentage of students not involved in service. 3. The report highlights frequency data for service performed, and attitudes towards service on pages 16-22. 4. A general summary and recommendations informed by the data are available on page 23. All data cross tabulated by multiple student demographics is attached as an appendix.

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute © Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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2013 NASCE Quick Facts1 Rollins College

Rollins

SAMPLE

Percentage of Students Reporting Service in College

73%

46%

Percentage of Students Reporting Service Prior to College

96%

86%

Change from High School (percentage points)

23

40

POP Scores 29

Institutional

17 17

37

Civic

7

11

Economic

8

Elder Care

8 39

Environmental

16 22

29

Health

12

27

Homelessness

15

30

Hunger

16

14

Religious

40

62

Youth 0

20 Low

40 Moderate

60 High

80 Impressive

Student Opinions (Agree or Strongly Agree): Overall, I would say that Rollins promotes community service among the student body.

96%

84%

I think the college does an appropriate job of informing students of all the ways they can be engaged in the community.

88%

72%

Overall, I am satisfied with my personal level of involvement in community service here at Rollins.

67%

59%

The column labeled “Sample� contains data from 27,038 students at colleges and universities from 2009-2013. The economic data reflects only 24,239 students; however, the missing students were assigned the mean economic score. All data represents the sum scores of all students in the entire dataset rather than institutional data. Rollins students are excluded from this data. 1

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Jan. 13, 2014 We developed the NASCE because we believe service is beneficial to students, colleges and communities. Students learn, grow and become in many ways better citizens through service. Colleges succeed in living their missions through enhancing, facilitating and supporting service. And communities find ways to effectively partner with their college neighbors while experiencing needed assistance through the service performed by students. Service is a Win – Win – Win. Colleges celebrate their students, and with good reason. Students perform service. Yet, questions remain. How much? How often? How integrated into their service sites are they? The NASCE gives schools the data necessary to speak confidently on these topics. While anecdotal cases offer powerful examples of service, NASCE participant institutions are equipped with the statistical information to understand the role service plays throughout their campus community. In October 2013, Rollins College administered the National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement in order to better understand student service on its campus. Five hundred fifty-seven students participated in the survey, representing 29% of Rollins’ total undergraduate day students (for implementation details see Appendix 3). These students reported service patterns as detailed through this report. NASCE Quick Facts offers a brief summary of the survey findings. Seventy-three percent of Rollins students report participating in some type of community service while in college, a decline of 23 percentage points from high school levels. Measured via the NASCE-unique POP score (POP combines service, frequency, and depth into one score), Rollins demonstrates impressive service addressing Youth Needs, moderate service addressing Civic Participation, the Environment, Health, Homelessness, and Hunger, and low service in the areas of Economic Opportunity, Elder Care, and Religious Service. When compared to scores from 27,038 college students collected from 2009-2013 (see page 4), Rollins’ student body performed better in eight of the nine areas, achieving significantly higher scores in the areas of Civic Participation, Hunger, the Environment, Homelessness, and Youth. Overall, 96% of students agree that the college promotes service and 88% agree that Rollins does an appropriate job informing students of service opportunities. Because Rollins’ NASCE dataset had a disproportionately high number of female respondents (see page 16), we also weighted the data to reflect Rollins’ actual gender distribution of enrolled undergraduate students (59% female, 41% male) and to reflect an equal distribution of students between each of the four undergraduate cohorts. The weighted POP Scores for each area and overall are included on page 16. Thank you for participating in the 2013 NASCE. We hope you find the data and analysis in this report helpful in both assessing and understanding service at Rollins and in your strategic planning process as you move forward. We look forward to continuing to assist you in your efforts to enhance Rollins’ overall community contribution. Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Don Levy Produced by the Siena College Research Institute © Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Institutional: All Service / All Areas 29

Rollins POP Score

0

Low

20 Moderate

40

60 Impressive 80

High

Do you participate in community service here at Rollins? No 27%

Yes 73%

How many hours per month do you engage in community service? 34%

35%

Econ 4%

36% Youth 24%

30% 25%

20%

20% 15% 10%

5%

5%

4%

Less than 5

Between Between Between 5-9 10-19 20-29

Hunger 12%

30 or more

Homelessness 6%

Capacity Contribution: Institutional 73% of students contribute to a POP score of 29.

