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Undergraduate 10/11

open spaces. open minds.

www.roehampton.ac.uk

1


OPEN DAYS

wednesday 15 july 2009 • SATURDAY 10 OCTOBER 2009 Wednesday 18 november 2009 • Saturday 27 february 2010 wednesday 7 july 2010

open spaces. open minds.

One of the leading new universities in the UK for research and number one for Dance and Biological Anthropology – RAE 2008 80% of research of international standing and 33% internationally excellent or world class – RAE 2008

More National Teaching Fellows than any other London university A beautiful parkland campus featuring historic buildings and lakes, and on-site student residences Ranked first among London universities for the environment on and around campus – Times Higher Education 2009 Student Experience Survey

Four historic Colleges dating back to the 1840s, create a strong sense of community on campus A thriving local social scene based around Putney, Richmond, Hammersmith and Kingston

…all this only 30 minutes from central London 2

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www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Contents 5 6 Welcome

Choose Roehampton

Academic life

9 10 14 2

Programmes Programmes: combinations, UCAS codes and entry tariff ranges Top academic staff/Internationally recognised research

www.roehampton.ac.uk

Student support 19 20 22 24 26

A historic tradition/Colleges An international university Accommodation Finance Student services and advice

30 32 34

More than study Explore central London/ Explore the local area Roehampton Students' Union: Entertainment on and off campus Roehampton Students' Union: Activities/Volunteering/ Welfare Services/Sports

39 116 118 120 123 124 128

Programme pages Entry requirements How to apply English Language Unit Directions Location: Campus maps Location: London map www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Welcome Roehampton offers a rich and stimulating learning environment that helps students to acquire the knowledge and skills needed for success in the 21st century. The University’s staff, who contribute to Roehampton’s strong and growing research base, bring the latest thinking in their subjects into the classroom. The University also offers excellent facilities and is located on a beautiful and historic campus in London, a city that has something for everyone, whatever your interests. I hope that you will enjoy learning about Roehampton in these pages – and that I will soon have the opportunity to welcome you here in person.

Professor Paul O’Prey, Vice-Chancellor

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CHOOSE

Roehampton

“One of the leading new universities” —The Times

“Significant proportions of Roehampton students are mature or from an ethnic minority” —The Guardian 6

www.roehampton.ac.uk

Join our lively learning environment and benefit from outstanding academic staff and facilities in a stunning location. You will be taught using innovative methods and state-of-the-art equipment by staff engaged in research at the cutting edge of their subjects.

Our students come from all walks of life and enjoy the comprehensive support services and generous scholarships we offer as well as the sense of community created by our four Colleges. The University’s strong foundation in education and social justice, stretching back to the 1840s, inspires its vision for the future: to prepare students for success in the 21st century. Our programmes are built on areas of academic strength across the arts, business, education, social sciences, and human and life sciences. A full list of the programmes on offer appears on pages 10–13.

Your university experience will be enhanced by our beautiful campus – unique in being both close to central London and set in parkland with grand, historic buildings and lakes side by side with newly built modern facilities. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Academic life

Programmes Most Roehampton University degree programmes

n Questioning Citizenship – examines issues

are Single Honours although there are a number

such as identity, nationalism, gender, refugees,

of Combined Honours programmes available. A

children’s rights and freedom of expression

Combined Honours programme will be a better fit

n Wellbeing and Lifestyle – draws on the

for students who wish to explore a combination of

University’s expertise in the fields of nutrition,

subjects as part of their degree. Both types of

health, sport science and psychology.

programme require you to gain 360 credits to achieve your degree. One year of full-time study typically involves a workload of 120 credits, which

Part-time study Roehampton offers a small number of programmes

may include lectures and seminars, tutorials, di-

on a part-time basis, giving you the flexibility to

rected activity and private study.

study alongside other commitments. Transfer between full-time and part-time study may be

The tables on pages 10–13 show the

possible if your circumstances change, although

combinations available at Roehampton, as

there may be fee implications. Please contact the

well as the UCAS subject codes for both Single

Enquiries Office for more information.

and Combined Honours programmes. The list of possible combinations is correct at the time of going to print but you are advised to check the

Foundation degrees These degrees combine academic and work-

Roehampton University and UCAS websites for

based learning through collaboration between

up-to-date information.

employers and the University. Foundation degrees are intended to provide students with the skills and

Roehampton University programmes are sufficiently

knowledge relevant to their employment. They are

flexible to allow you to take a limited number of

designed to appeal to students wishing to enter

modules in other areas, such as:

a profession as well as those seeking continuing

n Languages for All – beginner and intermediate

professional development.

courses in Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish

Students who successfully complete a Foundation degree may progress to year three of a BA/BSc programme.

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Academic life

Anthropology Single Honours

Art History

Single Honours Combined Honours Classical Civilisation Creative Writing English Literature History Journalism and News Media Philosophy Photography Theology and Religious Studies

Biological Anthropology Combined Honours Biological Sciences Psychology

Biological Sciences

Single Honours Combined Honours Biological Anthropology Psychology

Biomedical Sciences Single Honours

Business Management Single Honours Combined Honours Computing Studies Criminology Media and Culture Modern Languages Social Anthropology Sociology Spanish Sport Science

Business, International Single Honours

280–340

L600

240–320

V350

QV83 WV83 QV33 VV13 PV53 VV53 WV63 VV36

280–340 CL9Q CL86

240–300

C120

CL9Q CC98

240–300

B940

240–280

N190

GN41 MN91 PN3C NR29 NL16 NL13 NR14 CNP1

240–280

N120

Business Management — Human Resource Management Single Honours

240–280

N600

Business Management — Retail Management and Marketing 240–280 Single Honours

Childhood and Society Combined Honours Criminology Early Childhood Studies Education English Literature 10

Programmes: combinations, UCAS codes and entry tariff ranges

www.roehampton.ac.uk

NN25

160–200 ML95 X346 XX33 XQC3

Social Anthropology Sociology

Classical Civilisation

Single Honours Combined Honours Art History Creative Writing English Literature Film History Journalism and News Media Philosophy Social Anthropology Theology and Religious Studies

Computing Studies

Single Honours Combined Honours Business Management Criminology Film Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Sociology Sport Science

Criminology SH: 240–280, CH: 200–240

240–320

MN91 ML95 GM49 ML9F PM52 PM39 WM69 MC98 ML9P ML93 TBC

V901

QV83 WQ88 QQ8J PQ38 QV81 PQ58 QV85 QC8Y QV86

160–240

G400

GN41 GM49 GP43 GP45 GP4J GL43 GC46

G4G5

Computing with Information Management

160–240

Computing with Web and Multimedia

160–240

Conservation Biology

240–300

Counselling, Integrative

interview

Single Honours

Single Honours

Single Honours

Single Honours

Creative Writing

WW68 WR84 WV86

XL36 XLH3

Computing with Database Systems 160–240 Single Honours

Photography Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

G4GM

G490

CD94

B941

280–340

Single Honours W801 Combined Honours Art History WV83 Classical Civilisation WQ88 Dance Studies WW85 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies WW84 English Language and Linguistics WQ81 English Literature WQ83 Film PW38 Journalism and News Media PW58 Media and Culture PW3V Modern Languages WR89 Philosophy WV85

Single Honours Combined Honours Business Management Childhood and Society Computing Studies Human Rights Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Photography Psychology Social Anthropology Sociology Theology and Religious Studies

M900

Dance and Exercise Science

280–340

Dance Studies

280–340

Single Honours

CW65

Single Honours W500 Combined Honours Creative Writing WW85 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies WW45 English Literature WQ53 Photography WW65 Spanish RW45

Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Single Honours Combined Honours Creative Writing Dance Studies Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature Film Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Modern Languages Philosophy Photography Spanish

Early Childhood Studies

Single Honours Combined Honours Childhood and Society Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature Health Studies Sociology

Education

280–340

W440

WW84 WW45 WXK3 WQLH WQL3 PWH4 PW54 PW3K WR49 WV45 WW64 RW44

200–300

X310

X346 X347 QXJ3 QXHH XBH9 LX33

200–300

Single Honours X300 Combined Honours Childhood and Society XX33 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies WXK3 Early Childhood Studies X347 English Language and Linguistics XQH3 English Literature XQ33

History Human Rights Modern Languages Psychology Sociology Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

XV31 LX23 XR39 XC38 XL33 RX43 XV36

English Language and Linguistics

240 –320

English Literature

280–340

Single Honours Q340 Combined Honours Creative Writing WQ81 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies WQLH Early Childhood Studies QXJ3 Education XQH3 English Literature Q310 Film PQ31 History QVH1 Journalism and News Media PQ5J Modern Languages QR39 Philosophy QVH5 Social Anthropology QCJ9 Spanish QRH4 Theology and Religious Studies QVH6

Single Honours Combined Honours Art History Childhood and Society Classical Civilisation Creative Writing Dance Studies Drama,Theatre and Performance Studies Early Childhood Studies Education English Language and Linguistics Film History Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Modern Languages Philosophy Photography Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

Q300

QV33 XQC3 QQ8J WQ83 WQ53 WQL3 QXHH XQ33 Q310 QP3H QV31 PQM3 PQHH QR3X QV35 WQP3 QR34 QV36

Exercise, Nutrition and Health 240–280 Single Honours

Film

CB64

240–320

Single Honours Combined Honours Classical Civilisation Computing Studies Creative Writing Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies English Language and Linguistics English Literature History Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Modern Languages Photography Spanish

W600

PQ38 GP43 PW38 PWH4 PQ31 QP3H VP13 PP53 P391 PR39 WP63 RP43

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Academic life

Health and Social Care

160–200

Marketing

240–280

Health Studies

160–200

Marketing and Multimedia

240–280

Single Honours

Single Honours Combined Honours Early Childhood Studies

History

Single Honours Combined Honours Art History Classical Civilisation Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature Film Journalism and News Media Philosophy Photography Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

Human Biosciences

Single Honours Combined Honours Psychology Sport Science

Human Rights

Single Honours Combined Honours Criminology Education Journalism and News Media Modern Languages Philosophy Photography Social Anthropology Sociology Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

Journalism and News Media

L540

B900

XBH9

240–320

V100

VV13 QV81 XV31 QVH1 QV31 VP13 PV51 VV15 WV61 RV41 VV16

240–300

CL00

TBC CCP1

200–240

L290

ML9F LX23 PL52 RL92 LV25 WL62 LL9P LL23 RL43 LV26

280–340

Combined Honours Art History Classical Civilisation Computing Studies Creative Writing Criminology Drama,Theatre and Performance Studies English Language and Linguistics English Literature Film History Human Rights Media and Culture Modern Languages Philosophy Photography Social Anthropology Sociology Spanish Sport Science

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PV53 PQ58 GP45 PW58 PM52 PW54 PQ5J PQM3 PP53 PV51 PL52 PP3M RP95 PV55 WP65 PL56 PL5H PR54 PC56

Single Honours

Single Honours

Media and Culture

N500

NG54

240–320

Single Honours Combined Honours Business Management Computing Studies Creative Writing Criminology Drama,Theatre and Performance Studies English Literature Film Journalism and News Media Modern Languages Photography Sociology Spanish

Modern Languages

PL33

PN3C GP4J PW3V PM39 PW3K PQHH P391 PP3M RP93 PW36 PL3H PR34

240–320

Single Honours Combined Honours Business Management Creative Writing Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature Film Human Rights Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Spanish

R800

NR29 WR89 WR49 XR39 QR39 QR3X PR39 RL92 RP95 RP93 RR94

Modern Languages – Translating and Interpreting 280–340 Single Honours

Q910

Nutrition and Health

200–240

Philosophy

200–280

B400

Single Honours Combined Honours Art History Classical Civilisation Creative Writing Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies English Language and Linguistics English Literature History Human Rights Journalism and News Media Photography Theology and Religious Studies

V500

VV53 QV85 WV85 WV45 QVH5 QV35 VV15 LV25 PV55 WV65 VV56

240–320

Combined Honours Art History Creative Writing Criminology Dance Studies Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies English Literature Film History Human Rights Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Philosophy Social Anthropology Spanish

WV63 WW68 WM69 WW65 WW64 WQP3 WP63 WV61 WL62 WP65 PW36 WV65 WL6Q WR64

Primary Education

300–360

Psychology

280–340

Foundation and Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2 Please refer to our website for these UCAS codes.

Single Honours Combined Honours Biological Anthropology Biological Sciences Criminology Education Human Biosciences Sociology

C800

CL86 CC98 MC98 XC38 TBC CL83

Psychology and Counselling

280–340

Psychology and Health

280–340

Social Anthropology

240–280

Single Honours

Single Honours

Single Honours

Photography

Combined Honours Business Management Childhood and Society Classical Civilisation Criminology English Language and Linguistics Human Rights Journalism and News Media Photography Sociology Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

Sociology

Single Honours Combined Honours Business Management Childhood and Society Computing Studies Criminology Early Childhood Studies Education Human Rights Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Psychology Social Anthropology

C845

C841

NL16 XL36 QC8Y ML9P QCJ9 LL9P PL56 WL6Q LCH9 CR94 LV66

160–200

L300

NL13 XLH3 GL43 ML93 LX33 XL33 LL23 PL5H PL3H CL83 LCH9

Spanish Theology and Religious Studies

Spanish

LR34 LV36

240–320

Combined Honours Business Management Creative Writing Dance Studies Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature Film History Human Rights Journalism and News Media Media and Culture Modern Languages Photography Social Anthropology Sociology Theology and Religious Studies

NR14 WR84 RW45 RW44 RX43 QRH4 QR34 RP43 RV41 RL43 PR54 PR34 RR94 WR64 CR94 LR34 RV46

Sport and Exercise Sciences

240–280

Sport Psychology

280–340

Sport Science

240–280

Single Honours

Single Honours

C602

C813

Combined Honours Business Management Computing Studies Human Biosciences Journalism and News Media

CNP1 GC46 CCP1 PC56

TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) 240–320 Single Honours

Q330

Theology and Religious Studies 200–280 Single Honours Combined Honours Art History Classical Civilisation Creative Writing Criminology Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature History Human Rights Philosophy Social Anthropology Sociology Spanish

Zoology

V600

VV36 QV86 WV86 TBC XV36 QVH6 QV36 VV16 LV26 VV56 LV66 LV36 RV46

240–300

Single Honours

C300

FOUNDATION DEGREES FdA Ministerial Theology FdA Sports Coaching Practice FdA Supporting Learning and Teaching

V610 XC16 XX19

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Academic life

Top academic staff The excellence of our academics has been recognised by the Higher Education Academy’s National Teaching Fellowship Scheme. There are six Fellows associated with Roehampton, which is now in the elite league of universities with multiple Fellows. Many of our teaching staff have international reputations for their research and are working at the cutting edge of their subjects. Not only do they publish regularly in academic journals, they are also actively engaged in the issues of the day, featuring regularly in the media, and helping to shape policy as advisers to government, NGOs and industry. Zachary Leader, Professor of English Literature – published a highly acclaimed biography of the novelist and poet Kingsley Amis.

A culture of excellence, innovation and aspiration in teaching and research Roehampton is committed to excellent teaching and to ensuring that our curriculum is relevant to the needs of today’s students. Our talented teaching staff are united by a passion for helping students to reach their potential. All of our research staff teach, so students benefit from the latest thinking in their discipline. In addition, we regularly host highly respected guest lecturers from around the world, giving you access to international experts in your field. For details of the strong support network we have to help you study, see “Student services and advice” on pages 26–29. 14

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Ros Coward, Professor of Journalism – former Guardian columnist and key contributor to Mandela: the Authorised Portrait, which explores the international relationships forged by the former president of South Africa.

Internationally recognised research The University received an outstanding result in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), which measures the quality of research within UK universities. Roehampton was rated number one in the UK for its research in the areas of Dance and Biological Anthropology. The RAE also found that 80 per cent of the research submitted by Roehampton was of an international standard. Roehampton has a rapidly developing research culture and many of its professors are internationally renowned for their work and have an impressive track record of publication.

Dr Aisha Gill, Senior Lecturer in Criminology – an expert on violence against women in black and minority communities, Dr Gill led the analysis of a government consultation on the creation of a criminal offence relating to forced marriages and frequently features in the media as an expert on “honour” killings. Cecilia Essau, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology – led analysis of the most cited project in child and adolescent psychopathology to date: the Oregon adolescent depression project. Professorial Fellows Professor J Allan Hobson of Harvard Medical School was among those to discover and define rapid eye movements (REM) and the REM-sleep generators in the brain stem. On this basis he provided a brain-based explanation of the nature of dreams. Professor Hobson delivers a regular lecture series on campus. Dame Jacqueline Wilson is an award-winning children’s author whose books have sold 20 million copies in the UK and have been translated into 34 languages. She is involved in teaching on some of the Children’s Literature modules.

Through its honorary degrees, Roehampton recognises excellence in areas that reflect the University’s mission. Recent recipients include Sir Bob Geldof, Dame Jacqueline Wilson, Meera Syal MBE and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Academic life “Roehampton has one of the strongest research profiles among modern universities” —The Sunday Times University Guide

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Student support

A historic tradition The University has its roots in the traditions of its four constituent Colleges – Digby Stuart, Froebel, Southlands and Whitelands – which now share a single campus. All four Colleges were formed to address the needs of poor and disadvantaged children and to provide education of the highest quality. They were all pioneers in their fields and have had a profound impact on the education of generations of children in this country and abroad. In 1975 the four historic Colleges joined to form the Roehampton Institute of Higher Education and added a wide variety of degree programmes in the arts, social sciences and sciences. The Institute became a constituent college of the University of Surrey in 1984 and soon gained university powers for taught and research programmes before the two institutions became federated partners in 2000. Roehampton University was awarded its independent university title in 2004. Students at Roehampton benefit enormously from belonging to one of its four Colleges. Studying at a collegiate university gives students a sense of community; you are not only part of the University, but will also have an instant identity within the smaller world of the College. The four Colleges serve as the focal points for the University’s vibrant social scene. On-campus accommodation is centred on the Colleges and there are healthy intercollegiate rivalries in sport and other traditional celebrations.

Colleges Digby Stuart College

Whitelands College

Digby Stuart was established in 1874 as a teacher training college for Roman Catholic women. The College owes its existence to the vision of the Society of the Sacred Heart, whose members continue to support the College and the University.

Founded in 1841, the College is one of the five oldest higher education institutions in England. The flagship women’s college for the Church of England, it was the first college of higher education in the UK to admit women. It occupies a 14-acre site overlooking Richmond Park and is currently home to the School of Human and Life Sciences.

Froebel College Founded in 1892, the College was established to further the values of Friedrich Froebel, the German educationalist who pioneered a holistic view of child development. It is home to the University’s School of Education and is one of the UK’s major centres for initial teacher training.

Southlands College

Founded in 1872, the College offers an open, valuing, challenging and learning community for all of its members. The College ethos derives from and is sustained by its Methodist foundation. It offers a range of events and activities to help build and support the community. 18

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“The four Colleges set Roehampton apart from most other universities. As a member of a College you are more than just a number; you are an integral part of a College community. The Colleges provide each student with an identity and a localised support network, something which is rare to find at most other universities.” Gary Coates, Roehampton Students’ Union President

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Student support

Specialist staff Our International Centre helps students achieve their aspirations of studying abroad – whether you are an international student coming to Roehampton or a Roehampton student heading overseas. International Centre staff coordinate a network of international representatives and travel overseas to meet students considering study in the UK. They also administer the University’s exchange programmes, giving you the chance to study outside of the UK as part of your degree. These specialist staff ensure that the transition to studying as an overseas student is made as easy as possible. Our English Language Unit offers programmes to prepare international students to study for a degree and also English support throughout their studies. For more information, see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/englishlanguageunit

An international university Over 1,100 international students from 104 countries — a vibrant and diverse university community Studying at Roehampton gives you access to London, one of the most exciting and cosmopolitan cities in the world. We also encourage all students to take advantage of the opportunity to study abroad.

