Page 1

Diploma Project 2012 Save Trees

Student: Rohit Rajan Guide: Mr.Prakash Moorthy


Save Trees Animation Short Film Student Rohit Rajan (Communication Design) Guide Mr. Prakash Moorthy Institute D J Academy of Design Othakkalmandapam Post Coimbatore -641 032 Tamil Nadu,India. Sponsored by: STUDIO EEKSAURUS PRODUCTIONS PVT LTD, 201/202,Opulence,6th Road, TPS III, Santacruz [E] Mumbai- 400055


Save Trees | Animation Short Film

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Contents Project brief............................................................................................................................01 Research..................................................................................................................................03 Concept exploration...........................................................................................................17 Synopsis..................................................................................................................................24 Concept Art...........................................................................................................................25 Character Design.................................................................................................................35 StoryBoard.............................................................................................................................43 Boardomatics........................................................................................................................73 Layouts....................................................................................................................................75 Animatics................................................................................................................................87 References..............................................................................................................................89 Acknowledgement.............................................................................................................90

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Save Trees | Animation Short Film

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Project brief To develop an animation short film to save trees.

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

01

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Save Trees | Animation Short Film

02

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research Save Trees | Animation Short Film

03

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


How do trees help us? Trees cleanse and improves the quality of air by absorbing pollutants from the air.

cools down the climate

Prevents soil erosion,landslides

Cannot be digitalised kitchen napkins face tissues wet wipes

Produces oxygen

Getting digitalised

paper bags carboard box

calendars envelops books newspapers

Toilet paper egg cartons

Rate of consumption is very high non recycled

recycled collection of waste

chlorine used for bleaching

chlorine used for bleaching

dioxin & other toxic gases Save Trees | Animation Short Film

electricity water used in used in production production

electricity used in water used in production production 04

trees cut down

dioxin & other toxic gases Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


SAVE TREES

How can we save trees?

Why should we save trees?

Suggest an alternative for the products from trees

Because we are loosing our forest cover

How are we loosing the forest cover?

Bring awareness about the consiquences of cutting down of trees

Reduce the use of products from trees

Deforestation Pulp products

Wood products

What if we loose the forest cover?

Farming lands land slides

soil erosion extinction of species volcanoes

climatic changes green house effect

boats

toothpicks

doors

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

sports equipments

matches

Rise in level of carbon dioxide

furniture

musical instruments

05

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Why should we save trees? The woodlands of the earth are in a great threat.The abundant jungles of our earth are rapidly becoming extinct. We are loosing the forest cover of our earth rapidly due to the destruction called deforestation. Due to this destruction we are not only damaging the earth but also harming other species. What is deforestation? What are the effects of defoestation? Deforestaion means cutting down of trees of the forest in mass to meet the needs of the people. Destruction of forest cover can be attributed to natural process such as volcanoes and landslides. It generally increases rate of soil erosion. climatic changes would increase dramatically and many mllions of species, possibly us included would be extinct. Levels of carbondioxide and global warming kepps rising. Extinction of species: approximately 1 species per year from mammals and birds, which is approximately 23,000 species per year 40 years. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

06

Why are trees important ? How do trees help us? Trees absorb carbon dioxide and are vital carbon sinks.. They filter the air and keep it fresh by absorbing carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Each tree absorbs approximately 25kg of carbon emmissions each year, meaning 1 ton is removed from the atmosphere over a 40 year lifetime. Tree roots stabilize the soil and prvent soil erosion. Trees improve water quality by slowing and filtering rain water as well as protect aquifers and watersheds. Trees lower air temperature and induce rainfall by evaporating water from their leaves. Trees offer protection from downward fall if rain, sleet and hail as well as reduce storm run-off and possibility of flooding. Trees act as sound barriers to reduce noise pollution. They play a major role in helping to conserve the intensity of earths magnetic field.Trees provide food,shade and shelter to humans and wildlife.In one month trees are able to produce oxygen required for 10 people for one year. So trees are very important and they helps in lot of ways.To save the environment we need to save trees. Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

