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One of the leading new universities in the UK for research and number one for Dance and Biological Anthropology – RAE 2008

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78% of research of international standing and 33% internationally excellent or world class – RAE 2008

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One of the highest concentrations of National Teaching Fellows in the UK

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Our students come from 130 countries around the world, resulting in a vibrant and diverse university community

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A beautiful parkland campus featuring historic buildings and lakes, and on-site student residences

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Ranked first among London universities for the environment on and around campus – Times Higher Education 2009 Student Experience Survey

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Four historic Colleges dating back to the 1840s, creating a strong sense of community on campus

…all this only 30 minutes from central London

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Welcome............................................................................................. 1 Choose Roehampton......................................................................... 8 Academic life.................................................................................... 14

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Department of English and Creative Writing

Roehampton University Business School

Department of Psychology

Research publications.................................................................. 16 News from the academic Departments........................................ 18 Research degrees........................................................................ 22 International .................................................................................... 24 Student support............................................................................... 32 A historic tradition........................................................................ 33

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Department of Drama, Theatre and Performance

Student services and advice........................................................ 37 Finance......................................................................................... 40

Department of Life Sciences

More than study............................................................................... 42 Entry requirements/How to apply..................................................... 46 Index of courses............................................................................... 47 Courses (arranged by Department).................................................. 50

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Department of Dance

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Department of Education

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Department of Humanities

Department of Media, Culture and Language

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Department of Social Sciences

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Welcome to the Roehampton University postgraduate community

As a postgraduate student, you will be part of a friendly, modern, lively community, dedicated to providing the best possible opportunities for learning and research. Our postgraduates and research students enjoy close contact with academics working at the cutting edge of their subjects and you will find yourself both challenged and supported in this next stage of your academic career. Roehampton University has a very strong and growing international reputation for its teaching and research. The results of the UK government’s 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) showed that we have one of the strongest research profiles of any modern university in the UK. Overall, 78% of our research was “internationally recognised”, with 33% rated “internationally excellent” or “world class”. Two of our subject areas, Biological Anthropology and Dance, were assessed as being the very best in the UK. Our beautiful and historic campus in south-west London provides a wonderfully stimulating environment in which to pursue your studies, with great research resources on your doorstep. I hope you choose Roehampton and look forward to welcoming you in person.

Professor Paul O’Prey, Vice-Chancellor 6

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CHOOSE

—The Sunday Times

Roehampton

Roehampton jumps immediately to the top of the class of modern universities for research strength.

Join our growing postgraduate community and you will benefit from outstanding academic staff working at the cutting edge of their subjects. As a postgraduate you can choose from taught masters and research degree courses across the arts, business, education, social sciences, and human and life sciences. The on-campus facilities and support services, including our highly praised Graduate School, mean that our students leave Roehampton prepared for a successful career. With a tradition of undergraduate education that stretches back to the 1840s, Roehampton is now enjoying a reputation as one of the strongest performers of the newer universities in research terms, achieving excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, including being rated number one in the UK for Dance and Biological Anthropology.

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Stunning London campus

Roehampton is an ideal environment in which to learn. Our students are taught at our beautiful campus, set in 54 acres of parkland yet close to London’s many world-class academic facilities. The University boasts an impressive combination of modern architecture and listed 18th-century mansions, complemented by landscaped grounds and lakes. Richmond Park is just a short walk away with its 2,500 acres of woodlands

Comprehensive support services In addition to campus facilities we understand the specific needs of postgraduate students and have set up a strong network of support services to help you get the most out of your experience at Roehampton. In the most recent Quality Assurance Agency inspection, our Graduate School, which supports the needs of research students, was especially praised. For full details of the University’s support services, see pages 37–39.

Significant proportions of Roehampton students are mature or from an ethnic minority —The Guardian

and grasslands, and hundreds of free-roaming deer.

Excellent facilities Our state-of-the-art campus facilities are central to your success as a postgraduate student. We have a well-resourced Library and a range of facilities for specific subjects, such as dance studios, a drama theatre, sport and bioscience laboratories, a multimedia newsroom and an innovative outdoor learning space for trainee teachers. We have recently refurbished all our teaching rooms and we are progressing an ambitious programme of estate development.

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Enhanced career prospects In the current difficult economic climate, postgraduate study is an excellent option for those wishing to enhance their career prospects, or even change the direction of their career. Whether you are progressing to postgraduate study directly after gaining your undergraduate degree, or you are returning to study after a period of work, our courses will equip you with the skills you need to succeed in a highly competitive job market. Research conducted by the British Council indicates that for overseas students a UK qualification has a direct impact upon their future employability with recognition of the value of language fluency, cross-cultural sensitivity and independent thinking with which studying in the UK equips a student. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Stunning London campus

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Academic life

Research Centres Alongside other enthusiastic and diverse postgraduate students you will study under the guidance of excellent, and in some cases world-renowned, academic staff. At Roehampton we are committed to high-quality teaching and to ensuring that our curriculum is relevant to today’s issues. All of our research staff teach, so you benefit from the latest thinking in your discipline. In addition, we regularly host highly respected guest lecturers from around the world, giving you access to international experts in your field.

Our teaching staff publish regularly in academic journals, and are also actively engaged in the issues of the day, featuring regularly in the media, and helping to shape policy as advisers to government, NGOs and industry.

Applied Music Research Centre Centre for Applied Research and Assessment in Child and Adolescent Wellbeing Centre for Dance Research Centre for Educational Research in Equalities, Policy and Pedagogy

High-quality research Roehampton has a rapidly developing research culture and many of its professors are internationally renowned for their work and have an impressive track record of publication. Research is carried out within the University’s academic Departments and we only recruit students to active Research Centres, ensuring that research students receive the support and stimulation of a team of colleagues, both staff and students, working in similar fields. The University’s impressive reputation for research attracts students from all over the world.

Centre for Hearth Tax Research Centre for Language Assessment Research Centre for Organizational Research Centre for Research in Beliefs, Rights and Values in Education Centre for Research in Cognition, Emotion and Interaction Centre for Research in Ecology Centre for Research in English Language and Linguistics Centre for Research in Evolutionary Anthropology Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures Centre for Research in History and Theory Centre for Research in Modern Literature and Culture Centre for Research in Renaissance Studies

Academic life

Centre for Research in Romanticism Centre for Research in Sex, Gender and Sexuality

The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) rates the research output of universities across the UK, and the most recent results in 2008 cemented Roehampton’s position as one of the leading new universities for research. The University was rated number one for its research in Dance, which had the fifth highest concentration of world-class activity of any department in the country in any subject. We also achieved first place in the UK in Biological Anthropology.

Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies Centre for the Study of Voluntary and Community Activity Clinical and Health Psychology Research Centre Digby Stuart Research Centre for Catholic Studies Early Childhood Research Centre Health Sciences Research Centre Hispanic Research Centre

Roehampton’s other impressive scores in the RAE included achieving top position among London’s new universities in Drama, History, Theology, Spanish and Anthropology; second in Education, English, Sociology, Psychology and Sport; and fifth in Communication, Culture and Media Studies. There were also strong performances at a national level in Education; Communication, Culture and Media Studies; Theology; and Sociology. The RAE classed over a third of submitted research at Roehampton as internationally excellent or world class (3* or 4* – the highest classifications available). When 2* ranking is included, 78% of research submitted is regarded as being of an internationally recognised standard.

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National Centre for Research in Children's Literature Research Centre for Performance and Creative Exchange Research Centre for Therapeutic Education ReWrite – Centre for Research in Creative and Professional Writing Roehampton Social Research Centre Sport and Exercise Science Research Centre

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Academic life

Research publications The cutting-edge research undertaken at Roehampton not only furthers knowledge in the respective subject areas, it also feeds directly into the teaching on postgraduate programmes. Numerous research projects are currently under way at the University and recent examples of publications by staff include: Childhood, Well-being and a Therapeutic Ethos Edited by Dr Richard House, Senior Lecturer in Psychotherapy, and Del Loewenthal, Professor of Psychotherapy and Counselling, with a foreword by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams This book addresses the current debate on the issue of "toxic childhood" and questions policy and practice and its impact on the welfare of children. It calls for an approach to policy making that is informed by therapeutic values, if we as a society are to enhance children's well-being. The book was launched at a conference hosted by Roehampton’s Research Centre for Therapeutic Education in association with the Universities Psychotherapy and Counselling Association on the subject of "Cutting Edge or Cliché: The Relational in Psychotherapy and Counselling". Falling in Love Again: Romantic Comedy in Contemporary Cinema Edited by Dr Stacey Abbott, Reader in Film Studies, and Dr Deborah Jermyn, Reader in Film and Television This edited international collection of work examines the continuing appeal of a genre that has thrived since the classic screwballs of the 1930s, through Woody Allen's "nervous comedies" of the 1970s, to recent rom-coms such as Maid in Manhattan and Lost in Translation. The book explores the films and issues that illustrate the broad diversity of the genre, from the queer pleasures of Miss Congeniality and the rom-com personae of J-Lo and Bill Murray, to high school prom-coms and indie romantic comedies. It also explores the often controversial new male-centred romances and the healing power of romantic love in Bollywood films. Ian McEwan Edited by Sebastian Groes, Lecturer in English Literature This guide brings together a collection of fresh perspectives on Ian McEwan – one of the most significant, and controversial, British novelists working in the contemporary period. Although primarily a novelist, McEwan has also written short stories, television plays, a libretto, a children's book and a film adaptation. 16

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Across these many forms his work retains a distinctive character that explores questions of morality, place and history, nationhood, and sexuality and gender.

and complicated. The book's ultimate aim is to encourage readers to come to Movement writing with fresh eyes and to gain a fairer sense of its range and power.

Introduction to Religion and Literature

Treatments for Adolescent Depression: Theory and Practice

Mark Knight, Reader in English Literature

Edited by Cecilia Essau, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology

This book offers a lucid, accessible and thoughtful introduction to the study of religion and literature. While the focus is on Christian theology and post-1800 British literature, substantial reference is made to earlier writers, texts from North America and mainland Europe, and other faith positions. Each chapter takes up a major theological idea and explores it through close readings of wellknown and influential literary texts. One Dimensional Woman Nina Power, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy

In response to the growing number of young people affected by depression, this book explores the underlying theory and practical advice in the treatment of depression, while also highlighting its strong association with adolescent suicide. Depression affects one in five adolescents around the globe and is the most common mental health problem for this age group. The book was launched at the Fourth International Conference of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology, which was held at Roehampton University.

In its examination of contemporary feminism, this book is partly an attack on the apparent abdication of any systematic political thought on the part of today's positive, up-beat feminists. It suggests alternative ways of thinking about transformations in work, sexuality and culture that, while seemingly far-fetched in the current ideological climate, may provide more serious material for future feminism.

Professorial Fellows Professor J Allan Hobson of Harvard Medical School was among those to discover and define rapid eye movements (REM) and the REM-sleep generators in the brain stem. On this basis he provided a brain-based explanation of the nature of dreams. Professor Hobson delivers a regular lecture series on campus.

Teaching Primary Geography Tessa Willy, Senior Lecturer in Geography, and Simon Catling, Oxford Brookes University This book offers practical guidance and advice on planning, teaching and assessment, and also helps to increase readers’ subject knowledge and awareness of issues in primary geography. Linked to the Qualified Teacher Status Standards and other key government initiatives, the guidance offered is suitable for early years and primary education. The book includes chapters on "Exploring sustainability: environmental impact, sustainability and citizenship" and "Exploring global dimensions and non-UK localities". The Movement Reconsidered Edited by Zachary Leader, Professor of English Literature The Movement, which included writers such as Philip Larkin and Kingsley Amis, was the preeminent poetical grouping of post-war Britain. Professor Leader’s edited collection of original essays by distinguished poets, critics, and scholars from Britain and America, sets out to show not only that relations between Movement and other post-war British writers were more complex and nuanced than is usually suggested, but that the role these relations played in shaping the current literary scene is important

Dame Jacqueline Wilson is an award-winning children’s author whose books have sold 20 million copies in the UK and have been translated into 34 languages. She is involved in teaching on some of the Children’s Literature modules.

Guest lectures provide a real-world insight into the theory, which makes the information easier to understand and process.

— Bas Michielsen, MSc Information Systems student from the Netherlands www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Academic life

News from the academic Departments Roehampton University Business School An exciting new management education programme was launched to train leaders and managers to operate across south and east Asia, as well as the west, and promote business links between the areas. Backed by industry leader Colin Glass and delivered in partnership with SpringBoard4Asia Ltd, the Future Global Leaders programme combines study on a two-year MBA at Roehampton with a management internship at a leading company.

Top academic staff The excellence of our academics has been recognised by the Higher Education Academy’s National Teaching Fellowship Scheme. We now have one of the highest concentrations of National Teaching Fellows of any university in the UK. Many of our teaching staff have international reputations for their research and are working at the cutting edge of their subjects. Zachary Leader, Professor of English Literature – published a highly acclaimed biography of the novelist and poet Kingsley Amis, and received a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, which he will use to fund his biography of the writer Saul Bellow. Dr Aisha Gill, Senior Lecturer in Criminology – an expert on violence against women in black and minority communities who frequently features in the media commenting on “honour” killings. She was the only UK expert to be called upon to attend the UN’s expert-group meeting on good practices in legal reform. Cecilia Essau, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology – led analysis of the most cited project in child and adolescent psychopathology to date: the Oregon adolescent depression project. 18

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Department of Dance Stephanie Jordan, Professor of Dance Research, won a prestigious research fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust, one of the largest providers of subject research funding in the UK. Professor Jordan will produce the first detailed study of the music of American choreographer, Mark Morris. The book will raise fundamental questions about the interaction between seeing and hearing and, drawing from cognitive science, explore how our brains process and synthesise information from dance and music. Professor Jordan is celebrating continued success having received the 2010 Award for Outstanding Scholarly Research in Dance from the Congress on Research in Dance. Department of Drama, Theatre and Performance Following an excellent RAE result in the area of performance arts, Roehampton gained significant funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council for a new three-year project. Performance Matters will be co-directed by Adrian Heathfield, Professor of Drama, Theatre and Performance, in collaboration with Goldsmiths, University of London, and the Live Art Development Agency. It will lead to a series of commissioned dialogue works between renowned academics and artists, two public international symposia in leading arts venues, two new PhD studentships, and an exciting series of practice-based workshops involving earlycareer artists and leading academic and artistic figures. Department of Education The Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, one of the largest independent grant-making foundations in the UK, awarded funding to two researchers in Roehampton’s Department of Education. Fiona Collins, MA English Education Programme Convener, was part of a team that secured £78,000 from the Foundation to carry out a national project to encourage

primary pupils to become lifelong readers. Meanwhile, Adam Ockelford , Professor of Music, received over £73,000 from the Foundation to fund the third and final phase of “The Sounds of Intent Project”, an initiative that will see the development of the UK’s first interactive software package for teaching music to children with severe or profound learning disabilities in schools. Department of English and Creative Writing The University hosted a three-day international conference called "Literary Journalism: Perspectives and Prospects" in May 2010. The conference was held by the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies, and hosted by ReWrite, the University’s Centre for Research in Creative and Professional Writing. The agenda embraced a wide range of disciplines and topics, ranging from podcast narratives to the role of narrative journalism in the "national conversation" of South Africa. It also included a session with the BBC's World Affairs Editor, John Simpson – also Roehampton University's Chancellor – in which he discussed his work as a writer. Department of Humanities Roehampton University and the German Historical Institute (GHI), London, staged a high-profile conference in April 2010 at the GHI, entitled “From Space to Place: The Spatial Dimension in the History of Western Europe”. The conference explored the recent “spatial turn” in historical research and writing, which challenges the idea of space and place as unreflected categories, and proposes instead that they are socially and culturally constructed, mediated and contested. Scholars from the UK, Germany and the Netherlands discussed issues such as domestic spaces; work places; public spaces; and space, gender and class. Department of Life Sciences A recent study, carried out by Roehampton’s Dr Julia Lehmann in collaboration with researchers from Oxford and Bournemouth universities, suggested that certain species of leaf-eating African primate will become increasingly at risk of extinction because of global warming. The researchers warned that monkey populations in Africa, such as the already endangered gorillas and colobine monkeys, will be hardest hit even by a very modest two degrees Celsius increase in global mean temperature. In contrast, monkeys in South America will be virtually unaffected by the same rise in temperature.

Developers Conference in San Francisco, consolidating his position as one of the world’s first academic experts in the field of video game translation and localisation. In order to successfully localise games, Bernal-Merino argued at the conference that in addition to language, culture, stylistics, graphics, and music, even technical and legal factors must also be considered if the look and feel of the game are to be kept, so that players around the world can enjoy it. Adequately localised games are essential for publishers and developers, who can see their revenue doubled and even trebled. Department of Psychology As a centre for research excellence in therapeutic education, Roehampton launched the EU's first funded international project on phototherapy. The method can be used in traditional therapy situations by using the individual's photographs from the past or by involving the individual and the therapist in taking photographs as part of the session. The project is being led in the UK by Del Loewenthal, Professor in Psychotherapy and Counselling, and aims to use phototherapy to promote wellbeing and social inclusion among disadvantaged groups. Department of Social Sciences Dr Aisha Gill, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, acted as an expert adviser at the controversial murder trial of Tulay Goren. The 15-year-old girl was murdered for "shaming" her family by having a relationship with a man from a different Kurdish faith group. Dr Gill is an expert in so-called “honour killings” and has advised the UK government and the United Nations on issues relating to violence against women.

An exciting new management education programme was launched to train leaders and managers to operate across south and east Asia, as well as the west, and promote business links between the areas.