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www.roehampton.ac.uk

Home away from home Roehampton University is home to over 1,100 international students from countries as varied as Ecuador, Japan, Norway, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and the US. The University’s diverse population enriches the learning and social experience for all students, whether they are from the UK or overseas. Most international students at Roehampton stay in halls, which enables them to make friends with fellow hall residents and enjoy living in close proximity to their classes.

Study Abroad and exchanges Roehampton offers most second-year undergraduate students an exciting range of options to enhance their learning experience by participating in a Study Abroad or

exchange programme. Some programmes – particularly language programmes – include studying abroad as an integral part of your degree. You can study at universities in the US, Australia, Latin America and Europe as part of your programme. Students studying at European universities may even be eligible for a European Commission grant through the Erasmus programme. Studying overseas allows you to learn other languages, understand other cultures, make new friends and expand your knowledge of the world. Living in another country is a unique experience that will create memories for the rest of your life. Also, employers are often impressed by students who have lived and studied away from home: it demonstrates your independence and curiosity as well as your willingness to take on new and exciting challenges. Companies also value graduates with strong linguistic abilities – especially if you are an international student wishing to demonstrate your skills in the increasingly global language of English.

To find out more, or to get a copy of our International Guide, contact the International Centre: Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3192 Email: international@roehampton.ac.uk International website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/international n

Find out when Roehampton staff will be in your country, and if your qualifications meet our entry requirements.

n

Watch videos of our international students talking about Roehampton.

Roehampton University works closely with the British Council.

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Student support

Accommodation

Live on campus: n

make new friends easily

n

feel part of a collegiate community

n

easy access to classes and facilities.

Live off campus: n

share with friends

n

greater independence

n

feel part of London’s vibrant communities.

On-campus accommodation Roehampton has 25 halls of residence across its four Colleges.

Tel: 020 8392 3166/7 • Email: accommodation@roehampton.ac.uk Website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/accommodation

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www.roehampton.ac.uk

Securing a room on campus The majority of rooms in halls are made available to new students who arrive in September for the entire academic year. Our aim is to offer accommodation on campus to all students that live 35 miles or further away from the University, providing they apply within the deadline (see the website for the exact deadline). In order to apply, you must meet the following criteria: n

aged 18 or over

n

full-time student of Roehampton University

n

Roehampton must be your firm choice university.

Book your accommodation early online Once you have confirmed your acceptance of a place at Roehampton then you can apply for accommodation via the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/ accommodation/oncampus/. Once you have completed the online accommodation form, you will be allocated and offered a room by the beginning of September 2010.

n

Catered or self-catered accommodation is available.

Living off campus

n

Shared common rooms and kitchens provide space for socialising.

Many students choose to live off campus in shared rented accommodation.

n

All rooms offer internet access via data cabling or wireless network. IPTV allows you to receive TV programmes via network cable to your computer, and an IP phone facility allows you to make low-cost phone calls via your computer.

n

Live near the campus in Putney, East Sheen, Barnes or Roehampton, or live closer to central London.

n

Costs are highly variable, depending on the type of accommodation as well as its location, size, the state of the rooms, and what elements are included in the rent.

n

Some rooms have an en-suite shower/toilet; other rooms have shared facilities.

n

n

Quieter accommodation for mature students is available.

Most leases are for a 52-week period and will require that you pay up to two months’ rent in advance.

n

n

Rooms are available that are suitable for wheelchair users and those with hearing and visual impairments.

You will need to budget for your contribution towards all household bills including gas, electricity and water.

n

n

Hall Representatives in each hall are a great source of information for new students.

If you share with full-time students, you will not need to pay Council Tax.

n

n

Prices currently range from £80 to £116 a week.

You can walk, cycle or use public transport to get to the campus.

n

For full information about the halls of residence, see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/accommodation

n

The University’s Accommodation Office helps students to find suitable off-campus accommodation.

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Student support

Maintenance grants Maintenance grants of up to £2,906* a year are available for full-time UK students. See the directgov government website (www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance) for full details. Part-time students are eligible to receive a course grant of £250 from their Local Authority (LA).

Key finance information n

Finance Support from Roehampton University We believe that students need appropriate financial support throughout their studies. We are also committed to recognising and generously rewarding academic excellence. Roehampton therefore offers bursaries and scholarships in addition to the funding to which you may be entitled from other sources. For up-to-date information, please see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Roehampton offers some of the most generous Scholarships and Bursaries in the country.

Roehampton Scholarships and Bursaries

n

Tuition fee loans allow full-time UK and EU students to repay their fees at affordable rates after they leave university.

The Roehampton Scholarship recognises the outstanding academic performance of many students with a substantial financial contribution to their studies. There are also Scholarships for Sporting Excellence available.

n

Maintenance grants of up to £2,906* a year are available for full-time UK students.

The Roehampton Bursary is one of the most generous in the country, designed to help you afford the cost of studying.

n

Student loans with low interest rates are available for UK and EU students to help with living expenses.

For up-to-date information on the Scholarship and Bursary, see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/undergraduate-courses/ financialsupport/scholarshipsbursaries.html

Tuition fees for undergraduate students Full-time UK and EU students: the tuition fee in 2009/10 is £3,225 a year and will be subject to a small rise in 2010/11. The amount of this fee will be set by the government, not the University. If you have taken out a tuition fee loan from the Student Loans Company, you do not have to pay these fees until you have left university. Full-time international (non-EU) students: the tuition fee in 2009/10 is £9,230 a year and will be subject to a small rise in 2010/11. Part-time UK and EU students: the tuition fee in 2009/10 is £277 a ten-credit module but will be subject to a small rise in 2010/11. For the most up-to-date fee information, please check our website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/undergraduatecourses/fees

Student loans Maintenance loans from the Student Loans Company (SLC) Full-time UK and EU students: you can receive support for living costs by taking out a maintenance loan from the government via the SLC. This can be repaid, along with your tuition fee loan if you have one, after you graduate. For full details and how to apply, see the direct.gov.uk/studentfinance website. Tuition fee loans from the Student Loans Company (SLC) Full-time UK students: you are eligible to receive a loan from the government via the SLC to cover annual tuition fees. This can be repaid, along with your maintenance loan if you have one, after graduation. EU students: you can take out a loan from the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) via the EU Customer Services Team at Student Finance Direct to cover your annual tuition fees. See the direct.gov.uk/studentfinance website for more details.

Who to contact English students: visit www.direct.gov.uk/ studentfinance or call 0845 300 5090. Scottish students: visit www.saas.gov.uk or call 0845 111 1711. Welsh students: visit www.studentfinancewales.co.uk or call 0845 602 8845. Northern Irish students: visit www.studentfinanceni.co.uk or call 0845 600 0662. EU students: contact the EU Customer Services Team at Student Finance Direct (tel: +44 (0)141 243 3570, email: EU_Team@slc.co.uk). Non-EU international students: contact your own government education department or the British Council for information about funding.

Essential websites www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/finance www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance www.ucas.com www.uniaid.co.uk www.aimhigher.ac.uk www.slc.co.uk *2009/10 figure

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Student support

Catering Whether you want a quick snack or a hearty meal, the University has a range of catering facilities to suit all tastes. There are 12 cafes, restaurants, and bars (some with late opening hours at the weekends) spread across all four Colleges. There are also 24-hour vending areas and a shop that stocks an array of everyday groceries.

Student services and advice We offer a range of services and advice to help you make the most of your time at Roehampton. If your university experience presents any challenges, we have a strong support network in place to help you.

The three Colleges with church foundations each have their own chapels and chaplains who work to build a sense of community. The University also has two mosques, a Muslim Faith Adviser, a Hindu Faith Adviser and a Rabbi.

Childcare The University offers childcare for a number of children between five months and five years old. There are subsidised rates for students and some children are eligible for a nursery education grant. It is useful to know that there are also other nursery facilities near the campus.

Employability

Skills for the workplace

Counselling

The University has an excellent record of preparing students for employment in a wide range of interesting careers. Most students move directly from studying to employment while others choose to further their education and pursue postgraduate degrees.

Roehampton runs a programme of hour-long sessions aimed at developing various transferable skills. Typical sessions are aimed at building skills in assertiveness/ communication, team work and time management.

The University offers a range of counselling services to support students throughout their time at Roehampton.

The Employment and Careers Service offers comprehensive advice about career options, skill enhancement, employability and volunteering. Students also have full access to these services for up to three years after they have finished their studies at Roehampton. 26

Chaplaincy

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Academic advice Academic Advisers provide information on issues such as the Academic Regulations and the University’s Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme.

Medical Centre It is recommended that all new students living in halls register with the on-campus Medical Centre. The Centre is a branch surgery of a Putney-based practice and offers appointments both during and out of University hours. The medical staff are trained to deal with a wide range of physical and mental concerns. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Student support

The University Library building also houses:

Student services and advice Disability Services The Disability Services team offers students with dyslexia, disabilities and long-term medical conditions specialised services that are private and confidential. Most sessions are arranged on a one-to-one basis and are either run via a drop-in service or bookable appointments. Disability Services may be able to provide students with the following support: alternative examination arrangements, support in the Library, liaison with academic School/College, dyslexia assessments, assistance to apply for the Disabled Students’ Allowance, and access to dyslexia tutors and other support workers. This is not an exhaustive list of services; for further information, please call reception on +44 (0)20 8392 3113. Portable hearing loop systems are available for installation in individual teaching rooms.

English language support International students can receive support to improve their English throughout their studies. You can choose optional English language modules that will earn you 10 or 20 credits. The support equips you with the right skills for your chosen area of study, including interpreting essay questions, giving presentations, writing assignments and writing in examinations. Alternatively you can prepare with the specially designed pre-sessional English language summer programmes. For more information, see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/englishlanguageunit

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n

bookable individual study spaces

n

group study spaces

n

the eLearning Team, which supports our virtual learning environment StudyZone

n

IT and Media Services, who support computer use and multimedia work

n

laptop loan service

n

archive collection, containing resources for specialist research in dance, early childhood education and children’s literature.

IT facilities Students have 24/7 access to PC suites. You can also access the internet from your own laptop in the designated wireless zones on campus. Free software training is available for those needing help.

Roehampton Students’ Union (RSU) The RSU represents all Roehampton students and provides services such as: n

entertainments

n

societies

The University Library is the key resource for study at Roehampton. It is open seven days a week in term time, and the PC suites are normally open 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Our helpful staff include a team of Academic Liaison Librarians dedicated to supporting your specific subject needs.

n

advice and support on academic, financial and personal issues

n

campaigns

n

sports

n

fitness classes.

Through our catalogue and website you can access:

For more information, see pages 32–35 and the RSU website: www.roehamptonstudent.com

University Library

n

over 350,000 books, DVDs and CDs

n

over 11,000 electronic journals

n

a wide range of bibliographic and citation databases

n

a growing collection of over 36,000 e-books.

All our e-resources are available to Roehampton students over the internet. In addition, London has more libraries than any other city in the world and they are all within easy reach of Roehampton.

Study skills support Study support is spread throughout the four academic Schools, with specialist staff to promote writing development and maths and numeracy. Further support can be found online via Roehampton’s StudyZone, where there are self-study materials on academic writing and maths and numeracy.

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More than study

Explore the local area Putney – This classy riverside district features a cinema, an arts theatre and a high street packed with shops, cafes and restaurants. The annual Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race begins at Putney Bridge.

The foundation of university life is the academic experience, but there’s more than study on offer at Roehampton. You’ll be living in London, one of the world’s most exciting and cosmopolitan cities, and the areas close to Roehampton provide a wide range of social and

Kingston – In the area surrounding the historic market place of this Royal Borough there are many shops as well as pubs, clubs and a cinema. You’ll also find bars, restaurants and cafes along the riverside. Barnes – This beautiful area next to Roehampton has a peaceful village atmosphere with a green, duck pond and traditional pubs, as well as a farmers’ market, boutique shops and cafes. Its overground rail station provides a link to Waterloo station in central London.

thriving social scene, with regular club nights, and

Hammersmith – In addition to a huge range of shops, there is excellent nightlife in the many pubs, bars and clubs, and the London Apollo, where top international bands and comedians perform. The Riverside Studios contemporary arts centre incorporates a gallery and a cinema.

many societies to join and sports to take part in.

Shepherds Bush – You can shop at Westfield (the largest in-town

Explore central London

Richmond – With plenty of shops, traditional pubs and a green, Richmond has the feel of an upmarket town. It offers one of the most picturesque views of the river Thames and is a great place to enjoy a long summer evening.

cultural experiences. Also, our campus has a

Roehampton is only 30 minutes away from the centre of London, where you will find the best in: Music – 0² Arena, Wembley Stadium, Brixton Academy Nightclubs – Fabric, Ministry of Sound, Koko Film – Leicester Square cinemas, National Film Theatre, international film festivals

shopping mall in Europe), watch your favourite TV show being recorded at BBC TV Centre or catch a gig at the Shepherds Bush Empire.

Richmond Park – This is the largest of London’s Royal Parks and is only a 10-minute walk from the campus. It features 2,500 acres of woodlands, ponds, gardens and grasslands, and around 650 free-roaming deer. Wimbledon – Home of the international tennis tournament, Wimbledon has a village-style centre with restaurants and fashion boutiques.

Art – National Gallery, Tate Modern, Royal Academy of Arts Theatre – West End theatre district, National Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

Hammersmith The London Eye

Fashion – from Bond Street boutiques to Camden Market stalls Fulham

Sport – 2012 Olympics, Football (Wembley, Chelsea FC, Arsenal FC), Rugby (Twickenham), Cricket (Lord’s, the Oval)

www.roehampton.ac.uk

Greenwich

Putney

Twickenham Roehampton

Wimbledon

Museums – British Museum, Natural History Museum, Science Museum, V&A Museum

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Tower Bridge

Richmond

Architecture – from old (Houses of Parliament, St Paul’s Cathedral) to new (the “Gherkin”, Canary Wharf) Shopping – Oxford Street, numerous markets such as Spitalfields and Borough Food Market

Canary Wharf

Westminster

Kingston

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More than study Entertainment on and off campus

Roehampton Students’ Union (RSU) The Roehampton Students’ Union covers everything from entertainments and social events to academic support and looking out for your welfare. RSU website: www.roehamptonstudent.com

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If you’re looking for a place to meet friends, there are 12 different bars, cafes and restaurants on campus, offering a variety of food and drink at affordable prices and late opening.

Nights out on campus Regular nights include: n

The Bop – weekly club night; eclectic music (indie/chart/ cheese); fancy dress themes (eg pirates, beach party, commandos).

n

Bands Night – live indie bands at the Students’ Union Bar.

n

Acoustic Night – an open mic session for student talent.

There are also special seasonal events such as the Comedy Night, the Christmas Bash and, the grand finale of Freshers’ Week, the Freshers’ Ball, which features big-name DJs and live bands.

Summer Ball The highlight of the year, this mammoth event on campus lasts from Saturday afternoon to Sunday morning. As well as a fun fair, boating on the lake and a headphone disco, there are live acts – past examples include Razorlight, The Ordinary Boys, The Automatic, Liberty X, Tim Westwood, Scratch Perverts, Andy C, Shy FX, Keisha White, Emma Griffiths and Vernon Kay.

Nights out off campus The RSU organises regular nights out at local clubs, such as: n

Fez Club, Putney – weekly night out at R&B and hip-hop club; free transport organised by the RSU.

n

Clapham Grand – monthly night out at the biggest nightclub in south-west London (recently refurbished) exclusively for Roehampton students.

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More than study

Sports In 2012, the Olympic and Paralympic games come to London; as a Roehampton student you will be well positioned to enjoy all the excitement of the biggest sporting events in the world. The University competes in nationally organised student sports competitions and our coaches and sport scientists work alongside the RSU to ensure that athletes and teams achieve their full potential. We offer support to individual sportsmen and women who wish to represent the University in national championships. We also award a number of students with Scholarships for Sporting Excellence, and we have excellent links with a number of professional sports clubs.

Activities The RSU organises a huge range of activities, meaning you’ll never be wondering how to fill your time outside your studies. You can raise money for charities in the annual Raising and Giving (RAG) Week and get involved in events related to Black History Month, LGBT History Month and Go Green Week. If you have a specific interest, join one of the many societies: Afro-Caribbean • Alpha • American Football • Anthropology • Beer Appreciation • Big Band • Buddhism • Christian Union • Dance • Deviant • Education • Fair Trade • Film • Human Rights • International • Islamic • Japanese Culture • Jewish Resource Centre • LGBT • Mature Students • Music • Muslim Women • Nutrition • People and Planet • Philosophy • Roehampton Adventurers Guild • Roehampton Entrepreneurs • Roehampton Players • St John Ambulance • Whitelands Choir

The RSU’s Give it a Go scheme offers bargain prices on activities in three categories: Keep Fit…with sessions such as boxercise, yoga and hip-hop dance. Trips Away…to theatres, ten-pin bowling, paintballing and further afield on a ski trip and to Amsterdam and Disneyland Paris. Have Fun…with activities such as DJing, speed dating and language courses.

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Volunteering There are many short-, medium- and long-term volunteering opportunities available through Roehampton Community Action (RCA), the University’s volunteering centre. Volunteering can help you to gain work experience, test out vocations, develop office skills valued by employers, meet requirements of your programme of study, and fundraise for charities. RCA has established links with more than 60 charities and community projects, including Age Concern, Clic-Sargent, Girl Guides, Samaritans, St John Ambulance, the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability, and Victim Support.

Welfare services The RSU makes student wellbeing a priority by offering a range of personal support and advice on issues from academic matters and accommodation to sexual health and quitting smoking. RSU officers are elected by students every March. In addition to those dealing with general issues of student welfare, we have specialist officers for women, disabled students, international students, LGBT students, and also officers dealing with issues such as Cultural and Race Relations, and Fair Trade.

There are extensive opportunities for students to gain experience and qualifications as coaches and leaders in sport. The University’s own sports coaching in the community project (“Move”) recruits sports ambassadors at the start of each year. Sports clubs include: athletics • badminton • basketball • cheerleading • cricket • football • gymnastics • hockey • kickboxing • lacrosse • martial arts • netball • rowing • rugby • squash • swimming • table tennis • tennis • triathlon • Ultimate Frisbee • volleyball. On-campus sporting facilities include: n ROEActive – a state-of-the-art fitness centre with rowing and running machines, weights and other cardiovascular fitness equipment n

Multi-Use Games Area – a flood-lit, all-weather surface suitable for football, netball, tennis and basketball

n

grass football pitches

n

studio facilities for aerobics, circuit training and martial arts.

Our teams also use excellent nearby facilities, such as the Bank of England Sports Centre, for hockey, rugby and football matches, and the National Tennis Centre for home tennis fixtures.

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London’s only campus university 36

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38

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Anthropology

Why Roehampton? n

This programme is unusual in its breadth: it offers both biological and social anthropology, exploring their similarities and differences.

n

You will be taught by staff whose research is among the best in the UK according to the Research Assessment Exercise 2008.

n

Roehampton is exceptionally well equipped with laboratories and IT suites as well as specialist behavioural observation equipment and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

n

Rich in cultural diversity and academic resources, London is the ideal setting for studying Anthropology.