What leads to deforestation? Rising population tends to put a great deal of pressure on natural resources.Forests are logged to supply timber for wood and pulp products, and to clear land for farming and housing. Forests are also being cut down for industrial development.Major portion of the deforestition happens for the daily use products. Farming lands: Farming lands and are also a one time Wood Products: Deforestation for few wood products such as furniture, matches, doors & windows, sports equipments, musical instruments,etc,. are coming down as an alternative materials are found and Save Trees | Animation Short Film

07

is being replaced. And also most of the products are one time consumption and not repetative. Pulp Products: A major portion of deforestation accounts to the production of paper. Pulp products has a lot of daily use products such as Newspaper, books, calendars, envelops, kitchen napkins,face tissues,toilet paper, paper bags, wet wipes, etc,. Digital medium has replaced few products such as newspaper, calendar, envelops, books etc,. Cardboard boxes and eggcartons are not regular consuming products. Among the pulp products toilet paper has the higest rate of consumption.[Almost 27000 trees are either flushed or dumped in landfills every day, according to claude martin of WWF( Worldwide Fund for Nature)] Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Alarming Facts about deforestation: (http://www.grow-trees.com/Why_Trees/About_Deforestation.aspx) - At current deforestation rates, 55% of the Amazon’s rainforests could be gone by 2030 -Deforestation is contributing almost 20% to the overall greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere, more than the world’s vehicles and aircrafts combined. -Net forest loss per day is 20,000 hectares, an area twice the size of Paris. -More than 1.8 million hectares of dry deciduous forest disappear every year, 40 per cent of which is lost in the Sudan, Paraguay, Brazil and India. -Tropical forests cover 23 per cent of the Earth’s land surface, but they are disappearing at a rate of 4.6 million hectares a year. Asia leads losses with 2.2 million hectares a year, Latin America and the Caribbean together lose 1.9 million and Africa loses 470,000 hectares of rain forest every year. -About 6.1 million hectares of moist deciduous forest disappear every year, of which the largest regional share is in Save Trees | Animation Short Film

08

Latin America and the Caribbean, with 3.2 million hectares lost. -Annual losses of very dry forest total some 341,000 hectares. The Sudan loses 81,000 hectares of this type of forest every year, followed closely by Botswana, with 58,000 hectares. -Global annual deforestation for desert forest stands at an estimated 82,000 hectares, 60 per cent of which is lost in Mexico and Pakistan. -Hills and mountains lose about 2.5 million hectares of forest annually, 640,000 of which are lost in Brazil, 370,000 in Mexico, and 150,000 hectares in Indonesia. -In Ethiopia, between 100,000 and 200,000 hectares of forest are cut down every year. Still, at least 200 million people lack enough wood to cook their food properly. -Rainforests once covered 14% of the earth’s land surface; now they cover a mere 6% and experts estimate that the last remaining rainforests could be consumed in less than 40 years. Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Production of Paper On an average, a single ton(2000 pounds) of paper would be produced from 17 trees. Consumption of paper Worldwide paper consumption is projected to expand 46 percent by the year 2040 A common use for deforestation is for the production of paper, which accounts for more than 40 percent of logged trees. Worldwide consumption of paper has risen by 400% in the past 40 years, with 35% of harvested trees being used for paper manufacture. - Everyday Americans buy 62 million newspapers and throw out 44 million. That’s the equivalent of dumping 500,000 trees into a landfill every week. - It takes 75,000 trees to print a Sunday Edition of the New York Times Save Trees | Animation Short Film