Department of Media, Culture and Language Miguel Á Bernal-Merino, Lecturer in Media Translation, recently acted as adviser to the international Game www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Research degrees

Graduate School

Academic life

Research degrees Roehampton University offers a number of research degrees and a number of different routes to gaining a Doctoral level qualification. The MPhil/PhD programme is for students who wish to devise an independent research project, which will result in an original contribution to knowledge in the subject area. The professional doctorate may be considered a professionally oriented equivalent to the MPhil/PhD; although there is a substantial research component, much emphasis is placed on the skills and training needed for professional practice in the field. For further information on Professional Doctorate courses, please see pages 70, 114, 118 and 119. Every research student is assigned to at least one specialist Research Centre or Cluster based within an academic Department. This model ensures that Roehampton’s students receive the support and stimulation of a team of research-active colleagues, both staff and students, engaged in similar areas of investigation. In addition, every research student benefits from a dedicated team of supervisors whose joint wealth of expertise provides individually tailored support for our students’ research projects. Students who undertake a postgraduate research degree at Roehampton usually register for a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in the first instance and later transfer to a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). As an MPhil/PhD student, you will devise your own project which will result in an original contribution to knowledge in your subject area. Your Director of Studies and CoSupervisor(s) will guide you in the development of your research proposal and help steer your programme according to your needs. The University offers a comprehensive programme of research methods training and research students may take research methods training courses from any of the academic Departments. Students in the Department of Social Sciences and the Department of Education benefit by taking modules from a specially designed Social Research Methods programme. The University also provides a range of professional and personal development programmes to equip all of our graduates for a successful future. All research students are encouraged to take the Postgraduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education free of charge. The University is also excited to announce the new Introduction to Supporting Learning and Teaching course, which is offered to research students with teaching/demonstrating responsibilities. This programme is jointly accredited by the Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA) in conjunction with Roehampton University. Those who complete the programme successfully will be able to apply for professional recognition from the Higher Education Academy. Other opportunities for personal and professional development include software support courses, academic writing support and a well-equipped student careers service. 22

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The University offers a comprehensive programme of research methods training and research students may take research methods training courses from any of the academic Departments.

MPhil/PhD subject area list Roehampton University is able to support research degrees across an impressive breadth of subject areas. The University also welcomes interdisciplinary research. A list of subject areas is given below but this is by no means exhaustive. For a more detailed breakdown of individual areas of expertise, please visit www.roehampton.ac.uk/graduateschool

The Graduate School is the centre of the research student community at Roehampton. It provides support for research students in many ways but particularly through its Personal Development Programme and Research Methods Training Programme. The Graduate School provides an opportunity for research students from different disciplines and backgrounds to meet, share ideas and socialise. Members of the Graduate School also benefit from:

Art History Arts and Play Therapies Business and Social Sciences Children’s Literature Classics Cultural Studies Dance Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Ecology Education English Language and Linguistics English Literature Evolutionary Anthropology Film and Television Studies Health Sciences History Journalism Language Testing and Assessment Life Sciences Modern Languages (French, Spanish and/or Translation) Neurobiology Nutrition Philosophy Psychological Therapies Psychology Social Anthropology Social Policy and Administration Sociology Sports-related Studies Theology and Religious Studies

- an online portal where research students can communicate with one another through profiles, forums, blogs, noticeboards and shared documents

The following doctoral programmes are also available: • • • •

Doctorate in Education (EdD) (see page 70) Doctorate in Counselling Psychology (PsychD) (see page 114) Doctorate in Forensic Psychology (PsychD) (see page 118) Doctorate in Psychotherapy and Counselling (PsychD) (see page 119).

- regular email bulletins advertising research events, seminars and funding opportunities - the maintenance of a library of past theses both for information and as a research resource. In addition to the dedicated facilities of the Graduate School, the University offers the well-resourced Library (see page 38), which spans four floors and includes quiet study rooms, a stateof-the-art IT and media services centre and a new cybercafe. For information about the applications and admissions process, please visit the Graduate School website: www.roehampton. ac.uk/graduateschool If you have any queries about studying for a research degree at Roehampton University, please email research@roehampton.ac.uk

I’m a fairly ambitious person and I dream of being a neurologist. I was drawn to this neuroscience course because of the opportunity to work with such impressive international experts and researchers.

— Masud Anwar, MSc Clinical Neuroscience student www.roehampton.ac.uk

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International

An international university

Home away from home Roehampton University is home to over 1,100 international students from countries as varied as Ecuador, Japan, Norway, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and the US. The University’s diverse population enriches the learning and social experience for all students, whether they are from the UK or overseas. Most international students at Roehampton live on campus in halls, which enables them to make friends with fellow hall residents and enjoy living close to their classes.

Specialist staff Our International Team plays an active role in helping students with their aspirations to study abroad. Staff coordinate a network of international representatives and travel to education fairs around the world to meet students considering study in the UK. This ensures that the transition from living overseas to studying at Roehampton is made as easy as possible.

Over 1,100 international students from 130 countries — a vibrant and diverse university community Most masters programmes at Roehampton can be completed in one calendar year. This allows you to gain an internationally recognised qualification, improve your fluency in English as well as your career prospects in an affordable and time-efficient way. The University’s location in London provides a wealth of opportunities for you to undertake research vital to the successful completion of your dissertation.

Our English Language Unit offers programmes to prepare international students to study for a degree and also English support throughout their studies. For more information, see page 30 or visit the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/ englishlanguageunit

Post-study work A “staying on” scheme enables international students who have acquired a degree in any subject from a recognised UK higher education institution to apply to stay on to work in the UK for up to two years. This is an ideal way for international students to gain both academic and work experience before returning home and thus greatly enhance their career prospects. To find out more, contact the International Team: Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3192 Email: international@roehampton.ac.uk International website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/international n

Find out when Roehampton staff will be in your country, and if your qualifications meet our entry requirements.

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Watch videos of our international students talking about Roehampton.

Roehampton University works closely with the British Council. 24

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International

Reasons to study in the UK

Reasons to study in London

Ranked among the best in the world, higher education institutions in the UK attract thousands of international students from all corners of the globe. Postgraduate degree courses in the UK are shorter and more intensive than in most other countries and teaching is underpinned by a strong research ethos.

Roehampton University is just half an hour from central London; this advantageous location allows students to engage with the city’s major organisations, from multinational businesses to cultural bodies, and benefit from the links that Roehampton staff have established with them.

The outstanding reputation of the education system in the UK greatly enhances graduates’ future employment prospects as well as their intellectual and personal development. For more information about working in the UK during and after your studies, see page 25.

With more than 350,000 students from more than 200 countries, London offers an energetic and vibrant learning environment. As one of the world’s greatest knowledge capitals, London offers students a wealth of internationally renowned facilities such as libraries and museums.

In the recent i-Graduate survey of international students around the world, Roehampton was ranked first among 16

The city is also an international cultural centre for film, music, sport, nightlife, theatre, fashion and art. London’s many districts, each with their own distinctive character, provide opportunities for an extraordinary range of social and cultural experiences. Covent Garden, South Bank, Soho and Westminster are all within easy reach of the University. Even closer to the campus, students will find a wide variety of places of interest, shopping areas, bars and restaurants, many ideally suited for those looking for cheaper prices.

London universities that took part in the survey in the following areas:

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Gateway to the UK and Europe

University hosts Fulbright summer school

London’s many airports, and coach and train stations provide inexpensive and easy access to the rest of the UK and Europe. The historic university cities of Oxford and Cambridge and the vibrant seaside resort of Brighton are an hour away by train. Many international students take the opportunity to explore Europe during their summer holidays. For many this will be a “once-in-a-lifetime” opportunity before pursuing their chosen career. The cities of Barcelona, Amsterdam, Paris and Rome are all within a few hours of London by plane. Travel agents offer competitive prices to students, allowing even those on a tight budget to travel across Europe.

Roehampton recently ran the first US–UK Fulbright Commission Summer Institute Programme to happen outside of the US. Admission to the prestigious programme was the most competitive for a new programme in the 62-year history of the Fulbright Commission. The eight participating students, who were drawn from all over the US, experienced an exciting academic programme on campus at Roehampton. Drawing on the University’s academic strengths, the group investigated the concepts of citizenship and identity and developed skills including presentation, communication and teamwork by producing a short film on what citizenship means in today’s Britain.

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International

When I arrived in London, transportation from the airport to the school was already arranged and that was a big relief for me. The facilities on campus

Having worked in engineering-based areas for Turkish and international companies, I wanted to broaden my vision to take on a global

While working on my MA in Children’s Literature at Roehampton, I had the chance to learn from brilliant and accomplished instructors …

are good with spacious living arrangements

perspective… The Roehampton MBA attracts a

Of course, London also offered constant

and there are several activities that international

mixture of British and international students and

opportunities for educational development and

students can get involved in to meet other people.

my experience on the programme helped me to

an exciting social life. I am now a member of the

I feel at home here even though I am thousands of

gain a better understanding of other cultures.

English Language and Literature faculty at Clayton

miles from the US.

I also learnt more about myself and made an

State University in Atlanta, Georgia. Each day I

extraordinary network of friends and contacts.

try to give my students the same thoughtful and

I’m currently working for a Japanese corporation

encouraging educational experience I received at

in London, Itochu Europe Plc, where I have the

Roehampton.

— Adrian Thomas from the US

chance to put into practice many of the skills I

acquired on the Roehampton MBA.

— Elizabeth Hayes Doane, former MA Children’s Literature student

— Metin Denizsever, former MBA student from Turkey

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International

University preparation programmes

The Roehampton University Preparation Programmes are designed to prepare students for higher education studies at the University by developing their academic English and study skills.

The Roehampton University Preparation Programmes are designed to prepare students for higher education studies at the University by developing their academic English and study skills. On the Pre-masters programme you will also have the opportunity to develop your subject knowledge before starting your postgraduate degree. Students have the same access to the University’s facilities and resources as degree students and are taught by experienced academic staff who are specialists in their subject area. University pre-sessional programmes The University offers pre-sessional English programmes for students about to begin their studies at Roehampton. The programmes are open to all students whose first language is not English. You gain the confidence and skills necessary to progress on to your chosen postgraduate programme. The pre-sessional programmes also provide a route of entry for students holding a conditional offer to study at Roehampton but whose English language skills are below the level required in the conditional offer. Various start dates are available: short intensive programmes are held at the end of the summer for students with advanced English skills, while longer summer programmes are suitable for students with a slightly lower level of English. For more information and entry levels visit the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/englishlanguageunit

Pre-masters Certificate The one-year Pre-masters Certificate is for students who want to develop both their academic English skills and their subject knowledge before beginning a postgraduate degree. They will choose modules from one of the following pathways, taking classes with British students on degree programmes: • Business • Children’s Literature • Arts and Humanities • Childhood and Education

• Open pathway (this pathway is tailored to suit students who aim to take any other postgraduate degree).

International Foundation Certificate The one-year International Foundation Certificate is suitable for students who need more time to develop their level of English than is available on the pre-sessional programme. For more information and entry levels, visit the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/admissions/englishlanguageunit

• Media and Film www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Student support

A historic tradition The University has its roots in the traditions of its four constituent Colleges – Digby Stuart, Froebel, Southlands and Whitelands. All four Colleges were formed in the 19th century to address the needs of poor and disadvantaged children and to provide education of the highest quality. They were all pioneers in their fields and have had a profound impact on the education of generations of children in this country and abroad. In 1975 the four historic Colleges joined to form the Roehampton Institute of Higher Education and added a wide variety of degree programmes in the arts, social sciences and sciences. The Institute became a constituent college of the University of Surrey in 1984 and soon gained university powers for taught and research courses before the two institutions became federated partners in 2000. Roehampton University was awarded its independent university title in 2004. Students at Roehampton benefit enormously from belonging to one of its four Colleges. Studying at a collegiate university gives students a sense of community; you are not only part of the University, but will also have an instant identity within the smaller world of the College. The four Colleges serve as the focal points for the University’s vibrant social scene. On-campus accommodation is centred on the Colleges and there are healthy intercollegiate rivalries in sport and other traditional celebrations.

Colleges Digby Stuart College Digby Stuart was established in 1874 as a teacher training college for Roman Catholic women. The College owes its existence to the vision of the Society of the Sacred Heart, whose members continue to support the College and the University.

Froebel College Founded in 1892, the College was established to further the values of Friedrich Froebel, the German educationalist who pioneered a holistic view of child development. It is one of the UK’s major centres for initial teacher training.

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Southlands College Founded in 1872, the College offers an open, valuing, challenging and learning community for all of its members. The College ethos derives from and is sustained by its Methodist foundation. It offers a range of events and activities to help build and support the community.

Whitelands College Founded in 1841, the College is one of the five oldest higher education institutions in England. The flagship women’s college for the Church of England, it was the first college of higher education in the UK to admit women. It occupies a 14-acre site overlooking Richmond Park.

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A historic tradition

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Student services and advice

Student support

We offer a range of services and advice to help you make the most of your time at Roehampton. If your university experience presents any challenges, we have a strong support network in place to help you.

Catering Whether you want a quick snack or a hearty meal, the University has a range of catering facilities to suit all tastes. There are 12 cafes, restaurants, and bars (some with late opening hours at the weekends) spread across all four Colleges. There are also 24-hour vending areas and a shop that stocks an array of everyday groceries.

Chaplaincy The three Colleges with church foundations each have their own chapels and chaplains who work to build a sense of community. The University also has two mosques, a Muslim Faith Adviser, a Hindu Faith Adviser and a Rabbi.

Medical Centre It is recommended that all new students living in halls register with the on-campus Medical Centre. The Centre is a branch surgery of a Putney-based practice and offers appointments both during and out of University hours. The medical staff are trained to deal with a wide range of physical and mental concerns.

On-campus accommodation Accommodation is reserved for postgraduate and mature students in Whitelands College and Froebel College. All rooms are grouped in self-contained flats with shared kitchens and offer internet access via data cabling or wireless network. For information about on-campus accommodation either see the website www.roehampton. ac.uk/accommodation or contact the Enquiries Office: Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3232 Email: enquiries@roehampton.ac.uk

Living off campus Many postgraduate students choose to live off campus in one of the vibrant local communities of Roehampton, Putney, Sheen or Barnes. Roehampton’s Accommodation Office helps students to find off-campus accommodation and has an online list of local available properties on its StudentPad website: www.studentpad.co.uk/ roehampton/accommodation-search.asp Roehampton Accommodation Office Tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3166 Email: offcampusaccomm@roehampton.ac.uk

Counselling

Website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/accommodation

The University offers a range of counselling services to support students throughout their time at Roehampton.

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Student support

University Library The University Library is the key resource for study at Roehampton. It is open seven days a week in term time, and the PC suites are normally open 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Our helpful staff include a team of Academic Liaison Librarians dedicated to supporting your specific subject needs. Through our catalogue and website you can access:

Student services and advice Disability Services The Disability Services team offers students with dyslexia, disabilities and long-term medical conditions specialised services that are private and confidential. Most sessions are arranged on a one-to-one basis and are either run via a drop-in service or bookable appointments.

n over

350,000 books, DVDs and CDs

n over

11,000 electronic journals

n a

wide range of bibliographic and citation databases

n a

growing collection of over 36,000 e-books.

All our e-resources are available to Roehampton students over the internet. In addition, London has more libraries than any other city in the world and they are all within easy reach of Roehampton.

Disability Services may be able to provide students with the following support: alternative examination arrangements, support in the Library, liaison with academic School/College, dyslexia assessments, assistance to apply for the Disabled Students’ Allowance, and access to dyslexia tutors and other support workers. This is not an exhaustive list of services; for further information, please call reception on +44 (0)20 8392 3043.

The University Library building also houses: n bookable n group

study spaces

n the

eLearning Team, which supports our virtual learning environment StudyZone

n IT

and Media Services, who support computer use and multimedia work

Portable hearing loop systems are available for installation in individual teaching rooms.

n laptop

loan service

n archive

collection, containing resources for specialist research in dance, early childhood education and children’s literature.

Employability The University has an excellent record of preparing students for employment in a wide range of interesting careers. The Employment and Careers Service offers comprehensive advice about career options, skill enhancement, employability and volunteering. Students also have full access to these services for up to three years after they have finished their studies at Roehampton.

individual study spaces

The facilities at Roehampton were very good. The Library had everything I needed; also the service provided by the

IT facilities Students have access to PC suites 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can also access the internet from your own laptop in the designated wireless zones on campus. Free software training is available for those needing help.

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Postgraduate Office was excellent.

— Amanda Hallot, MSc Clinical Nutrition student from Alfreton, Derbyshire

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Student support

Finance A career investment Postgraduate study is becoming more and more attractive in a recruitment market saturated with first degree holders. There are currently more than 530,000 postgraduates studying at UK institutions.

Fees at Roehampton University Fees for each course are set out on the course pages on the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses/finance/ bands.html You can either pay the full amount on registration, for which you receive a 2% discount, or in two instalments: the first upon registration with a credit/debit card and the second by direct debit in January. If you pay your fees in instalments, you will not be charged interest.

Funding options

Scholarships

Most postgraduate taught students at Roehampton are selffunded. Finance can be a significant factor when choosing to embark on postgraduate study and there are several ways that you can fund your studies.

Roehampton offers a generous package of scholarships specifically designed for international students. Full details of awards and entry criteria are available on the University’s international webpages at www.roehampton.ac.uk/international

Teachers with Qualified Teacher Status and who are resident in England are eligible to apply to Roehampton University Department of Education for a subsidy to significantly reduce the cost of undertaking professionally relevant masters-level study. Find out more at www.roehampton.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses/education

Other sources of funding A range of foundations, charities and trusts also award partial funding for postgraduate study, from the world’s largest medical charity the Wellcome Trust, which awards hundreds of studentships each year, to the British Federation of Women Graduates, which offers a small number of cost-of-living bursaries for female postgraduates in the second year of their research degree. Grants and scholarships are also awarded by companies, trade unions, arts organisations and even wealthy individuals in their wills.

Useful funding websites Prospects, the UK’s official graduate careers website: www.prospects.ac.uk Educational Grants Advisory Service: www.family-action.org.uk/section.aspx?id=1037 Student Money: www.studentmoney.org Association of Charitable Foundations: www.acf.org.uk

Support with financial management Roehampton, in association with the Financial Standards Authority, has pioneered the Money Doctors scheme to help students to manage their finances. For more information call +44 (0)20 8392 3199.

Deposits International applicants are required to pay a deposit to secure a place.

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Charity Commission for England and Wales: www.charity-commission.gov.uk British Council funding your studies website for overseas students: www.britishcouncil.org/learning-funding-your-studies.htm

The University has a long-standing relationship with the Society of the Sacred Heart – the Roman Catholic organisation that established Digby Stuart as a women’s teacher training college in 1874. The Society recently made a generous donation of £650,000 to the University for student scholarships. The University intends to use the gift primarily to fund competitive scholarships for postgraduate students who have been educated in a school, college or university with a Roman Catholic foundation, based on academic performance and financial need. For more information visit www.roehampton.ac.uk/postgraduatecourses/finance

Professional and Career Development Loans Professional and Career Development Loans are bank loans that can be used to help pay for work-related learning. You can borrow between £300 and £10,000 to help support the cost of up to two years of learning (or three years if it includes one year’s relevant unpaid practical work). The Young People’s Learning Agency will pay the interest on the loan while you are learning and for one month afterwards. The loan can be used to pay course fees or other costs such as travel and living expenses. You can also use the loan to supplement other forms of support such as grants or bursaries. Because the Professional and Career Development Loan is a commercial loan product, it should only be considered as an option once all other student funding options have been investigated. For further information on financial assistance to support your learning, please visit www.direct.gov.uk/adultlearning or contact Careers Advice on 0800 100 900.