Summary Explore the versatility and diversity of humankind as you focus on differences in cultures, on politics and religions around the world, and on human evolution and adaptation to the environment. Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (including Biology), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Double Science or Biology at grade C, or equivalent

Facilities The University’s laboratories are equipped with facilities for DNA analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electrophysiology, bone collection and environmental monitoring. We also have excellent microcomputing facilities with specialist hardware and software, as well as specialist behavioural observation equipment. The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Anthropology. London is home to many museums, galleries and places of worship. Among the world-class resources close to Roehampton are London Zoo; the Natural History Museum; the Grant Museum, University College London; and the Primate Society of Great Britain.

Career prospects You acquire a range of transferable skills, including the ability to carry out independent research, computer literacy and an understanding of behavioural, biological and cultural differences among people. This wide range of skills means that

our graduates are suited to many career paths in industry, administration, personnel and non-governmental organisations as well as teaching.

First year You are introduced to the basic concepts of social and biological anthropology through a number of compulsory modules. These explore how we evolved and how we live and interact with our environment.

Second year You build on the concepts absorbed in earlier studies with modules focusing on Humans and Other Primates, Understanding Behaviour, Kinship and Gender, and Theory and Politics.

Third year You carry out a piece of independent and original research in the form of an extended essay or project report. A wide variety of optional modules are also available including Primate Biology and Conservation; Evolution and Palaeoanthropology; Animal Behaviour and Cognition; Understanding Genocide; Gender and the Body in Ancient Art; and Animals, Culture and Society.

Sample modules • • • •

Ethnography 1: The Ethnographic Tradition Primate Biology and Conservation Kinship and Gender Evolution and Palaeoanthropology www.roehampton.ac.uk

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n

n

n

Roehampton is close to all the major national art collections in London, such as Tate Modern, the National Gallery and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Single Honours students have the option of museum or gallery work placements and modules in photographic practice and theory. You have the opportunity to study abroad as part of your degree.

Summary Studying Art History will help you to develop a wide range of analytical, visual and critical skills. You will benefit from study visits to world-famous galleries and museums that are on our doorstep in London. This programme will help to prepare you for a range of creative careers in the art world, from gallery or museum curatorship, to teaching and consultancy work.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 10) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (Ancient History, Economic History, Classical History or English desirable), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Roehampton University is only a short ride from world-renowned galleries, such as the National Gallery.

40 www.roehampton.ac.uk

Introductory classes focus on methods and approaches to art history as well as visual analysis. You will learn about Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture in Italy, France, Spain and the Netherlands. Optional modules include photography, classical civilisation, philosophy, history and aesthetics.

Second year You will study the development of modern art as well as consider trends in contemporary visual culture. In addition, you will have the option of a museum or gallery placement (Single Honours only).

Third year You will complete a museum studies module called Cultures of Display, and write a dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with your tutor. You will also study Women and Visual Culture in Early Renaissance Italy, Fin-de-Siècle Art and Society, and a selection of other modules on western and non-western art. Sample modules • Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Art in Italy • Art and Architecture in the 17th Century • Modernity and Modern Art • British Art and Architecture

Career prospects Art History enables students to evaluate critically and present their research and ideas clearly in writing. The discipline also encourages the development of transferable skills, particularly organisational and IT skills. Career opportunities exist in gallery and museum work (including educational services), arts administration and teaching (following diploma and postgraduate study).

Facilities As well as excellent on-campus facilities for the study of Art History, such as the Library, Roehampton has long-standing links with the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Students also regularly use the resources at other nearby galleries and museums including Tate Modern, Tate Britain, National Gallery, British Museum, Royal Collections and the Imperial War Museum.

Why Roehampton? n

You will be taught by staff whose research is ranked best in the UK according to the Research Assessment Exercise 2008.

n

Roehampton is exceptionally well equipped with laboratories and IT suites as well as specialist behavioural observation equipment.

n

We have long-standing links with zoos, including London Zoo, and museums for visits and research projects.

Summary Explore the place of humans in the biological world with this challenging programme, which examines the human species with a focus on evolution, disease, genetics and adaptation to diverse environments. Humans’ place in the primate order is explored in the context of our species’ cultural evolution. Combined Honours (see page 10) • You can combine this programme with Social Anthropology, providing an integrated BSc Anthropology programme. Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (one of which should be in a Biological Science), vocational A-levels (in Science), or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Double Science at grade C, or equivalent

First year You are introduced to evolutionary theory and genetics, human health and disease patterns, and to cultural evolution.

Second year You study the core modules Understanding Behaviour, and Humans and Other Primates. A research methods module allows you to develop skills in preparation for a third-year research project. There is also an optional field course.

Career prospects Students acquire a range of transferable skills, including the ability to carry out independent research, computer literacy and an understanding of behavioural, biological and cultural differences among people. This wide range of skills means that our graduates are suited to many career paths in industry, administration, personnel and non-governmental organisations as well as teaching.

Facilities Our laboratories are equipped with facilities for DNA analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electrophysiology, high-performance liquid chromatography and environmental monitoring. We also have specialist behavioural observation equipment and Geographic Information Systems. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the Natural History Museum; London Zoo; Grant Museum, University College; and the Primate Society of Great Britain.

Third year You are taught theory and practice in biological anthropology and carry out research in an area of your choice, which accounts for a third of the final year. Sample modules • Humans and Other Primates • Animal Behaviour and Cognition • Primate Biology and Conservation • Evolution and Palaeoanthropology

Roehampton leads the field in the UK. We work on topics in primatology and human evolution, including fieldwork in Namibia, Nigeria, Puerto Rico and Brazil.

Ann MacLarnon, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology www.roehampton.ac.uk 41

Biological Anthropology

Art History

Why Roehampton?

First year


42 www.roehampton.ac.uk

www.roehampton.ac.uk 43


n

n

n

In a recent review by the Quality Assurance Agency, the programme scored 23 out of 24 points, one of the highest quality ratings in the UK. Roehampton is close to excellent resources such as the Natural History Museum and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The programme includes a residential field course and extensive opportunities for local fieldwork.

Summary How was Dolly the sheep cloned? How bio-engineered is the food we eat? This programme explores the molecular, cellular and organismal biology essential for understanding modern biology. Learn about rapidly developing areas such as biotechnology and recombinant DNA technology and their social implications as well as more traditional aspects of animal and plant biology.

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–300 points from A-levels (including Biology), vocational A-levels (in Science), or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

n

Excellent teaching and learning facilities include modern, well-equipped laboratories; the programme emphasises the development of strong laboratory skills.

n

Staff members active in research ensure that modules address cutting-edge issues.

n

The programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science.

First year You are introduced to key areas such as cell and molecular biology, physiology, ecology, evolution and the major animal and plant groups. Specific modules in human biology and evolution are also available.

Second year Through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars and informal tutorials you will study the three main topic areas of organisms and ecology; evolutionary biology and behaviour; and molecular biology, physiology and biomedicine. A residential field week in south Wales acts as a link between the first year and later years. You will receive training in research methods and have the opportunity to develop a research proposal.

Third year You may select advanced modules from any area of biology, and have the opportunity to specialise. A research project in any one of the topic areas will account for one third of the final-year assessment.

Summary Designed for students with a broad interest in the medical aspects of biology, this programme offers a practical approach to the subject and prepares you for careers in bioscience or work in medical laboratories. You will gain experience in laboratory practices, instrumentation and analytical techniques. Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–300 points from A-levels (one of which should be Biology or Chemistry), vocational A-levels (in Science), or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

First year

Sample modules • Animal Biology • Animal Behaviour and Cognition • Aquatic Biology • Molecular Biology: Theory and Practice

You take core modules in biomolecular science, cell and molecular biology, physiology, and human disease, preparing you for Honours-level study. A module on practical methods introduces a wide range of biological and biochemical techniques and develops laboratory skills, including the use of computer systems to present and analyse data.

Sample modules • Immunology • Pathophysiology • Microbiology • Molecular Biology and Genetics

Career prospects

Second year

Career prospects

Graduates find employment in a range of administrative, advisory, research and field appointments in central and local government or industry. Some seek careers in teaching.

Facilities Our laboratories are equipped with facilities for DNA analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electrophysiology, highperformance liquid chromatography and environmental monitoring. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including London Zoo and Chessington Zoo. We also make use of the excellent local wildlife areas, such as the Wildfowl and Wetlands Centre at Barnes, Wimbledon Common and Richmond Park. 44 www.roehampton.ac.uk

Why Roehampton?

In the second year, modules focus on subjects such as biochemistry and toxicology, applied biology and genetics, clinical nutrition, environmental health, pharmacology, and practical methods in molecular biology and biochemistry.

Third year You undertake a research project and study modules in subjects such as medical microbiology, molecular genetics, and practical methods in haematology, microbiology, histology and biochemistry.

A Biomedical Sciences degree will equip you for a laboratorybased career in biosciences – in public or private health services, technical support in research and educational institutions and industry.

Facilities Our laboratories are equipped with facilities for DNA analysis, high-performance liquid chromatography, electrophysiology, microbiology, and light and electron microscopy. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the Wellcome Collection and Library, and the British Museum. Our research links with many of London’s hospitals and medical schools facilitate visits, projects and access to specialist libraries. www.roehampton.ac.uk 45

Biomedical Sciences

Biological Sciences

Why Roehampton?

Single or Combined Honours (see page 10)


n

n

With their roots in London’s business community, Roehampton’s Business programmes equip you with skills and knowledge that will give you a competitive edge in a tough job and business start-up market. To give your degree a vocational focus you can study specialist subjects such as business economics, human resources, and marketing at progressively higher levels in each year of the programme.

n

You may apply to change your original choice of Business degree title before progressing to the second year.

n

Career prospects are excellent as companies are eager to recruit individuals who have a wide range of management competencies and are proficient in the use of IT.

Business

Business

Why Roehampton?

Business Management (Human Resource Management) Single Honours This programme helps to equip you for a career in personnel management; graduates can expect to progress to senior and strategic roles in this sector. You will consider the role of people in organisations, the theory and practice of human resource management, employment law and how employees learn and develop professionally during their careers.

Sample modules • Human Resource Management • Learning and Development in Organisations • Labour Law

Business Management (Retail and Marketing Management) Single Honours This programme focuses on two closely related and popular areas of business management where employment opportunities are many and varied. Practising retail consultants contribute to the programme and many students are able to relate their part-time employment activities to programme content.

Sample modules • • • •

Retail Purchasing Supply Chain Management Retail Theory and Practice Retail Issues and Applications

Marketing Single Honours Business Management Single or Combined Honours (see page 10) Taught on the doorstep of a global business hub, this programme provides an excellent foundation for a range of managerial careers, across human resource management, retail management and marketing. The programme reflects our particular areas of expertise and excellent industry contacts.

Sample modules • • • •

Managing Organisations Business Research The European Economy Marketing and Enterprise

46 www.roehampton.ac.uk

Marketing concerns all the activities that help an organisation manage demand. This programme provides a broad foundation in the key business areas before progressing to the Marketing modules. This qualification will equip you for a wide range of careers in areas such as brand management, product development, business-to-business marketing or marketing in the charity and public sector.

Sample modules • • • •

Consumer Behaviour Marketing Management Marketing Research International Marketing

International Business Single Honours See page 49.

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent • Business or social science-based Access qualification accepted • For non-native speakers of English, an overall IELTS score of 6.0 generally and also a minimum of 6.0 for the writing segment • Applications from students without standard A-level qualifications but with relevant work experience and evidence of ability and aptitude will also be seriously considered

www.roehampton.ac.uk 47


n

Based in the global business hub of London, this programme equips you with skills and knowledge that will give you a competitive edge in an international economy that is globalising at an unprecedented speed.

n

You can customise your programme of study to support your career objectives, specialising in subjects such as business economics, marketing, retail, management, or human resources at progressively higher levels in each year of the programme.

n

Students from outside the UK with recognised qualifications may be admitted directly to the final year of the programme. All other students are required to spend a semester in their second year studying at one of Roehampton’s overseas partner universities.

Summary This programme delivers an in-depth understanding of the exciting and dynamic world of international business, including “real-world” application of business concepts in a cross-cultural context. It equips you for a career in organisations that operate in a multi-country, multi-regional economic, cultural and business environment. The programme is designed for two categories of students: students from outside the UK (whose first language typically is not English and who wish to experience studying in the UK) and UK students who wish to gain international experience through study in another country. First year

Third year

This foundation year consists of the following modules: Business Skills; Quantitative and Accounting Methods for Business; People and Organisations; Marketing and Enterprise; Business Economics; Foreign Language (English, French, Italian, Spanish, Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin); and Questioning Citizenship.

You contribute to and learn from the programme at an advanced level on the basis of real international experience developed during your second year. You continue to extend and deepen your business knowledge and practice. All students study Cross-Cultural Management and complete an international research project.

Second year All students study International Business Environment, International Business Workshop, and Managing Organisations. Non-UK students typically stay at Roehampton and select modules from a wide variety of options such as The European Economy, Marketing Management, and Entrepreneurship. UK students spend a semester overseas in a partner institution studying business to an equivalent level to Roehamptonbased students.

48 www.roehampton.ac.uk

Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE Maths at grade C, GCSE English at grade C (or an IELTS overall score of 6.0 and generally also a minimum of 6.0 for the writing segment), or equivalent

www.roehampton.ac.uk 49

Business, International

Why Roehampton?


Duchesne Building, Digby Stuart College 50 www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Why Roehampton? n

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You will benefit from a multidisciplinary approach to the subject, drawing on sociology, social policy, media studies and psychoanalysis. The programme suits those who want to continue with professional training or to pursue a more academic line of enquiry.

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You will look at childhood in a broad sense rather than focusing on a particular age group.

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There are opportunities for practicebased learning in appropriate environments.

Why Roehampton?

You are introduced to some of the main academic contributions to this field of study. Modules include Children in British Society and Introduction to the Psychoanalysis of Childhood.

Second year You focus your studies according to your personal interests. Some students choose to use the programme as a preparation for further professional training, while others opt to pursue a more academic line of enquiry.

Third year

How does society treat children? How are they governed, and what are the moral and political values attached to childhood? This programme considers these questions by analysing institutions, such as the family and schools, as well as areas of welfare provision. The programme also draws on psychoanalytic perspectives for insights into children.

This is one of the most wide-ranging Classics undergraduate programmes in the UK.

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You can gain exciting practical experience on a work placement; for example, on an archaeological dig or at a museum.

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You have the opportunity to design a website on a classical topic.

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Roehampton is close to London’s many world-class academic facilities, such as the British Museum, British Library, Museum of London and Institute of Classical Studies.

Optional modules are available that allow you to pursue particular perspectives such as psychoanalysis, social policy and sociology

Summary

Sample modules • Children’s Rights • Infant and Child Observations • Childhood and the Mass Media • Comparative Childhoods

Our multidisciplinary approach brings the classical worlds of Greece and Rome to life. This programme offers a wide range of subjects that explore classical civilisation and its influence on modern western culture.

Career prospects

Summary

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Graduates are well equipped for further professional training or a career in education, social administration, health and welfare services, or children’s rights organisations. You will also be qualified to conduct research in these and related areas.

Facilities We have excellent on-campus facilities, such as the University Library, and we encourage contact with outside agencies and visiting speakers. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the Foundling Museum, Museum of Childhood, National Children’s Bureau, British Library and Freud Museum.

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Homer and the Epic Cycle Pompeii Violence and Law in Ancient Greece Classics and Cinema Politics, Society and Religion in the Late Roman Empire

Career prospects

Building on first-year introductions, optional modules expand on aspects of antiquity and its influence on modern culture. A core module comprises a study of classical myths and mythology. You can also choose to continue to study Greek and Latin and to take a work placement.

The skills in thinking, arguing and communicating that you will develop in your investigations of this exciting period are transferable to a wide variety of different professions and careers. Employers are always looking for broad generalists with such skills and Classical Civilisation graduates find careers in museums, education, the civil service, arts administration, the media, business and government.

Third year

Recent placements have included play support worker at Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital, work in a bureau tracing missing children, and helping to draft a children protection policy for the Children’s Society.

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 160–200 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

Sample modules

You obtain a solid grounding in the discipline in the first year. Core modules provide introductions to Greek and Roman literature and history. Optional modules expose you to a broader range of subjects including classical art and archaeology, social anthropology, ancient philosophy, and the Greek and Latin languages.

Second year

Practice-based learning

Combined Honours (see page 10)

First year

You write a dissertation on a subject of your choice under the guidance of a supervisor. Optional modules offer specialised topics informed by current staff research and you can also choose to study advanced Greek and Latin.

During my work placement at Vindolanda [a Roman fort and settlement near Hadrian’s Wall] I was able to learn about Roman Britain in a hands-on fashion and this contributed greatly to my decision on my third-year dissertation topic to be on the frontiers of Roman Britain.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 10) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (Classical Civilisation, History, Art History, English are desirable but no previous knowledge of the subject is required), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Sophie Dobson, former Classical Civilisation student 52 www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Classical Civilisation

Childhood and Society

First year


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Computing

Exit pathways

Why Roehampton? n

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Extensive industry contacts provide engaging guest lecturers and class discussions – our Computing Department has strong links with local, national and international organisations including Microsoft, Google, Hewlett Packard and IBM. The programme is taught in dedicated labs with industry-specific software by a highly competent team of experts from a variety of IT-related backgrounds. All graduates can gain membership of the Institute for the Management of Information Systems and the British Computer Society (student membership).

Summary How does Amazon know what you want in your shopping basket even before you do? How does Facebook know who your best friends are? From online shopping to the virtual world of Second Life, technology continues to develop at an unstoppable pace. Follow an exciting programme of study centred on the information and communications technologies that have driven the phenomenal growth of the internet.

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 160–240 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

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Single Honours • Computing Studies • Computing with Database Systems • Computing with Web and Multimedia • Computing with Information Management Combined Honours (see page 10) • Computing Studies The first year is designed to give you a grounding in the fundamental aspects of Computing – how data is managed, what systems are used in different contexts, how humans and computer interact, how digital graphics are made, and the professional issues associated with computers in society. After that year, you progress your study to specialise in an area that particularly interests you. The programme has been designed to equip you with valuable skills for employment – not only technically but also in the area of honing your communication and problemsolving skills to enable you to meet the demands of the workplace. Our graduates gain jobs in many fields such as system analysis, web design and development, marketing and retail management. After gaining a solid base in the first year you can specialise in one of three subject pathways – Database Systems, Web and Multimedia, or Information Management – or take elements of all three and continue a broader programme of Computing Studies. If you wish to combine Computing with another programme at Roehampton you can do so by taking elements from all three areas to form a Combined Honours programme of your choice.

I found the variety of skills sets learned at the University a great help in securing myself a career in project management in the IT industry.

Ella Horswell, former Computing student from Wimbledon, London, now works as a Project Manager at World Archipelago in Fulham, London

First year

Second and third year

The first year is common across all four Computing pathways and will provide you with a solid basis in a variety of areas such as:

Depending on the pathway you choose, the second and third years will provide you with opportunities to: • design and build professional websites that cater to clients’ needs

• the role of information systems in business and society • different methods used in the development of information systems • ways to collect and manage data • the legal and ethical aspects of being a computing professional • computer programming; computer hardware, networks and graphic design. You will be debating with your fellow students on topical issues such as the dilemmas of music downloading and hacking. You will create your own computer programs, design your own databases and learn how to use industry-specific software such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to create computer graphics for a variety of purposes.