09

An individual tree is said to produce an average of 4,76,637 sheets of paper. Worldwide, there are approximately 10,000 paper and paperboard mills in operation. U.S is the world’s leading producer of paper and paperboard, with over 500 mills in operation. About 300 million metric tons of paper and paperboard are produced each year in the world. US alone produces about 87 million metric tons of paper and paperboard, representing nearly one-third of the world’s total production. It takes one 15-year old tree to produce half a box of paper Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Recycled Paper vs Non-recycled paper: -The Energy Information Administration claims a 40% reduction in energy when paper is recycled, while the Bureau of International Recycling (BIR) claims a 64% reduction. Wastage of Paper Every year enough paper is thrown away to make a 12’ wall from New York to California. The amount of wood and paper we throw away is enough to heat 50 million homes for 20 years. It is projected that Americans will throw away over 4 and a half million tons of office paper and nearly 10 million tons of newspaper. Everyday Americans buy 62 million newspapers and throw out 44 million. That’s the equivalent of dumping 500,000 trees into a landfill every week. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

10

- The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has found that recycling causes 35% less water pollution and 74% less air pollution than making virgin paper. However, recycling mills may have polluting by-products, such as sludge. De-inking at Cross Pointe’s Miami, Ohio mill results in sludge weighing 22% of the weight of wastepaper recycled. -Recycling 1 ton of paper saves 17 mature trees, 7 thousand US gallons of water, 3 cubic yards of landfill space, 2 barrels of oil (84 US gal or 320 l), and 4,100 kilowatt-hours of electricity — enough energy to power the average American home for six months. Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Production of toilet paper Toilet paper is generally a combination of approximately 70% hardwood and 30% softwood. The pulp from one eucalyptus tree, a commonly used tree, produces as many as 1,000 rolls of toilet tissue. Statistics of US TP production and consumption: (www.treehugers.com) -US consume 36.5 billion rolls of Toilet Paper, each year. - To produce 36.5 billion rolls of toilet paper, you need a pulp of 15 million trees. - 473,587,500,000 gallons of water is used in the production of 36.5 billion rolls of TP. In a single roll there is 37 gallons of water. -Manufacturing of 36.5 billion TP requires about 17.3 terawatts of electricity annually. - 2, 53,000 tons of chlorine is used for bleaching purposes. Toxins are formed during bleaching process. - Use of TP for drying is marginal compared to wiping. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

11

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Trees cut for Toilet Paper: Worldwide, the equivalent of almost 2,70,000 trees is either flushed or dumped in landfills every day and roughly 10 percent of that total is attributable to toilet paper. i.e., 27,000 trees are cut in a day for producing Toilet Paper.’’ World watch magazine’’(www.worldwatch.com) In a new report, “The truth behind APP’s greenwash,” Eyes on the Forest estimates that APP has pulped some five million acres of Indonesia’s tropical forests since it began in 1984. (http://razzmatazz.mgis. in/environment/tree-conservation/relatedarticles/#more-562) The fastest growing brand of toilet paper in United States today Paseo, has a direct link to rain forest destruction. Paeso toilet paper and tissue products are made from pulp from the Sinar Mas Group’s Asia Pulp & Paper (APP).(http://www.worldwildlife.org/sites/toiletpaper/index.html) Save Trees | Animation Short Film

12

Over the past 25 years, APP, its affiliates and suppliers have clear-cut 5 million acres of Sumatran forest wood, WWF estimates.   Sumatran tiger and elephant populations in the areas most intensively cleared will face extinction in just few years if deforestation is not halted. Elephants and tigers are at a risk of local extinction in the Riau and jambi provinces because of rampant deforestation. Only 30% of Sumatra’s forests remain(http://www.worldwildlife.org/ sites/toiletpaper/index.html) Since 1985, WWF analyses found more than half of Sumatra’s natural forests—some 30 million acres—have been lost, much of that due to forest conversion to pulp plantations for paper. (http://www.worldwildlife. org/sites/toiletpaper/index.html) Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

History of toilet paper

The Greeks would use clay. In Coastal Regions, mussel shells were used (and sometimes coconut husk). Wealthy French used lace, wool and hemp