27% of students report doing no service.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

Elder Care 3% Environment 17%

Religion 6%

0%

Civic 15%

75%

Health 11%

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 100%

POP Score

40%

Total Service by Needs Area

10% of students account for 37% of the Institutional POP score.

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Civic Participation / Public Awareness 37

Civic POP Score 0

Low

20

Moderate

40

60

High

Impressive

80

Do you participate in service promoting public awareness or civic participation? No 67%

Yes 33%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60% 75% 45% 30% 15% 0%

27%

60%

32%

49% 38%

45% 13%

13%

11% 5%

27%

30% 15%

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

33% of students contribute to a POP score of 37

67% of students do no service addressing civic needs or public awareness.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

75%

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 100%

POP Score

Capacity Contribution: Civic

10% of students account for 61% of the Civic POP score.

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Economic Opportunity 11

Economic POP Score 0

20

40

Low

Moderate

60 High

80 Impressive

Do you participate in service addressing economic justice? No 90%

Yes 10%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60%

75%

45% 30% 15%

29%

38%

45% 14%

12%

10% 0%

0%

48%

60%

34%

22%

30% 15%

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

90% of students do no service addressing economic access and justice.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

75%

40 35 30 25 10% of students 20 contribute to a POP 15 score of 11 10 5 0 100%

POP Score

Capacity Contribution: Economic

10% of students account for 99% of the Economic POP score

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Elder Care 8

Elder Care POP Score 0

Low

20

Moderate

40

High

60

Impressive

80

Do you participate in service addressing elder care? No 89%

Yes 11%

With what frequency? 45%

30%

15%

70%

44%

75% 60%

30%

45% 11%

25% 8%

30%

7% 0%

0%

With what depth?

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

15%

15% 0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

11% of students contribute to a POP score of 8. 89% of students do no service addressing elder care.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

75%

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 100%

POP Score

Capacity Contribution: Elder

10% of students account for 97% of the Elder POP score.

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Environmental Efforts 39

Environmental POP Score 0

Low

20

Moderate

40

High

60

80

Impressive

Do you participate in service addressing environmental efforts? No 56%

Yes 44%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60% 45%

75% 35%

37%

60%

30%

33%

45% 15%

15% 0%

58%

6%

2%

5%

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

21%

30% 15% 0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

44% of students contribute to a POP score of 39.

56% of students do no service addressing environmental needs.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

75%

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 100%

POP Score

Capacity Contribution: Environmental

10% of students account for 53% of the Environmental POP score.

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Health or Fitness 29

Health POP Score 0

Low

20

Moderate

40

High

60

80 Impressive

Do you participate in service working to promote health or fitness? No 66%

Yes 34%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60%

75% 41%

45%

60%

32% 30% 15% 0%

58%

36%

45% 14%

20%

30%

10% 3%

2%

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

15% 0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

Capacity Contribution: Health 40 35 30 25 20 15

POP Score

34% of students contribute to a POP score of 29.

10 66% of students do no service addressing health or fitness needs.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

5 75%

0 100% 10% of students account for 57% of the Health POP score.

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Homelessness or Housing 27

Homelessness POP Score 0 Low

20 40 Moderate

High

60

80 Impressive

Do you participate in service addressing homelessness or housing? No 68%

Yes 32%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60%

58%

60% 30%

30% 15%

13%

9% 2%

0%

35%

45% 4%

19%

30% 15%

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

Capacity Contribution: Homelessness 32% of students contribute to a POP score of 27.

40 35 30 25 20 15 10

68% of students do no service addressing Homelessness.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

POP Score

45%

75% 42%

5 75%

0 100% 10% of students account for 63% of the Homelessness POP score.

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Hunger or Nutrition Issues 30

Hunger POP Score 0

Low

20

Moderate

40

High

60

80 Impressive

Do you participate in service addressing hunger and nutrition? No 62%

Yes 38%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60% 45%

75% 40%

60%

60%

34%

37%

45%

30% 14%

30%

9%

15%

2%

2%

0% Once Several About Several About or Times a Once a Times a Once a Twice a Year Month Month Week Year

More Than Once a Week

14%

15% 0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

Capacity Contribution: Hunger 40 35 30 25 20 15 10

62% of students do no service addressing hunger or nutrition.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

POP Score

38% of students contribute to a POP score of 30.