• design and build robust and secure databases with web connectivity • design and create original interactive animated graphics and multimedia projects • gain in-depth understanding of the role of IT in industry and the importance of strategic planning and analysis of information systems. All pathways are designed to provide expertise in the key skill areas of: • analysing and designing systems for specific industries • managing projects to ensure quality and efficient time management • writing concise and relevant reports and communicating effectively with clients and customers to present findings and IT solutions. www.roehampton.ac.uk 57


Why Roehampton? n

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In a recent review by the Quality Assurance Agency, the programme scored 23 out of 24 points, one of the highest quality ratings in the UK. Roehampton is close to excellent resources such as the Natural History Museum and the Wildfowl and Wetlands Centre at Barnes. The programme includes a residential field course and extensive opportunities for local fieldwork.

Summary Explore the link between humans and their natural environment as you delve into the development of effective conservation strategies, based on a sound knowledge of biology and ecology. This challenging programme, acknowledged for its high-quality teaching, focuses on the maintenance of biodiversity within natural and human-influenced environments.

You explore topics that provide a foundation for more advanced studies such as the field course and modules in conservation and ecology. You also take modules in cell and molecular biology (which provide grounding for further study of molecular genetics) and the biology of vertebrate and invertebrate animals.

Why Roehampton? n

This programme is approved by the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP) as a pathway to professional registration as a Psychotherapeutic Counsellor.

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Graduates can progress to further study on MSc/PsychD programmes (and full registration as a Psychotherapist with the UKCP).

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We stage a full programme of research seminars and guest seminars featuring eminent speakers in the field.

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Once you graduate, you benefit from personal and professional support from the alumni organisation.

Second year A residential field week in south Wales acts as a link between the first year and later years. You also take a research methods module that offers the opportunity to write a research proposal and give a presentation on conservationrelated or ecological topics of your choice.

Third year You complete a conservation-based research project, which makes up one third of the final year. You can also choose from a variety of optional modules including Animal Conservation, Conservation Biology and a field module based in south Devon. Sample modules • Environmental Physiology • Ecosystems • Primate Biology and Conservation • Conservation Ecology

Summary This experiential practitioner-based programme examines theoretical issues from a critical perspective while providing a thoughtful, relational approach to practice. Teaching staff are all practising therapists and as researchers are members of the University’s internationally renowned Research Centre for Therapeutic Education. First year

Employment opportunities include administrative, advisory or research appointments in industry, central or local government and non-governmental conservation organisations. Teaching is also a popular career choice.

You explore the therapeutic relationship with an emphasis on a greater sense of awareness of self and other. Personal development is facilitated through a combination of study of different theoretical approaches, practical work in small groups, and participation in a larger experiential group. Research issues are considered in relation to ethical practice.

Facilities

Second year

Career prospects

Our laboratories are equipped with facilities for DNA analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electrophysiology, highperformance liquid chromatography and environmental monitoring. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, London Zoo and Chessington Zoo. We also make use of the excellent local wildlife areas, such as Wimbledon Common and Richmond Park.

You further develop your counselling skills and make a deeper exploration of person-centred and psychodynamic theory. You begin to integrate concepts of counselling theory into work with clients and obtain 30 hours of counselling practice, 6 hours of clinical supervision, and 25 hours of personal therapy. The emphasis throughout is on the development of the therapeutic relationship. Research issues in relation to therapeutic outcomes are considered.

Third year Single Honours

Richmond Park, a 10-minute walk from Roehampton University.

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Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–300 points from A-levels (including Biology), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

You increase your understanding of the relational approach to counselling and explore the contrast between philosophical approaches to counselling, including existential and phenomenological models, which are compared to behaviourist and cognitive approaches. You obtain a further 70 hours of counselling practice, 12 hours of supervision and 25 hours of personal therapy. The research module looks at research methodologies from quantitative and qualitative perspectives and offers you an opportunity to explore an issue of your choice in depth.

Sample modules • Person-centred Theory • Psychodynamic Theory • Reflection on the Integration of Theory Into Practice • Existential and Cognitive Behavioural Theory • Research

Career prospects There has been a long tradition, particularly in health and social care, of using this practitioner-based programme to enhance career opportunities. Graduates have been very successful in achieving professional accreditation and working as counsellors for a wide variety of organisations and in private practice. The opportunity to register with the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP) as a Psychotherapeutic Counsellor provides a further opportunity for career development.

Single Honours Entry requirements • Entry to the programme is by interview. Successful applicants will have significant and relevant life experience, and will have reached a time in their lives when they are able to make the emotional, intellectual, financial and time commitment that this programme demands. Evidence of work experience with people in a relational role, paid or voluntary, or an introductory course would be an advantage.

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Counselling, Integrative

Conservation Biology

First year


Why Roehampton? n

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This is one of the longest-established Creative Writing undergraduate degrees in the London area. It is one of only a few Creative Writing programmes in the UK to offer innovative fiction and poetry and a strong nonfiction strand. Specialist options include writing for children, travel writing (with an opportunity to study abroad), screenwriting, writing for the internet, and stand-up comedy. A third-year core module introduces you to writing industry representatives. Roehampton has a rolling programme of fellowships – current holders are Jacqueline Wilson and Daljit Khan.

Summary Taught by working writers (including poets, novelists, journalists and screenwriters), the programme introduces and focuses on writing practice in four main genres: fiction, nonfiction, poetry and screenwriting. As students explore the technical craft and process of writing, they develop broad critical awareness and skills. As they progress through the degree programme, they may also choose to specialise.

You are asked to examine, consolidate and improve your basic writing skills, to try out different ways and forms of writing and to explore your own creative processes. In this year, you are also asked to engage with a wide range of challenging texts from different genres and historical periods and to explore some of the critical and theoretical approaches that will be important in later work. The first year is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, experimental practice and tutorials.

Why Roehampton? n

The programme emphasises the relationship between criminology and other fields of study such as law, globalisation, gender, racism and the city.

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The curriculum draws on cutting-edge developments within criminology and the exciting research being conducted by many of our lecturers.

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Dr Aisha Gill, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, regularly contributes to national media as an expert on the subjects of “honour” killings, forced marriages and domestic violence.

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There are opportunities for work placements in appropriate environments.

Second year You take compulsory and optional modules, which are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. In the second year, the programme offers more specialist writing genres (including fiction, poetry and screenwriting) and modules that provide an opportunity to practise, analyse and criticise specific forms of writing. You also have the opportunity to study travel writing and then to spend a semester abroad at one of our exchange institutions.

Third year You may choose to specialise in a particular area of interest, which also provides a path toward an MA in Creative Writing. Alternatively, you can elect to continue to explore a variety of writing genres, which may include innovative forms of fiction and poetry, novel writing, screenwriting, or (subject to availability) song lyrics and the graphic novel. Sample modules • Developing the Novel • Poetry and Innovative Form • Life Writing • Writing Journalism and Nonfiction

Career prospects This programme provides grounding for a range of careers related to writing, the media, publishing, film and television, education and the arts in general.

Summary Criminology encourages students to think both practically and critically on the topics of crime and crime control. The programme examines the complex underpinnings of criminal behaviour, mechanisms to control crime and the relationship between crime and gender, ethnicity, age and poverty. First year Modules provide an introduction to theories of crime, the historical and contemporary study of the criminal justice system, and criminological study and research. To help you develop your skills in research and writing, we provide continuous assessment and sustained feedback throughout this year.

Sample modules • Crime Prevention and Community Safety • Gender, Violence and Human Rights • Prisons and Punishment • Crime, Culture and the City • Service Learning (includes placements)

Second year

Career prospects

Core modules build on themes from the first year, exploring the ways that theories of crime can be applied in research and the transitions taking place in crime control. Specialist modules cover topics such as race and criminal justice, youth crime and justice, and theories of punishment.

Third year You can choose from a range of module options and there is an opportunity to carry out an independent research dissertation in an area that interests you.

Graduates are employed in a wide range of governmental and non-governmental organisations, including the Home Office, Police, probation service, courts, youth offending teams, prisons and higher education.

Work placements Examples of past placements include prison visitor centres, Victim Support, the Witness Service, youth offending teams; the Police; Westminster Drug Project, and Nacro (the crime reduction charity).

Facilities Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Single or Combined Honours (see page 10) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (including grade C in a relevant subject), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

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Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points (Single Honours) or 200–240 points (Combined Honours) from A-levels (Sociology or Politics desirable), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

We have excellent on-campus facilities, such as the University Library, and we encourage contact with outside agencies and visiting speakers. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the British Library, Old Bailey, Royal Courts of Justice, Home Office and Museum of London.

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Criminology

Creative Writing

First year


Dance and Exercise Science

First year

Why Roehampton? n

Roehampton is internationally renowned for its work in Dance.

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Our Sport Performance, Assessment and Rehabilitation Centre is the best laboratory of its type in London and includes automated motion-capture systems and high-speed and highdefinition recording facilities.

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The Dance Department hosts an intensive programme of in-house performances starring leading companies and major dance personalities.

• The combination of a dance theatre, four additional studios and top-class BASESaccredited laboratories makes this an extremely well-resourced programme.

Summary This new programme seeks to promote an understanding of dance as an art form in contemporary Britain and supply a scientific underpinning in biomechanics, physiology and psychology for the dance practitioner and teacher. It draws on two well-established areas within Roehampton University – Sport Sciences and Dance – and benefits from their excellent facilities including purpose-built dance studios, a studio theatre, a creative dance technology studio, a conditioning gymnasium and fully equipped biomechanics and physiology laboratories.

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You develop a broad grounding in theoretical and applied areas of dance such as choreography, technique, and history and appreciation of dance. You will also be introduced to the scientific underpinning of human motion and the analysis of skilled movement.

Second year Your study develops according to your interests and can include practical and theoretical areas of dance as well as sport-science-based modules in biomechanics, physiology and psychology. Core modules include Introduction to Dance Science, and Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology, which help you apply your understanding of your first-year work to dance and exercise analysis.

Third year A wide range of modules is available, allowing you either to further specialise or to continue your study of a variety of areas. In collaboration with a supervisor you will design and execute a dissertation, which is worth a third of your finalyear marks, on an aspect of dance science that particularly interests you.

Sample modules • • • • •

The Moving Body: Understanding Movement Introduction to Physiology and Fitness Assessment Looking at Dances Choreography, Composition and Collaboration Biomechanics: Performance and Injury

Facilities In addition to the excellent on-campus facilities, Roehampton is close to London’s world-class sports venues, including Wimbledon tennis and Twickenham rugby, and dance venues, including the Royal Opera House and Sadler’s Wells.

Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (including one Science subject – PE is accepted), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Science at grade C, or equivalent • Applicants should have a keen interest in dance and it is essential that they have some dance experience (contemporary or ballet). Applicants may need to attend an audition/interview for the dance aspects of the programme.

I learnt a lot studying at Roehampton and was always supported and encouraged by dedicated and passionate staff. Geraldine Ruffle, former Dance and Exercise Science student

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We host an intensive programme of in-house performances and dance events starring leading companies and major dance personalities.

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We have an excellent theatre, four additional studios, recording facilities and one of the UK’s finest dance libraries.

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Members of the programme team act as consultants for television and radio, and have strong links with ballet and contemporary dance companies.

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Eligible students may benefit from spending one semester abroad, studying at an associated overseas university.

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Roehampton is home to the renowned Centre for Dance Research.

Summary This internationally renowned programme focuses on dance art in 21st-century Britain from diverse multicultural and artistic contexts and allows you to explore your enthusiasm for dance through a mixture of practice and theory. Strong links with the profession are supported by staff members’ own creative work and choreographic research fellowships.

Dance research at Roehampton was rated number one in the UK by the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

First year

Third year

You develop a broad grounding in practical and theoretical areas of dance, such as choreography, technique, dance history, appreciation and contextualisation, and the analysis of human movement. Dance techniques are drawn from a range of contemporary styles (including Cunningham, Graham, Limón, Release and Contact Improvisation) and ballet.

While you can specialise in an area, you are expected to maintain an interdisciplinary and theoretical approach to your study. There are also modules that are more vocational in nature, such as Community Dance, Dance Criticism in Practice, The Teaching Artist, and Dance Performance and Repertory.

Second year Your study develops according to your interests. Areas of study include choreography and technique, and various theoretical modules offering philosophical, analytical, socio-historical, anthropological and movement-studies approaches.

Sample modules • • • •

Choreography: Composition and Direction Introduction to Dance Science Dance, Culture and Society World Music and Dance

Facilities

Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent 64 www.roehampton.ac.uk

As well as the excellent on-campus dance studios, theatre and library resources, Roehampton is close to the many world-class performance venues in London, such as Sadler’s Wells Theatre and the South Bank Centre.

Career prospects Our combined emphasis on theoretical and practical approaches to dance is a strength of our programme, and graduates work in a variety of community, production, therapy, teaching, administrative and archival posts. www.roehampton.ac.uk 65

Dance Studies

Why Roehampton?


Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

First year You will be introduced to performance studies, which will broaden your understanding of what theatre can be by addressing such events as the Notting Hill Carnival, speeches by world leaders, and the performance of social rituals. You will be making your own performances as well as reading a number of plays and investigating theatrical venues and critical approaches.

Why Roehampton? n

The programme is designed to enable you to gain maximum benefit from the University’s proximity to the theatres, museums and arts archive resources in London.

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The University has five flexible studio spaces and extensive library and technical facilities.

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Staff on the programme were judged as conducting research that is “worldleading” and “internationally excellent” in the most recent national Research Assessment Exercise.

Second year Optional modules include Community Drama, Performance and Live Art, Representing Women, Music and Performance, Writing in Performance, Modernism and the Avant Garde, and Approaches to Directing. You will also be involved in devising a full-length production.

Third year You can choose from a wide range of modules such as Playwriting, Stages of Terror, or Drama of the 60s Counterculture. At this level the modules are informed by current staff research, which means that you will benefit from expertise at the cutting edge of the discipline. Sample modules • Performance in the Age of Hip Hop • Advanced Theatre Practices • Shakespeare and Contemporary Performance • Staging Multicultural Britain

Summary We actively encourage intellectual curiosity and creativity, which helps you to articulate your ideas in writing, speech and performance. You will critically analyse plays, performances and audiences; build confidence and presentation skills; and develop your understanding of specific performance activities.

Career prospects The programme equips students with a wide range of transferable skills: experience of working as part of a group, complex problem solving, time management, information retrieval, research, and presentation. Recent graduates have gone on to careers in administration, marketing, teaching and therapeutic work. Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (arts, humanities or social science; pass in Drama if taken), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Drama has given me a great opportunity to do a mix of practice and theory while developing my playwriting.

Nikita Folly, third-year Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies/English Literature student from Farnborough, Hampshire 66 www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Why Roehampton? n

Roehampton is internationally renowned for its work in early childhood studies.

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Our close working relationship with a local nursery provider enables you to carry out child observations.

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Our Early Childhood Research Centre is based in Froebel College, which has a long history of pioneering work in the field. You will have access to the Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies, a unique collection of materials documenting the history of early childhood.

Summary Discover how children develop, learn and think from birth to the age of six in this programme designed to meet the increasing demand for early years specialists. The programme also provides those already working in this field with the opportunity to enhance their practical work with a better understanding of early childhood theory.

The study of young children and the cultural influences on their lives and development is explored in depth. You research current issues and concerns in early childhood and consider equity and inclusion. You also learn about the importance of observation in the study of young children and develop your observational skills.

Why Roehampton?

Second year You look critically at the significance of play, imagination and creativity in children’s development, consider a variety of curriculum models, and examine the impact of the early childhood pioneers on current perspectives and practice. Optional modules are available in social work and child protection, and health and wellbeing. There is also the opportunity for a placement in an early years setting.

Third year You carry out a substantial research project in an area of your choice and therefore develop a specific expertise. You also study what it means to be an advocate for young children and their families, and have the option to learn about the nature of teamwork and leadership, or to study children’s thinking and understanding. Sample modules • Cultural Influences • Babies and Toddlers • Children’s Communication and Culture • Health and Wellbeing

Career prospects The care and education of young children is a rapidly expanding area, offering graduates a wide range of career opportunities. Recent graduates work in nursery centres, schools, family and children’s centres, and national campaigning organisations.

Facilities The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Early Childhood Studies. We also have the internationally renowned Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies, containing many rare books, toys and photographs.

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Roehampton is internationally renowned for its work in Education.

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You have the opportunity to work with children in a variety of settings, at home or abroad, for which you may obtain 30 credits towards your degree.

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The programme is flexible and dynamic, with the opportunity to specialise in different aspects of education for young children through to adults, in a range of settings.

Summary Everyone is entitled to an education, but what should be taught and by whom? The programme explores this fascinating subject through aspects such as the impact of gender on education, how to support vulnerable children, education both in and outside of the classroom, and inclusive and special education. During the programme you are encouraged to build a portfolio not only of academic but also of personal and vocational skills. First year You are introduced to the main ideas about the structure of the education system in England, children’s development from birth to adolescence, and the aims and purposes of education. If you are a Single Honours student, you will also engage with ideas about the importance of educating the whole person and issues raised by the notion of social justice.

Second year A compulsory module explores controversial contemporary issues in education. You then specialise according to your interests. You may choose modules that focus on a particular age range, or on an area such as values in education, inclusive and special education, or informal learning. Alternatively you may select modules that cover a diversity of issues, thus broadening your knowledge of education as a whole. There is also an opportunity to undertake a work placement in one of a variety of settings, such as after-school clubs, charities and schools.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 200–300 points from A-levels (including at least one grade C or 80 points from one subject at A-level), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

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Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 200–300 points from A-levels (including at least one grade C or 80 points from one subject at A-level), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Third year You continue to study a wide range of modules in areas such as comparative education, counselling and guidance, philosophy of education, careers education, and children’s rights. You have the opportunity to do a further work placement, this time in the area of museums and galleries education. In your third year you may also choose to undertake an in-depth study in an area of personal interest with the support of a tutor.

Sample modules • • • • • •

Child Development and Childhood Social Justice in Education Children’s Rights Informal Learning: Learning through Leisure Comparative Education: Education in Developing Countries Supporting Vulnerable Children

Career prospects Academic, vocational and personal skills gained on this programme provide graduates with excellent employment options. Teaching attracts many students, who go on to gain places on PGCE courses or in graduate teaching schemes. Graduates also have the option to become a learning mentor, social or community worker, careers adviser, youth worker or educational administrator. Other career paths include work in museums, publishing and on examination boards.

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Education

Early Childhood Studies

First year


Why Roehampton? n

We specialise both in theoretical linguistics and in sociolinguistics, the inter-relationship between language and society. We pay attention to “real language”.

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Our research-active team contributed to research judged to be of national and international importance in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

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The programme was rated as excellent for the quality of its teaching and for its practical approach to linguistics by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

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A range of language courses is offered through Roehampton’s Languages for All programme.

Summary From the sounds children make to the way people speak to the elderly; from media spin to everyday conversations, linguistics examines the structure and use of language. This programme takes a lively hands-on approach and, at every stage, focuses on the language that is relevant to you and to modern-day society.

Linguistic tools and techniques are taught through using “real-world” examples. You will study Introduction to Linguistics (looking at the sounds and structure of language); Language, Society and Power (introducing a wide range of sociolinguistic issues); and Meaning in Language (an introduction to word meaning).

Second and third years

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Our staff were judged as conducting research of national and international importance in the last Research Assessment Exercise.