Employers Some students receive full or partial funding from their employer throughout their studies. Employers value postgraduate study as it can bring additional skills and knowledge to their organisation.

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More than study

The foundation of university life is the academic experience, but there’s more than study on offer at Roehampton. You’ll be living in London, one of the world’s most exciting and cosmopolitan cities, and the areas close to Roehampton provide a wide range of social and cultural experiences. In addition, our campus has a thriving social scene, with many societies to join and sports to take part in.

Explore central London Roehampton is only 30 minutes away from the centre of London, where you will find the best in: Architecture – from old (Houses of Parliament, St Paul’s Cathedral) to new (the “Gherkin”, Canary Wharf) Art – National Gallery, Tate Modern, Royal Academy of Arts

Explore the local area Barnes – This beautiful area next to Roehampton has a peaceful village atmosphere with a green, duck pond and traditional pubs, as well as a farmers’ market, boutique shops and cafes. Its overground rail station provides a link to Waterloo station in central London. Hammersmith – In addition to a huge range of shops, there is excellent nightlife in the many pubs, bars and clubs, and the London Apollo, where top international bands and comedians perform. The Riverside Studios contemporary arts centre incorporates a gallery and a cinema. Kingston – In the area surrounding the historic market place of this Royal Borough there are many shops as well as pubs, clubs and a cinema. You will also find bars, restaurants and cafes along the riverside. Putney – This classy riverside district features a cinema, an arts theatre and a high street packed with shops, cafes and restaurants. The annual Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race begins at Putney Bridge. Richmond – With plenty of shops, traditional pubs and a green, Richmond has the feel of an upmarket town. It offers one of the most picturesque views of the river Thames and is a great place to enjoy a long summer evening. Richmond Park – This is the largest of London’s Royal Parks and is only a 10-minute walk from the campus. It features 2,500 acres of woodlands, ponds, gardens and grasslands, and around 650 free-roaming deer. Shepherds Bush – You can shop at Westfield (the largest in-town shopping mall in Europe), watch your favourite TV show being recorded at BBC TV Centre or catch a gig at the Shepherds Bush Empire. Wimbledon – Home of the international tennis tournament, Wimbledon has a village-style centre with restaurants and fashion boutiques.

Fashion – from Bond Street boutiques to Camden Market stalls Film – Leicester Square cinemas, National Film Theatre, international film festivals

Hammersmith Westminster

Museums – British Museum, Natural History Museum, Science Museum, V&A Museum

The London Eye Fulham

Music – 0² Arena, Wembley Stadium, Brixton Academy Nightclubs – Fabric, Ministry of Sound, Koko Shopping – Oxford Street, numerous markets such as Spitalfields and Borough Food Market

Canary Wharf Tower Bridge

Richmond

Greenwich

Putney

Twickenham Roehampton

Sport – 2012 Olympics, Football (Wembley, Chelsea FC, Arsenal FC), Rugby (Twickenham), Cricket (Lord’s, the Oval)

Wimbledon

For a more detailed map see page 128. 42

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Kingston

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More than study Activities

Sports

The Roehampton Students’ Union (RSU) organises a huge range of activities, meaning you will never be wondering how to fill your time outside your studies. You can raise money for charities in the annual Raising and Giving (RAG) Week and get involved in events related to Black History Month, LGBT History Month and Go Green Week.

In 2012, the Olympic and Paralympic games come to London; as a Roehampton student you will be well positioned to enjoy all the excitement of the build up to the biggest sporting events in the world.

If you have a specific interest, join one of the many societies: Afro-Caribbean • Alpha • American Football • Anthropology • Beer Appreciation • Big Band • Buddhism • Christian Union • Dance • Deviant • Education • Fair Trade • Film • Human Rights • International • Islamic • Japanese Culture • Jewish Resource Centre • LGBT • Mature Students • Music • Muslim Women • Nutrition • People and Planet • Philosophy • Roehampton Adventurers Guild • Roehampton Entrepreneurs • Roehampton Players • St John Ambulance • Whitelands Choir

The University competes in nationally organised student sports competitions and our coaches and sport scientists work alongside the RSU to ensure that athletes and teams achieve their full potential. We offer support to individual sportsmen and women who wish to represent the University in national championships. We also award a number of students with Scholarships for Sporting Excellence, and we have excellent links with a number of professional sports clubs. There are extensive opportunities for students to gain experience and qualifications as coaches and leaders in sport. The University’s own sports coaching in the community project, “Move”, recruits sports ambassadors at the start of each year. Sports clubs and activities include: aerobics • athletics • badminton • basketball • boccia • cheerleading • cricket • fencing • football • gymnastics • hockey • kickboxing • lacrosse • martial arts • netball • Pilates • rowing • rugby • running • squash • swimming • tae kwon do • table tennis • tennis • triathlon • Ultimate Frisbee • volleyball • yoga • Zumba.

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On-campus sporting facilities include: n

ROEActive – a state-of-the-art fitness centre with rowing and running machines, weights and other cardiovascular fitness equipment

n

Multi-Use Games Area – a flood-lit, all-weather surface suitable for football, netball, tennis and basketball

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grass football pitches

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studio facilities for aerobics, circuit training and martial arts.

Volunteering can help you to gain work experience, test out vocations, develop office skills valued by employers, meet requirements of your programme of study, and fundraise for charities.

Our teams also use excellent nearby facilities, such as the Bank of England Sports Centre, for hockey, rugby and football matches, and the National Tennis Centre for home tennis fixtures.

Volunteering There are many short-, medium- and long-term volunteering opportunities coordinated by the University’s Employment and Careers Service and the RSU, in partnership with Wandsworth Volunteer Centre. Volunteering can help you to gain work experience, test out vocations, develop office skills valued by employers, meet requirements of your programme of study, and fundraise for charities. Opportunities are advertised via the online JobShop system, helping you to volunteer for a wide variety of organisations, including the Citizens Advice Bureau, Fulham FC Community Sports Trust, Samaritans, St John Ambulance and Victim Support.

Welfare services The RSU makes student wellbeing a priority by offering a range of personal support and advice on issues from academic matters and accommodation to sexual health and quitting smoking. RSU officers are elected by students every March. In addition to those dealing with general issues of student welfare, we have specialist officers for women, disabled students, international students, LGBT students, and also officers dealing with issues such as Cultural Diversity and Fair Trade. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Entry requirements

Entry requirements Each postgraduate course has specific entry requirements but students are usually expected to hold a good honours undergraduate degree from a recognised university in the UK, or an approved equivalent qualification from overseas. Non-graduates with appropriate professional qualifications and/or relevant experience will also be considered on an individual basis.

Animal Ecology...................................................................................96

Health Sciences...............................................................................100

Applied Linguistics and TESOL........................................................108

Historical Research............................................................................92

Course-specific entry requirements can be found on the University’s website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses. As the whole application is taken into account, applicants are encouraged to submit an application form in order for their full suitability for the course to be assessed.

Applied Music Education...................................................................71

Human Rights and International Relations.......................................124

Applied Music Psychology...............................................................112

Human Rights and Society...............................................................124

Applied Psychological Research......................................................112

Human Rights Practice (Erasmus Mundus)......................................125

Art, Craft and Design Education.........................................................73

Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy.....................................116

Art Psychotherapy............................................................................113

International Management.................................................................50

Applicants who do not meet the usual entry criteria may be admitted as associate students in the first instance. Progression to registration on the full award will then depend on successful completion of one or two modules, as determined by the Programme Convener.

Attachment Studies..........................................................................113

International Management with Finance............................................51

Audiovisual Translation.....................................................................108

International Management with Information Systems........................51

Ballet Studies.....................................................................................58

International Management with HRM.................................................52

Biomechanics...................................................................................103

International Management with Marketing.........................................52

EU/international students English language requirements Taught postgraduate courses typically seek students with a strong English language level who have achieved (or are expected to achieve prior to the start of the course) IELTS 6.5 with 6.0 or above in each band of the test or a score of 100 in the TOEFL IBT (Internet Based Test). Please note that some courses have higher English language requirements; applicants should check the individual course webpage.

Children's Literature (on-site).............................................................86

Marketing...........................................................................................54

Children's Literature (distance-learning)............................................86

MBA (Business Administration)..........................................................54

Choreography MFA............................................................................58

Media, Culture and Identity..............................................................109

Choreography and Performance........................................................59

Modern Literature and Culture...........................................................88

Clinical Neuroscience.........................................................................96

Music Therapy..................................................................................116

Clinical Nutrition.................................................................................97

Non-profit Management.....................................................................55

Community Dance..............................................................................59

Obesity: Risks and Prevention.........................................................100

Counselling and Psychotherapy.......................................................114

Performance and Creative Research.................................................67

Counselling Psychology...................................................................114

PGCE Primary (full- and part-time).....................................................82

Creative and Professional Writing......................................................87

PGCE Secondary...............................................................................83

Dance Anthropology...........................................................................62

Play Therapy.....................................................................................118

Dance Movement Psychotherapy....................................................115

Primate Biology, Behaviour and Conservation.................................101

Dance Studies....................................................................................62

Psychotherapy and Counselling.......................................................118

Documentary....................................................................................109

Social Research Methods.......................................................... 77/125

Dramatherapy...................................................................................115

South Asian Dance Studies................................................................63

Early Childhood Studies.....................................................................73

Special and Inclusive Education........................................................80

Early Modern Literature and Culture..................................................87

Special and Inclusive Education (Erasmus Mundus).........................81

Education (EdD)..................................................................................70

Sport and Exercise Physiology........................................................103

Education (MA)...................................................................................74

Sport and Exercise Science (MSc)...................................................104

Education, Leadership and Management..........................................76

Sport and Exercise Science (MRes).................................................104

English Education...............................................................................76

Sport Psychology.............................................................................105

Forensic Psychology........................................................................118

Stress and Health.............................................................................105

Health and Community.......................................................................97

Teaching Dance: Science and Art......................................................63

How to apply Postgraduate applications are accepted from October. Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications through UKPASS – an online postgraduate application service run by UCAS. To gain access to UKPASS, visit the relevant course page on the Roehampton website (www. roehampton.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses) and follow the “Apply online” link for the level of qualification you would like to apply for. For further information about the University, making a postgraduate application and advice on entry requirements, please contact Enquiries (tel: +44 (0)20 8392 3232, email: enquiries@roehampton.ac.uk). Students who are unable to apply online should contact Enquiries for a hard copy of the application form.

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Index of courses

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Our advantageous location allows you to engage with London’s worldrenowned business and commerce, not-for-profit and voluntary sectors, and cultural and historical heritage. The strong links we have with employers and industry have led to industry visits, live consultancy projects and guest speakers lecturing on campus. You also benefit from the real-world experience of our staff, who are involved in research and applied consultancy nationally and internationally. The quality of our teaching and student support has been commended by national and government bodies. Our MBA and MSc International Management courses are fully recognised by the Chartered Management Institute. The MBA is also approved as part of the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants Gateway Programme.

www.roehampton.ac.uk/business-school

Roehampton University Business School The Business School offers a range of high-quality courses with a strong focus on globalisation and international business. Roehampton has one of the most diverse student bodies of any university in the UK, and we welcome students from around the world to develop the skills they need to succeed in an increasingly global market. 48

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MSc

MSc/PGDip

MSc/PGDip

MSc/PGDip

International Management courses

International Management

International Management with Finance

International Management with Information Systems

The MSc/PGDip International Management portfolio aims to produce managers and leaders who can do business across time zones, cultures and languages.

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120 Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Course duration:

Course duration:

It offers students a grounding in key areas of business and management practice and allows those with particular interests in marketing, human resource management (HRM), finance or information systems to gain a named award in these areas. You can either follow a general course in International Management or study for one of the following named awards in these specialist areas: • International Management with Finance • International Management with HRM

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information The increasing globalisation of the world economy, the expansion of world trade, the accession of many eastern European countries to the European Union, and the dramatic growth in the development of market-led economies of Brazil, China, India and Russia have created a demand for managers who can operate in global and diverse multicultural contexts. This course aims to produce managers and leaders who can do business in these challenging contexts.

• International Management with Information Systems • International Management with Marketing

Key areas of study:

This suite of named awards shares a common first semester allowing you the flexibility to change your area of specialisation within the first semester.

Core areas of study: • management research methods

Applicants must have a minimum of a second-class honours degree in any discipline, or equivalent. Graduates for whom English is not their first language must satisfy the University’s requirement for IELTS, currently 6.5 overall with no less than 6.0 in each band of the test.

• international management and human resource management

Special features (of all International Management courses) With tutors’ agreement, students can choose global organisations and topics of special interest on which to focus their coursework assignments and research projects.

• cross-cultural management

• international financial management

There is a particular focus on international capital markets and international banking. This pathway develops students for a management career where the raising and managing of capital in mixed financial environments is a fundamental feature that must be factored into any business decision making and is especially critical in the international context.

General course information The modern global economy requires a new breed of managers and leaders equipped with flexible, transferable skills and a global vision. The course aims to produce managers and leaders who have a practical and theoretical understanding of business information systems and are able to apply this in the context of global business. Key areas of study: Core areas of study: • management research methods • international management and human resource management • international economic environment and marketing

• international economic environment and marketing • dissertation (summer period)

Key areas of study:

• dissertation (information systems).

Core areas of study:

Optional areas of study:

• management research methods

• project management

• international financial management

• managing ethics and professional issues

• international management and human resource management

• entrepreneurship.

• managing ethics and professional issues

Optional areas of study: • contemporary issues in human resource management • contemporary issues in marketing • modern technology marketing • retail marketing • entrepreneurship. Special features The course attracts graduates from over 25 countries thus making for an excellent cross-cultural mix in learning and teaching sessions. All students on the course are registered as affiliate members of the Chartered Management Institute. Research areas: Organisational behaviour; business ethics; career development; outsourcing of IT provision; brands and brand management; technology marketing; international capital and financial markets; international banking; social enterprise; accounting.

www.roehampton.ac.uk

General course information Businesses and governments rely on sound financial knowledge to underpin their strategies for economic growth. This course provides the theoretical structure for an understanding of the operations of the finance function of organisations and key elements of corporate financial management.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

The course exposes students to advanced finance concepts, knowledge and skills that are academically rigorous and have practical application in the workplace.

• brand and brands management

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full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

• international economic environment and marketing • international capital markets and banking • dissertation (finance). Optional areas of study: • managing ethics and professional issues • project management. Special features The course is delivered by highly qualified teaching staff with practical experience of financial management and research, and consultancy expertise in credit, banking and financial services.

• information technology management • information systems management

Special features You gain in-depth knowledge via case studies and assessments of the importance of designing and managing information systems within a global organisation. This prepares you for a career in a global business environment. Research areas: Outsourcing of information systems; virtual project management; computer ethics.

Research areas: International capital and financial markets; international banking; social enterprise; accounting, project and risk management. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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MSc/PGDip

MSc/PGDip

International Management with Human Resource Management (HRM)

International Management with Marketing

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Course duration:

Course duration:

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information The business context for managing human resources has changed significantly in recent years due to economic, political, social and technological forces. Competition in global business has led to significant interest and research into which HRM policies and practices lead to enhanced organisational performance. Another area of strategic focus for HRM, within multinational companies in particular, is the ease and speed at which knowledge can be developed and disseminated. This pathway is designed to engage students in a critical dialogue about the strategic importance of HRM in international firms as well as competing perspectives of international HRM, drawing on current research and practice.

General course information This pathway helps students analyse the marketing context in which international brands operate and to evaluate their operational options. Students investigate current research in marketing, the global business context, and apply marketing concepts to non-traditional areas, including non-profit organisations and the public sector. There is a range of options through which students can further enhance their knowledge and expertise of specialist areas of marketing practice.

Key areas of study:

Core areas of study:

Core areas of study:

• management research methods

• management research methods

• international financial management

• international financial management

• international management and human resource management

• international management and human resource management

• international economic environment and marketing

• international economic environment and marketing

• contemporary issues in marketing

• contemporary issues in human resource management

• dissertation (marketing).

• dissertation (HRM).

Optional areas of study:

Optional areas of study:

• modern technology marketing

• managing ethics and professional issues

• retail marketing

• cross-cultural management

• brand and brands management

• project management.

• entrepreneurship

For the dissertation, students choose a research problem with a marketing focus and are supported by a specialist tutor in this area. Key areas of study:

• project management. Special features This course is delivered by research- and consultancy-active staff who are engaged in research and development both nationally and internationally.

Special features This course is seeking recognition from the Chartered Institute of Marketing. It is taught by research- and consultancy-active staff.

Research areas: Organisational behaviour; business ethics; career development; outsourcing of IT provision; gender and employment; knowledge management; cross-cultural management.

Research areas: Brands and brand management; technology marketing; political marketing; retail marketing; marketing in the not-for-profit sector; service quality.

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MSc/PGDip

MBA

MSc/PGDip/PGCert

Marketing

Master in Business Administration

Non-profit Management

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: 180

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

Course duration:

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

General course information This course blends academic and practical study of the field of marketing and its role in contemporary organisations and a global business environment. You will build a systematic understanding of current theories, models, concepts and professional practice in marketing, and also develop the ability to reflect critically upon these areas.

General course information The Roehampton University Business School MBA is designed to prepare those with a minimum of two years’ experience of the workplace for the challenges of senior management in an international environment. Graduates of the course often progress to more fulfilling and better-paid employment. On the MBA, students from around the world explore and debate important issues in contemporary professional management. Study is guided by a committed team of tutors who have both practical experience and expert knowledge. You develop personal managerial knowledge and sophisticated interaction and intercultural skills that are of interest to employers worldwide.