Different materials were used depending upon the country, weather conditions, social customs and status in place of toilet paper. Three phases in evolution of toilet paper: Phase I : People used leaves, grass, ferns, corn cobs, maize, fruit skins, seashells, stone, sand, moss, snow and water. The simplest way was physical use of one’s hand. Wealthy people usually used wool, lace or hemp. Romans were the cleanest. Wealthy used wool and rosewater and others used sponge attached to a wooden stick, soaked in a bucket of salt water. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

13

In Islamic cultures people used their left hand with little water (they are still doing that today). This is why it is offensive to greet someone with your left hand. The Islamic prophet Muhammad specified that one should use an odd number of stones (preferably three) to cleanse the anal orifice after defecation and then proceed to a different location to wash it with water. Use of toilet paper in place of stones is now acceptable, but washing with water is still needed for ritual purity The Eskimos would use moss or snow. The Vikings used wool. The Colonial Americans used the core center cobs from shelled ears of corn. The Mayans used corn cobs. Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Phase II: In 50 B.C the Chinese first made paper with short lengths of bamboo and then later added cotton linen rags which were soaked in water and pounded into swollen pulp. In the late fifteenth century, when paper became widely available, it began to replace other traditional materials. Old correspondence such as pages from old books, magazines, newspapers, catalogs and even paper bags, envelops were used. Phase III: The French invented the first bidet in 1710 (of course without of modern plumbing). As people flushed the newspapers, catalogs and other papers after wiping, there were problems of paper getting clogged. As a solution to this problem, Toilet Tissues came into exisistence. In 1880, The British Perforated Paper Company produced toilet paper which was sold in boxes of individual squares. In 1890 Scott Paper company introduced toilet paper rolls. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

14

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Research

Research Analysis

To save trees, there need to be changes made in the human behavior. As forests supply timber and paper products, people depend on forests. Rising population tends to put a great deal of pressure on natural resources. Deforestation leads to land slide, soil erosion, volcanic eruptions, climatic changes, extinction of species, green house effects, rise in the level of carbon dioxide and other natural disasters. There is not enough aforestation happening to make up for the loss of trees. The world would need to plant trees over an area of 130 million hectares, an area as large as Peru. This would entail planting 14 billion trees every year for 10 consecutive years, i.e. 2 saplings for every person on earth. One of the common uses for deforestation is for the production of paper. Now, digital medium is taking over a lot of places where paper is being used (example: letters are being replaced by e-mails, even the newspapers are in digital form). So there is already an alternative found and there is a shift towards the digital medium. A major problem lies in the area where there is no alternatives found to replace the pulp products such as kitchen napkins, face tissues, toilet Paper, wet wipes, carton boxes, etc,. This is the area Save Trees | Animation Short Film

15

where it cannot be digitalized too. Now, let us look at one area among the pulp products where there is a regular use. Among these, toilet Paper is a regularly used pulp product which wipes out the maximum number of trees (Almost 27,000 trees are cut down for the production of toilet paper each day). It’s not just trees, but also a huge amount of water and electricity are used in the production of toilet Paper. There are lots of toxic gases emitted into the atmosphere polluting the environment during the process of production. In case of recycled toilet paper, the amount of electricity and water used is also a lot in the production process. The recycled toilet paper is much better than the virgin toilet paper but even recycled toilet paper pollutes the air and water. I think this is the area where there is a need for urgent behavioral changes among people, before rest of the trees are cut. By sensitizing people about the other alternatives which doesn’t harm the environment to replace toilet paper could be a better solution than a recycled toilet paper. And also, by encouraging people to plant trees to recover the already lost natural carbon dioxide sink (forests) along with it. Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Save Trees | Animation Short Film

16

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Exploration Save Trees | Animation Short Film