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Roehampton is close to London’s many theatres, libraries, museums and archives.

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We encourage applications from mature students.

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As home of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature, we are the only university to offer children’s literature options throughout the programme.

In your second and third years, core modules give you broad and detailed knowledge of significant areas of linguistic theory, training you in language analysis and in critical evaluation of a range of related theories. Our core modules include Discourse and Conversation Analysis, English in its Social Context, and Phonetics and Phonology. Optional modules focus on specialised areas of language study and build on the theories and practical skills acquired in core modules. The options are largely research led, in that the lecturer will be an active researcher in the area covered. This will provide you with a clear understanding of what is involved in cutting-edge linguistics as well as training you to conduct your own research.

Summary

Sample modules

First year

• • • • •

Language Acquisition Pragmatics The Linguistics of Sign Language Storytelling in Everyday Conversation Forensic Linguistics

Career prospects

If you’re interested in children’s literature or crime fiction, in Shakespeare or stand-up comedy, in Victorian novels or visual texts, then come to Roehampton. We offer a challenging programme of unrivalled range and richness, as well as a supportive learning environment.

You are introduced to a challenging range of texts from different genres and historical periods, and will explore some of the critical and theoretical approaches that form the basis for work in the subsequent years.

Second year

Our graduates are in demand for a variety of careers in media and communications, business, industry and the public sector. Recent graduates have also travelled abroad to teach English as a Foreign Language.

The programme is designed to allow you to pursue your particular areas of interest in greater depth. You take a core set of modules in the second year, covering pre-20th-century literature, and a range of optional modules such as Literature and the Bible, Travel Writing, and Gothic and Fantastic Literature.

Facilities

Third year

The University Library has excellent resources for the study of English Language and Linguistics. Roehampton is also close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the British Library and many SCONUL libraries.

• • • •

Period modules from Renaissance to Modernism About Reading Writing by Women of Colour Literature and the City

Career prospects Graduates enter a wide range of careers in publishing, the media, education and public relations.

Optional modules in the final year include Crime Fiction, Literature and Addiction, Women Writers, and The Literature of Food; students can also opt for a dissertation module. Within the programme it is also possible to pursue a specialised interest in children’s literature or English language.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 11)

Single or Combined Honours (see page 11)

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (including at least one grade C or 80 points from one subject at A-level), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (including at grade B in English Literature), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

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Sample modules

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English Literature

English Language and Linguistics

First year


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This programme has been fully accredited by the Nutrition Society and on graduation you become a Registered Associate Nutritionist.

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The staff includes state-registered dieticians, registered nutritionists and British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences-accredited practitioners in exercise physiology and psychology.

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Staff regularly work with individual elite performers, Premiership football teams and national teams.

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Roehampton has modern, specialised laboratories including a food lab with tasting booths, and microbiology labs.

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Our Sport Performance, Assessment and Rehabilitation Centre is the best laboratory of its type in London and includes a climatic chamber and automated motion-capture systems.

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The Roehampton Nutrition Club, run by students for students, organises talks by external speakers, careers workshops and social events.

Summary While concerns about the growing “obesogenic” worldwide culture continue to hit the headlines, the role of physical activity and good nutrition as forms of preventative medicine are increasingly being recognised as key ways to tackle this issue. This programme explores the association between our diet and lifestyle and the impact that it has on health. You learn the practical skills needed to identify strategies that could improve public health. First year You are introduced to the study of human nutrition, anatomy, exercise physiology, psychology and health sociology, as well as a variety of research skills necessary for successful completion of your degree. In addition, you will undertake practicals and workshops in both nutritional and fitness assessment.

Exercise, Nutrition and Health has provided me with all the necessary knowledge and practical skills needed in my current role as a personal trainer.

Gerald Smith (left), former Exercise, Nutrition and Health student from West Norwood, London, now works as a personal trainer at LA Fitness in Holborn, London

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Second and third years In the upper years, you can choose from the wide range of modules, allowing you to specifically focus on areas of particular interest to you or retain a breadth to your study throughout your programme.

Sample modules • • • • •

Dietary Assessments and Surveys Health Promotion Training Programme Health Psychology Exercise and Health

Career prospects There is an increasing range of opportunities for graduates to work in the expanding sports, leisure and health industries. You will be well equipped for professions including lifestyle and fitness consultancy, health promotion, personal training, health and nutrition journalism, food marketing and retailing, occupational health programmes and organisations concerned with health issues. In addition, it is anticipated that clinical exercise therapists will become part of many healthcare teams in the future.

Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points from A-levels (including a Science subject), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Science at grade C, or equivalent

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Exercise, Nutrition and Health

Why Roehampton?


Film

First year You will learn how to “read” film and study the history of cinema while gaining basic skills in digital video production: cinematography, editing and sound. You will also explore some of the critical debates that shape the way film is discussed and understood. At the end of this year, you will choose whether to specialise in production or history and theory or a combination of the two.

Why Roehampton? n

Roehampton runs partnership events with the British Film Institute.

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Production-based modules are taught in our Media Centre, which is fully equipped with state-of-the-art digital video cameras and editing facilities.

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Second year You will deepen your understanding of film history and theory or continue to pursue your film-making ambitions. You will have an opportunity to choose a range of options from modules such as Audiovisual Criticism, Film Journalism, Cinematography and Animation.

Students benefit from an extensive video/DVD library and teaching rooms equipped with digital projectors.

Third year The Production Project will allow you to develop, shoot and exhibit your own short documentary or fiction film while the dissertation will enable you to conduct an in-depth study of a subject that particularly interests you. Optional modules focus on areas as diverse as National Cinemas (French, Italian or Japanese), Genre and Adaptation, while specialist modules are offered on topics such as Film and the Environment, American Quality TV, Screenwriting, and Producing and Production Management.

Summary Digital technologies have revolutionised every aspect of film culture from production and distribution to exhibition and consumption. This innovative programme allows you to study and produce film in its social, cultural and historical contexts while interrogating film form either as a digital filmmaker or as a film theorist and historian or as a combination of the two. Whether working critically with found footage to produce essay films or shooting documentaries on digital video, the emphasis is on intellectual rigour and audiovisual creativity.

Sample modules • • • • •

Facilities Our facilities include a well-equipped studio, a voice recording booth running Pro Tools, Final Cut Pro edit suites, JVC 200 cameras, and Sony Z7 cameras. Our Media Centre also offers a range of copying, recording and editing services. The University Library includes an extensive collection of videos and DVDs.

I’m currently the Series Editor on the BBC programme Casualty. My job is to run the script department, managing all writers, script editors and researchers. I’m also responsible for continuity of characterisation and stories, and script quality. Henry Swindell, former Film student

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Audiovisual Criticism Editing Cinematography World Cinemas Screenwriting

Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the British Film Institute National Library, BFI Southbank, French Institute, Riverside Studios, Teddington Studios, Twickenham Film Studios, Shepperton and Pinewood.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (grade B at A2 in a humanities or social science discipline will normally be required), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) www.roehampton.ac.uk 75


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This programme offers an ideal grounding for careers such as social worker, health promotion specialist, community development worker and various forms of nursing. Students come from a variety of backgrounds and work experience, which enhances the learning experience and produces stimulating and dynamic class discussions.

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A service learning module involves part-time volunteer work in an area of social care.

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The programme is available in both full- and part-time mode, making it an excellent choice for those requiring flexible modes of study.

Summary This programme provides an excellent starting point for a career in the caring professions, whether in administration, research or teaching. It also allows those with work experience to update their knowledge or specialise in a particular area. You learn through theoretical and research modules as well as practical work experience gained in the second year. Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 160–200 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

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Introductory modules in human physiology, psychology, sociology and social policy prepare you for more detailed studies of these subjects during the following two years. You are taught how to establish a clear writing style for essays and reports.

Second year You take compulsory modules in research methods, which help you to understand and evaluate other people’s research and to conduct your own. You also take a service learning module, which involves part-time volunteer work in an area of social care and an exploration of this work through oral and written presentations.

Third year As well as conducting a research investigation with tutorial support, self-directed modules allow you to pursue an area of particular interest in greater depth while optional modules offer the opportunity to better understand, analyse and explain health issues.

Why Roehampton? n

This flexible programme allows for specialisation in any of three aspects of the field: sociological (eg policy development), psychological (eg communications and education) or physiological (the human body in health and disease).

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The study environment is stimulated by the wide variety of students, including post A-level and post Access students, and those with nursing or other paramedical training.

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The strong emphasis on research skills enables many students to progress to higher degrees or directly into research jobs.

Summary This flexible programme focuses on the three major disciplines that encourage the understanding and promotion of health in contemporary society: sociology, psychology and physiology. You can focus on the discipline of your choice.

Sample modules • • • • •

Social Work, the Child and the Family Health and Safety at Work Community Care Health Care Policy Concepts and Methods in Health Research

Career prospects You will have specialist knowledge of the needs of different groups of clients who require the provision of care; for example, children and adolescents, people with mental health problems and the elderly. You will be well prepared to help develop and deliver services to such groups through the public, private or voluntary sectors.

First year You take modules that introduce the basic theories and methods of human physiology, psychology and medical sociology as a foundation for more detailed study in the next two years. You are taught how to establish a clear writing style for essays and reports.

Second year A wide range of modules that use various assessment methods is available in the second year. You take modules in research methods to prepare for your chosen research project in the third year, and also take modules in each of the three disciplines: sociology, psychology and physiology.

Third year You undertake a research project in a subject of your choice under the guidance of a supervisor. Self-directed modules allow you to pursue an area of particular interest in greater depth while optional modules offer the opportunity to better understand, analyse and explain health issues, from both a domestic and an international perspective.

Sample modules • • • •

Psychological Problems of Childhood and Adolescence Health Promotion and Public Health Health Psychology Psycho-physiology of Stress

Career prospects Graduates are able to pursue a range of health careers such as health promotion, healthcare management, research in health issues, and teaching health practitioners.

Facilities The excellent on-campus facilities include modern, wellequipped specialist laboratories for physiology, microbiology, food science and computing. In addition, Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including research libraries, hospitals, museums and international conference venues.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 160–200 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

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Health Studies

Health and Social Care

Why Roehampton?

First year


Why Roehampton? n

Roehampton is near some of the best facilities for historical study in the UK, such as the National Archives at Kew, National Portrait Gallery, Museum of London, Victoria and Albert Museum and other national museums and galleries.

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Leading international experts teach on the History programme.

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Organised study trips take students out of the classroom; for example, to the Imperial War Museum, and on walking tours of the East End of London.

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You take modules focusing on the foundations of historical study. Core modules in Reading and Writing History, and Introduction to Humanities provide the theoretical basis and the methodological skills for more advanced studies in the upper years. Other modules explore themes such as migration, revolutions, religious change, and visual and material cultures, in broad chronological and geographical contexts, such as the Americas, and the ancient world.

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A recent review by the Quality Assurance Agency praised the “excellent teaching and learning facilities”. Biosciences at Roehampton scored 23 out of 24 points, one of the highest quality ratings in the UK.

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Our well-equipped laboratories have facilities for electron microscopy, electrophysiology and pollution studies, together with powerful, specialist microcomputing hardware/software and a controlled-temperature laboratory for thermoregulation studies.

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Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the Natural History Museum, British Museum, and the Wellcome Collection and Library.

Second year You take the compulsory Histories module, which examines social, cultural and technological approaches to history through the theme of war. From a broad selection of optional modules, you then develop your research and critical skills through engagement with particular concepts, places and periods, such as religious and political change in medieval and early modern England, 19th-century London, and European modernity. You can also choose to take a work placement option.

Our lively research seminar programme features visiting speakers.

Third year As well as taking more specialised options, designed to give you in-depth exposure to the research specialism of the programme team, you will study original documents more intensively and prepare a dissertation or a special long essay involving independent research under the guidance of a supervisor.

Summary Boasting impressive research ratings and teaching expertise that brings history to life, this popular programme includes modules that range from Ancient Athens to the 1960s and span Britain, Europe, Africa, the Americas and the Arab-Islamic world.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 11) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (including History or another literary or social science subject, eg English, Anthropology), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Why Roehampton?

Sample modules • Introduction to Ancient History (first year) • France in the World: 1940–2000 (second year) • Medieval Iberia: Muslims, Jews and Christians (third year)

Career prospects History students acquire a valuable range of transferable skills in communication, problem-solving and presentation that are popular with a range of employers. For example, recent History graduates are now working in publishing, broadcasting, the civil service, market research, museum research, lecturing, teaching and commerce.

Summary This topical programme examines the central aspects of human biology: physiology, behaviour, evolution, disease and ecology. You are immersed in issues such as genetically modified foods, human cloning, conservation of endangered species, and problems posed by pollution and climate change. First year You are introduced to the study of human behaviour, disease, evolution and physiology. Modules in biomolecular science and introductory physiology prepare you for Honours-level study if you do not have an A-level Science background.

Career prospects Health administration, social services work and human resource management are common career destinations for our graduates. Others take up laboratory-based careers or retail management. The degree is also a suitable foundation for teaching.

Second year A residential field course in south Wales acts as a link between the first and second years. Core areas of study include applied biology, genetics and human physiology. Additional modules are offered in nutrition.

Third year You carry out a research project, which may be based in any of the human sciences subject areas. The remainder of the programme is chosen from a range of topic areas including the environment; anthropology and behaviour; and physiology, health and nutrition.

Sample modules

Roehampton was my first choice because I wanted to study at a London-based university with a proven track record in History. The standards of teaching and support have been excellent and I have thoroughly enjoyed my time at Roehampton.

• • • •

Human Disease Human Nutrition Understanding Behaviour Population, Health and Disease

Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–300 points from A-levels (including Biology), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Double Science at grade C, or equivalent

Heather Bennett, third-year History student 80

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Human Biosciences

History

First year


Human Rights

Why Roehampton? n

We are home to Crucible – the only government-recognised centre of excellence in teaching and learning in the field of human rights in the country, for which Roehampton was awarded £4.5 million to set up.

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The programme is supported by organisations such as Amnesty International and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

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You can choose to go on an accredited placement at a human rights organisation.

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The programme is convened by Dr Darren O’Byrne, whose publication Human Rights: An Introduction is the first textbook of its kind approaching the subject from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Summary Discourse on human rights has become commonplace in modern society, as these issues affect all of our lives. Roehampton University leads the way with this unique programme that examines the philosophical, sociological, political and legal aspects of human rights.

First year The Human Rights in Theory and Practice module introduces the major legal, political and philosophical concepts in the study of human rights, from freedom and equality to crimes against humanity, and the International Criminal Court. The Contemporary Issues in Human Rights module encourages you to monitor world affairs and to engage in discussions about current human rights concerns. You will also take a class in Research Methods. Single Honours students take additional modules in human rights.

Second year The Sociology and Anthropology of Human Rights module introduces topics such as torture, slavery and the death penalty, and you develop a campaign on a human rights issue of your choice. Other modules introduce different aspects of the human rights debate, including historical, philosophical, legal, and international political dimensions.

Third year Modules include Understanding Genocide, Religion and Human Rights, Human Rights on Film, and Children’s Rights. You can also undertake independent research, and are encouraged to take an accredited volunteering placement at a human rights organisation.

Sample modules • • • •

Contemporary Issues in Human Rights Refugee Studies Human Rights Law I and II Human Rights on Film

Career prospects The degree is a major advantage to students wishing to pursue a career in campaigning organisations, social movements or political lobbying. It also equips you for more general career paths, including management, education and teaching, research, local and community services, or media work.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 200–240 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent 82

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The Duchesne Building (opposite page, top) is home to Crucible, the national centre for excellence in human rights education. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Why Roehampton? n

As London is the heart of the UK’s media industry, Roehampton is ideally located for access to major journalism and media organisations, as well as a wealth of archive material.

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You have an opportunity to gain work experience, with help from a specialist placement officer. Past students have worked at the BBC, Sky, MTV, the Independent, the Daily Express, OK! and Vogue.

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As well as academic study, this programme includes opportunities for practical work and learning skills such as writing, interviewing and researching.

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Graduates of this degree enter the employment market with a very broad range of transferable skills that are recognised and sought by employers across the creative industries.

Summary This programme offers you a unique chance to study and practise journalism in the context of the contemporary media, including the “quality” and tabloid newspapers, the internet, radio, television and photography. You will start to learn how to write like a journalist, before studying such genres as sports writing, features, investigative reporting, tabloid and international journalism. First year You practise writing journalism and discuss the journalist’s function. You examine the role of media ownership and regulation, biased reporting, tabloid and celebrity journalism. You also consider the skills required to produce journalistic content.

Career prospects Graduates are well equipped to be trained for careers in areas such as journalism, copy writing, events management, public relations and research.

Second year You extend your research and practical news-writing skills. You explore web journalism and examine key theoretical debates surrounding the history and practice of reporting. This will provide a basis to consider such areas as sports journalism, what it takes to be an ethical reporter and how power and politics are reported.

Third year You build upon and consolidate your knowledge of the journalism and media industries with opportunities to specialise in areas of particular interest. You are also able to undertake an extensive piece of independent research and writing with one-to-one tutorial support.

Sample modules • • • • • 84 www.roehampton.ac.uk

Producing and Debating Journalism Writing Sport Investigative Journalism East and West: Terror, Power and New Journalism North and South: Reporting Africa

Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (including humanities), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

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Journalism and News Media

The Wired Cybercafe in the University Library


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This is one of only a few Single Honours degrees in Marketing and Multimedia offered in the UK.

n

This exciting new programme examines the impact of technology on marketing practices and strategies.

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You will gain an understanding of marketing theory from a traditional and digital perspective, and you will also develop the technical skills to implement marketing solutions via the web and through other digital media.

Summary At a time when technology is increasingly influencing marketing practices, an understanding of how to apply multimedia techniques is a valuable talent for any marketeer. This programme provides the theoretical background as well as the practical skills in multimedia that will enable you to engage effectively with customers. Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

86 www.roehampton.ac.uk

You will gain a foundational understanding in the area of business and technology, covering aspects of graphic design, database design, professional issues, and marketing and enterprise, as well as business skills to address this unique set of technical and non-technical knowledge.

Second year You will build on your knowledge of concepts of technology, marketing management and research, consumer behaviour, strategies and models for the virtual world, database and website design, and customer-focused interactivity.

Third year You are able choose from two separate directions: either to focus on the technical application of marketing solutions through the refinement of interactive multimedia and website development skills, or to follow a more business-orientated model, picking from a range of options such as marketing for non-profit organisations, retail theory and practice, entrepreneurship, and/or leisure and tourism marketing. The programme culminates in a final-year project in which you can either choose to develop a technological marketing solution for a specific business problem – starting with analysis of the problem, through to design and building of a solution using contemporary technological approaches – or you can undertake a marketing research project.

Sample modules • • • • •

Digital Environment Website Design Multimedia Marketing Management Marketing Research

Facilities All students on Single Honours Computing degrees enjoy the benefits of laboratories available exclusively for their use, which contain state-of-the-art computers with high-spec graphics cards and industry-specific software.

Career prospects This degree is particularly useful for those students interested in a career in marketing, business and/or multimedia. You will gain a skill set that is sought after by employers as it combines high-level technical expertise with an understanding of marketing theory and practice.

Why Roehampton? n

London’s abundance of media companies and cultural institutions means Roehampton is ideally located for studying this subject.

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You will study contemporary issues in the media as well as consider current debates about culture.

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You have the opportunity to gain work experience with some of the country’s leading companies and organisations in the media and creative industries.