Increasing globalisation of trade and the development of a global consumer economy requires marketing professionals that can engage with the challenges and opportunities that this presents. This course is designed for graduates who wish to develop a specialism in marketing within an international context. Key areas of study: Core areas of study: • management research methods • consultancy practice • international economic environment and marketing • strategic marketing management • contemporary issues in marketing • dissertation. Optional areas of study: • modern technology marketing • retail marketing • brand and brands management • entrepreneurship • project management.

full-time: 1 year

Key areas of study: • A foundation in the key operational and functional areas of business and management (for example, finance and accounts, marketing, human resource management and organisational analysis) together with an appreciation of the contemporary context of business. • A personal development programme that includes activities aimed at enhancing managerial skills and the opportunity to take an optional course to develop specific managerial knowledge in depth; for example, in the fields of marketing, human resource management, information systems or finance. • A strategic and integrative appreciation of management challenges, including an exploration of senior managerial decision making, and the implications of change and innovation. • The application of knowledge to a personally selected management project, reported as a dissertation and supported by a business research methods module.

Special features The course offers you an opportunity to engage in a real marketing consultancy project with an external client. This is a supervised project undertaken with a client and coordinated by the University. There may be opportunities to engage in such a project overseas.

Special features The MBA is recognised by the Chartered Management Institute and the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (Gateway Programme). The course includes strong elements of employer engagement with regular industry visits and guest speakers.

Research areas: Technology marketing; brands and brand management; political marketing, retail marketing, marketing for the not-for-profit sector, service quality.

Research areas: Organisational behaviour; business ethics; career development; outsourcing of IT provision; brands and brand management; technology marketing; international capital and financial markets; international banking; social enterprise; accounting.

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General course information This course prepares you for employment in local, national and international non-profit organisations. It is suitable for recent graduates wanting to develop a career in the sector, for those wishing to change sectors and for those in the sector wishing to develop their understanding and broaden their skills. You are prepared for leadership and managerial roles in non-profit organisations by analysing the complex environment in which these organisations work and making appropriate responses to the distinctive challenges faced by these organisations. Key areas of study: • the nature of civil society and understanding the environment of non-profit organisations • applied organisational theory and behaviour • applied management skills – financial management, marketing and managing volunteers • options from either human rights and global governance or international development • reflective (service) learning and practical experience through a work placement. Special features You go on a work placement organised by the University, for two days a week with a non-profit organisation. Roehampton’s Centre for the Study of Voluntary and Community Activity holds regular seminars that you are encouraged to attend. The University is also home to Crucible, the only recognised centre of excellence in human rights and social justice education in the country. Research areas: Volunteering; voluntary organisation impacts; independence of voluntary action.

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www.roehampton.ac.uk/dance

Department of Dance The Department is long established and internationally renowned with a world-leading research culture and courses at undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral levels. Our research was ranked first in the recent UK Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2008) and our internationally recognised Centre for Dance Research, led by Professor Stephanie Jordan, collaborates regularly with dance companies and professional organisations and hosts a range of research projects, seminars, performances and conferences. Photo courtesy of Simon Ellis

Our large faculty comprises more than 20 academic staff with wide expertise in practical and theoretical areas of dance. We offer an unrivalled range of eight masters programmes, two of which are unique throughout the world (MA Ballet Studies and MA South Asian Dance Studies). In addition, we have a thriving MPhil/PhD programme with students conducting theory- and practice-based research. Our postgraduate student body is diverse, with many students from overseas (including Asia, Europe and America), resulting in a lively and stimulating academic community. Our extensive library, studio facilities and the Michaelis Dance Theatre are well equipped to support your studies, and our proximity to London’s dance organisations and venues makes Roehampton one of the top destinations for postgraduate study in dance. 56

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MA/PGDip

MFA

MRes

MA/PGDip/PGCert

Ballet Studies

Choreography

Choreography and Performance

Community Dance

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: 240

Number of credits: 180

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert 60

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–3 years

Course duration: full-time: 2 years; part-time: 4 years

Course duration:

Course duration:

General course information This course celebrates the richness and breadth of ballet and develops an in-depth understanding of the form within broad cultural and artistic contexts. Through an interdisciplinary and politically informed study of theory and practice, you consider ballet in terms of the urgent debates that are found currently among the other arts.

General course information The MFA course enables students to develop their skills in choreography, performance, teaching, and writing about dance as a practitioner. In addition to experiencing a range of technique classes in Ballet, Contact, Cunningham, Graham, Limon and Release-based techniques, students have access to visiting artists, acquire theatre lighting and production skills, and are provided with rehearsal space and opportunities for work experience.

Since its inception in 1994 the course has been highly successful, appealing to a wide variety of students coming from the profession and a traditional undergraduate background. It is at the forefront of the field of dance studies and has played a radical role in developing scholarly thinking in ballet. Key areas of study: • ballet styles in class and performance and across history • ballet companies as national institutions • ballet and popular culture • racism, sexism, ageism and the ballet world • theorising and embodying ballet. Research methods are integrated into the compulsory core modules and research skills are developed further through the self-directed, individually tutored dissertation. Special features This is the only postgraduate course of its kind currently available in Europe and in the English-speaking world. You benefit from the close links Roehampton staff have with the Royal Ballet and other dance professionals. You also benefit from contact with those on other MA dance cluster courses and those studying for research degrees (MPhil or PhD), and from the excellent material facilities for dance at Roehampton. Research areas: Aesthetics; politics; philosophy as pertaining to dance; dance analysis; dance–music relationships.

Key areas of study: • choreography, performance and improvisation • dance practice as research • dance technique • analysing dance. You prepare and perform original work in each term of your first year of study and produce a sole-authored thesis concert at the end of your final year. Special features This is the only postgraduate course of its kind currently available in Europe. It offers a breadth of study including options that explore reflective practice, dance and technology, and dance education and community. You are offered a portfolio of technique classes, choreography workshops, laboratory sessions, lectures, seminars, tutorials and mentored workplace learning. You also benefit from the close links Roehampton staff have with dance professionals in the UK and overseas. Research areas: Choreography and performance practice; choreo-musical relationships; dance and technology; improvisation and performance; dance education.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

General course information This course is designed to develop the work of experienced choreographers and performers by supporting and challenging sustained reflective practice. It is unique in delivering a flexible and supportive approach to learning, making it possible for you to continue and strengthen your professional practices while working towards a higher degree. The MRes will include a blend of theoretical work (selected from a range of modules that reflect your individual interests), and research methods with an emphasis on understanding practice as research. In addition, you will be supported in the development and presentation of a comprehensive choreographic and/or performance portfolio. Students on this course will normally possess significant practices and experience as choreographers and/or dancers in the national/international communities.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–3 years

General course information This course provides a critical and creative resource for those who work, or aspire to work, within the community dance sector. You will be able to apply your existing experience, disseminate new ideas about community dance and collaborate with local dance organisations. The course is intended for students who would like to develop their ideas about community dance by engaging with conceptual, political and artistic challenges within the practice. The course is distinct in the rich range of disciplines and theoretical perspectives that are drawn upon in order to reflect the alliance of community dance with other agents, such as youth services, health practitioners, the criminal justice system and schools. This emphasises the examination of dance as an entity within political, social and cultural frameworks. Key areas of study:

Key areas of study:

• dance, education and community

• practice as research

• dance, current issues and community

• choreographic and performance making strategies

• dance as a socio-cultural practice

• dramaturgy

• dance analysis

• communication and documentation

• dance practice as research.

• choreographic contexts.

Optional modules include Reflective Practice, Dance Composition, Music and Dance, Creating Event Spaces, Ethnographic Fieldwork, Dance and the Politics of Identity, and The Performance of Heritage: Dance in Museums, Galleries and Historic Sites.

Optional modules include analysing dances, creating event spaces, music and dance, dance philosophy, visual arts and performance, and dancing genders and sexualities. Special features The course maximises flexibility for students who have ongoing professional practices. This means that you are only required on site for one term of the MRes. The rest of the course is structured around remote contact, ongoing studio-based practice, and face-to-face feedback and analyses. Students will benefit from communication with students on other MA Dance cluster courses and those studying for research degrees (MPhil or PhD), as well as from the excellent material facilities for dance at Roehampton.

Research methods are integrated into the compulsory core modules and research skills are developed further through the selfdirected, individually tutored dissertation. Special features The course offers an exciting combination of theoretical and practical options and is particularly flexible, enabling you to choose your own pathway to suit your needs and interests. You will also benefit from our connections with industry, which will help you to examine community dance practice and policy.

Research areas: Dance and performance making, choreography, performance, documentation/archiving, screendance, creative research and collaborative processes. 58

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MA/PGDip

MA/PGDip

MA/PGDip

MA/PGDip/PGCert

Dance Anthropology

Dance Studies

South Asian Dance Studies

Teaching Dance: Science and Art

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180, PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert 60

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–3 years

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–3 years

Course duration:

Course duration:

General course information The premise of this course is that all dance genres – be they aboriginal dances, ballet, ballroom, or Bharathanatyam – say something about the human beings who engage in them. It explores the social construction of dance and of the dancing body cross-culturally and emphasises the different conceptualisations that exist in different parts of the world.

General course information This course explores the key issues, approaches and methods of enquiry in dance studies. The focus is on dance as a theatre art, explored from a variety of perspectives, in the context of other dance practices and the increasing interdisciplinarity of dance scholarship. The course equips students with the knowledge, current awareness and research skills to work at the forefront of this relatively young, thriving academic discipline. Applicants will typically be recent dance graduates wishing to enhance their dance-related vocational options or prepare for higher level academic research. The course will also be relevant to others wishing to embark on a career in HE teaching and dance scholarship, such as dance practitioners and dance administrative, managerial and technical personnel.

General course information Globalisation, media and mass migrations have transformed the historical identity of Indian/Asian classical, popular, and folk art forms. Asian forms are not just staged as international forms on world stages today, but they are also patronised as heritage, diaspora, community and ethnic cultures and traditions and practices in the US and the UK. The course thus examines the cultural reproduction of Indian/Asian theatre arts within the three-pronged geographical constellation of India/Asia, US and the UK and situates the study itself within a global modernities, dance migration, and diaspora perspective. The course provides students with skills and knowledge necessary to work broadly as cultural and creative entrepreneurs in the international domain of arts production.

• dance, globalisation and the multicultural debate

Key areas of study:

Key areas of study:

• dance, identity and ethnicity

• dance, philosophy and history

• South Asian dance, global modernities and globalisation

• fieldwork as a key investigative tool.

• dance and the politics of identity

• South Asian dance, global diasporas and ethnicity

Research methods are integrated into the compulsory core modules and research skills are developed further through the self-directed, individually tutored dissertation.

• analysing dances

• post-colonial identity formations, aesthetics and politics

• dance as a socio-cultural practice

• South Asian dance and the multicultural debate

Optional modules include dance practice as research, music and dance, world dance survey, visual arts and performance, and dancing genders and sexualities.

• South Asian “community” dance, institutions, and patronage.

The course equips you, whether you are a dancer or an anthropologist, with the knowledge, awareness and research skills to work at the forefront of this new academic discipline. Key areas of study: • dances as socio-cultural practices and transnational commodities

Special features You benefit from contact with those on other MA Dance cluster courses and those studying for research degrees (MPhil or PhD) and from the excellent material facilities for dance at Roehampton. You will be able to join an Intensive Erasmus Programme in Norway during the Easter break and be taught by key scholars within the field. Research areas: Western theatre dance; Australian Aboriginal, Indian and Indonesian dance; identity; diasporic movements; nationalism; politics as pertaining to various dance genres; dance analysis.

Research methods are integrated into the compulsory core modules and research skills are developed further through the self-directed, individually tutored dissertation. Special features You benefit from contact with those on other MA Dance cluster courses and those studying for research degrees (MPhil or PhD), as well as from the excellent material facilities for dance at Roehampton. Research areas: Dance analysis, politics, philosophy, history; music, visual arts and dance practice as research. This broad-based course can accommodate and develop a variety of student research interests relevant to the current concerns of the discipline.

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full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–3 years

Special features This is the only postgraduate global arts course currently available in Europe and in the English-speaking world that is focused specifically on the study of Asian performing arts. This innovative course is integrally linked with the other Dance MAs taught at Roehampton. Students benefit from the course’s strong links with key South Asian dance organisations based in the UK and India. Research areas: Asian theatre dance in a cross-cultural perspective; Asian dance globalisation, migration and diaspora formations; Asian dance institutions, and multiculturalism; Asian dance and public arts policy; Asian dance, ethnicity and identity; Asian dance modernism and postmodernism; Asian dance, gender and politics; Asian contemporary and classical dance production; Asian dance, postcolonial theory and identity formation.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–3 years

General course information This course critically examines the teaching of dance and is aimed at practising dance teachers who wish to advance and update their skills or progress to research in the field. Recent and ongoing developments in learning and teaching and dance science give us new perspectives on the role of the dance teacher and dance teaching methods. This course will critically examine these and other factors to promote an understanding of the rich possibilities of the dance class for learning and personal development. It brings together potentially conflicting interests of artistic necessity and scientifically validated good practice, and thus facilitates enlightened enhancement of dance teaching practice. You will be equipped with tools to develop your teaching in a continuing process of review and reflection in the light of ongoing developments. The course is offered as Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) and Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) to allow students to focus on particular areas relevant to their professional development rather than take the full MA. Key areas of study: • dance analysis • dance, education and community • choreological studies (dance movement analysis) • dance science • reflective practice. Optional modules include dance practice as research, music and dance, world dance survey, visual arts and performance, and dancing genders and sexualities. Research methods are integrated into the compulsory core modules and research skills are developed further through the selfdirected, individually tutored dissertation. Special features The course is not dance-style specific; if you are not sure whether the course is appropriate to your dance style, please contact us to discuss this. Teaching opportunities may be available within the Dance Department for suitably qualified international students and those who are unable to maintain their teaching practice during the course. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, over 60% of staff research was graded as of world-leading or internationally significant quality and the Department was given the highest possible rating, indicative of international excellence. We have strong relations with some of the world’s leading performancemakers and academics, who are regular participants at events hosted by the Department. Whether your ambitions are in art practice or academia, we offer one of the most stimulating and supportive environments for postgraduate study, right next to the theatrical and artistic life of London.

www.roehampton.ac.uk/drama-theatre-and-performance

Department of Drama, Theatre and Performance The Department has an established international reputation for both teaching and research and has forged an unusually distinctive identity within the field for its investigations through cutting-edge performance practice and critical theory. We have one of the largest concentrations in the UK of staff working in the area, with international reputations as performance makers, visual artists, writers, curators, critics and theoreticians, working across both cultural and academic sectors. 64

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MA/MRes Performance and Creative Research Number of credits: 180 Course duration:

full-time: 1 year

General course information This course provides you with the opportunity to engage in performance as an interdisciplinary and connective practice, spanning the fields of live art, theatre, visual art, dance and new media. Exploring performance as creative research, the course moves fluidly between practice-based and theory-oriented approaches and deploys a diverse set of critical paradigms and methods associated with Performance Studies to examine performance as a cultural phenomenon. Key areas of study: • interdisciplinary performance practices • live art, experimental theatre, dance-performance, new media • paradigms of Performance Studies, visual and cultural theory • the artist as cultural agent/producer and public display. Special features This course enables you to research, conceive and realise creative projects in performance. You are also asked to develop critical interrogations, reflecting on your own practices and the artistic, social and political frameworks of performance making and reception. There is a strong emphasis on creative collaboration, critical dialogue and practices of public display. The course offers opportunities for exchange with practising performance makers and theoreticians active in the field, and may include residential work abroad. Research areas: Performance making; creative research methodologies; the formulation, composition and realisation of ideas; performance theories and histories; visual and cultural theory; performance and live art; experimental theatre; dance and new media; public intervention, reception and display.

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www.roehampton.ac.uk/education

Department of Education The Department provides opportunities for students to gain certificates, diplomas and full masters awards through a flexible postgraduate scheme. Many of our courses are supported by the Teacher Development Agency and our MA in Social Research Methods is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council.

The quality of our teaching and student support is highly regarded. Staff are engaged in the provision of professional development and consultancy as well as in teaching at all levels. Our work combines the very best professional practice with the strength of our research in education. Our research is innovative, highly relevant and demonstrates a commitment to the improvement of education locally, nationally and internationally. We have strong partnership links with local schools and colleges, local authorities, private businesses and agencies. We also work with partners in India, Malaysia, Singapore, Greece, the Netherlands and Ireland to deliver postgraduate-level courses on and off site. We welcome students from the UK and overseas to work with us to develop the skills needed to succeed and to make a positive difference in education provision. 68

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EdD (Doctorate)

MA/PGDip/PGCert

Education

Applied Music Education

Course duration: part-time: 5 years

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Course duration: full-time: 12 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters

General course information This innovative part-time course leading to the award of Doctor of Education (EdD) is aimed at busy professionals who wish to undertake a substantial investigation into an area of current professional practice in education or training. It aims to provide you with a thorough grounding in theory and practice of educational research, professional competence, and transferable employment skills. The EdD is offered jointly by Roehampton University and Kingston University, and builds upon the existing successful courses at masters level and extensive PhD work. Between them, the two universities can offer a range of knowledge which extends from pre-school learning to educational gerontology, in public and private sectors, together with nationally recognised expertise in research methods training. Key areas of study: Stage 1 (years 1 and 2) All students take the following three core modules: • Professionalism in Education • Perspectives on Teaching and Learning • Educational Research Philosophy and Practice. In addition to the core modules, students complete a pathway module in Teaching and Learning. Stage 2 (years 3–5) You undertake a research project reported in a thesis (or equivalent) of approximately 45,000 words. Entry qualifications: Typically, applicants will have completed M-level study in Education or a related field, and be in a professional role in education with at least two years’ experience. You should also be looking forward to contributing to the development of theoretically informed reflective practice in your particular professional setting. Applications should be directed to the Research Office.

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General course information This new postgraduate course offers you the opportunity to work towards the degree of MA in Applied Music Education or through one of two pathways leading to the award of: • MA in Applied Music Education (Psychology) • MA in Applied Music Education (Special Educational Needs) Depending on the pathway selected, the course is designed to enhance your professional knowledge, skills and understanding of the respective subject area within a broad educational context. Key areas of study: • developmental psychology of music • comparative and international music education • music and special educational needs • curriculum theory, context and practice in music • dissertation/performance project • learning and cognition in music • social psychology of music • using and learning ICT in music education. Special features This is the first graduate course of its type in the UK and it attracts students from all over the world. The course operates in full collaboration with Roehampton’s Department of Psychology. Research areas: Comparative international music education; music and special educational needs; music and inclusion; social psychology of music; musical identity; psychology of musical performance; psychology of music education; informal and formal music education.