17

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept exploration

Concept-1

In this concept, the protagonist is a toilet paper factory worker. The story begins with a shot of toilet paper rolls coming out of a machine after it is produced. On the other side of the machine, the protagonist is pushing a log of wood into the cutting machine. He fails in the first attempt. As he pushes the second time and he farts and runs to the toilet. Once he is relieved, he tries to get a toilet paper from the toilet paper dispenser. He doesnt get the toilet paper. He hits on the dispenser and waits, expecting the toilet paper to come out of it. But it doesnt come. Then, on the dispenser screen it show ‘running out of trees’. He wonder what is happening. He hits on the dispenser once again, a pipe from the dispenser falls out. He picks it up and takes a close look of it. He press the lever which is on the pipe. Water sprays from the pipe on to his face. Then he realises that he can use water to clean his bum. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

18

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept exploration

Concept -1

The protagonist represents the people in this concept. The factory sequence was added later into this concept after discussion with my guide to bring in that we are also part of the destruction of cutting down of trees and making toilet papers. We also discussed what if we show the entire destruction and then give a solution to the problem so that the viewers are also convinced. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

19

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept exploration

Concept-2 After the discussion with my guide i was working out on how to show destruction in the process of making toilet paper. This when i came up with this concept of making toilet paper inside the toilet itself. In this concept it reveals that there is electricity, toxic chemicals, trees and water used in the production of toilet paper. In this concept, the story begins with a old person sitting on a commode a relieving himself. As he relieves himself he pulls the lever down to switch on the power of the toilet paper dispenser. As he switches it on the chemical container fixed next to it starts emiting smoke from it. He starts choking as the smoke comes out. The he pushes the button which is integrated to a tree form. Water flows into the dispenser automatically. A toilet paper comes out of the dispenser after few seconds. He pulls it out of the dispenser and uses it. As he uses it, a boy starts shouts ‘come out grand pa’ and he bangs on the door. The grand pa finishes and opens the door. The boy rushes in quickly. Now the boy relieves himself. As he finishes, he pulls the lever to switch the power on. As he does that smoke comes out of the chemical container. Then he pushes the button for trees. On the screen of the dispenser it shows ‘running out of trees’. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

20

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept exploration

Concept -3

Inside the toilet The protagonist is sitting on a commode and trying to relieve himself. As soon as he relieves himself, he feels happy. He pushes the button of the toilet paper dispenser. Inside the Toilet Paper dispenser The button of the dispenser pushes a factory worker who was leaning on the button. The worker becomes happy, and pulls the string next to the button to turn the power on. As the power is switched on, the music begins. Establishing the Toilet paper factory Background: Logs of wood being carried on parachutes by workers. The logs are cut into pieces using a automated machine which has an axe on its one end. Two workers pick up a few chopped pieces from the belt and shoot them up into a chipper machine which is kept right above the giant tank using a catapult. The chipper machine cuts the log pieces into smaller parts. The chipped log particles are added to the tank. Another worker who looks like a scientist Save Trees | Animation Short Film

21

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept exploration

Concept-3

goes up the ladder which is kept against the giant tank and pours acid into it using a test tube. The mixing of chemicals with the wood emits thick smoke. The worker is pleased and grins widely. Birds that were flying over the tank fall into it due to the emission of polluted smoke. The Slurry is moved from the tank to another machine through a pipe where it is bleached and water is added. In order to convert the pulp to paper stock, water is drawn from a nearby river using a water wheel. The water wheel is manned by two workers who step on the wheel to rotate it. On rotating the wheel, water from the river gets collected in containers attached to the wheel circumference. The collected water is carried into the bleaching machine through a pipe connection. A worker opens the valve situated beneath /side of the tank to let the paper stock out. This stock falls onto a moving mesh screen draining out the water. From Save Trees | Animation Short Film

22

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept exploration

Concept -3 the mesh, the half dried stock is passed through an automated heated cylinder. Heated cylinder dries out the slurry and gives it a texture, thus forming paper. The paper is wound on a tube that is fixed horizontally onto 2 holders. The holders rotate the tube automatically. Paper is thus wound onto the tube. On completion of this activity, the holders on both sides of the tube are slightly pulled apart by two workmen. The tube with toilet paper then slides down. Workers celebrate by bursting paper crackers. Some of the workers shed tears of joy!! Outside the Toilet Paper dispenser The toilet paper comes out through the dispenser. The person sitting on the commode pulls it out.