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This programme is designed to appeal to students of all ages and different cultural backgrounds.

Summary The media play an increasingly significant role in contemporary society. They shape our social, cultural and political interests; they fill our leisure time and define our cultural interests and activities. This programme will develop your understanding and knowledge of the dynamic interplay between social formations and media/cultural processes in contemporary society. The programme has been designed to encourage and support you in developing valuable skills and experience in relation to future employment, life-long learning and citizenship. First year You are introduced to the key debates in media and cultural studies through modules such as Media Narratives, Ways of Looking, and Mapping the Field. Lectures, seminars and workshops explore the critical concepts of the field and offer opportunities for formal and informal discussions of emerging trends and issues.

Second year You build on the foundation laid in the first year to develop a deeper understanding of media and cultural issues. Modules expose you to a range of approaches to the interconnections between our mediated culture and everyday lived experiences. This includes a range of themes and topics such as popular culture, gender, reality television, travel and tourism, and new technologies. In addition, you have the opportunity to take our career preparation module to help support and develop your future career plans.

Third year The final year allows you to explore areas of interest in greater depth, either through taught modules or through independent study modules. Advanced modules include such diverse subjects as Reality Revolutions; Emotions in Culture; Madness and Metaphor: Culture on the Edge; Television Futures; and Popular Journalism and Tabloid Culture. Single Honours students are expected to undertake a large piece of independent work, usually in the form of a dissertation.

Sample modules • • • • •

Approaches to Media and Culture Work Placement Screening Gender Televising Reality Travel, Tourism and the Media

Facilities The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Media and Culture. The library catalogue offers access to a vast range of online databases containing the latest academic articles, newspaper databases and other relevant archives. These resources continue to expand year on year.

Career prospects Students who successfully complete the degree will be well equipped to seek a career in media and creative industries. We have an excellent record of our graduates gaining full-time employment, often as a result of completing our Work Placement module.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (including humanities or a social science), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) www.roehampton.ac.uk 87

Media and Culture

Marketing and Multimedia

Why Roehampton?

First year


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You spend the third year of this four-year programme at one of our partner institutions abroad or as an English-language assistant in a school or college, or on a work placement. While on exchange abroad, students who are eligible for a full-year Erasmus grant may also be exempt from tuition fees for that year. Two annual awards of £250 are made to the best undergraduate dissertations/ research projects written in the final year.

Second year In addition to the compulsory language modules, you have a wide range of options to choose from including European cinema, political and economic organisations in Europe and translation.

Third year

Fourth year You complete your final year at Roehampton and choose specialised modules in language, culture and translation. You can also opt for a research project or a language-based work placement.

Sample modules

Summary French, Spanish and English are offered as main foreign languages within this new four-year programme. Throughout your studies you are provided with a structured framework for developing practical language skills.

Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (including French and/or Spanish), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Why Roehampton?

All students take modules in the relevant foreign languages and other modules focusing on aspects of UK, French or Spanish culture and society.

You normally spend this year abroad on an exchange programme at one of our partner institutions, as an English-language assistant in a school or college, or on a work placement.

• • • •

London as a Resource France in the World 1940–2004 European Cinema Introduction to Spain and Latin America

Career prospects Our graduates are well placed to find employment both in the UK and throughout the world. Recent graduates have found positions related to their language skills in advertising, publishing, export companies, teaching and the civil service.

Facilities The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Modern Languages. You will also have access to the Languages Centre, which is well equipped with video-viewing facilities, satellite TV and multimedia CALL packages.

Modern Languages – Translating and Interpreting

Modern Languages

Why Roehampton?

First year

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You spend the second year of this three-year intensive programme at one of our partner institutions abroad in a school of translating and interpreting.

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While on exchange abroad, students who are eligible for a full-year Erasmus grant may also be exempt from tuition fees for that year.

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Two annual awards of £250 are made to the best undergraduate dissertations/research projects written in the final year.

Summary This three-year, fast-track Single Honours programme is aimed at students with a high level of competence in more than one language. It offers French, Spanish and English as main languages. In addition to your advanced study of two languages, you are able to begin a new language from scratch. First year All students take modules in the relevant foreign languages, linguistics and translation methodology.

Second year You normally spend the second year abroad at a school of translating and interpreting in France, Belgium, Switzerland or Spain.

Third year You complete your final year at Roehampton and choose from a range of optional specialised translating and interpreting modules such as Consecutive Interpreting or Professional Translation. You may also undertake research in a specialised area of translation or apply to take a work-based translation module in the UK.

Sample modules • • • • •

Political and Economic Institutions in Europe Media Translation European Cinema Consecutive Interpreting Computer-Assisted Translation Tools

Facilities As well as excellent on-campus facilities (such as video-viewing facilities, satellite TV and multimedia CALL packages in the Languages Centre), Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the British Library, the Instituto Cervantes and the Institut Français.

Career prospects Our graduates are well placed to find employment both in the UK and throughout the world. Recent graduates have found positions related to their language skills in translating agencies and media companies.

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Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels (including French and/or Spanish), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) www.roehampton.ac.uk

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This programme has been fully accredited by the Nutrition Society and on graduation you become a Registered Associate Nutritionist. Roehampton has modern, specialised laboratories including a food lab with tasting booths, and microbiology labs. The Roehampton Nutrition Club, run by students, organises talks by external speakers, careers workshops and social events.

Summary Good nutrition enhances wellbeing and prevents disease, so the state of our health is largely dependent on what we eat. This popular programme analyses the connection between food and health, and teaches you how to apply this knowledge to individuals and the general public.

The first year introduces you to the principles of human nutrition, vitamins and minerals, physiology and metabolism as well as the aspects of psychology and sociology that can influence food intakes. Additional modules are available to assist you if you do not have an A-level Science background.

The second year includes a module in research methods that prepares you for a research project on a subject of your choice in the third year. You also embark on specialised studies of particular aspects of nutrition such as food safety and dietary assessment. Barriers to healthy eating are examined to identify strategies that could improve the diet and health of the nation.

You conduct your own research project in nutrition under the guidance of a tutor. Selecting from a wide choice of optional modules, you advance your specialist knowledge and add to your understanding of those aspects of health and disease that are influenced by diet.

Sample modules • • • • • •

Principles of Human Nutrition Vitamins, Minerals and Health Nutrition Through the Lifespan Clinical Nutrition Dietary Change and Health Public Health Nutrition

Career prospects There are career opportunities in a wide variety of fields, including the food industry, health promotion, work for Local Education Authorities, social services, the fitness industry, environmental health departments and hospitals. Employment can also be found in health, consumer and public interest organisations concerned with public health. Experienced nutritionists can also work as consultants.

Facilities

Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 200–240 points from A-levels (including a Science subject), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Science at grade C, or equivalent

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Why Roehampton?

Second year

Third year

Our excellent on-campus facilities include well-equipped specialist laboratories for food science, food microbiology, physiology and computing. In addition, Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including libraries, hospitals and venues for international nutrition conferences and exhibitions.

Philosophy

Nutrition and Health

Why Roehampton?

First year

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London is one of the most exciting centres for philosophical events and activities in the world.

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Roehampton’s Philosophy programme is an institutional member of the Institute of Philosophy University of London. Roehampton staff and students have access to the lectures, seminars and conferences that are held at the Institute.

n

The programme is also an agent of the Royal Institute of Philosophy and hosts a programme of public lectures and seminars given by guest lecturers on behalf of the Institute.

Summary At over 2,000 years old, philosophy is one of the oldest subjects that you can study at university. Great philosophers have supplied profound answers to some of the deepest questions that confront each of our lives: • What is the nature of reality? • What am I? • What is human nature?

• How should I live? • How can we achieve social justice? • What are the foundations of human knowledge?

The study of philosophy at Roehampton will enable you to examine and consider leading answers to these questions and a host of other philosophical questions. First year

Career prospects

You will be introduced to some of the leading thinkers in the history of philosophy, such as Socrates, Plato and Aristotle from the ancient world and Descartes, Hume and Kant from the modern era. You will also be trained in the use of logical and analytical techniques for research, thinking and writing in philosophy.

Graduates have taken up careers in parliament, the civil service, local government, journalism, law and teaching. Single or Combined Honours (see page 12) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 200–280 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

Second and third years Study in the upper years of the programme is primarily organised around particular subject divisions within philosophy: ethics, political philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, continental philosophy, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of science. Some modules explore the works of particular philosophers such as Ludwig Wittgenstein and Karl Marx.

Sample modules • • • • •

Classical Philosophy Modern Philosophy Critical Thinking Metaphysics, Mind and Meaning Moral and Political Philosophy

Attending the Royal Institute of Philosophy lectures and running the Philosophy Society has allowed me to engage with people who hold similar interests to myself, whilst deepening my understanding of contemporary approaches to a range of issues.

Mandy Brown, third-year Philosophy student and President of the Roehampton Student Philosophy Society, from Romford, Essex

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Photography

Why Roehampton? n

This programme provides a critical and theoretical environment in which you can develop your creativity, judgement and enthusiasm for adventure, alongside technical skills.

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The University has a new purpose-built studio, darkroom and Mac suite.

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Guest speakers are regularly invited to address students. These include artists, commercial photographers, curators and editors.

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The third year includes a final project, such as a portfolio or exhibition or dissertation.

First year You explore the notion that photographs are “made” rather than “taken”. You also examine the way meaning is constructed, read and understood through practical projects and theoretical discourses. This includes the development of skills in analogue and digital photography.

Second year As you progress through the programme, you are assigned more sophisticated project-based work that includes wide-ranging studies of identity, psychoanalytic and feminist theory, and photography’s role in the evolution of commodity culture. Three optional modules involve in-depth analysis of three genres of photographic practice that take a critical approach to existing codes and conventions.

Third year Your ideas, techniques and working methods synthesise in the production of self-initiated, large-scale project work. Theoretical work in the final year relates closely to your practical work and also requires the production of an extended piece of writing.

Sample modules

Summary Examine the world around you through the lens of this popular hands-on programme in Photography. This all-pervasive medium is explored in relation to contemporary visual culture across a range of practices and discourses including advertising, documentary, fashion and fine art.

• • • •

Photography, Histories and Manipulations Photography, Readings and Constructions Photography and the Home Photography and Commodity Culture

Career prospects The media and creative industries continue to flourish in the UK. This programme enables graduates to follow careers in the creative, commercial, cultural, artistic, and photographyrelated industries. Photography opportunities exist in gallery and museum work, arts administration and teaching (following diploma and postgraduate study).

Facilities In addition to excellent purpose-built photography facilities on campus, Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including a host of galleries, museums and other significant cultural resources.

Combined Honours (see page 13) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels (including grade C in Photography, if taken), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117)

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n

This programme is a direct route to becoming a primary teacher, as graduates achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

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Roehampton is one of the principal providers of teacher education in the UK.

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You will benefit from extensive school-based experience – we have partnerships with over 500 schools.

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In the most recent survey, 97 per cent of our students had gained teaching employment within six months of graduating. Roehampton is internationally renowned for its work in education and early childhood studies.

Specialist subject

Malcolm Pearse, former Primary Education student

School experience

Programme structure This three-year programme ensures that you develop your subject knowledge and teaching skills, as well as a thorough understanding of children and the curriculum, and the ability to reflect on experience.

Summary

It is a school-focused programme that qualifies you to teach the full primary range and enables you to specialise in either the 3 to 7 year, or the 7 to 11 year, age range.

This nationally renowned programme reflects the needs of a primary teacher and the nature of the primary curriculum. It promotes the development of subject knowledge and teaching skills, a thorough understanding of children and the curriculum, and the ability to reflect on your experiences.

Each year you take modules in Teaching and Learning, Core Curriculum English, Mathematics and Science, the National Curriculum Foundation Subjects, your elective subject specialism, and school experience.

Teaching and Learning

Subject specialisms available Art and Design Design and Technology Early Childhood Studies English Geography History Information and Communication Technology Mathematics Modern Foreign Language (subject to validation) Music Physical Education Religious Education Science

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The Teaching and Learning modules provide a unifying link across the programme, relating the understanding of children’s learning and cross-curricular issues to classroom practice. They seek to develop key professional skills and enable you to appreciate your task as a teacher within the broad framework of the purposes of education.

Core Curriculum studies Studies in English, Mathematics and Science aim to give you knowledge and understanding of these core areas of the National Curriculum. They are designed to help you teach the programmes of study effectively and to provide the potential for curriculum management and leadership. Each module is related to work with children during school placements.

The programme offers subjects (listed on the opposite page) that relate directly to the demands of the National Curriculum and the standards laid down by the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF). You develop specialist knowledge, skills and understanding that prepare you not only for classroom teaching but also for potential curriculum management and leadership in schools.

This is the most important aspect of the programme. You are placed in a different school each year and spend at least 120 days in schools during the three years. There is a block period of school experience in each year, ranging from five to ten weeks in length. In some years, you undertake participant observation visits to familiarise yourself with the children, the school and the curriculum. This time is spent teaching and observing primary school practice. Each school placement builds on previous experiences and your professional role develops throughout the three years from being a support teacher to eventually becoming the lead teacher. Cohesive links are made between taught courses and school experience. You are given tutorial support in developing your teaching skills while taking increasing responsibility for children’s learning. Progress is supported and monitored through a partnership between the schools and the University and is recorded in a Profile of Professional Development that enables you to track your growing competence as a teacher. There is also the opportunity to experience a school placement at a distant location; for example, we have partnerships with schools in Dorset.

Gaining Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) All trainee teachers need to pass the National Skills Tests in Numeracy, Literacy and ICT before they gain QTS and take up a post as a fully qualified teacher. These tests are administered by the Training and Development Agency for Schools and details can be found on its website (www.tda.gov.uk). If you complete the programme successfully, meet the relevant standards for QTS and pass the three Skills Tests, you will be recommended for QTS, which is awarded by the DCSF.

The wider curriculum You are introduced to the National Curriculum Foundation Subjects and Religious Education. You examine the inter-relationship of these areas of knowledge and their relationship to the Core Curriculum subjects. You also explore ways of organising the experiences children need in order to develop their understanding of the world around them, and ways of ensuring continuity and progress in their learning. Our programme takes into consideration recent government initiatives, including the promotion of the creative curriculum, which incorporates clear directives in relation to cross-curricular links.

Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 300–360 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C, or equivalent www.roehampton.ac.uk 97

Primary Education

Primary Education

Why Roehampton?

Studying at Roehampton was a brilliant experience, both challenging and rewarding. I feel the benefits now as a teacher of the time spent in different schools. It enabled me to understand how they work and the ethos that defines each particular school.


Why Roehampton? n

n

n

Cognitive, social and developmental psychology, and research methods are taught in greater depth in the second year, along with personality psychology and abnormal behaviour.

Third year In the final year, you undertake a year-long, supervised research project. You also have the opportunity to study a diverse range of optional modules that reflect the research interests and expertise of the teaching team, such as autism; criminal and forensic psychology; and body movement, gaze and gesture.

This programme reflects contemporary developments in psychology such as clinical aspects of neuropsychology and criminal psychology.

Sample modules • • • •

Summary

Psychology of Music Occupational Psychology Family and Child Wellbeing Positive Psychology

Facilities The School of Human and Life Sciences has social, cognitive and computing laboratories and is a centre for counselling practice and research. A student-run Psychology Society invites guest speakers and runs social events. The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Psychology.

Career prospects Recent graduates have chosen to pursue professional training in psychology while others have taken up careers in the NHS, social services, education, industry, the civil service, the prison services, management and counselling.

The teaching of Psychology is excellent and the lecturers are friendly. It’s a great place to study as the students are very diverse. Every age, ethnicity and background is represented. Kate Saxton, Psychology student from London

Single or Combined Honours (see page 13) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent 98

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n

This cutting-edge programme was the first of its kind in the UK, offering psychology with an introduction to counselling and personal development.

n

Graduates are entitled to graduate membership of the British Psychological Society.

n

This programme prepares you for a range of postgraduate training in psychology and the helping professions, particularly to become a Chartered Counselling Psychologist.

Second year

Graduates are entitled to graduate membership of the British Psychological Society. This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

How do drugs alter our perceptions? Does a psychopath differ from other people? What is personality? Psychology, the study of human experience and behaviour, addresses these questions and many more. The discipline is constantly evolving as exciting new developments allow us even greater understanding of human behaviour and its root causes.

Why Roehampton?

You are introduced to child development, cognitive and biological processes, psychological research methods and social psychology.

Psychology at Roehampton has been praised as “excellent” in the Sunday Times.

Psychology and Counselling

Psychology

First year

Summary This pioneering programme combines the study of human functioning and development in psychology and counselling. It combines the theoretical foundations of both counselling models and psychology and offers experiential group work. This programme provides the basis for careers in psychology and other helping professions. First year

Facilities

In the first year you study two modules in Counselling: Interpersonal Communication for Counselling, and Practice of Counselling Skills. You also study core introductory modules to Psychology: Research Methods; Social and Developmental Psychology; and Mind, Body and Brain, as well as an exploration of psychology in practice.

We have well-equipped teaching facilities, including social, cognitive and computing laboratories. The School has a Centre for Counselling Practice and Research. Staff research has involved work on self regulation, mood and cognition, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, neuropsychology and cyclical patterns in development. Through research and teaching interests we have links with a number of hospitals, counselling centres and universities.

Second year You will gain a deeper understanding of models of counselling, and the Reflective Practice in Counselling module will develop your experiential learning and personal development. You will also further your understanding of social and developmental psychology, and prepare for an extensive research project in the third year with training on qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Third year You complete your research project. You also study cognitive and neurological psychology and modules in Psychological Assessment in Counselling, and Managing the Counselling Process. During this final year you will explore career possibilities in health and caring professions for applications to relevant postgraduate training programmes, many of which are offered by Roehampton.

Sample modules • • • •

Interpersonal Communication for Counselling Personality Psychology and Abnormal Behaviour Autism: An Interdisciplinary Approach Reflective Practice in Counselling

Career prospects This programme prepares you for a range of postgraduate training in psychology and the helping professions, particularly to become a Chartered Counselling Psychologist.

I have found the combination of psychology with counselling prepares me for working with people both practically and as a professional, which gives me so many career options for the future.

Debbie Cottrell, second-year Psychology and Counselling student from Putney, London Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent • Applicants may be called for an interview as part of the selection process www.roehampton.ac.uk

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n

Graduates are entitled to graduate membership of the British Psychological Society. This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

n

This programme offers students flexibility and experience across a range of research methods and topics.

n

This general qualification allows you to specialise in one of a variety of postgraduate fields of study and practice.

You are introduced to psychology as a scientific discipline. The study of basic physiology teaches you the biological basis of ill-health while instruction in medical sociology allows you to understand the societal factors that play a part in determining the overall health of a society.

Second year In the second year, you complete some of the modules required for graduate membership of the British Psychological Society. Compulsory modules also address the topics of health psychology, the psychology of stress, and the psychology and sociology of mental health. Optional modules cover subjects such as the role of nutrition in health, and complementary and alternative medicine.

Third year A module in research methods prepares you to complete a research project on a topic of your choice. You also choose from a selection of modules on specialisms within psychology, such as abnormal and positive psychology.

Summary Health psychology is making a growing contribution to improving health in society and in individuals as there is a growing realisation that good health cannot be promoted and ill-health cannot be treated solely by medical means. This crossdisciplinary programme examines this rapidly growing field. You explore how the rigorous scientific theories of psychology inform the debate on the definition of health, the promotion and maintenance of good health, and the effective and humane treatment of ill-health.