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MA/PGDip/PGCert

MA/PGDip/PGCert

Art, Craft and Design Education

Early Childhood Studies

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Course duration: full-time: 12 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters

General course information This course provides opportunities to investigate and analyse the role of art, craft and design in education. It attracts teachers, lecturers and other professionals from a range of educational contexts, from Early Years settings through to primary and secondary schools and initial teacher education. By critically reflecting upon your professional practice and studying its location within a theoretical framework, you develop a broader knowledge and deeper understanding of your field. You also undertake a practical project through which you develop your own art practice in an educational context. Key areas of study: • concepts and issues in art, craft and design education • museum and gallery education • critical and contextual studies in art, craft and design education • practice-based work in art, craft and design. Special features The course is taught by highly qualified and experienced tutors who are recognised as specialists in their selected areas. Teaching staff encourage you to adopt innovative approaches to coursework; several modules (including, by negotiation, the dissertation) offer opportunities for you to exhibit practical work alongside your written work. The “Learning through Art in the Museum” module is taught entirely at Tate Britain and Tate Modern. Research areas: Creative development in the early years; assessment in art education; museum and gallery education; cultural diversity and teachers’ contemporary art practice.

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Course duration:

full-time: 12–18 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters. Normally taught in evening sessions. Some modules are taught in intensive day and weekend sessions.

General course information With content that crosses different disciplinary and professional boundaries, this course aims to develop a deep understanding of the factors that promote the wellbeing of young children and their families. You become part of the research community and develop your ability to consider critically issues in early childhood and their implications on pedagogy, policy and provisions. Key areas of study: • critical reflections on early childhood • play, representation and communication • wellbeing in the earliest years • historical approaches to early childhood • research methodology and enquiry • dissertation. Special features • The course builds on Froebelian principles, which stress the value of play in the care and education of young children. • With its association with Froebel College and its internationally renowned Froebel Archive for Childhood Studies, the course has developed an international reputation in the field and has attracted students at postgraduate level from around the world. • The course is designed for professionals from a variety of backgrounds who work with young children, including those involved in education, health and social services as well as for those who are involved in developing the early years workforce such as further education college lecturers, and for non-professionals who have a particular interest in the early childhood field. Research areas: Effective environments for early learning and development; historical aspects of early childhood; policy development in the early childhood field; principles and practice of work with children under three; the development of the professional role in the early childhood sector; social relationships and children’s creative thinking; health issues in early childhood. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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A sample of our most popular modules on the MA Education*

MA/PGDip/PGCert Education If you would like to follow a qualification that leads to Qualified Teacher Status, please see the PGCE courses on pages 82 and 83. Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Course duration:

12 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters

General course information The course has been designed to provide flexible opportunities for practising professionals working in education, and in related professions, to widen and deepen their theoretical perspectives and critically reflect on the implications for their practice. Within the MA Education, you can specialise in a range of curriculum areas including: • Literacy • Mathematics • Science • ICT • Physical Education. Other pathways include Management and Leadership, and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Alternatively, you can select from a range of options that gives the award of MA Education. A selection of examples of masterslevel modules available within the taught postgraduate scheme is shown on the opposite page. Key areas of study: • dissertation • research methodology and enquiry in education • international perspectives on professional practice in education, which uses both reflective and comparative methods. In addition, other modules are available: • Independent Study in Education • APEL (Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning) • Context of Professional Practice • International Perspectives in Special and Inclusive Education. For your dissertation, you may select from a broad range of possible research areas (see below).

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Special features The course allows you either to specialise in a particular area of interest or design for yourself a wide course of study to reflect on the varied but linked aspects of education in today’s and tomorrow’s world. Research areas: Science and technology education; teacher education in policy; social justice; education management and leadership; education of professionals; music education; art education; language; social and cultural studies; human rights education; early childhood studies; citizenship education; religious education; physical education; mathematics education; multiculturalism and education.

Literacy, Culture and Media This module aims to encourage participants to develop a critical understanding of the teaching of literacy in the 21st century through exploring print and multimedia texts within a sociocultural perspective. Language in Action This module considers children’s use of language both in and out of the school environment. Through close exploration and analysis of children’s use of language, you are encouraged to develop an understanding of children’s language development in action. Reading: Politics and Pedagogy This module provides an informed and critical understanding of the complexities, issues and debates that surround the teaching of reading both in the past and present, enabling you to gain a thorough understanding of the reading process. International Perspectives on Professional Practice in Education (IPPPE) This module encourages you to use literature as an evidence base in your chosen field when applying reflective and comparative methods. You reflect on personal and practical education experiences and then examine and analyse similarities, differences and alternatives from contemporary and relevant books, journal articles and web sources. Primary Science This module provides a rationale for the inclusion of science within the primary curriculum, analyses the history and philosophy of science education, and reflects on curriculum theories and practices in primary science. Each of these themes is considered both theoretically and in relation to the individual’s beliefs and classroom practices. Secondary Science This module is designed to extend the knowledge and improve the practice of professionals working within secondary science education. It enables you to develop a critical understanding of the ways in which learning and teaching science have changed over time and how these changes have an impact on classroom practice. Teaching Physical Education This module aims to develop your understanding of holistic approaches to effective teaching and learning in physical education. The context examined is primarily school-based, but wider links to other educational environments will be made where appropriate. Key elements are the synthesis of disciplinary

conceptual frameworks and their application to your own professional context. You will engage in critical appraisal of current approaches to teaching and learning in the subject and explore the potential for developing physically educated learners. Primary Mathematics This module offers development opportunities for those with an interest in primary maths education, including practising teachers, curriculum leaders, advisory teachers and consultants, and focuses on a range of issues concerning pedagogy, subject knowledge, curriculum policy, innovation and teacher development. Leading and Managing Teaching and Learning This module aims to explore the place of leaders and managers in the discourse surrounding the quality of teaching and learning. It will involve a consideration of the debates about what makes a successful learning culture and what it means to enable pupils and students to become effective, enthusiastic and independent learners. Design and Technology: Designing and Making This module encourages you to identify and critically evaluate examples of good practice. You devise, develop and implement your own brief, and analyse and evaluate your work within the contexts of classroom practices and the management of design and technology in schools. Theories of Second Language Learning This module is designed for MA Education students who have a language-teaching background and/or an academic background in TESOL or Applied Linguistics. The module aims to develop such students’ critical understanding of the processes of second language learning by introducing them to a range of theoretical approaches as well as more practically orientated research findings. Linguistic Analysis for Language Teaching This module aims to provide such students with theoretical and analytical tools that will enhance their understanding of both how language is structured and of how it is used in a range of communicative events. Students apply these insights to practical tasks of language analysis in an educational setting. For information on the range of further modules available within the taught postgraduate scheme, visit www.roehampton.ac.uk/ postgraduate-courses/education *Please note that not all modules run in both terms (except IPPPE). To find out when modules run, please check with the Programme Convener, Richard Race. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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MA/PGDip/PGCert

MA/PGDip/PGCert

MA/PGDip/PGCert

Education Leadership and Management

English Education

Social Research Methods

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Course duration:

Course duration:

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Course duration: full-time: 12 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters

General course information This course is underpinned by a model of critically reflective practice. It is designed to offer professionals the opportunity to engage in the processes of systematic and analytical enquiry into the theories and practices of education leadership and management, with a view to improving their own practice. The course provides a range of flexible opportunities for professionals working in education. It is primarily aimed at all those in leadership, management and administrative roles and those aspiring to such roles across the whole range of educational settings and levels.

full-time: 12 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters

General course information This course provides opportunities for primary and secondary teachers to explore and analyse the centrality of English in education. The course covers the teaching and learning of English in all age phases and modules offered cover a breadth of relevant areas and are assessed in a range of ways. Key areas of study: • reading: politics and pedagogy • literacy, culture and media • language in action • teaching texts

full-time: 12 months; part-time: 2 years

General course information The course is distinctive in providing students with an exciting opportunity to develop expertise in a range of both quantitative and qualitative research methods of data collection and analysis with a focus on their application to real-world issues. Key areas of study: • research skills and skills needed for employment in the research field • philosophy of social research • the design of social research • quantitative research methods of data collection and analysis (including use of SPSS) • qualitative research methods of data collection and analysis (including use of CAQDAS)

Key areas of study:

• teaching phonics: issues and debates

• the educational organisation in its environment

• children as readers.

• discipline-specific knowledge and skills: a choice of education or social science.

Suggested dissertation topics:

The certificate course addresses core features of social research methods, focusing on different forms of data and how they can be collected and analysed. MA-level study is aimed at students who either want a discrete research-based MA or want to run a pilot study for an MPhil/PhD research project.

• leading and managing people in education • change strategy and implementation • leading and managing teaching and learning

• teaching literature through drama

• research methods and enquiry.

• cultural influences on literacy learning

Special features The course allows you to specialise in particular areas of interest to reflect the work you do in your professional role in education leadership/management so your study has an immediate relevance and also prepares you for your future development. If you are currently in a senior management position, then a special route may be possible for you depending upon your experience and courses completed with organisations such as the National College.

• gender and literacy

Research areas: These include education policy, enhancement and quality, inspection and review systems. The course has links with a variety of Research Centres within the Department of Education such those for curriculum, policy and professionalism; beliefs, rights and values; early childhood; and creativity and learning.

Special features Sessions are taught in a dedicated teaching space, which houses a collection of children’s books, academic journals and relevant theoretical reading.

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• the teaching and learning of reading • the teaching of poetry • developmental spelling • literacy multimodal texts • reading digital texts • EAL and literacy • teaching the bilingual child.

Research areas: Children’s literature; poetry; drama; phonics; digital literacy; gender and literacy; responding to reading and response at Key Stages 2 and 3.

Special features External assessors have rated the innovative “general research skills” module very highly and commented favourably on the assessment mix. Research areas: Education policy; social justice – class, race and gender; education of professionals; early childhood – history and policy; music education; art education; human rights education; citizenship education; physical education; classroom ethnography; crime, social policy, ethnicity and multiculturalism; domestic violence; human rights; food; childhood; human–animal relations; globalisation; citizenship; New Labour; women in science; kinship in South Asia. The course has 1+3 recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council. Only three Education Departments in post-92 universities have this prestigious kitemark. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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MA/PGDip/PGCert

MA/Mgr

Special and Inclusive Education

Special and Inclusive Education (SIE) – Erasmus Mundus

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Course duration:

full-time: 12 months; part-time: 3–8 semesters

General course information The concept of Special and Inclusive Education requires a new breed of professionals equipped with both a secure knowledge and understanding of special and inclusive practice while having due regard for the political, legislative and social inclusion agenda that is driving inclusion in the local and international context. This innovative course reflects on these key themes. It examines approaches used to meet personalised needs and to manage special and inclusive provision while reflecting on the influences and potential tensions between practice and the wider socio-political and legislative inclusion agenda. The course attracts local and international teachers and multiprofessional agencies working in the field of Special and Inclusive Education. It offers participants the opportunity to complete a Certificate (60 credits), a Diploma (120 credits) or a full MA award (180 credits) in Special and Inclusive Education. The course also offers the mandatory TDA New to Post SENCO Postgraduate Certificate Award. Key areas of study: MA, required modules: • dissertation (60 credits) • perspectives on special and inclusive education (20 credits)

Special features The MA course is delivered in a variety of national and international contexts, which enhances its currency and the experience of tutors involved in its delivery. The course allows for selection of: • three optional modules to make up a Certificate award to support practice-based knowledge and skills or to support leadership and management in the field of SEN and Inclusion • six 20-credit modules to make up a Diploma in Special and Inclusive Education OR • three optional modules plus all modules from the “MA Required modules” to make up the full MA award. Research areas: Professional development and inclusion; promoting inclusion: principles, practices and provision; perspectives and challenges; autistic spectrum disorders; developmental dyslexia; sociology of education (policy sociology); the capability approach to impairment; the development of the socio-political and human rights approach to disability; cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary research.

Number of credits: 90 ECTS Course duration:

full-time: 16 months

General course information This 16-month course is taught by Roehampton University in the UK, Charles University in the Czech Republic, and University of Oslo in Norway. The three partners equally contribute to the course and share responsibility for its delivery. You are based in the UK, Norway and the Czech Republic for equal periods of time and will be offered an opportunity to spend two months at universities in Malaysia or South Africa. The course is taught in English. The course is designed for students within the UK, Europe and the wider international community. Applicants must successfully complete 90 ECTS (Roehampton equivalent is 180 credits at masters level). The key entrance requirement is a first degree. Key areas of study: • research methodology and enquiry in education (compulsory, co-taught by all three partner universities) • international perspectives in special and inclusive education in education (compulsory, UK) • inclusive society – inclusive education (compulsory, Czech Republic)

• research methodology and enquiry in education 1 (20 credits)

• special and inclusive education for learners with special needs (compulsory, Norway)

• research methodology and enquiry in education 2 (20 credits).

• dissertation (compulsory).

Optional 20-credit modules: • autism: principles and practice • dyslexia: principles and practice • behaviour management: support for learning • leading and managing special and inclusive education • teaching and learning in special and inclusive education.

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Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Primary Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Primary These qualifications lead to Qualified Teacher Status. Number of credits: 120 Course duration:

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 18 months/5 terms

GTTR codes: Age phase:

see webpage full-time: Foundation Stage/Key Stage 1 or Key Stage 2 part-time: Foundation Stage/Key Stage 1 only

For full details of this course, please see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/teacher-education General course information The PGCE Primary courses, full-time and part-time, are for graduates intending to qualify as primary school teachers. The courses lead to PGCE qualifications at either of two levels the Postgraduate Certificate in Education at masters level (HE4) or the Professional Graduate Certificate in Education at honours level (HE3). Both qualifications carry the recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The PGCE aims to prepare primary teachers who can organise their pupils’ learning appropriately and effectively and who are reflective practitioners, committed to continuous improvement in their professional practice. In particular, the course aims to foster the following qualities in student teachers: • a recognition of cultural and linguistic diversity and their implications for teaching and learning • an awareness of the active nature of learning • an understanding of the different needs of individual learners • respect for children. The full-time course starts in September and the part-time course starts in January with completion in the following July. Due to high demand for these courses, it is recommended that applications are made as early as possible. All applicants must have spent a minimum of two weeks in a mainstream state UK primary school in a relevant key stage or early years setting, and be able to discuss this experience at interview. We also expect

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Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Secondary Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Secondary

applicants to have broader experience of diverse groups of children of the relevant age range, both inside and outside the classroom.

These qualifications lead to Qualified Teacher Status.

School experience Full-time The practical experience in school includes a preliminary school observation (which is arranged by students) and two blocks of school experience.

GTTR codes:

Part-time This element of the course requires full-time commitment. The practical experience in school is organised into two main block school experiences and a school observation period of two weeks. The school experience total for both full-time and part-time students is a minimum of 90 days; block placements are organised by the University in its partnership schools. Special features The courses cover all subjects and areas of learning within the National Curriculum for KS1 and KS2 and the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum. Roehampton is one of the largest providers of initial teacher education in the UK and recent Ofsted inspections of primary provision have been extremely positive, with management and quality assurance rated as outstanding.

Number of credits: 60 M-level + 90 P-level or 60 HE3 + 90 P-level Course duration:

full-time: 1 year see webpage

For full details of this course, please see the website: www.roehampton.ac.uk/teacher-education General course information Two qualifications are available for graduates intending to teach their specialist subject within the secondary age range: the Postgraduate Certificate in Education at masters level (HE4) and the Professional Graduate Certificate in Education at honours level (HE3). Both qualifications carry the recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The course is for graduates intending to teach their specialist subject within the 11–19 age range. When applying for a place, you select a single subject of study which will qualify you to teach it in secondary schools. The subjects on offer currently are:

University-based work is mainly subject-focused but is supported by Professional Studies common to all subjects, which are taught in mixed subject groups. The time spent in the University gives you time to prepare for and evaluate schoolbased work. It also allows the sharing of experiences with other trainee teachers. Special features Whichever subject you follow, you benefit from the strong links that exist between the University and local secondary schools. Practising teachers contribute to all the courses and staff are involved in both research and in-service work with local schools. You gain extensive experience of teaching in two different schools, building on the work done in the University with the support and guidance of school subject mentors.

• Art and Design • Business Education • Design and Technology (specialising in Materials Technology, Electronic and Communications Technology, Food or Textiles), • English

Key areas of study The course has two components: school-based experience and university-based studies. School-based work includes observation of experienced teachers at work, team teaching, and taking increasing responsibility for teaching whole classes.

Roehampton has provided me with everything I need to embark upon a career

• History

in teaching. The support and advice given

• Mathematics

The friendly, expert tuition on offer at

to trainees is outstanding and I would

• Modern Foreign Languages

Roehampton combined with two fantastic

recommend the course to any future

• Music

school placements have given me the

• Religious Education

trainee teachers.

confidence to take on what is a challenging

• Science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics).

yet ultimately rewarding job.

— Rachel Taylor, PGCE Secondary (English) graduate from Twickenham, now works as an English teacher at Overton Grange School

— Jerome Marshall, former PGCE Primary student from Rochester in Kent, now works as a teacher at Glenbrook Primary School in Clapham, London

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www.roehampton.ac.uk/english-and-creative-writing

Department of English and Creative Writing Postgraduate study in English and Creative Writing can be a wise career move; it can also be a great pleasure, and a life-changing experience. At Roehampton we are pleased to offer an exciting range of taught courses and possibilities for research.

We welcome students from all over the world to our courses in Children’s Literature, Creative Writing and English Literature, and to work in small groups with our lively team of lecturers and creative writers. The Department’s research record is impressive: we cover a range of expertise, from Blake to Ballard, from the history of Cupid to the social history of cake, and from screen-writing to the experimental sonnet. You are also well placed to take advantage of the vibrant culture of literary London. Whether it’s the resources of the British Library and other unique research archives which appeal to you, or the stunning array of live performance venues, Roehampton provides an excellent home and launch pad for your life as a graduate student. 84

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MA/PGDip

MA/PGDip

MA/MRes/PGDip

MA/MRes/PGDip

Children’s Literature (on-site)

Children’s Literature (distance-learning)

Creative and Professional Writing

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180; MRes: 180; PGDip: 120

Early Modern Literature and Culture (1500–1700)

Course duration: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

Course duration: part-time: 2–4 years

General course information

General course information

This course is run by the award-winning National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL).

This course is run by the award-winning National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL).

This internationally acclaimed course involves the study of children’s books in all forms and their broader cultural influence. You explore the relationships between the adults who produce, publish and introduce books to children, and the children who are meant to read them. The course introduces critical theories and methods, enabling you to analyse the sign systems employed in children’s literature and so to identify and evaluate the messages and value systems encoded in them.