5 75%

0 100% 10% of students account for 53% of the Hunger POP score.

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Religious or Spiritual Needs 14

Religious POP Score 0

Low

20 Moderate

40

High

60

80 Impressive

Do you participate in service addressing religious or spiritual needs? No 92%

Yes 8%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60%

75%

45% 30% 15% 0%

51%

60% 19% 13%

17%

19%

49%

45% 17%

15%

30%

21%

15% Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

0%

One-Shot

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

Capacity Contribution: Religious/Spiritual 40 35

25

8% of students contribute to a 20 POP score of 14. 15 10

92% of students do no service addressing religious or spiritual needs. 0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

POP Score

30

5 75%

0 100% 5% of students account for 83% of the Religious POP Score

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Youth Services 62

Youth POP Score 0

Low

20

40 Moderate

60

High

80 Impressive

Do you participate in service addressing youth concerns? No 55%

Yes 45%

With what frequency?

With what depth?

60%

75%

45%

15% 0%

24%

24%

43%

36%

37%

Regular Involvement

Deep Commitment

45% 14%

12%

15%

11%

30% 15%

Once or Several About Several About More Twice a Times a Once a Times a Once a Than Year Year Month Month Week Once a Week

0%

One-Shot

80

Capacity Contribution: Youth

70

45% of students contribute to a POP score of 62.

60 50 40 30

POP Score

30%

60%

20 55% of students do no service addressing youth needs.

0%

25%

50% Percent of Respondents

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

10 75%

0 100% 10% of students account for 47% of the Youth POP score.

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Demographics and Weighted Data Gender

Class Year Senior 26%

Male 26%

Freshman 24%

Junior 24%

Female 74%

Sophomore 26%

Weighted POP Scores

Unweighted Scores 29

29

Institutional

37

38

Civic

11

12

Economic

8

8

Elder Care

39

41

Environmental Health

29

29

Homelessness

28

27 31

Hunger

30 14

13

Religion

61

Youth

0

20

40

60

62

80

Low Moderate High Impressive *Since the gender distribution in Rollins’ NASCE dataset had a disproportionately high number of females, in addition to reporting the data as is, we also weighted the data to accurately reflect the gender distribution of Rollins’ enrolled undergraduate students (59% female and 41% male), and to reflect an even distribution of college freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors (25% for each class). The above graph displays the POP Scores of the weighted dataset. Notably, there was no change to the Institutional POP Score and very little change to specific area POP Scores once the data was weighted* Produced by the Siena College Research Institute © Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Average Age: 21

Average Rollins GPA:

Which of the following best describes your high school experience?

I would describe myself as:

Hispanic or Latino 12%

Multiracial 6%

3.35

8%

Native American <1%

2%

I attended a public school for my entire time in high school

32%

I attended a private school for my entire time in high school

Asian 5%

I attended both public and private schools during my high school

Black or AfricanAmerican 6%

Caucasian 71%

58%

I was homeschooled

I believe my family's total income last year was: 18%

More than $250,000 5%

More than $200,000 but less than $250,000

11%

More than $150,000 but less than $200,000

19%

More than $100,000 but less than $150,000

22%

More than $50,000 but less than $100,000

24%

Less than $50,000 0%

70%

5%

10%

Do you have a job or internship to which you report to during the academic year?

20%

25%

How many hours per week do you work at your job or internship? 25%

54%

60%

15%

46%

18%

20%

50%

Job

40%

No Job

30%

15% 10%

20%

19%

10%

At least 5 but less than 10 At least 10 but less than 20

7%

20 or more

5%

10%

Less than 5

0%

0% At Rollins

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

At Rollins

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Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Economic: Rollins Economic: High School