Why Roehampton? n

With no more than 40 students in each year, you benefit from personal attention in interactive lectures, seminars and workshops.

n

Dr Garry Marvin, a tutor in Social Anthropology, is an award-winning documentary film-maker.

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Students are encouraged to carry out a small-scale ethnographic project under supervision.

Summary Social anthropologists engage in the fascinating study of human societies in all their diversity and complexity, from the smallest groups to mass western social systems. The programme focuses on social issues such as variations in family structures, cultural traditions, gender and sexuality, and religious, political and economic systems.

Sample modules • • • • •

Physiology and Introductory Statistics Introduction to Human Disease Human Evolution Neurobiological Aspects of Behaviour The Biology and Psychology of Alcohol Misuse

Facilities You will have access to several computer suites with specialist software and technical support. Staff teaching the programme have a wide range of experience, training and research interests in the field. The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Psychology and Health.

Career prospects Recent graduates have found employment in pharmaceutical and healthcare professions.

First year

Facilities

You are introduced to the theoretical traditions of the discipline as well as its core subject areas, including the family, the political system and religion. A focus on classical ethnographic field studies enables you to read a major ethnographic text in detail to familiarise yourself with the practice of social anthropology.

The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Social Anthropology. Your classes will be in Southlands College, where there are excellent facilities and access to well-equipped computing suites that are open 24 hours a day. If you take the Visual Anthropology module, you will be supported by the excellent facilities of Television Roehampton – the University’s own video production company.

Second year Your knowledge of the discipline is expanded through core modules including Kinship and Gender, Ethnographic Research Methods, and Theory and Politics. There are also optional modules in areas such as human rights, and ethnicity and migration.

Third year You are encouraged to embark on a small-scale supervised ethnographic project. Specialist modules cover areas such as human-animal interactions, the anthropology of tourism, the anthropology of genocide, the anthropology of religion and the ethnography of south Asia.

Single Honours

Sample modules

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Science at grade C, or equivalent

• Kinship and Gender • Anthropology of Religion • Animals, Culture and Society

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Career prospects This programme will prepare you for a career in areas such as health and welfare services, personnel, education, general management and administration. You will learn a range of specific and transferable skills, including the ability to understand other people and different cultures, to carry out independent research, an understanding of society and social institutions, and confidence in using computers.

Combined Honours (see page 13) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

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Social Anthropology

Psychology and Health

Why Roehampton?

First year


n

n

n

Sociology lecturers are productively engaged in research activities that inform their teaching, and the latest Research Assessment Exercise noted that a large majority of our research projects were internationally recognised or internationally excellent. A recent external review described this as a “state-of-the-art” Sociology programme. You can choose from a very wide range of exciting modules to study the areas that interest you the most.

Summary This challenging programme explores the relationships between people and the institutions they create to help them organise their lives. Sociologists are increasingly sought out in both the public and private sectors for their skills in information gathering and analysis.

You are introduced to the subject through modules such as Sociology: From the Personal to the Global; Theory I: The Sociological Tradition; Sociology and Everyday Life; and Politics and Policy.

Second year You further develop your skills as a sociologist through core modules in sociological theory and methods, plus modules exploring contemporary urban life and self-identity. You also have the option of taking modules from related programmes, such as Childhood and Society, and Human Rights.

Third year There are opportunities for independent study and placements in voluntary organisations. You also choose from optional modules such as Understanding Globalisation, and Sociology of Death.

Sample modules • • • •

Sociology and Everyday Life Sociology of Power and Politics Food and Society Sociology of Health and Illness

Facilities

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You can join the programme as a complete beginner, or with A-level Spanish, or as a native speaker.

n

From the second year on, most of the teaching is in Spanish, and most tutors are native Spanish speakers.

n

The programme includes a fully accredited, compulsory year abroad in Spain or Latin America, and if you are eligible for a full-year Erasmus grant, you may be exempted from tuition fees for that year.

n

An annual award of £250 is made to the best dissertations/research projects written in the final year.

Summary With 420 million speakers in Spain, Latin America, the US and elsewhere, Spanish is the third most widely spoken language in the world. This programme equips you with the linguistic skills to travel and work among Spanish-speaking people, and also to explore their history and culture. First year

Sample modules

Your first year will combine intensive language modules with an introductory module on Spanish and Latin American history, culture and society. These will provide you with a solid foundation for your remaining three years of Spanish study, leading to proficiency in spoken and written Spanish, and to a sound knowledge of Spain and Latin America in the modern world.

• Introduction to Spain and Latin America • Spanish Language in Context • European Cinema • Public Service Interpreting (Spanish)

Career prospects

Second year

Single or Combined Honours (see page 13) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 160–200 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent

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Why Roehampton?

The University Library has excellent resources for the study of Sociology, and we have specialist computer hardware and software. You will also be able to take advantage of the expertise of staff whose research interests relate to the variety of real situations in which informed social analysis is increasingly valued. The Department encourages contact with outside agencies and visiting speakers.

This programme will provide you with a suitable and well-recognised basis for further professional training or a career in health and welfare services, personnel, education, general management and administration, and a range of other occupations. Learning useful skills for employment is emphasised throughout the programme and students are encouraged to develop career management skills.

Spanish

Sociology

Why Roehampton?

First year

Facilities

Language study continues to form the main component of the programme, but you will also be able to choose from a number of optional modules, ranging from European Cinema and Spanish Writing to Translating and Interpreting. The aim of the compulsory and optional modules is to prepare you fully for your year abroad.

You will have access to the University’s Languages Centre, which is well equipped with video-viewing facilities, satellite TV and multimedia CALL packages. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including the libraries of the Instituto Cervantes and Canning House, as well as the materials and workshops organised by the Consejería de Educación of the Spanish Embassy in London. Many embassies of Spanish-speaking countries also offer activities of interest.

Third year

Career prospects

You spend your third year abroad, either on an exchange programme at one of our partner universities, as an Englishlanguage assistant in a school or college, or on a work placement in Spain or Latin America.

Recent graduates have found positions related to their language skills in governmental agencies, advertising, publishing, export companies, teaching and the civil service.

Fourth year You choose from options such as Media Translation, Interpreting, Spanish Research Project, or a work placement in which you use your language skills in a business or community context.

Combined Honours (see page 13) Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240– 320 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • Beginners in Spanish can join this programme www.roehampton.ac.uk 103


Sport Psychology

Why Roehampton? n

n

n

n

n

Roehampton’s Sport Science programmes have attracted high-calibre students, coaches and athletes for over 25 years. Graduates are entitled to graduate membership of the British Psychological Society. This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist. Our Sport Performance, Assessment and Rehabilitation Centre is the best laboratory of its type in London and includes a climatic chamber and automated motion-capture systems. The laboratory and Roehampton sport staff are accredited by the British Association for Sport and Exercise Sciences. Roehampton is close to renowned sport venues such as Wimbledon (tennis), Twickenham (rugby), Harlequins Rugby, and Chelsea and Fulham football clubs.

Summary What determines whether a footballer scores in a World Cup penalty shoot out? How does an Olympic champion cope with media attention? How do we encourage increased participation in sport and exercise? You will explore the answers to questions such as these in this exciting new programme, which draws on Roehampton’s strong reputation in teaching Sport Science and Psychology.

104 www.roehampton.ac.uk

First year You will be introduced to a range of different modules that will provide you with a foundation for your studies in the second and third years. This interesting and varied year is designed to whet your appetite for the rest of the programme.

Second year You will broaden your knowledge base in the second year and enhance your critical awareness of sport psychology. This part of the programme embeds the subject within the wider context of sport science as a whole.

Third year You have the opportunity to select modules based on your particular topic areas and the choice to research areas of specific interest for your dissertation project. During the year, you follow a coherent pathway of study to facilitate your future direction within the exciting discipline of sport psychology.

Sample modules • • • •

Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology Psychology of Peak Performance Understanding Sport and Culture Foundations of Psychology

Career prospects The transferable skills learnt on our degree programmes enable our graduates take to up a range of professions both inside and outside the field of sport and exercise. Some graduates begin careers as fitness instructors, consultants in sport physiology/psychology and in the health professions. Those graduates who have studied the cultural aspects of sport are especially well suited to careers in journalism, media and cultural research.

Facilities The University’s Psychology Research Centres provide a variety of counselling practices and research, while the student-run Psychology Society invites guest speakers and runs social events. The sport psychologists within our Centre for Scientific and Cultural Research in Sport have particular research strengths in the areas of career transitions, training adherence, overtraining and burnout, promoting optimal performance, hypnosis and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP).

Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 280–340 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Science at grade C, or equivalent www.roehampton.ac.uk 105


This programme allows you to study sport from a scientific and a cultural perspective. You can either focus on specific areas of interest or pursue a broad range of sport topics.

Why Roehampton? n

n

Roehampton’s Sport Sciences programmes have attracted highcalibre students, coaches and athletes for over 25 years.

In addition, you explore cultural aspects of sport, such as how today’s media-saturated culture shapes the contemporary sport experience. You can also study spectacular sporting events such as the Olympics, the meaning of sport celebrities, and the reasons people choose one sport brand over another.

The Sport Performance, Assessment and Rehabilitation Centre is the best laboratory of its type in London and includes a climatic chamber and automated motion-capture systems.

n

The laboratory and Roehampton sport sciences staff are accredited by the British Association for Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES).

n

Staff are actively engaged in research within the Centre for Scientific and Cultural Research in Sport and modules are designed around staff expertise.

n

You develop expertise in the scientific disciplines of physiology, biomechanics and psychology. You learn how to enhance the physical and biomechanical performance of elite athletes, how psychological intervention strategies can improve mental skills, and how exercise and physical activity can promote general wellbeing.

Sport Science — Combined Honours You can also study the scientific and cultural aspects of sport outlined above as part of a Combined Honours programme with one of the following subjects: Business Management; Computing Studies; Human Biosciences; or Journalism and News Media.

First year You are introduced to the to the four key academic disciplines that make up sport sciences – physiology, psychology, biomechanics and sociology – and you develop a range of skills for studying sport and exercise. Modules include Introduction to Physiology and Fitness Assessment; Biomechanical Analysis of Movement; Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology; and Understanding Sport and Culture.

Roehampton is close to renowned sport venues such as Wimbledon (tennis), Twickenham (rugby), Harlequins Rugby, and Chelsea and Fulham football clubs.

Second year You can choose to focus your studies exclusively on either the scientific or sociological aspects of sport, or you can continue

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–280 points from A-levels (including one Science subject), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English, Maths and Science at grade C or equivalent

Third year The choice of modules on offer enables you to tailor your programme to your specific interests. In addition, there is an opportunity to carry out an independent research dissertation in an area that interests you. Modules include Training Programme; Advanced Topics in Psychology; Biomechanics: Performance and Injury; and Sport, Media and Visual Culture.

Career prospects The transferable skills learnt on our programmes enable our graduates take to up a range of professions both inside and outside the field of sport and exercise. Some graduates begin careers as fitness instructors, consultants in sport physiology/psychology and in the health professions. Those graduates who have studied the cultural aspects of sport are especially well suited to careers in journalism, media and cultural research.

A defining aspect of the programme is the access we are given to the most up-to-date equipment in the physiology and biomechanics labs.

Robyn Bond, third-year Sport and Exercise Sciences student 106 www.roehampton.ac.uk

to study a combination of the two. Modules are available in Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology; Psychology of Peak Performance; Applied Biomechanics; and Sport, Culture and Power.

Sample modules • • • • •

Introduction to Physiology and Fitness Assessment Psychology of Peak Performance Applied Biomechanics The Body and Identity in Sport and Exercise Sport, Media and Visual Culture www.roehampton.ac.uk 107

Sport Sciences

Sport Sciences

Sport and Exercise Sciences — Single Honours


Why Roehampton? n

This programme is unique in providing a sound base for a career in the field of TESOL: teaching, testing, materials development and design, or administration.

n

The participation of students from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds provides a rich learning environment.

n

The programme has strong links with the local TESOL community, which offers opportunities for teaching placement.

n

You get to observe teaching in a variety of contexts.

Summary

Second year You develop teaching skills in practice classes, and learn to plan effective language lessons and to evaluate and use materials effectively. You will investigate the relationship between theory and practice through observation of teaching in local schools. Core modules provide the tools that will enable you to develop and assess the effectiveness of language learning programmes. Optional modules, such as Bilingual Language Use and Media in Language, provide opportunities to develop your knowledge of language, and your skills in analysis.

Third year In the final year, you focus on theories of language learning and how individual differences affect learning and study syllabus design, assessment and evaluation. Optional modules allow development of individual areas of interest, such as the role of English as a Global Language, English for Specific Purposes and Language Issues in Multilingual Settings.

• • • •

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching Intercultural Communication The Language Learner Second Language Acquisition

Career prospects You can move on to a career in testing, materials design, ELT administration, or teaching. However, you may wish to teach at primary or secondary level, either in the UK or overseas. Support and guidance will be provided to help you select appropriate progression routes for your future career.

Facilities

The variety of skills and theories learnt at Roehampton prepared me for a broad range of positions in the EFL industry and enabled me to quickly rise to positions of responsibility.

Nataëlle Vinadia, former TESOL student from Annecy, France; currently working as an EFL Teacher for Bell School in Geneva, Switzerland

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Why Roehampton? n

The staff have twice been recognised as reaching national and international levels of research excellence by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

n

Three of Roehampton’s constituent Colleges have religious foundations: Anglican, Roman Catholic and Methodist.

n

The programme is complemented by Crucible (the University’s centre of excellence in human rights education), the Jewish Resource Centre and the Centre for Religious Education and Development.

Summary What do the great theologians, philosophers, and religious thinkers say about God? What can we learn from the major religions of the world? Who was Jesus of Nazareth? What does the Bible really claim and say? What are sacred texts? What does theology have to say about issues of social justice and injustice? What is the impact of religion on society, on gender, and on many other social and cultural phenomena? This programme allows you to explore answers to these questions.

Sample modules

Are you interested in teaching English as a foreign or second language? English is taught in a wide variety of contexts around the world. This programme is designed to give you an excellent grounding in the knowledge and skills you need in this rewarding career and is valued by employers.

You are introduced to various aspects of language, from pronunciation and grammar to the relationship between language and society. You investigate different approaches and methods in language teaching and the theories that inform them.

The University Library has excellent resources for the study of TESOL. You will also have access to the Languages Centre, which is well equipped with video-viewing facilities, satellite TV and multimedia CALL packages. In addition, Roehampton is close to world-class facilities in London such as the National Centre for Languages. Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–320 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English at grade C, or equivalent

You can also study: • Foundation degree in Ministerial Theology (see page 112).

First year You are introduced to the multi-faceted nature of theological and religious studies and to the main themes of the Bible. You also have the opportunity to study the languages in which the sacred texts were written or into which they were translated: Hebrew, Sanskrit, Greek, classical Arabic and Latin.

Second year This year covers the intermediate study of theology and religion. Theology modules explore central themes in Christian theology, the Historical Jesus, the reception of the Bible in both the past and the present, and the nature of religious knowledge. In Religious Studies, you are able to continue your study of the major world religions, building on what you have learned in your first year. You will also be able to study, for example, the impact of philosophy on religion (and vice-versa), and the impact of religion on culture and society.

the Impact of Myth on Religion. You have the opportunity to pursue these interests in depth through dissertations and special studies. Field trips to places of religious significance (eg Lourdes in France) and work placements are also available as study modules.

Sample modules • • • • •

The Bible Past and Present Reformation Thought in Theological Perspective Reason and Revelation Islam and Women Studies in Mythology

Career prospects The programme equips you with the skills needed for a range of professions: education; the media; civil service; and social, church, and community work (including race and ethnic minority relations).

Third year

Single or Combined Honours (see page 13)

You are able to select from a range of options. In Theology you could study Reformation Thought in Theological Perspective; Issues in Contemporary Catholicism; and Theologies of the Nonwestern World. In Religious Studies you could study Advanced Concepts in the Philosophy of Religion; Islam and Women; and

Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 200–280 points from A-levels, vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) www.roehampton.ac.uk 109

Theology and Religious Studies

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

First year


Zoology

First year

Why Roehampton? n

n

A recent review by the Quality Assurance Agency praised the “excellent teaching and learning facilities”. The programme scored 23 out of 24 points, one of the highest quality ratings in the UK. Roehampton is close to excellent resources such as the Natural History Museum and the only urban Wildfowl and Wetlands Centre, at Barnes.

n

The University has an extensive collection of zoological specimens.

n

The programme includes a residential field course and many opportunities for local fieldwork.

n

There is a strong emphasis on the development of research skills in a research-active environment.

Summary Zoology at Roehampton explores animal biology through a wide and fascinating range of core and optional modules. You gain an in-depth understanding of the evolution, anatomy, physiology, behaviour and ecology of animals as well as a broad general knowledge of modern animal biology.

I worked at London Zoo as a zoological explainer, giving presentations about the animals. I wouldn’t have got the job without the knowledge I had from my degree.

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You receive a thorough grounding in the evolution and biology of vertebrate and invertebrate animals, physiology, data handling, cell biology and plant biology.

Second year A residential field course in south Wales acts as a link between the first and second years of the programme. You carry out core studies in vertebrate biology, including reptiles, amphibians and fish. The Research Methods module includes the development of a research proposal and you give a presentation on a specialist zoological topic of your choice.

Third year In the final year, you undertake a research project and study core modules that span the biology, evolution, behaviour, ecology and conservation of a wide range of animal groups. Optional modules in aquatic biology, and animal behaviour and cognition are also offered.

Sample modules • Primate Biology and Conservation • Animal Behaviour and Cognition • Invertebrate Zoology

Career prospects As a graduate zoologist you will have a breadth of skills and knowledge suitable for a wide range of careers, and not just within zoology. Employment opportunities include administrative, advisory or research appointments in industry, central or local government and non-governmental organisations including conservation work. Teaching is also a popular career choice.

Facilities Our laboratories are equipped with facilities for DNA analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electrophysiology, high-performance liquid chromatography, and environmental monitoring. Roehampton is close to the many world-class facilities in London, including London Zoo, Chessington Zoo and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. We also make use of the excellent local wildlife areas, such as Wimbledon Common and Richmond Park National Nature Reserve.

Single Honours Entry requirements • Offers are typically based in the range of 240–300 points from A-levels (including Biology), vocational A-levels, or equivalent, including the 14–19 Diploma (please refer to the general entrance requirements on page 117) • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent www.roehampton.ac.uk 111


FdA Sports Coaching Practice

Foundation degrees

Foundation degrees integrate academic and work-based learning through close collaboration between employers and programme providers. The academic component of these programmes is therefore taken on a part-time basis while students continue to work. The programmes typically take two years to complete, after which students can apply to enter the third year of an Honours degree programme.

• Roehampton is internationally renowned for its work in education. • This programme focuses on the development of practical approaches to coaching. • You are introduced to the scientific aspects of coaching, such as anatomy, physiology, movement analysis and nutrition.

Programme summary

Applications Applicants to the full-time Ministerial Theology Foundation degree should apply through UCAS. For all other programmes please apply direct to Roehampton University’s Admissions Office, details on page 119. For more information about these programmes, including tuition fees, please visit the Roehampton website (www.roehampton.ac.uk) or the Carshalton College website (www.carshalton.ac.uk).

FdA Ministerial Theology • Roehampton University has extensive experience and historical roots as an institution partly founded on Christian principles. • You study in the historical Christian settings of Digby Stuart College and Whitelands College and benefit from the expertise of University colleagues representing the Church of England, Methodist, Baptist, Pentecostal and Roman Catholic creeds.