This popular course involves the study of children’s books, in both written and visual forms, and their broader cultural influence. Distance learning students are not required to travel to the University at any point in the course, although many enjoy visiting Roehampton for conferences or NCRCL “cluster talks”. For taught modules, you work through written course materials and online resources, with self-administered learning exercises and assignments to submit to a designated tutor. Tutorial support, by telephone or email, is available throughout and you can also interact with your peers through the University’s virtual learning environment. You are assessed through coursework and a dissertation.

Key areas of study: • early children’s literature • British children’s literature 1900 to the present • children’s literature in translation • creative writing for children • critical and theoretical perspectives • illustrations/picture books. Special features Roehampton houses the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), which runs the annual MA/IBBY Conference and helped establish the Marsh Award for Children’s Literature in Translation and the post of Children’s Laureate. Dame Jacqueline Wilson, who is a Professorial Fellow at Roehampton, offers insights on how to write for children. The course is supported by the specialist Children’s Literature Collection (including the Richmal Crompton Collection) in the University Library and librarians with an extensive knowledge of the subject. Research areas: Translation studies; alternative forms of narrative; contemporary adolescent literature; Jungian studies; Victorian children’s literature; visual texts; children’s reading habits and choices.

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Key areas of study: • British children’s literature from 1900 to the present day • critical and theoretical perspectives • origins and development of children’s literature • poetry written for children • visual texts. Special features The academic team is internationally acclaimed for its work in children’s literature and regularly hosts major conferences. The MA course allows you to combine an overview of the subject with the opportunity to specialise in a field where original research is flourishing. Research areas: Translation studies; alternative forms of narrative; contemporary adolescent literature; Jungian studies; visual texts; Victorian children’s literature; children’s reading habits and choices.

Course duration:

1 year; part-time: 2–4 years Number of credits: MA: 180; MRes: 180; PGDip: 120

General course information This course allows you to explore a particularly broad scope of writing disciplines. In addition to traditional creative writing pathways such as fiction and poetry, the course offers modules on writing for children, screenwriting and creative nonfiction (a very rare option in the UK). You improve your writing skills through detailed and specialised encounters with writing theory and practice that expand awareness of the context and the skills needed for contemporary writing. Key areas of study: • poetics and critical writing • creative nonfiction (not offered in 2011/12) • writing for the screen • fiction: how to grow stories

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

General course information Roehampton has a distinguished tradition of research in Renaissance studies, with a number of internationally recognised scholars producing high-profile work in this field. Based in the Centre for Research in Renaissance Studies (see www.roehampton.ac.uk/researchcentres/renaissance), the MA provides an opportunity for the interdisciplinary study of European and English Renaissance culture. Core modules engage you in conversations about the most important texts and issues of the period, while training you in the theories, skills and practical knowledge needed for MA-level work. Optional modules enable you to develop your own interests.

• writing for a child audience

Key areas of study:

• poetry: form and innovation.

• theories and texts • research methods: skills and theories

Special features • All teaching staff are practising writers with links to professional publishing and other media. • Dame Jacqueline Wilson, who is a Professorial Fellow at Roehampton, offers insights to students on how to write for children. • The course administrator collates and sends out a regular email newsletter to students, informing them about conferences, readings, competitions and other issues relevant to their professionalisation. • The qualification and skills gained from this course offer a number of career possibilities, including working as a professional writer, working in the publishing industry, in the media, or continuing to study for a PhD at Roehampton. Research areas: Children’s literature; poetics and theory; creative nonfiction; fiction; poetry; screenwriting.

• authorship controversies • Renaissance bodies • the big house and estate c.1480–1750 • court, city and theatre in early modern London • cultures of early modern food • media Shakespeare • Ovid in the Middle Ages and Renaissance • early modern drama in performance. Please note, not all options are available every year. Special features This interdisciplinary MA degree allows you to explore Renaissance literature and culture from many angles and to pursue your intellectual interests with support from tutors. MA students at Roehampton are perfectly positioned to take advantage of London’s wealth of archives, art, theatre, playing spaces and architecture in their explorations of the Renaissance. Research areas: English literature; history; drama; art history; classical civilisation. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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MA/PGDip/PGCert Modern Literature and Culture Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Course duration:

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information Concentrating on literature from the 18th century to the present, this course considers a diverse range of canonical, popular and forgotten texts in relation to key aspects of the study of material culture. It draws on tutors’ considerable research expertise in this area to create a lively atmosphere for investigation, dialogue and debate. The course covers an exciting range of topics, including space, the body, consumption, the everyday, and the materiality of the text. It explores the culture of reading, the development of popular genres, and the complex and shifting interrelationship between objects, texts, and the culture that produces them. Specific subjects that may be explored include the history of reading, working-class fiction, sex, food, violence, death, the city, domestic space, adolescence, and addiction. You are introduced to a range of methodologies and theoretical approaches to enable you to explore different ways of relating literary and cultural materials and perspectives. Key areas of study: • literature and material cultures • literature and the history of the everyday • the culture of reading • the literature of war, punishment, crime, addiction, food, pain, sex, work, travel, the family, religion, race, childhood, adolescence, death • popular literatures including biography, detective fiction, dystopian literature, cookery books, working-class fiction. Special features Methodological and theoretical approaches include the history of reading; theories of high and popular literature; cultural materialism; historicism; and theories of the middlebrow. Research areas: 18th-, 19th- and 20th-century English and American literature; postcolonial literature; literature of war; food writing; travel narratives; literature of addiction; dystopian fiction; crime fiction; working-class writing; literature and race; biography; sensation fiction; literature and religion; middlebrow fiction; material cultures; the history of reading. 88

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Our advantageous location allows you to engage with London’s worldrenowned cultural and historical heritage: with its many libraries, archives, museums and faith-communities, London offers unrivalled resources for the humanities student and researcher. Our research-active staff include pioneering and influential scholars whose research, writing and public engagement have put Roehampton on the intellectual map. We currently offer a masters in Historical Research and are developing MAs in Theology and Religious Studies and in Philosophy. Students who have completed the MA Historical Research have successfully used it as a springboard for doctoral research or as a development tool in their employment. Stonehenge

The Roman Baths in Bath

www.roehampton.ac.uk/humanities

Department of Humanities The Department’s courses are united by their strong confidence in the value of studying the actions, cultures, thoughts and beliefs of humanity past and present. We have a commitment to excellence in teaching, and to being friendly and approachable.

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MA/MRes/PGDip Historical Research (also available by distance learning) Number of credits: MA: 180; MRes: 180; PGDip: 120 Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information This course offers students the opportunity to study historical methods and theory at postgraduate level with a team of experts in ancient, early modern and modern history. We have a unique combination of modules training you in a variety of historical approaches, including the theories of history and methods of primary source analysis. Skills are taught through the study of key social, political and cultural issues in a specific historical context. Together the modules reveal some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in historical scholarship today. In addition to the general MA in Historical Research, you may choose from one of two specialised pathways: Classical History, or Social and Cultural History. We also offer an MA in Local History and Archival Practice for part-time students by distance learning. Sample areas of study: • theory and methods (compulsory) • big houses and estates in the early modern period • gender and crime in Ancient Greece • oral history • dissertation of 15,000 words (MA only). Special features The course is unusual in focusing on methods, skills and concepts, rather than specific periods or places. It covers a very broad scope of history, from ancient to contemporary, and incorporates diverse cultures and regions, while offering students who wish to focus on local history and sources the opportunity to do so. You will be taught by nationally and internationally renowned historians with broad interests. Field trips and visits to museums and record offices are included in many modules. Research areas: Crime in 19th-century Britain; histories of radicalism; historical writing and theory; the politics of history; war and conflict; local history; gender in the ancient world; the history of the family; microhistory; early modern cultural history; medieval archaeology; Iberian and Latin American history; oral history; classical history. 92

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www.roehampton.ac.uk/life-sciences

Department of Life Sciences The Department offers a supportive and stimulating environment in which to pursue academic excellence. We are based on the Whitelands Site of the University campus, right on the edge of Richmond Park, with a Grade I listed villa and modern extensions that house state-of-the-art laboratories. Our students enjoy the most complete laboratory experience, and our London location gives them easy access to museums, biological collections and field visits.

The Department is home to postgraduate courses that are underpinned by first-class research carried out by staff members. We are passionate about the development of new learning technologies and paradigms to enhance the student experience. Our curricula are continuously updated to reflect current scientific advances, and designed to produce highly employable graduates with skills that meet the needs of modern society. We also work with a range of organisations in the biomedical and healthcare industries on knowledge transfer activities and promoting public engagement in science. The scale, scope and quality of our offerings are, we believe, without equal.

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MRes

MSc/PGDip/PGCert

MSc/PGDip/PGCert

MSc/PGDip

Animal Ecology

Clinical Neuroscience

Clinical Nutrition

Health and Community

Number of credits: 180

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

(also available by distance learning)

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Course duration:

Course duration:

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Course duration:

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

Course duration:

General course information This course takes a rigorous cutting-edge approach to a study of the theory and practice of Animal Ecology and enables students to build expertise in, and awareness of, current issues in the Animal Ecology arena, including those focusing on research, legislation and practice. It develops the skills to carry out a large research project and is an excellent preparation for research and consultancy employment. Assessment is by submission of practical reports, workshops, essays and seminars. Students also conduct a substantial research dissertation (120 credits) that provides an introduction to PhD level research, enabling development of key skills in project design, planning and data analysis. Key areas of study: • the key concepts, principles and theories in Animal Ecology • current developments, debates, controversies and ethical issues in Animal Ecology • research methods including statistical analysis, literature review and project management. Special features You enhance your expertise in current issues through attendance at a regular seminar series and interaction with experts from institutions of international significance. Roehampton’s proximity to cutting-edge facilities in London such as the Natural History Museum and the British Library greatly enhances the student learning experience. Research areas: Canopy ecology; soil ecology; aquatic ecology; environmental physiology; behavioural ecology.

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General course information The course offers an exciting opportunity to study modern neuroscience with a focus on clinical implications. It gives an insight into recent advances in neurosciences relevant to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The development of research skills is central to the course and a research project is the core of the full MSc training. The PGDip option is particularly suitable for health professionals who are interested in updating their knowledge without conducting a research project. The option of a PGCert (60 credits) contributes towards a well-balanced suite of courses. This course can accommodate students from a range of backgrounds including new graduates from life sciences or psychology as well as health professionals who hold nontraditional qualifications, giving them an opportunity to advance their theoretical knowledge and to develop their academic skills. Key areas of study: • clinical relevance of recent developments in neuroscience • brain imaging techniques and their applications in neurology and psychiatry

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information This was the first MSc in Clinical Nutrition to be established in the UK (in 1995) and has gained an international reputation, attracting students from around the world. The course considers the patient’s journey from birth to extreme age in the context of the metabolic response to injury, to surgery or to chronic disease. Effective nutrition assessment and the organisation of nutrition support teams is considered in relation to all techniques of artificial nutrition support. The course is designed for all members of nutrition support teams and is also suitable for students who wish to pursue clinically based nutrition research. The course does not offer a qualification in dietetics. Key areas of study: • macronutrient and micronutrient metabolism in health and disease • nutrient digestion and absorption and gastrointestinal disease • nutritional support in paediatric, adult, older adult and critically ill patients

General course information This course reflects current shifts in health and healthcare toward the community setting. It aims to examine what is meant by community together with the organisation and practice of health and associated care environments in the community in relation to long-term conditions and specific client groups. The course will draw on sociology and psychology to develop and broaden your understanding of the practice of healthcare. You will also develop professional knowledge and skills relating to health and healthcare in the community from an organisational and practical level. The course is designed for professionals wishing to broaden their experience toward health in the community and for those who wish to enter the field from other disciplines. Key areas of study: • community and health in a changing society • communication in healthcare • social issues in health

• neurobiological mechanisms of brain disorders

• the effect of disease on nutrition status and of nutrition status on outcome

• effects of nutrition and addiction on brain function

• research methods.

• public health

• research methods. Special features The course is delivered in a student-friendly way, using a wide variety of teaching methods. You benefit from the contribution of expert guest speakers and access to our high-specification modern biomedical and computer laboratories. Research areas: Brain, health and illness; brain neurochemistry; health psychology; models of human brain disorders.

Special features Guest lecturers eminent in their field of study and external collaborators from well-known medical schools and nutrition departments contribute to the course. You experience interactive lectures and seminars, work in small groups, and practical classes. The MSc is accredited with the Nutrition Society. Research areas: Dietary management strategies in women with polycystic ovary syndrome; RNA turnover in different patient groups; the role of brain–gut interaction in obesity, eating disorders, and irritable bowel syndrome; the role of the enteric nervous system in known intestinal diseases; vitamin E status in health and disease.

• qualitative approaches to health research • community-based qualitative research project. Special features The course addresses issues of community development and participation from a qualitative perspective that considers the role of policy, and voluntary and local authority sectors. The course draws on your prior experiences and encourages interaction and discussion of healthcare and community organisation, and engagement in modern societies. Research areas: Health, food and diet; client groups in the community: older people; children; disability; mental health; medical knowledge/ medical education; relationships between community and health; social aspects of diabetes; sociology of health; community development and regeneration; qualitative research methods; health psychology. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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MSc/PGDip

MSc/PGDip/PGCert

MRes

Health Sciences

Obesity: Risks and Prevention

Primate Biology, Behaviour and Conservation

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

Number of credits: 180 Course duration:

General course information This course is designed to provide a biopsychological perspective on the nature and study of human behaviour and health, with an emphasis on the contemporary developments in the social and biological sciences. A social context is provided for these studies through anthropological, psychological and sociological perspectives on health and healthcare. The broad spectrum of biological approaches from molecular to evolutionary studies also presents a diverse range of theories and methods for the study of human behaviour and health. You develop your research skills through the study of research methods, a research project (MSc students only) and contact with active researchers. Key areas of study: • assessment of health and wellbeing • evolution and genetics • principles of neurobiology • rhythms, mood and sleep • social, psychological and biological approaches to health and disease. Special features This course deals with a wide range of health issues from stress to sleep, and looks at the aetiology and symptomology of what can be complex processes. The course is supported by a strong academic staff team of biological and health scientists. The Department of Life Sciences’ active Health Sciences Research Centre holds regular seminars. Research areas: The biological basis of behaviour is an increasingly important aspect of understanding health and illness. Research is central to clinical practice in this area and previous students have done research on subjects ranging from attitudes to medication to insomnia.

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General course information Obesity has now reached pandemic proportions, affecting populations as well as individuals in developed and developing countries. Understanding what the major risk factors are for obesity is a complex issue and is an important aim of this exciting new course. A solid scientific base on obesity risks as well as important prevention strategies will enable you to design interventions and research projects for combating obesity for all ages. As the challenges surrounding this contemporary issue are greater now than ever before, graduates of this course will have extremely good opportunities of employment within health services (including the National Health Service in the UK), private healthcare providers, the food supply industry and research institutions. Given the scale of the problem, opportunities to work as a consultant will arise. Key areas of study: • obesity as a risk for chronic disease • how does culture and lifestyle lead to obesity? • the role of diet and exercise • metabolic principles • planning interventions and evaluating their effectiveness • communication and ethics in dealing with chronic conditions. Special features Guest lecturers eminent in their field of study and external collaborators from well-known medical schools and nutrition departments contribute to the course. You experience interactive lectures and seminars, work in small groups, practical classes, and computer-based exercises. Research areas: Cultural and lifestyle issues relating to obesity; diabetes and depression; polycystic ovary syndrome; bariatric surgery; regulation of appetite; development of food preferences; schoolbased interventions; variations in energy intake and expenditure in response to eating or skipping breakfast; activity-specific energy expenditure.

full time: 1 year

General course information This course combines theoretical investigation with laboratory work and fieldwork on a range of primatology topics. You will carry out practical investigations in zoos and local habitats and learn how to interpret skeletal material. After the first semester the emphasis will be on independent study, with all students undertaking an in-depth piece of original research. Project topics may include a range of areas such as the behaviour and ecology of wild animals, human–wildlife conservation issues, behaviour of captive animals (in zoos and other collections as the University does not hold captive animals), evolutionary work using museum collections, and work using the University laboratories. Key areas of study:

Special features University staff have well-established links with a number of institutions and field sites, such as the German Primate Centre, Zoological Society of London, Gashaka Primate Project Nigeria, Trentham Monkey Forest, and Berenty Reserve Madagascar. Research areas: Staff research interests encompass a broad range of topics within primate socioecology, palaeoanthropology and conservation. Specific research areas include comparative research into reproductive life history characteristics, primate morphology, socioecology, communication and the social organisation in mammals. Other research areas include human– wildlife conflict, cognition, and the theory and method of phylogenetic inference.

• ecology and behaviour: methods used in surveying and gathering biological information, methods of recording behaviour in the field • social behaviour and cognition: the evolution of social systems, social networks, primate cognition • conservation: habitat change, human–wildlife conflict, bushmeat • life-history evolution: allometry, reproductive life history variables, comparative analysis of life-history and brain size evolution • reproduction: laboratory techniques for gathering data and analysing reproductive hormone data in wild and captive primates; the evolution of mating strategies • zoos and museums as a resource for the study of primates and the ethics of studying captive primates • methods of analysing physical and behavioural adaptations (eg locomotion, sensory systems); phylogenetic reconstructions and interpretations of adaptations.

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MSc/PGDip

MSc/PGDip

Biomechanics

Sport and Exercise Physiology

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Course duration:

Course duration:

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information This unique course critically examines the theoretical basis of methods of assessment and the practical application of data within biomechanics. It offers students a means of studying biomechanics from a discipline-specific standpoint in an exciting, practical yet academic way. It addresses the scientist’s need to understand how theoretical biomechanics can be applied to the understanding and development of movement for sport, exercise and clinical applications.

General course information Through this innovative course you make a critical examination of the theoretical bases of physiological assessment and intervention methods, as well as develop the knowledge and practical skills required to meet the specific needs of the client, be it optimal performance or improved health.

For information on the special features of the sport science courses at Roehampton, see the previous page.

Key areas of study:

Key areas of study:

Sport Science at Roehampton Well-established, successful masters courses

Research-active staff

Roehampton University has been successfully delivering quality masters courses across the Sport Science disciplines for over 13 years. This wealth of experience has been used to develop high-level academic, yet practical, degree courses that enable students to develop the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required for the sport science professions in a stimulating and enjoyable environment.