Youth: Rollins Youth: High School

Religious Service: Rollins Religious Service: High School

Hunger: Rollins Hunger: High School

Homelessness: Rollins Homelessness: High School

Health: Rollins Health: High School

Environmental: Rollins Environmental: High School

Elder Care: Rollins Elder Care: High School

Civic: Rollins Civic: High School

Institutional Total High School Total

0

11 10

Low

8

14

20

30

31

Moderate

27

29

29

30

29

40

39

37

42

41

Before and at Rollins

High

46

51

12 45 48

Hunger Religious Service Youth

60

59 62

Impressive

4

Homelessness

1

17

Health

Economic

12

21

Elder Care Environmental

7

12

Civic Participation

80

Rollins:

Change from High School to Institutional

Overall and Area Level POP Scores:

100

110


Avenues for Student Service Participation Breakdown of Total Service by Rollins Student Volunteers Club or Organization/ Sports Team 53%

Service 73%

No Service 27%

Individual Projects 22% Course/ Academic Office 25%

Avenues for Student Service Awareness How have you heard about service opportunities available Motivations, here Obstacles, and Satisfaction at Rollins? 90%

Campus emails

86%

Through a club

84%

Word of mouth

80%

Social Media like Facebook Flyers

71%

In a class

71% 61%

Office of Community Engagement Office of Student Involvement

54%

Residence life

53% 49%

Organizational Fair Office of Student Success

41%

Campus Radio Station

41% 20%

SESi Initiative

17%

The Sandspur 0%

10%

20%

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30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

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Obstacles to Service 84%

I'm too busy with schoolwork 55%

I have to work Lack of transportation

49%

I'm too busy with my friends/social activities

48% 41%

I don't know what is available 32%

What I would like to do is not available

23%

I'm not interested 16%

It makes me uncomfortable 12%

Previous bad experience 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Strongly Agree

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

Agree

Motivations forand Service Institutional Service Promotion Volunteer Attitudes 97%

I believe I can help people who are in need It makes me feel good about myself

95%

It is the right thing to do

94%

I want to gain experience/insight

90%

I meet people through participating

89% 85%

It is important to have on my record 74%

I want to change the world 62%

I have been required to 51%

Because my friends do it

49%

It is important to my faith/religious beliefs 24%

I don't want to feel guilty 0%

20% Strongly Agree

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40%

60%

80%

100%

Agree

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Overall, I would say that Rollins promotes community service among the student body. Agree 39%

I think the college does an appropriate job of informing students of all the ways they can be engaged in the community.

Disagree 4% Strongly Disagree 1%

Disagree 12%

Agree 47%

Strongly Disagree 1%

Strongly Agree 40%

Strongly Agree 56%

Overall, I am satisfied with my personal level of involvement in community service here at Rollins. Disagree 31%

Over the past month, have you been asked by a fellow student, staff, or faculty member at your college to volunteer for any organization or cause in your community? No 24%

Agree 47% Strongly Disagree 2%

Yes 76%

Strongly Agree 20%

How important is it to you that you contribute to addressing the needs of people that require assistance in your community? Somewhat important 36%

Not very important 6% Not at all important 1%

Very important 57%

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Which of the following two positions is closer to your view? The volunteer efforts of students from our college have a substantial impact on the lives of those that need assistance Volunteering is a nice thing to do and no doubt makes people feel good but it really doesn't change anyone's life

11%

89%

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Service Leadership In which of the following ways have you participated in service here at Rollins College? Of Those Who Serve

Of All Respondents

I have organized/planned a service project that involved other volunteers

43%

31%

I have helped facilitate a group service project as a group leader

38%

27%

I have participated in a service-based trip

49%

36%

Club Involvement Club/Extracurricular Involvement in High School Deeply Involved 64%

Club/Extracurricular Involvement at Rollins No Clubs or Activities 7%

No Clubs or Activities 3% Some Clubs or Activities 9%

One or More Regularly 24%

Deeply Involved 48%

Some Clubs or Activities. 16%

One or More Regularly 29%

*The percentage of students who are regularly or deeply involved in extracurricular activities at Rollins decreases from 88% in high school to 77% in college, similar to but slightly less than the drop-off in community service from high school to college (96% to 73%). About 7% of Rollins students say they are not involved in any extracurricular activities such as clubs, organizations, sports, or other outside activities. NASCE data shows that club/student organization involvement is related to increased service participation.* Produced by the Siena College Research Institute Š Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Summary

Summary and Recommendations

1.