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

23

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Synopsis “This is a film intended to bring awareness about the destruction caused by the production of toilet paper�

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

24

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept art Save Trees | Animation Short Film

25

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Giant grinding machine to make pulp

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

26

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Vehicle to pick up trees from the forest

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

27

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Vehicle to pick up trees from the forest

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

28

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Wood cutting machine

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

29

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Drying Machine

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

30

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Toilet Paper roll cutting machine

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

31

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Location of the manufacturing unit

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

32

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Waterfall Chemical area

chin

e

Tank

Lift

ma

Belt

cutt

achi

ne

Dry

ing

ing m

Entry from toilet

Forest

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

33

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Concept Art

Location of the manufacturing unit

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

34

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character Design Save Trees | Animation Short Film

35

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Initial sketches

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

36

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Initial sketches

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

37

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Initial sketches

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

38

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Explorations on smile

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

39

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Mask for the characters

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

40

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Application of mask

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

41

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Character design

Final character design

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

42

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Save Trees | Animation Short Film

43

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 1

Duration

Inside Toilet The protagonist of the film is sitting on a commode. Camera zooms in slowly

Shot No.1

Duration

The protagonist humming a song

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

44

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.1

Duration

He relieves himself and feels happy

Shot No.1

Duration

He looks at the toilet paper dispenser

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

45

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 1

Duration

He press the toilet paper dispenser button

Shot No. 1

Duration

He wonders looking at the dispenser

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

46

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 1

Duration

He press the button again

Shot No. 1

Duration

He wonder what is happening to the toilet paper dispenser

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

47

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 1

Duration

He bends to peep into the toilet paper dispenser

Shot No. 2

Duration

Camera placed inside the dispenser He peeps into the dispenser

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

48

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 2

Duration

Camera travels through a pipe as he looks

Shot No. 3

Duration

Two workers looking at bulb which is flashing a red light

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

49

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 3

Duration

Same two workers turn and looks at their boss hearing his command

Shot No.4

Duration

The boss points at the forest as the workers in the background looks at him. Camera pans from left to right

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

50

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.5

Duration

camera zooms to a tree

Shot No.6

Duration Two workers smiles and cut the tree

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

51

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 7

Duration

A machine holds on to the cut tree as it zooms out

Shot No. 7

Duration

The machine lifts the cut down tree from the ground

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

52

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 8

Duration

The machine brings the log down to a new location

Shot No. 9

Duration

The log being placed on the chopping machine

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

53

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 9

Duration

The machine unholds the log

Shot No. 9

Duration

The machine goes out of the frame

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

54

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 10

Duration

Camer pans from right to left

Shot No. 11

Duration

A worker moves the lever front and back so that the chopped pieces which are carried in the belt droped into the containers which goes up.

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

55

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 12

Duration

Chopped pieces are carried up to the tank in the containers which moves automatically

Shot No. 13

Duration

The containers with chopped wood pieces are emptied into the tank through the slider Camera pans from right to left

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

56

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.14

Duration

A worker tries to pull the lever

Shot No.14

Duration

He pulls the levers towards him

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

57

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 15

Duration

Smoke comes out of the test tube as the worker pulled lever

Shot No.16

Duration

Camera zooms out from the chemical area Chemical flows through the pipe and comes to the tank

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

58

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.16

Duration

Smoke comes out of the tank as the chemicals are added

Shot No.17

Duration

Birds flying across the tank

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

59

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 17

Duration

Birds flying through the smoke that has emitted from the tank

Shot No. 17

Duration

Birds fall because of the smoke. Huge container which is fixed near the water fall starts to pour the water collected into the tank.