Sport Science staff are engaged in the research of a wide range of subject areas that relate to performance enhancement, including the biomechanics of running gait and injury; amputees, prostheses and the disabled athlete; heat acclimatisation; sports nutrition; career transitions; overtraining/burnout; and the psychology of sport injury/illness. A diversity of research method experience also allows staff to supervise an array of innovative and high-calibre dissertations. All students are invited to attend seminars held by the Department’s Sport and Exercise Science Research Centre.

Consultancy-active staff All Sport Science staff are actively engaged in providing consultancy support and many are accredited by professional bodies such as the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) and the British Psychological Society (BPS). Recent contracts include providing support to West Ham, Chelsea and Fulham football clubs, various Olympic athletes, the Lawn Tennis Association, British Fencing, the All England Netball Association, and Hampshire County Cricket Club.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

• biomechanical measurement and technology • musculoskeletal biomechanics • advanced biomechanics of locomotion • fundamentals of biomechanics • research dissertation (60 credits: MSc only) • research methods.

For information on the special features of the sport science courses at Roehampton, see the previous page.

• physiological assessment • physiology of sport and exercise performance • nutritional aspects of sport and exercise performance • professional practice • research dissertation (60 credits: MSc only) • research methods. An optional module can be taken in biomechanics, psychology or sport injuries.

An optional module can be taken in professional practice, physiology, psychology or nutrition.

State-of-the-art laboratory facilities Our state-of-the-art laboratory facilities for biomechanics and physiology are the best of their type in London and the physiology lab gained BASES re-accreditation in 2008. As we are keen for students to gain high-level assessment skills, modules ensure you are taught how to use these facilities and are given open access to further develop your skills.

You benefit greatly through these links thanks to the opportunities for internships, scholarships and assisting with consultancy/research projects. 102

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MSc/PGDip

MRes

MSc/PGDip

MSc/PGDip

Sport and Exercise Science

Sport and Exercise Science

Sport Psychology

Stress and Health

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: 180

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120

Course duration:

Course duration:

Course duration:

Course duration:

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information This unique course gives you the opportunity to examine critically the theoretical bases of assessment methods and their practical application within at least two disciplines from physiology, psychology and biomechanics. It is suitable if you are aiming to develop your skills and enter the consultancy, research or lecturing professions, and offers you a means of studying sport and exercise from a multidisciplinary standpoint in an exciting, practical, yet academic way.

General course information This course is ideal for students who are interested in focusing on a specific research area at masters level as two-thirds of the course is based around the completion of an extended research project. Each student is supervised by a member of staff experienced in research to ensure a high standard of work. Potential areas of research are highlighted in the “Researchactive staff” section on page 102, along with information on other special features of the sport science courses at Roehampton.

For information on the special features of the sport science courses at Roehampton, see page 102.

Key areas of study:

General course information This course is designed and taught by BASES-accredited/ BPS-chartered sport psychologists and aims to provide the knowledge and practical skills that they have found to be essential. Specifically, the course critically examines the philosophical and theoretical basis of assessment, support and intervention, to give an informed and holistic perspective on the profession. It is delivered in a manner that supports and stimulates your active engagement in your professional development and provides invaluable experience of aspects of being a sport psychologist.

• research dissertation (120 credit) – this is predominantly supported through individual supervisory tutorials

For information on the special features of the sport science courses at Roehampton, see page 102.

Key areas of study: • modules relating to assessment and providing scientific support within: • physiology • biomechanics

• research methods (20 credits) • two of the three following 20-credit modules from the MSc courses: Psychological Assessment; Physiological Assessment; Biomechanical Measurement and Technology.

Key areas of study: • psychological assessment • approaches to psychological support

• psychology

• practical interventions in sport psychology

• research dissertation (60 credits: MSc only)

• professional practice

• research methods.

• research dissertation (60 credits: MSc only)

Optional modules can be followed in nutrition or sports injuries.

• research methods. Optional modules can be followed in sport psychology, nutrition, physiology, biomechanics or sports injuries.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information Interest in stress is increasing in terms of scientific research as well as the rapidly growing commercial stress management sector. This course provides an academically respectable and science-based qualification in the study of stress, dealing specifically with the mechanisms by which psychological stress can induce illnesses and examining issues of measurement, prevalence and management. You look at how psychological states can affect physical wellbeing, in particular the role of stress in the development of various diseases, such as coronary heart disease (the biggest killer in the west) and metabolic disorders including diabetes and mental illnesses. It is important to emphasise that this course is not intended to be a general counselling course as it focuses specifically on the psychobiology of stress. Key areas of study: • health and stress assessment • stress management: methods and issues • the effect of psychological states on organic function • the role of stress in changing patterns of disease • types of stress and responses to stress. Special features This course deals with the specifics of how stress affects particular illnesses and includes a practical module on the problem of assessing stress levels. It also looks at various approaches to reducing stress, particularly in the workplace. Research areas: Stress medicine and psychoneuroimmunology are growth areas in modern medicine. Research into occupational stress is increasingly important in the modern context.

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You will have an opportunity to participate in the Department’s strong research culture, manifested in its four Research Centres and its dynamic MPhil/PhD students. You will also benefit from the real-world experience of our staff, who are not only undertaking high-quality research but are also involved in the production of works of national and international standing. Our London location allows you to engage with the city’s world-renowned creative industries as well as its rich cultural and historical heritage. The strong links we have with employers and industry have led to internships and work placements, course development, and guest speakers lecturing on campus.

www.roehampton.ac.uk/media-culture-and-language

Department of Media, Culture and Language The Department offers academically rigorous courses with a strong focus on research as well as practice. The quality of our teaching and student support has been highly praised; for example, our Modern Languages and Linguistics subject area was ranked eighth nationally in the Guardian’s University Guide 2011. In addition, our research was well placed in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. 106

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MA/PGDip

MA/PGDip

MA

MA/PGDip

Applied Linguistics and TESOL

Audiovisual Translation

Documentary

Media, Culture and Identity

Number of credits: MA: 180, PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Number of credits: MA: 180

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120

Course duration: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

Course duration:

Course duration:

General course information This course is designed to offer English language teaching professionals the opportunity to engage with the theories and practices of language learning and assessment with a view to developing and enriching their own teaching and furthering their careers in the field of language education.

General course information This course aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating audiovisual media and familiarises students with the socio-cultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise this type of translation. It places significant emphasis on accessibility to the media and offers grounding in translation theory and research methods. Through your work with dedicated software and high-tech industry-standard equipment, you are equipped with the necessary skills to enter the professional market and the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

Key areas of study: • principles and practice in language teaching • theories of second language learning • language testing • issues in applied sociolinguistics

Key areas of study:

• linguistic analysis for language teaching

• subtitling and surtitling

• research methods and dissertation.

• dubbing, voice-over and video games translation

Special features Holders of the DELTA will receive a credit transfer of 40 credits and so be exempted from the module Principles and Practice in Language Teaching and one optional 20-credit module. Lecturers on the course are members of two Research Centres: • The Centre for Language Assessment Research (CLARe) offers scholars, examining boards and government organisations a centre for training and consultancy. It is currently engaged on test development and research projects worldwide. • The Centre for Research in English Language and Linguistics (CRELL) is a focus for a range of linguistic and applied linguistic research and runs a seminar series open to students with key speakers in a variety of areas in English language, linguistics and TESOL. Research areas: Second language acquisition; task-based language learning; sociolinguistic and applied linguistic perspectives on TESOL; cross-cultural issues in teaching and testing; second language test development; validation; perspectives and challenges associated with benchmarking and standardisation.

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• live subtitling by respeaking • audio description for the blind and the visually impaired • subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing • translation theories • translation tools and localisation. Special features • The course is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom. • Online versions of some modules will be available. • The University’s location in London is ideal as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world. Research areas: Subtitling; dubbing; respeaking; audio description; subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing; lexicography. The course can accommodate a variety of student research interests in the translation discipline.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

General course information This is a course in the theorised practice of documentary through digital video, photography and journalism. It draws on a range of disciplines such as film studies, documentary photography, journalism and human rights, to contextualise the processes of researching, developing, writing, shooting, editing and exhibiting the documentary. The course is intended for those looking to enhance and develop their production and critical skills in direct relation to documentary practices in their chosen medium but there is also an option in documentary history and theory. Key areas of study: • independent documentary production • documentary photography • documentary and journalism • documentary research • documentary and human rights • film studies • production management, promotion and distribution • histories and theories of documentary. Special features This project-based MA requires you to develop a documentary project in your chosen medium and while doing so reflect on your practice in relationship to issues of human rights, journalism, documentary photography and film studies. All of the lecturers and associate lecturers teaching on the course are either practising film makers or researchers active in the field, and include visiting lecturers from the industry. Research areas: Documentary research; documentary production; documentary ethics; international documentary production; producing; documentary cinematography; editing; sound design; human rights; journalism; film studies; documentary photography; exhibition.

full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–4 years

General course information This new and innovative course combines media and cultural studies in an interdisciplinary way. Drawing on critical theoretical methodologies from the broad spectrum of the humanities, this masters course is distinct in its exploration of the relationship between media, culture and identity. Key areas of study: • contemporary cultural and political issues – the politics of identity and mediatisation • advanced theoretical and methodological developments in cultural and media studies • cultural theories such as Marxism and post-Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis and post-colonialism • media and cultural industries such as TV, film, print media, indy media and the internet • debates on the formation of social and cultural identity, emotion, visual culture, everyday life, public sphere and imagined communities. Special features You become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC), giving you access to a diverse programme of research seminars, symposia and special events organised in collaboration with institutions such as the British Film Institute. For international students, a dedicated pathway on the International Foundation Certificate feeds directly on to this course. Roehampton’s location in London is ideal for media and culture students. There is a multitude of relevant conferences and research seminars, and of course there is an abundance of cultural institutions and media companies in London, unrivalled by any other city in the UK. Research areas: Media studies; cultural industries; cultural and critical theory; gender; race; ethnicity; cultural politics and policy; psychoanalysis; globalisation; television industry; television histories.

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www.roehampton.ac.uk/psychology

Department of Psychology The Department brings together world-leading research and teaching in all major areas of psychology, psychological therapies and the arts and play therapies. As one of the largest psychological training departments in the country, it provides opportunities for researchers in a range of disciplines to investigate an array of psychological problems and phenomena.

The Department is committed to using the latest technology and is part of the CUBIC MRI consortium, providing access to an fMRI scanner. Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create a dynamic environment for both study and research, based at our stunning campus beside Richmond Park. We also host a range of specialist seminars, workshops and guest lectures.

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MSc/MA

MSc/PGDip/PGCert

MA

MSc

Applied Music Psychology

Applied Psychological Research

Art Psychotherapy

Attachment Studies

Number of credits: 180

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Number of credits: 240

Number of credits: MSc: 180

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2 years

Course duration: full-time: 1 year; part-time: 2–5 years

Course duration:

Course duration:

General course information Music psychology is an exciting subdiscipline of psychology, which combines a number of theoretical approaches and research methodologies to answer interesting and important questions on the relationship between music and human perception, cognition and emotion. Insights into the way in which we listen to, perform and compose music help us address important issues in the areas of brain function, language processing, memory, problem solving and creativity. At the same time, music fulfils important social functions, which have been subject of much research and debate.

General course information The course is distinctive in enabling you to develop expertise in the application of quantitative and qualitative research to real-world psychological issues. It also provides a sound basis for further training in doctoral-level research and the psychology professions.

Music psychology has many practical applications (eg in the areas of retail and media). In addition, the ever-increasing use of music as a healing and therapeutic medium makes it even more important for experts to understand psychological and neurological mechanisms and processes that underpin our experience of music. Key areas of study: • theoretical perspectives in music psychology • research methods (quantitative and qualitative) • music perception and cognition • commercial applications • social and developmental psychology of music • introduction to clinical and therapeutic applications • psychology of musical performance • neuropsychology of music. Special features The course brings together expertise of psychologists, educationalists, musicians and special needs experts and the focus is on applying theoretical insights in real-life settings including commercial, media, clinical, educational, community and special needs. Research areas: Music perception and cognition; emotion and music; musical identities; music and the brain; psychology of musical performance; music and special needs. 112

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Key areas of study: The PGCert course includes modules on:

full-time: 2 years; part-time: 3 years

General course information This course is approved by the Health Professions Council and leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification. The course provides theoretical and practice-based knowledge together with a supervised clinical placement. Theory is underpinned by Jungian analytical psychology, and you are encouraged to continue to develop your identity as an artist while training to be a therapist. In addition, Roehampton University provides a range of opportunities for qualified arts therapists to continue studying in the areas of research as well as attending continuing professional development (CPD) courses.

full time: 18–24 months; part-time: 2–3 years

General course information This course offers practical and theoretical training in Patricia Crittenden’s Dynamic Maturational Model (DMM) of attachment. You will be able to learn two validated attachment assessments, for use with infants and children up to the age of five years. In addition you will receive an introduction to attachment assessments for older children and adults. The programme will suit clinicians and practitioners from a wide range of health and social care disciplines as well as students interested in attachment research at masters or PhD level. Key areas of study:

• quantitative data collection and analysis • experimental design, data collection and analysis

Key areas of study:

• competing theories in attachment studies

• qualitative data collection and analysis.

• art psychotherapy process group

The PGDip course builds on this by allowing you to choose from a range of research methods and applied topics and thereby develop more specialist expertise.

• art psychotherapy workshops

• using and coding the CARE-Index (adult–child interaction suitable for children aged 1 day to about 3 ½ years)

Examples of applied topics include adult psychopathology, child psychopathology, health psychology and cognitive neuroscience.

• theory and practice of art psychotherapy: assessment, evaluation and research

Examples of applied methods include ANOVA, conversation analysis, correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, structural equation modelling, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, narrative analysis and phenomenology.

• theory I: human growth and development

The MSc course builds on this by enabling you to investigate issues of particular relevance in a research dissertation using a method of your choice. Special features Topics will be taught by experts in the area (eg clinical and health psychologists) and depending on the choice of optional modules and selection of dissertation topic, you will be eligible to chose a named endorsement (eg health psychology, psychopathology, social interaction). This will highlight your commitment and expertise in the particular area.

• art psychotherapy clinical placements and supervision • introduction to other arts therapies

• theory and practice of art psychotherapy: Jungian analytic psychology and art psychotherapy. You remain in personal therapy throughout your training. Special features All students complete an intensive week at the beginning of the training and follow a course of study that features: • an emphasis on a Jungian analytic psychology model of art therapy • an exploration of the unconscious through symbols • child developmental psychology, psychoanalytical and philosophical theories. Research areas: Research areas include clinical, theoretical and philosophical issues pertaining to art psychotherapy theory and practice. This might include areas such as impoverished symbol formation in children on the autistic spectrum; art therapy and mental illness; the relationship between drawing style and self-concept in primary school children; and the use of mandala images in art therapy.

• using and coding the Preschool Assessment of Attachment (Strange Situation Procedure with Children aged 19 months to 5 years) • current trends and approaches in neuroscience and attachment • overview of other procedures such as Narrative Stems, the School Aged Assessment of attachment and the Adult Attachment Interview • clinical intervention seminar • forensic use of attachment assessments • research. Special features This course is unique in teaching the uses and analysis of specialist assessment procedures as part of a mainstream MSc course. The DMM is the only truly developmental model of attachment currently available and is particularly sensitive to variations in cultures and to the attachment strategies of distressed and atypical populations of people. Research areas: There is a wide research base to draw on, including children who are fostered or adopted; the assessment of parenting; adult and child mental health; adult attachment and neuro-imaging; and the forensic use of attachment studies in child protection and the penal system.

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MSc/PGDip/PGCert

PsychD

MA

MA

Counselling and Psychotherapy (UKCP)

Counselling Psychology (BPS)

Dance Movement Psychotherapy

Dramatherapy

Number of credits: MSc: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

Number of credits: D-Level: 360; M-Level: 240

Number of credits: 240

Number of credits: 240

Course duration: part-time: 3 academic years over 6 semesters

Course duration: full-time: 3 years; part-time: 4 years

Course duration:

Course duration:

General course information The MSc is designed as both a stand-alone course and as part of and progression to the PsychD award. The course offers you a clear path to United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP) registration as a psychotherapeutic counsellor and/ or psychotherapist. The PGCert year focuses on practice, the PGDip year on theoretical implications and the MSc year on relational research.

General course information This practitioner doctorate course equips you for registration with the Health Professions Council (HPC) as a counselling psychologist and with the British Psychological Society (BPS) as a chartered counselling psychologist. All candidates must have the graduate basis for registration (GBR) with the BPS, a 2:1 in psychology or equivalent, experience in an emotionally demanding helping role and, preferably, a basic training in counselling skills.

General course information This innovative course is designed to prepare you for professional practice as a dance movement psychotherapist. The unique training comprises an integrated range of theoretical, experiential and clinical areas combined with cutting-edge research.

Key areas of study: • integration of relational approaches through exploration of phenomenology through the main therapeutic modalities (humanism, existentialism, psychoanalysis and postmodernism) • ethical and professional issues in relation to practice and supervision

This integrated, competence-based course considers the therapeutic encounter from a relational perspective. This unifying theme runs throughout the three years. Key areas of study:

part-time: 3 years, full-time: 2 years

The philosophical framework of the training promotes a social constructionist approach to dance movement psychotherapy. The social construct model actively promotes embodied performance practices, mutual influence and the construction of social and power differentials between client and therapist. You are encouraged to develop a self-reflexive practice and the ability for critical reflection on creative processes. On successful completion of the course, you are entitled to register as a member of the professional body, the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK).

part-time: 3 years

General course information Based on the ritual theatre model of dramatherapy, this unique course provides opportunities for the theoretical, practical and clinical exploration of ritual and drama for healing and change. The part-time structure includes monthly weekend attendance and one intensive week per year (Easter School). The course is approved by the Health Professions Council and leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification. Key areas of study: • clinical placement and supervision • therapeutic stories • individual and group process • ritual theatre

• evidence-based practice and relational research

• the relational model, an integrative framework for psychological therapy incorporating person-centred and psychodynamic approaches

• phenomenology, and developments such as postmodernism

• cognitive behavioural theory and therapy

Key areas of study:

• individual dramatherapy

• time-limited (short- and long-term) and open-ended therapy.

• research training

• contemporary and historical approaches to dance movement psychotherapy

• crafting theatres of the psyche

• the social construction of meaning in relation to the body, gender, class, ethnicity and culture

• the art of structure

Special features This is a practitioner course. In all years use is made of learning communities and, within these, therapeutic groups, practice sessions on the implications of theory for practice, case presentations and academic group supervision. Research areas: This course is attached to the Research Centre for Therapeutic Education at the University and benefits from its wide-ranging and innovative research base and seminar programmes.