Programme summary Whether you are a pastor, pastoral assistant or evangelist, a worship leader or running a church or community group, this pioneering programme gives you the opportunity to develop your intellectual and practical expertise while continuing to exercise your ministry in the local church or community.

A significant part of the programme is work-based with students completing modules at work with the support of University staff and workplace mentors. Your employer will need to provide “mentorship” that will enable you to apply your learning to the coaching environment and to develop your working practices within the workplace context.

Sample modules • • • •

Coaching Process Science of Coaching Coaching Pedagogy Work-based Reflective Practice

Entry requirements You will normally have a minimum of one of the following qualifications: • appropriate A-levels (eg Physical Education, Sports Studies or Sciences), or Vocational A-level equivalent, or BTEC sport-related courses • NVQ/SVQ at Level 3 or other appropriate vocationally related NQF level 3 qualification. You should be able to demonstrate competence (through qualifications and experience) of knowledge and practice related to generic coaching skills, sport-specific knowledge and a commitment to developing your knowledge of coaching.

FdA Supporting Learning and Teaching • Roehampton is one of the UK’s principal providers of teacher education and is internationally renowned for its work in the field. • This programme is delivered at Roehampton University and Carshalton College.

Programme summary This programme is particularly suitable for teaching assistants who require a continuing professional development opportunity linked to a recognised undergraduate qualification. For those who do not already hold higher level teaching assistant (HLTA) status, this can be integrated into the first year of foundation degree study. You have the opportunity to develop basic research skills alongside developing an area of expertise of your own choosing that has direct relevance to your role in the workplace.

Sample modules • • • • • •

Study Skills Learning and Teaching Literacy/Numeracy HLTA Preparation (if appropriate) SEN and Inclusion Working With Others

Entry requirements • Minimum of one year’s experience of working in an educational environment • GCSE English and Maths at grade C, or equivalent • Support of employer via provision of a work-based mentor • Demonstration of enthusiasm and commitment • Access to a computer with an internet connection for self study, and a basic level of IT competency in word processing, emailing and attachments

Sample modules • • • • •

Scripture Christian Ministry and Mission Theological Reflection Christian Believing Christian Lifestyle

Entry requirements There are no formal entry requirements and you will not be expected to have any academic or theological background although, where appropriate, those who have already done some church-related study will be welcome. All applicants will be interviewed.

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Entry requirements

How do I know if I’m eligible to study for a degree at Roehampton?

What language qualifications do I need if English is not my first language?

You need to satisfy two requirements:

To follow your chosen programme successfully, you will need to be fluent in written and spoken English. These are the qualifications in English regarded as an acceptable minimum level of competence:

1. You must be at least 17 years old by the time the programme begins (this may be waived in exceptional circumstances). There is no upper age limit. 2. You must satisfy any additional departmental requirements for entry to your chosen programme (see individual subject entries).

What if I have other experience that shows I have the potential to gain a degree?

• GCSE grade C • Cambridge Proficiency Certificate grade C • Cambridge Advanced Certificate grade A • overall IELTS score of 6.0 and generally also a minimum of 6.0 for the writing segment • TOEFL score of 550 (213 computer-based, 79–80 internet-based), including 4.0 in the writing test (academic test).

Applicants are generally expected to meet Roehampton’s minimum entry requirements (see below). However, the University also welcomes applications to most programmes from individuals who can demonstrate the same academic potential as applicants with conventional qualifications. Please note that there are a number of programmes where the entry criteria are not flexible – typically where these are governed by outside bodies.

If you have not reached this standard, or feel that you would benefit from a short course in English before you start your programme at Roehampton, please check below to see which would be the right course for you. If you are taking a TOEFL exam and would like the information to be sent direct to Roehampton University please quote 8598 on your answer sheet and score report request form.

In order to gain admission, the University requires evidence of significant experience in a field related to the programme to which admission is sought. This experience could have been gained through relevant paid employment, voluntary work or other substantial life experience.

What are the entry requirements for the International Foundation Certificate?

What if I have other UK qualifications? Various UK qualifications may satisfy the general entry requirements. These include a degree awarded by a UK or other approved university or the CNAA, a Teacher Training Certificate, ONC, OND, HNC, HND, Access course, Open University course credits or certain professional qualifications. Contact the Enquiries Office for advice.

What if I have overseas qualifications? Certain overseas qualifications may also satisfy the general entry requirements. International students (non-EU) should contact the Admissions Office.

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English major The entry level for undergraduates to the English major is IELTS 4.5 (with 4.5 in writing) or TOEFL 53 internet test/477 paper test. Students taking the English major route study intensive academic English throughout the year and are also able to take specialist subject courses in the second term.

• Open pathway (this can be tailored to students’ needs) • Business and IT • Media. All programmes run from September to June. Your conditional offer at Roehampton will depend on your results on this course so you will not have to repeat IELTS or TOEFL. You can find more information and an application form at www.roehampton.ac.uk/ admissions/englishlanguageunit

What are the entry requirements for the pre-sessional English course? Courses run for 12, 8 or 4 weeks in the summer, ending in September before your degree starts. The minimum English levels for the courses are: • 12 weeks – IELTS 5 (5 in writing) or TOEFL 61 internet test/500 paper test • 8 weeks – IELTS 5.5 (5.5 in writing) or TOEFL 71 internet test/527 paper test • 4 weeks – IELTS 6 (5.5 in writing) or TOEFL 74 internet test/537 paper test. Focusing strongly on language development, you will also gain experience of academic tasks not covered by IELTS or TOEFL courses, such as writing longer essays, using sources and giving presentations. The pre-sessional programme will also give you the opportunity to settle into life and study at Roehampton before your further studies begin. If you have a conditional offer to study at Roehampton, successful completion of this course will meet the English language condition of your offer. It is recommended for any student with less than IELTS 7.

English minor The entry level for undergraduates to the English minor is IELTS 5 (with 5 in writing) or TOEFL 61 internet test/500 paper test. You will study one term of intensive academic English followed by one term of modules from a range of programmes along with English support. There are three possible pathways in the second term:

Credit transfer For information about transferring credits from previous study, please visit the website: www. roehampton.ac.uk

APL/APEL For information about Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)/Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL), please visit the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk

General Entrance Requirements These requirements may be satisfied by means of one of the following: 1. General Certificate of Education (GCE) either (a) passes in two subjects at Advanced level; or (b) passes in one subject at Advanced level and two subjects at Advanced Subsidiary level. No subject may be counted at more than one level and passes in subjects that contain a high proportion of common material will not be counted separately. 2. Either (a) Vocational A-level Double Award; or (b) Vocational A-level Single Award plus two part Awards. 3. Either (a) One subject at Advanced level plus one Vocational A-level Single Award; or (b) One subject at Advanced level plus two Vocational A-level part Awards; or (c) Two subjects at Advanced Subsidiary level plus one Vocational A-level Single Award. Please see tariff information at: www.ucas.com/ students/ucas_tariff 4. The following qualifications are included within the UCAS tariff system: BTEC National Certificate or Diploma, Scottish Certificate of Education, the International Baccalaureate Diploma, the Irish Leaving Certificate, and the 14–19 Diploma. Some programmes will require specific A-level qualifications in addition to the 14–19 Diploma; please refer to the UCAS or the Roehampton University website.

Deferred entry You can apply through UCAS to enter the programme in October 2010 to take a year out before coming to Roehampton. You can indicate on your UCAS form that you intend to defer your entry. However, if you decide to defer after making your application, please contact our Admissions Office to make arrangements. For any further information, please contact: Admissions Office Roehampton University. Roehampton Lane London SW15 5PU • Tel: 020 8392 3314 • Fax: 020 8392 3220 • Email: admissions@roehampton.ac.uk Enquiries Office Tel: 020 8392 3232• Email: enquiries@roehampton.ac.uk International students please contact: International Centre Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3192 • Fax: +44 (0)20 8392 3031 Email: international@roehampton.ac.uk www.roehampton.ac.uk 117


How to apply

Applicants currently attending a UK school or college

Applicants who are no longer attending school or college

The University and College Application Service (UCAS) manages applications to full-time undergraduate programmes in UK universities from students currently enrolled in UK schools and colleges. After completing the UCAS online application, you submit it to a member of staff at your school. The staff member checks your details, adds your academic reference, including predicted grades, and submits the completed application to UCAS. There is a small fee payable to UCAS that applicants usually pay online using a credit or debit card although it may also be possible to pay through your school or college. You can obtain advice about applying to university from your teachers or from a careers adviser at your school.

If you reside in the UK but are not currently attending a school or college, you must apply independently through UCAS. Direct applicants are responsible for completing the online form, for obtaining an academic reference, for paying the fee online and for submitting the completed application to UCAS.

Applicants attending a school or college outside the UK Some schools outside the UK are registered with UCAS but most are not. Applicants from outside the UK, whether in the EU or elsewhere, apply to full-time undergraduate programmes in UK universities independently through UCAS. Direct applicants are responsible for completing the online form, for obtaining an academic reference, for paying the fee online and for submitting the completed application to UCAS. Advice on applying is available from your school, from Roehampton’s International Centre and from British Council offices overseas. International students who have applied through UCAS should also inform the Admissions Office that they have made an application. If possible, please send us a photocopy of the UCAS form along with your transcripts, certificates or other proof of qualifications. International students who are interested in attending Roehampton on an exchange, as a Study Abroad or visiting student, or on a certificate or graduate programme should contact the International Centre directly.

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Applicants wishing to study part-time or wishing to begin their studies in January Applicants who wish to pursue their studies on a parttime basis at Roehampton, or who want to begin their studies in January, do not apply through UCAS. Rather, you must apply directly to Roehampton using the online application form, see www.roehampton.ac.uk/ug/ apply/applyparttime.html for details.

UCAS Extra UCAS Extra allows applicants who have not received an offer to continue applying for courses. If you have not been successful you will automatically be placed in UCAS Extra (see www.ucas.com for more information). You will then be able to submit applications – one at a time – until the end of July, to programmes with vacancies at higher education institutions.

The application cycle UCAS begins to receive applications for Autumn 2010 entry from 1 September 2009. UCAS will notify you about the outcome of your application. If you are still in school, your offer is likely to be conditional on achieving the minimum entry requirements for the programme to which you are applying. A number of Roehampton programmes require applicants to be interviewed. You will be contacted by an interview coordinator to schedule an interview if required. Once results are available, the Admissions Office will inform you of the outcome of your applications through UCAS. If you have achieved the minimum required results, we will offer you admission and any conditions of the offer will be clearly stated in the letter from UCAS. If there are still places available on degree

programmes, Clearing takes place in August after the results of A-levels, BTEC qualifications and Access courses are released. To find out what is available at Roehampton, check www.roehampton. ac.uk, www.ucas.com or one of the national newspapers such as the Guardian or the Independent.

Services for careers and higher education advisers Roehampton’s UK Recruitment and Widening Participation (WP) staff are available to offer assistance to careers and HE advisers. We offer a range of activities for prospective applicants including taster days, academic visits, workshops, and bespoke talks and presentations. Our full-time staff are supported by student ambassadors who are child-protection trained and CRB-checked. If you would like us to visit your school, please let us know. In addition to individual school visits, we also attend regional and national fairs. For more information see www.roehampton.ac.uk/schoolsliaison

Useful addresses UCAS code: R48 Full-time undergraduates must apply through UCAS. The UCAS application form and UCAS Directory (formerly the Handbook) should be obtained from your school or college. If you are not at school or have difficulty obtaining the literature the following contact details can be used: UCAS application requests UCAS Rosehill New Barn Lane Cheltenham Gloucestershire GL52 3LZ Tel: +44 (0)871 468 0468 Email: enquiries@ucas.ac.uk Application materials can be requested online via the UCAS website: www.ucas.com

Part-time and January-start students should apply directly to Roehampton: Admissions Office Roehampton University Roehampton Lane London SW15 5PU Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3314 Fax: +44 (0)20 8392 3220 Please contact the Enquiries Office for further details and an application form: Enquiries Office Roehampton University Roehampton Lane London SW15 5PU Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3232 Fax: +44 (0)20 8392 3470 Email: enquiries@roehampton.ac.uk International students please contact: International Centre Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3192 Fax: +44 (0)20 8392 3031 Email: international@roehampton.ac.uk

Timeline for applications From September 2009: Make your application through UCAS to study at Roehampton. Mid January 2010: Deadline for UCAS applications. From March 2010: Make your application for financial support (loans and grants). End of April 2010*: Deadline for financial support applications for students who do not provide their financial details. End of June 2010*: Deadline for financial support applications for students who do provide their financial details. *Applications for financial support may be made later than these dates but it cannot be guaranteed that the support will be in place by the start of the academic year.

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English Language Unit

The English Language Unit supports students during their studies and also provides programmes that prepare international students for their degree.

International Foundation Certificate (IFC) The IFC has been designed to prepare students for higher education studies at a British university and enables students to develop their academic English, study skills, subject knowledge and understanding of the UK and its culture. Successful completion of the IFC can allow students to go on to study a degree at Roehampton. We offer four versions of the IFC: English Major (this has the strongest focus on academic English); Business and IT; Media; and the Open pathway (this can be tailored to suit students who want to progress to any other Roehampton degree). Each foundation pathway includes two parts. The first part enables students to concentrate on the development of academic English and study skills while the second focuses more closely on the specific subject area of their chosen pathway.

Pre-sessional English This course is designed for students who have been offered an place at Roehampton but whose English language level is slightly below the level required by their offer. There are courses of 12, 8 and 4 weeks depending on your present level of English. Students with unconditional offers can also participate in this course in order to fine-tune their English before beginning their studies.

English support during your degree In most programmes you can take a 10- or 20-credit English for Academic Study module in the first year that counts towards your degree. As part of this module you will get some individual feedback on your subject coursework. You will learn vital skills, such as interpreting essay questions and giving presentations. You will also work on improving your use of English in assignments. There is also further support available for those who need it. Please see pages 116–117 for English language entry requirements for your degree and for the IFC and presessional courses.

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Directions

Travelling by public transport Roehampton University is in zone three of the London Transport system.

National Rail From Barnes station the main site (Digby Stuart, Froebel and Southlands) is a 10-minute walk and Whitelands and Mount Clare are a 25-minute walk, or a short ride on the 72 or 265 buses. Trains from Barnes go to Clapham Junction and Waterloo in one direction and Kingston, Richmond, Staines and Windsor in the other direction.

Underground From Hammersmith (District/Piccadilly/Hammersmith and City lines) take the 72 bus from stop K in the Lower Bus Station next to the shopping centre (above the Underground station). From Putney Bridge (District Line) take the 265 bus outside the station.

Bus The University is well served by buses that link Roehampton to Hammersmith, Richmond, Kingston, Putney, Clapham Junction, Wimbledon and New Malden. The 72, 265 and 493 buses stop next to the main site (at Queen Mary’s Hospital) and close to Whitelands and Mount Clare (at the junction of Danebury Avenue). The 170 and 430 buses stop on Danebury Avenue, which is very close to Whitelands and Mount Clare and a short walk from the main site.

Travelling by car Please note, parking is limited on campus and in nearby streets. All University sites are on or near the A306 Roehampton Lane, between the A3 and the A205 South Circular (Upper Richmond Road). From the A3, turn into the A306 Roehampton Lane. For Whitelands turn left after 0.5 mile into Danebury Avenue and then turn immediately left into Holybourne Avenue; for Mount Clare, follow Danebury Avenue and turn left into Minstead Gardens. For the main site, stay on Roehampton Lane for a further 0.5 mile; you will find the main site on the left, opposite Queen Mary’s Hospital. From the A205 South Circular heading west, turn left into the A306 Roehampton Lane. The main site is approximately 0.75 mile on the right. For Whitelands continue for about 0.5 mile and then turn right at the traffic lights into Danebury Avenue and then turn immediately left into Holybourne Avenue; for Mount Clare follow Danebury Avenue and turn left into Minstead Gardens. From the A205 South Circular heading east, there is no right turn into Roehampton Lane. At this junction, follow the sign for Putney Bridge and Roehampton and then immediately follow the signs for Dorking (A24), Guildford/Portsmouth (A3) and Roehampton. This takes you in a loop to head west and turn left into the A306 Roehampton Lane at the next junction.

Travelling by bicycle The University can be easily reached by bike. There are cycle parking stands throughout the campus. The Transport for London online journey planner can be used to provide route maps to the University, see http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk

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Location

Main site: Froebel, Digby Stuart and Southlands Colleges

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Location

Whitelands college and mount clare

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Location

Trafalgar Square

The London Eye

Buckingham Palace

Close to the heart of London

St Paul's Cathedral

Central London

Harrods

Tower Bridge

Barnes

Sheen High Street

KENSINGTON

BRENTFORD FULHAM

ISLEWORTH

HOUNSLOW

Richmond

MORTLAKE

Barnes Putney

King’s Road Chelsea a

Putney Bridge RIV

Twickenham Stadium

Brixton EAST DULWICH

Balham

HAM

Teddington

The Houses of Parliament

Clapham Junction

WANDSWORTH

We have links with Natural History Museum • National Gallery • V&A Museum • London Zoo • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew • 30 St Mary Axe (aka the Gherkin) • Museum of London • Canary Wharf • Wimbledon Common • Houses of Parliament • Royal Opera House • Theatre district • Hampton Court Palace • Imperial War Museum • BBC • Wimbledon tennis • Bevis Marks Synagogue • Buddhapadipa Temple • Westminster Abbey • London Central Mosque • Shri Swaminarayan Mandir • Richmond Park

Battersea Power Station

Roehampton Village

Carling Academy Brixton

Wimbledon

HAMPTON

ROTHERHITHE

VAUXHALL

BATTERSEA

ER THAMES

Twickenham

Waterloo

WESTMINSTER CHELSEA

KEW

Richmond Park

Knightsbridge

Earls Court

Hammersmith

Roehampton University is just half an hour from central London; this advantageous location allows students to engage with the city’s major organisations, from multinational businesses to cultural bodies, and benefit from the links that Roehampton staff have established with them.

Kingston

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court

SURBITON

Putney Shops

THAMES DITTON

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If you require an audio, Braille or large-text version of this publication, please call the Enquiries Office on 020 8392 3232. Please allow a minimum of 10 days for delivery.

Wimbledon

Kingston-uponThames

Roehampton University is committed to being an equal opportunities education provider and will therefore make reasonable adjustments for disabled applicants and students. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information given in this publication is accurate at the time of going to print and the University will use all reasonable efforts to deliver the programmes as described. However, the University reserves the right, without notice, to withdraw or change the programmes or programme combinations included in this prospectus, to alter tuition fees, entry requirements, and the facilities or services provided, and cannot accept responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions, cancellations or alterations. Please check the website for up-to-date information. www.roehampton.ac.uk 129


One of the leading new universities in the UK for research and number one for Dance and Biological Anthropology – RAE 2008 80% of research of international standing and 33% internationally excellent or world class – RAE 2008

More National Teaching Fellows than any other London university A beautiful parkland campus featuring historic buildings and lakes, and on-site student residences Ranked first among London universities for the environment on and around campus – Times Higher Education 2009 Student Experience Survey

Four historic Colleges dating back to the 1840s, create a strong sense of community on campus A thriving local social scene based around Putney, Richmond, Hammersmith and Kingston

…all this only 30 minutes from central London

Contact us Tel: 020 8392 3232 Email: enquiries@roehampton.ac.uk www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Undergraduate Prospectus 2010/11