Students at Rollins perform service at the moderate rate (POP Score of 29), and comparatively higher than the NASCE national sample of 27,038 students. Overall, 73% of Rollins students are engaged in community service of some kind, which represents a comparatively small dropoff from high school levels (23 percentage points).

2.

Ninety-three percent of Rollins students are involved in extracurricular activities including clubs and student organizations, above the national sample (71%). Forty-nine percent of Rollins students are deeply involved in extracurricular activities, a drop of 16 percentage points from high school rates.

3.

Across 5 distinct areas – Youth, Civic Participation, the Environment, Hunger, and Homelessness (and Health to a lesser extent) – Rollins significantly outperforms the national sample.

4.

Looking at the total amount of service performed by Rollins students, 53% of it is done through clubs, organizations or sports teams; while one-quarter of students engage in community service as part of a course or through an academic office (p. 19).

5.

Nearly all Rollins students agree that Rollins promotes community service among the student body, and almost 9 out of 10 say the college does an appropriate job informing students of service opportunities. More than three-quarters of students say that over the past month they have been asked by a fellow student, staff, or faculty member to volunteer.

Recommendations 1.

While the dropoff in service from high school to college is comparatively low at Rollins, it still exists (23 percentage points). Develop existing programs to address and lessen the gap between High School and Collegiate service with the end goal of eliminating the dropoff altogether.

2.

While Rollins students are involved in community service at a significantly higher rate than the national sample (73% compared to 46%) and its POP Scores are comparatively higher in most areas, still 70% of students report doing, on average, less than 10 hours of service per month (34% do less than 5). Building on the structures that Rollins already has in place (especially those in its 5 strongest areas), implement programs and partnerships that foster campus-wide service engagement at more frequent and deeper levels, moving away from “one-shot” service events towards sustained and committed involvement for the entire student body.

3.

Despite nearly equal rates of service participation in the areas of Youth (45%) and the Environment (44%), the Youth POP Score is 23 points higher than the Environment POP (62 vs. 39) indicating that students are engaged in service at higher levels of frequency and depth in the area of Youth. Consider and assess Rollins’ service programs addressing each of the nine areas, and use Youth as a model to enhance programs in stronger areas that are still dominated by less frequent, “one-shot” service (like the Environment), and to implement new developmental initiatives in weaker areas (like Elder Care and Economic Justice).

4.

While 93% of students agree that it is important to contribute to addressing the needs of those that require assistance, one-third of students are not satisfied with their personal level of involvement in community service. The largest obstacles to service identified by Rollins students are schoolwork (84%), work (55%), and lack of transportation (49%). Expanding service-learning offerings and incorporating community service requirements into school-sponsored work positions are two potential ways to overcome the first two obstacles, while providing transportation to off-campus service sites is a tangible solution to the third one.

5.

Utilize the NASCE Report and POP Scores to strategically enhance Rollins’ overall service contribution and community contribution (see next page).

Produced by the Siena College Research Institute © Dr. Mathew Johnson and Dr. Donald Levy

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Appendix 1: Strategic Impact POP Scores are created by combining participation, frequency, and depth in service activities. The following example will offer various ways that service can be understood and impacted through strategic planning efforts. Example: Service addressing Civic Participation at XYZ College. Current POP Score: 20 Participation in Service: 17% Average Frequency of Service: Several Times a Year (2.32/4) Average Depth of Service: One-Shot Service /Regular Involvement (1.85/3) To reach a target POP score of 45: Method #1: Method #2: Method #3: Method #4:

Increase gross participation across campus Increase frequency of service among current volunteers Increase depth of service among current volunteers Any combination of the above

Method #1: Make service addressing civic participation compulsory for XYZ students.2 Participation: 100% Frequency: 2.32/4 Depth: 1.85/3 Resulting POP Score: 107 Method #2: Have active students commit to service activities once a week. Participation: 17% Frequency: 4/4 Depth: 1.85/3 Resulting POP Score: 31 Method #3: Integrate active students into partnerships with specific service sites. Participation: 17% Frequency: 2.32/4 Depth: 3/3 Resulting POP Score: 29 Method #4: Combination Participation: 30% Frequency: 3/4 Depth: 2/3 Resulting POP Score: 45

2

While merely increasing community service participation to 100% will indeed create a POP score in a high range, doing so without addressing frequency and depth will yield a low quality, low impact, and potentially damaging increase in community involvement.