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

60

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 17

Duration

Water is poured from the huge container to the tank

Shot No. 18

Duration

Middle component of the tank starts turning anti-clockwise

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

61

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.19

Duration

Tank turns anti-clockwise

Shot No.20

Duration

A worker opens the tap of the tank and pulp is emptied into a container. The pulp flow from the container to the drying machine through a slider

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

62

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.21

Duration

The drying machine press the pulp and water splashes out

Shot No. 21

Duration

The middle component of the drying machine press the pulp for the second time and water splashes out again

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

63

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.22

Duration

The drying machines press the pulp again sent it through hot cylinders and dried

Shot No. 23

Duration

The toilet paper is rolled on to a pipe

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

64

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 24

Duration

The roll is now released and it falls into the cutting area.

Shot No. 25

Duration

The toilet paper roll is cut into small rolls

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

65

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 26

Duration

The cut rolls are slided to a machine where it is shooted up with the air pressure

Shot No. 27

Duration

Establishing the place where the toilet paper rolls are shooted up

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

66

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 28

Duration

The rolls comes up and the door of the base closes automatically

Shot No. 29

Duration

As the door closes the air pressure is blocked and the toilet paper rolls falls on the door.

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

67

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 29

Duration

Toilet paper rollsdown

Shot No. 29

Duration

One toilet paper roll bounces on to the camera

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

68

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 29

Duration

Toilet paper roll comes on to the camera

Shot No. 30

Duration

Inside the toilet , close up of the dispenser

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

69

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 28

Duration

Toilet paper comes out

Shot No. 29

Duration He stops peeping and comes back to his position

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

70

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No. 30

Duration He is shocked

Shot No.30

Duration

He takes his mask off from his face

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

71

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Story Board Shot No.

Duration

He see something written on the inner side of the mask

Shot No.

Duration

He reads the statistics written on the mask

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

72

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Boardomatics 73


Boardomatics

It is at this stage where i started timing the film. The actual storyboard was evolved at this stage. A lot of story boards were removed and added to get the right flow of the story. A lot of camera angles were tried out to get the visual flow. Also did few layouts at this stage to get better clarity. It is at this stage where i made a decision do the shot.2 in 3D . I did three lineups at this stage. First lineup came upto around 1min 50 sec. In the second line i aded a music track to get the tempo of the film. Then i started working littlebit on the camera movements too in the third lineup. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

74

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts Save Trees | Animation Short Film

75

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

76

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

77

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

78

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

79

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

80

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

81

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

82

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

83

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

84

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Layouts

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

85

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Save Trees | Animation Short Film

86

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Animatics Save Trees | Animation Short Film

87

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Animatics

It is at this stage the concept of mask was cracked. Entire sequence inside the toilet was changed completely. The timing of each shot was fine tuned. The acting of the protagonist was made cracked at this stage. At this stage the total timing of the film was finalised at 1min 40sec. Save Trees | Animation Short Film

88

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


References FILMS Coke Happiness Factory How to destroy the world Fern Gully the last rain forest Clover - Milky way Charlie and the chocolate factory

WEBSITES: www.treehugers.com www.grow-trees.com www.worldwatch.com www.worldwildlife.com www.partnersinrhyme.com

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

89

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Acknowledgement I would like to thank Mr. Suresh Eriyat and the entire team Eeksaurus for their help and support throughout the project. Mr Suresh Eriyat and Nilima Suresh for offering me this project A special thanks to Mr. Prakash Moorthy for his guidance and help from time to time that helped me in shaping up the project. Professor S. Balaram and the entire DJAD family for bringing out the best in me. Friends and family

Save Trees | Animation Short Film

90

Rohit Rajan | D J Academy of Design


Save trees document  
Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you