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ROGAN ANJILI 2017 - 2018


Contents

Death by Masculinity Leather, Pyrography Etched Plates A Peaceful Chaos Nairobi CBD Retro-scapes Prints from Leather Plates Untitled Works Curriculum


Death by Masculinity

Death by Masculinity is a topic that the artist uses to illustrate the various distortions of nature. It’s a dive into a contemporary topic. The use of leather as a subject is not by happenstance but by research on the process by which animals are slaughtered and their skins removed for commercial purposes such as the creation of modern apparel. Indeed, this presents itself as a distortion. The choice of scouring leather surfaces to create images symbolizes the scarring effect that is left by the act of distorting nature, in attempts to recreate a ‘more suitable’ object of appeal that fits into a modern society. Dealing with the subject of this emobdiment of work, the artist looks at how masculinity, in this case toxic masculinity is destorting nature and destroying humanity. By illustrating men in vulnerable-esque curved positions, the artists attempts to bring out his own expression of how man in caving into his masculinity, and it is destroying him from within. Furthermore, female characters are illustrated with struggled looks, as perceived, attempting to remove her breasts. The act symbolizes the forceful urge to rid her femininity, to fit into the modern world that is deemed as masculine, especially in the workforce. Therefore, many women feel need to adopt aggression (a predominantly male biological trait) in order to fit in or be as competitive in various social settings. It is in so doing that distortion is created, overlooking the feminine balance needed for the peaceful balance of the wolrd. Therefore, we witness ‘Death by Masculinity’.


Caving stippling, pyrography on leather (87.0 x 74.0)cm 2018


Binti Kaanika Sidiria stippling, pyrography on leather (113.0 x 118.0)cm 2018


Kilo Bure stippling, pyrography on leather (81.0 x 72.0)cm 2018


Leather, Pyrography Etched Plates


Am I Moran? stippling, pyrography on leather (9.2 x 13.4)cm 2018


In the Line of Pleasure stippling, pyrography on leather (16.4 x 19.6)cm 2018


Genderful Africa, Omo stippling, pyrography on leather (17.2 x28.2)cm 2018


Trumpalicious Says, “Look at Me” stippling, pyrography on leather (19.6 x16.8)cm 2018


Prints from Leather Plates

Coinned as heatpoint or pyrography etching, the use of a leather surface as a printing plate is a deliberate process in an attempt to acheive monoprints. Recognizing the maleability of leather, resultant prints are expected to have separate characteristics, with no one print emerging similar to its predecessor. The variation from other printing plates is located within leather’s creases, visible in the effects provided on each print, which shows evidence of visual noise. Notably, this is acheived when the leather surface is physically stressed, and the result is a wash-like vine texture.


Genderful Africa, Omo monoprint on paper (29.7 x 42.0)cm 2018


Genderful Africa, Omo monoprint on paper (29.7 x 42.0)cm 2018


Genderful Africa, Omo monoprint on paper (21.0 x 29.7)cm 2018


Am I Moran? monoprint on paper (21.0 x 29.7)cm 2018


Trumpalicious says “Look at me” monoprint on paper (20.0 x 17.0)cm 2018


A Peaceful Chaos

A peaceful chaos, an oxymoron of the visible calamity yet calming force existing within the universe. It is a look into the universe (as the mind and thought process), with each stroke representing a forming thought intersecting with another similar thought to create what is know in existence as a structure or an orderly form. Sometimes peace is orderly but other times it does not need a definition, as humans always attempt to befit objects and abstracts to certain structures. Only then does peace exist for some.


A Peaceful Chaos acrylic, glue on canvas (35 x 35 x 4)cm 2018


Genderful Africa, Nandi oil, acrylic, & glue on canvas (38.0 x 57.0 x 2.0) cm 2018


Nairobi’s Central Business District (CBD) Retroscapes

Nairobi’s CBD retroscapes are visual respresentations of architectural city scapes using vibrant block colors used to capture, as to what is considered as Nairobi’s oldest architectural monuments that stand till date. The architectural figures are captured from an under-looking disappearing perspective that attempts to capture a child’s first possible visuals of a city, filled with tall buildings as he/she visits for the first time.


Ambassadeur acrylic on canvas (51.0 x 89.2 x 2.0 )cm 20178


Hilton CBD acrylic on canvas (51.0 x 89.2 x 2.0)cm 2018


Biashara St acrylic on canvas (51.0 x 89.2 x 2.0)cm 2018


Untitled Works


Shumileta oil pastel on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Untitled acrylic on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Old Pansies stippling, ink on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Binti stippling, ink on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Untitled stippling, ink on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Untitled stippling, ink on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Chebliplip stippling, ink on paper (21.0 x 29.7) cm 2017


Curriculum

Biography Rogan Anjili, born as Frank Rogan Kipchirchir Amatalo Anjili, was born in Nairobi (Kenya), in 1992, where he spent much of his childhood in the bustling capital of Kenya. He was born to Benard Amang’alia Anjili and Salina Chebwambok Bor, a former deputy director for the Kenya School of Government and a medical practitioner, respectively. The beginning of his passion for art was at the point he would predominantly use sketching as a means of connection, for having spent large amount of his time as a child alone. He considered art as his social life and would be immersed in his sketches for hours. He would later on take part in art school projects that saw him participate and gain a certification award in the 2003 Ford Foundation and Global Environment Facility Art Workshop. He was to later on pursue his studies in Criminology and Security studies and attain a Bachelor’s certification, in which he after frequented Kuona Trust Arts Center, in 2016. He currently rents a studio in Kuona Artists’ Collective (KAC), an artist-led center, in Nairobi, where he continues to create works that delve in internal and external emotional, social, psychological, political, economic states that govern identity.


Curriculum

Exhibitions Kenya Art Fair 2017 Nairobi (KE) Awards Ford Foundation and Global Environment Facility Art Workshop certification 2003 Nairobi (KE) Series Death by Masculinity Nairobi Central Business District Retroscapes A peaceful Chaos Workshops Attended Origami and Collage Workshop 2018 Narobi (KE) Workshops Hosted Clay-making workshop 2018 (KE) Contacts rogananjili@gmail.com


Rogan Anjili Portfolio  

visual artist portfolio

Rogan Anjili Portfolio  

visual artist portfolio

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