• personal development • placements and supervision. Special features This course is well established, has an excellent reputation and is taught by experienced practitioners and researchers. Teaching and learning takes an interactive form, with an emphasis on participation in skills sessions, seminars and workshops. The subject area is multidisciplinary and trainees join a community of practitioners in training including psychotherapists and counsellors. It is possible to exit the course with an MSc rather than a doctoral thesis. The MSc does not confer practitioner status in the UK, but may be of interest to overseas applicants in particular.

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Research areas: The course is connected to the Research Centre for Therapeutic Education. Examples of research areas include existential analytic psychotherapy; heuristic enquiry; conversation and narrative analysis; group psychotherapy; diversity and antioppressive practice.

• embodied performance practice • dance/movement improvisation • fieldwork placements and supervision • the body, play and child development • client embodiment: clinical placement and supervision (one to two days a week). Special features The course offers opportunities for you to explore and expand movement preferences, ways of interacting with others, belief systems, prejudices and values. Emphasis is placed on you developing your own style as a dance movement psychotherapist. You also have the opportunity to perform and exhibit your ongoing work in a yearly Arts Therapies Exhibition.

• working with myths • paratheatrical explorations

• therapeutic theatre • dramatherapy and closure. Special features You are trained to facilitate an in-depth therapeutic process with a range of client groups, and devise therapeutic performances and workshops. You also undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice. Research areas: Individual dramatherapy in schizophrenia; perception and evaluation of therapeutic outcomes from therapist and client perspectives; the role of race, culture and gender; dramatherapy and “mentalisation” with borderline personality disorder and complex trauma; therapeutic scenarios and resistance; creativity and destructiveness; the dramatherapist and the multidisciplinary team.

Research areas: Staff are involved in seminal research in the field and have links with various Research Centres across the University. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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MA

MA

Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy

Music Therapy

Number of credits: 180 Course duration: 3 years (attendance one day a week in each of the 3 years)

General course information This innovative course draws on the 20 years of accumulated teaching and practice experience of the staff team to offer academic progression and professional training in the field of psychological therapy. The MA takes three academic years to complete, with attendance at the University for one day a week. From the second year, you are required to spend the equivalent of another day a week in one or more counselling placements. The course includes all the training necessary for eligibility to apply for individual practitioner accreditation with the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP). Applications for BACP accreditation may only be made after at least one year of independent supervised counselling practice following graduation. Key areas of study: In response to recent developments in the field, an integrative relational model is taught and you are encouraged to learn about different approaches to counselling and psychotherapy. Teaching includes: • life-span developmental theories • therapeutic skills practice in small groups • supervision of client work in small groups • critical analysis of approaches and research into counselling and psychotherapy. You are required to be in personal therapy throughout the course. Special features All members of staff are qualified, experienced counselling and psychotherapy practitioners and teachers in higher education. The course offers a comprehensive skills training and it also takes a critical look at person-centred, psychodynamic and cognitive models of theory and practice. Research areas: The course is attached to the Research Centre for Therapeutic Education, in which opportunities exist for researching many areas of clinical theory and practice. 116

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Number of credits: 240 Course duration: full-time: 2 years; part-time: 4 years (it is also possible to complete in 3 years by arrangement with tutors)

General course information This course aims to help individuals to develop skills and self-understanding through a primarily non-verbal relationship in music. Work takes place individually or in groups. Music is viewed as an expression or manifestation of ourselves. Through the use of improvised music the therapist facilitates the individual’s move towards increased wellbeing in the form of specific therapeutic aims. The course leads to a qualification that confers eligibility for registration with the Health Professions Council, which provides legal status for practice as a music therapist in the UK. Key areas of study: • clinical context for music therapy • music studies: clinical improvisation • infant observation • music therapy theory • clinical case work and supervision • personal therapy • introduction to research • dissertation • research project. Special features The course emphasises the emotional development of the student practitioner together with clinical exploration through critical enquiry. The practitioner is constantly observing on an intuitive and empirical level, and forming initial hypotheses that are then tested for their validity in the light of clinical evidence. Research areas: The course has links with a variety of Research Centres within the University. Staff who teach on the course are active researchers with strong publication records within the field.

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MA

PsychD

PsychD

Play Therapy

Forensic Psychology

Psychotherapy and Counselling (UKCP)

Number of credits: 240

Number of credits: 360

Number of credits: 360

Course duration:

Course duration:

Course duration:

2 years (2 days per week on site plus external placements etc)

General course information Based on a person-centred model of therapy, the course emphasises the use of play within a therapeutic relationship to facilitate therapeutic change. It prepares you for clinical practice, predominantly with children, as a professional therapist within the public and private sectors. The course leads to a qualification that entitles you for registration as a Full Member of the British Association for Play Therapists. The 10 modules are designed to train you for therapeutic practice that is theoretically sound and emotionally aware. Key areas of study: • human development and growth • play therapy theory and skills • play therapy practice (and clinical supervision) • working with loss, trauma and abuse • young child observations (and attachment theory) • play therapy in context • research methods and clinical efficacy • personal development (though personal therapy and experiential process groups). Special features The course encompasses theoretical, practical and experiential learning. All students are required to be in personal therapy for the duration of the course and will complete two specified periods of supervised clinical placements alongside their studies. Research areas: Child-centred play therapy and the use of therapeutic boundaries; play therapy and unresolved bereavement issues; play therapy in schools; the efficacy of play therapy; play therapy and different cultural beliefs.

minimum 30 months, maximum 40 months

General course information This is a unique opportunity for those who are HPC-registered Forensic Psychologists (or are eligible to be so registered) to obtain a doctoral degree specifically relating to their work as practitioners. Student research is undertaken in the Department of Psychology, which runs a number of highly innovative professional doctorate courses and is well placed to provide support to those pursuing the PsychD in Forensic Psychology. Key areas of study: You are expected to produce a research dissertation, which you are encouraged to undertake in your place of work. The dissertation may focus on issues of psychological relevance within the criminal justice system (eg in prison settings), the nature and social context of the forensic psychologist (eg the specific needs of certain offender populations) or within legal contexts or other domains where the work of a forensic psychologist is pertinent. Other areas of research may be possible providing there is relevant expertise within the Department. Special features You can expect a supportive research culture with regular seminars and workshops. Relevant modules from the MSc in Applied Psychological Research can be taken to enhance methodological skills in qualitative and/or quantitative methods. There is also an opportunity of an SPSS refresher course for those interested in engaging in quantitative research. Research areas: Sex offending; child abuse; domestic violence; addictive behaviours; anxiety and psychopathology; psychology and the legal system.

part-time: 5 years minimum (including MSc years)

General course information In addition to the aims of the MSc in Counselling and Psychotherapy, this Professional Doctorate course offers an exciting and innovative opportunity that further develops practice and research within an ongoing professional training with a clear path to United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP) registration as a psychotherapist. The course is also suitable for experienced counsellors and psychotherapists who are already qualified and wish to advance their development both academically and as practitioners and supervisors. Furthermore, there is the opportunity to carry out a piece of original research, which forms an integral part of this course. Key areas of study: • exploration of phenomenology providing a grounding and continuing development in the integration of relational approaches to counselling and psychotherapy through humanistic, existential and analytic psychotherapy • an opportunity to study European philosophy and consider this in the light of contemporary 21st-century practice • a comparative study of research methods, with an emphasis on qualitative and relational approaches, and the opportunity to carry out an in-depth research study in a chosen area • a consideration of ethical and professional issues in psychotherapy and counselling as applied to practice, research and supervision. Special features This is a practitioner-based course taking you to high levels of practice and research as well as a deeper understanding of the issues in this field. In all years use is made of learning communities and, within these, therapeutic groups, practice sessions on the implications of theory for practice, case presentations and academic group supervision. Research areas: This course is attached to the Research Centre for Therapeutic Education at the University and benefits from its wide-ranging and innovative research base and seminar programmes.

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In a world where a reductive, mechanistic interpretation of science dominates, the Roehampton PsychD Psychotherapy and Counselling programme offers an increasingly important forum in which science in its truest sense – a quest for knowledge, not a hermeneutic quest for validation – can be explored. Tom Cotton, former student

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Our teaching is informed by the internationally recognised research done by staff in areas such as migration, multiculturalism, “honour” killings, hate crime, substance abuse and addiction, urban criminology, health policy, childhood development, and conflict and commemoration. The Department is also home to the Crucible Centre for Human Rights and Social Justice. This was the first institution to be awarded the UK government’s “Centre for Excellence in Human Rights Teaching and Learning”, which it held from 2005 to 2010. This reflects Roehampton’s central commitment to the promotion of social justice through excellence in teaching, learning and research. In addition to academic research, members of the Department of Social Sciences are also involved in consultancy and collaboration on behalf of, among others, the UK government and the European Union as well as international NGOs and statutory human rights bodies.

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Department of Social Sciences Social science is a diverse, dynamic and challenging field confronting some of the most pressing issues facing the global community today. This international perspective is reflected in the Department of Social Sciences at Roehampton, which brings together academics involved in teaching and international research in four distinct yet complementary areas: sociology, childhood and society, human rights and criminology. 120

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Human Rights at Roehampton Roehampton offers a distinctive suite of MA courses in human rights aimed at international and UK-based students from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds. While each course concentrates on various discipline-specific aspects of human rights, they are located within a broader, multidisciplinary perspective through shared modules. In the first semester you will gain a solid grounding in human rights theory and practice and also have the chance to develop your own research interests in collaboration with staff, invited specialist lecturers, and the many international students with whom you will be studying. In the second semester you will then be able to specialise in your chosen area via dedicated modules, culminating in an original piece of work prepared through your dissertation. At present, two such pathways are in place: Human Rights and International Relations, and Human Rights and Society. The former is ideally suited to students with a particular interest in international political aspects of human rights, the latter to those interested more in the sociological aspects. We are however currently expanding our suite, and four new pathways – Human Rights and Criminal Justice, Human Rights and Religion, Human Rights and Political Thought, and Human Rights and Documentary – are being developed to take advantage of the expertise in these areas by specialists in criminology, theology and religious studies, philosophy, and film-making respectively. Once again, while students formally enrol on one of these pathways at the start of their course, the first term is a shared experience and there is flexibility across the pathways prior to the second term and the subsequent dissertation, which are more pathway-specific. Even then, students can take one module in the second term from outside their pathway, so there is plenty of scope to try something different.

to be awarded the UK government’s “Centre of Excellence in Human Rights Teaching and Learning”, which it held from 2005 to 2010. In addition to attending modules delivered by internationally published academics, you will also be encouraged to attend regular seminars where you will be exposed to the latest research being undertaken by international scholars. The courses also ensure that you are exposed to the “real world” of human rights through involving NGOs in the delivery of modules and providing all students with the opportunity to go on work placements as part of their studies. This combination of academic and practical experiences provides an excellent preparation for study at higher levels (MPhil or PhD) and for work in the fields of human rights and social justice.

Roehampton has plenty of expertise in this area and an established reputation. In addition to this suite of masters courses, we also offer the first multidisciplinary undergraduate programme in Human Rights to be offered in the UK, and the highly prestigious Erasmus Mundus masters programme in Human Rights Practice. We are also home to the Crucible Centre for Human Rights and Social Justice. This was the first institution 122

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MA/PGDip/PGCert

MA/PGDip/PGCert

MA

MA/PGDip/PGCert

Human Rights and International Relations

Human Rights and Society

Human Rights Practice – Erasmus Mundus

Social Research Methods

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Course duration:

Course duration:

MA: 1–1½ years; PGDip: approx. 1 year; PGCert: approx. 10 months

General course information This course deals specifically with understanding the role of human rights in world politics, and involves a critical discussion of the structures and institutions of global governance. It is ideally suited to students with a background in politics or international relations wishing to focus their disciplinary knowledge on this timely and contested area of study.

MA: 1–1½ years; PGDip: approx. 1 year; PGCert: approx. 10 months

General course information This course focuses on the use of sociological methods and theory to investigate human rights standards and abuses. The “sociology of human rights” is a relatively new but significant area of study within sociology. This course is therefore ideally suited to students with a social science background (for example, sociology, social anthropology, social psychology) wishing to focus on this emerging subdiscipline. Key areas of study:

Key areas of study:

• human rights from a sociological perspective

• global governance and citizenship • global political economy and social justice • dissertation (MA only). Research areas: The study of genocide; war and peace studies; media and political communication; globality and governance; human rights in international relations; not-for-profit and voluntary sector management; citizenship.

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60

• rights, citizenship and social justice • dissertation (MA). Research areas: The application of social theory to human rights; the study of genocide; globalisation; “race” and ethnicity; gender; social justice and equal opportunities; work and employment; political sociology; citizenship.

Number of credits: MA: 180; PGDip: 120; PGCert: 60 Number of credits: 120 compulsory ECTS credits Course duration:

General course information This prestigious EU-sponsored course is taught by three universities: Roehampton University (UK), Gothenburg University (Sweden) and Tromsø University (Norway). The course prepares you to:

stimulating and thoroughly engaging. This was largely because of the energy and commitment to the subject of the academic staff and the varied approach to the study of Human Rights. I felt privileged to have the opportunity to re-engage with formal education – after a very long break – and to be part

of an international student group.

Janet McColl, former MA Human Rights and International Relations student

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General course information The course is distinctive in providing students with an exciting opportunity to develop expertise in a range of both quantitative and qualitative research methods of data collection and analysis with a focus on their application to real-world issues. Key areas of study:

• work effectively with the protection, promotion and implementation of human rights in a changing global context

• research skills and skills needed for employment in the research field

• take up careers in human rights work in civil society organisations, governments and the public sector, and business

• philosophy of social research

• develop analytical expertise in human rights perspectives, contexts and organisations • evaluate and apply this knowledge to different cases and practices • develop programmes of action and policies • compare analytically human rights practice across different cultures and nation-states, recognising that interpretations and practices vary in different regions of the world. Key areas of study:

The course was challenging – as it should be – but always

Course duration: full-time: 12 months; part-time: 2 years

2 years

• human rights practice: an interdisciplinary approach • human rights practice: legal perspectives • globalisation: challenges to human rights • human rights: society and social structure • human rights and organisational management: civil society, the state and market. Special features This is perhaps the most practice-oriented course of its kind currently available in Europe. Research areas: Theories of human rights; indigenous rights; sociology of rights; human rights law; genocide; political communication; children’s rights; war and peace; reconciliation initiatives; globalisation; culture and ethnicity; NGOs; organisational management.

• the design of social research • quantitative research methods of data collection and analysis (including use of SPSS) • qualitative research methods of data collection and analysis (including use of CAQDAS) • discipline-specific knowledge and skills: a choice of education or social science.

The certificate course addresses core features of social research methods, focusing on different forms of data and how they can be collected and analysed. MA-level study is aimed at students who either want a discrete research-based MA or want to run a pilot study for an MPhil/PhD research project. Special features External assessors have rated the innovative “general research skills” module very highly and commented favourably on the assessment mix. Research areas: Education policy; social justice – class, race and gender; education of professionals; early childhood – history and policy; music education; art education; human rights education; citizenship education; physical education; classroom ethnography; crime, social policy, ethnicity and multiculturalism; domestic violence; human rights; food; childhood; human–animal relations; globalisation; citizenship; New Labour; women in science; kinship in South Asia. The course has 1+3 recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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Trafalgar Squar e

The London Eye

Buckingham Palace

Close to the heart of London

St Paul's Cathedral

Central London

Harrods

Tower Bridge

Barnes

Sheen High Street

KENSINGTON Knightsbridge

Earls Court

Hammersmith

WESTMINSTER

BRENTFORD

CHELSEA

KEW

FULHAM

ISLEWORTH

Richmond Park

HOUNSLOW

Richmond

MORTLAKE

Barnes Putney

King’s Road Chelsea a

Putney Bridge RIV

Twickenham Stadium

Battersea Power Statio

Roehampton Village Wimbledon

SURBITON

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Kingston-uponThames

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If you require an audio, Braille or large-text version of this publication, please call the Enquiries Office on +44 (0)20 8392 3232. Please allow a minimum of 10 days for delivery.

Wimbledon Putney Shops

THAMES DITTON

EAST DULWICH

We have links with Natural History Museum • National Gallery • V&A Museum • London Zoo • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew • 30 St Mary Axe (aka the Gherkin) • Museum of London • Canary Wharf • Wimbledon Common • Houses of Parliament • Royal Opera House • Theatre district • Hampton Court Palace • Imperial War Museum • BBC • Wimbledon tennis • Bevis Marks Synagogue • Buddhapadipa Temple • Westminster Abbey • London Central Mosque • Shri Swaminarayan Mandir • Richmond Park

Carling Academy Brixton

Kingston Hampton Court

Brixton

Balham

HAMPTON

Hampton Court Palace

The Houses of Parliament

Clapham Junction

ER THAMES

HAM

Teddington

ROTHERHITHE

VAUXHALL

BATTERSEA

WANDSWORTH Twickenham

Waterloo

Roehampton University is just half an hour from central London; this advantageous location allows students to engage with the city’s major organisations, from multinational businesses to cultural bodies, and benefit from the links that Roehampton staff have established with them.

Roehampton University is committed to being an equal opportunities education provider and will therefore make reasonable adjustments for disabled applicants and students. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information given in this publication is accurate at the time of going to print and the University will use all reasonable efforts to deliver the courses as described. However, the University reserves the right, without notice, to withdraw or change the courses included in this prospectus, to alter tuition fees, entry requirements, and the facilities or services provided, and cannot accept responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions, cancellations or alterations. Please check the website for up-to-date information. www.roehampton.ac.uk

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One of the leading new universities in the UK for research and number one for Dance and Biological Anthropology – RAE 2008

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78% of research of international standing and 33% internationally excellent or world class – RAE 2008

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One of the highest concentrations of National Teaching Fellows in the UK

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Our students come from 130 countries around the world, resulting in a vibrant and diverse university community

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A beautiful parkland campus featuring historic buildings and lakes, and on-site student residences

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Ranked first among London universities for the environment on and around campus – Times Higher Education 2009 Student Experience Survey

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Four historic Colleges dating back to the 1840s, creating a strong sense of community on campus

…all this only 30 minutes from central London

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Postgraduate Prospectus 2011/12  

A guide to the postgraduate degrees available at Roehampton University

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