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Appendix 2: The POP Score Based upon the Percent of the Possible service at an institution, POP Scores are meant to offer a quick and easily understood reference point for levels of service. The measure includes self-reported indicators of service participation, frequency, and depth. Three questions form the basis of the POP measure: 1) Do you participate in service addressing Issue X? a. Yes (1) b. No (0) 2) How often would you say you did that type of service? a. Once a year (1) b. Several times a year – Once a month (2) c. Several times a month (3) d. Weekly or more (4) 3) Which best describes your level of involvement? a. I would participate at an event or short term drive. Usually it was one-shot type involvement. (1) b. I was involved on a regular basis for a period of time. One example would be a regular commitment to be there once a week for an entire semester, or another would be to participate on a service trip for most of each day for a period of time. (2) c. I was deeply involved in a project or cause and dedicated to it. Rather than thinking of my service as a chore or time commitment, I was drawn to serve by the issue or problem and worked towards its resolution. (3) An individual’s responses are multiplied to create area level individual scores ranging from 0-12. These totals are summed across the institution and divided by the maximum score.  (Service * Frequency * max(Depth)) n*12 The area level scores are averaged to create the institutional percent of the possible. Both institutional and area scores are then normalized with .33 equaling a POP Score of 100.

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Appendix 3: Implementation Details The National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE) was administered at Rollins College in the Fall of 2013 by the Siena College Research Institute (SRI), in conjunction with Rollins. After confirmed participation in the NASCE, Rollins completed an individuation process. This process was used by SRI to create the customized NASCE web-module for Rollins. Rollins then provided SRI with a complete list of current undergraduate student email addresses. Over twelve days, four successive email invitations (Monday, Thursday, Monday, and Wednesday) were sent from SRI to each student, with a link to the web-based survey. Individual user names or passwords were not provided to students. The first 400 students who participated in the survey were given a free “Anchor R” t-shirt, as a material incentive to participate. After the twelve day window, the web-portal closed and SRI began the data analysis. Previous research indicates that students who perform service are more likely to participate in surveys addressing service. The inclination to participate among students who serve implies an overestimation of service by the NASCE due to its reliance on voluntary participation.

The “Other” Category of Service In addition to the nine areas of service recorded above, the survey also provides students with the option of “Other (Please Specify)” to ensure that all types of service are included in the analysis. While the students who select “Other” have been included in the overall percentage of students who serve at Rollins, they are not included in the institution’s overall POP score. We track “Other” at every participating school across our entire sample, and it does not have a significant effect on institutions’ POP scores. In Rollins’ case, 34 students (6%) chose “Other.” To see what they said specifically, please refer to Q24_OO in the raw dataset.

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Appendix 4: Glossary of Terms Prompts provided to respondents within the survey:  Community Service: any activity, including internships and work study, in which you participate with the goal of providing, generating and/or sustaining help for individuals and groups who have unmet human needs in areas like shelter, health, nutrition, education, and opportunity.  Civic Participation: types of service promoting public awareness or civic participation (e.g. voter awareness, human rights, refugees & immigration, public safety)  Economic Opportunity, Access, and Development: types of service promoting economic access and justice (e.g., tax assistance, job training, fair trade)  Elder Care: types of service addressing elder care (e.g. adopt a grandparent, nursing home)  Environmental: types of service addressing environmental efforts (e.g. local clean-up, environmental advocacy)  Health: types of service working to promote health or fitness (e.g. donating blood, visiting the sick, raising money to combat a disease)  Homelessness: types of service addressing homelessness or housing (e.g. Habitat for Humanity, Affordable Housing)  Hunger: types of service addressing hunger and nutrition issues (e.g. soup kitchen, food drive)  Religion: types of service addressing religious or spiritual service (e.g. teaching a Sunday School class, mission work)  Youth: types of service addressing youth services (e.g. tutoring, coaching, working on a toy drive)

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Rollins NASCE Report  

The NASCE provides you with a unique measurement – the POP Score – for your entire institution as well as each of nine areas of need. The PO...

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