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moirahouse.co.uk Roedean Moira House, Upper Carlisle Rd, Eastbourne, BN20 7TE, United Kingdom +44(0)1323 644144 Registered Charity 307072

Sixth Form Curriculum 2019


Contents Academic

3

Economics

26

Pastoral

4

English Literature

28

Leadership

5

Further Mathematics

30

Co-curriculum: Sport, Music

6

Geography

32

Creative and Performing Arts

7

History

34

Beyond the Curriculum

8

Languages: French, German & Spanish 36

Sixth Form Scholarships

10

Latin

38

Choosing your A Levels

12

Mathematics

40

Art and Design

14

Music

42

Biology

16

Photography

44

BTEC in Performing Arts

18

Physical Education

46

Business

20

Physics

48

Chemistry

22

Psychology

50

Drama and Theatre Studies

24

Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics) 52 Textile Design

54

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A-Level Results 2018 A* - A = 32% A* - B = 65% A* - C = 89%

Academic The Sixth Form at Roedean Moira House promises a journey of intellectual stimulation and challenge, combined with a wealth of opportunities and experiences, in a happy and caring environment. These final years of school will provide you with a solid and powerful springboard to the next stage of your education, and onwards into 21st century society. Life in the Sixth Form is a liberating experience. For the first time in your school career, you will be able to study the subjects you love. You must be prepared for the fact that the move into the Sixth Form is a significant step. You will normally choose three subjects in Year 12 and you will find the increasing emphasis on individual study gives you more space to develop your own ideas and sense of personal involvement in your work. In addition to your studies, you will have the opportunity to take on new responsibilities and leadership, and to participate in our extensive range of co–curricular activities, visits, and the Community Action Programme.

The learning environment at Roedean Moira House provides you with an opportunity to take academic risks, pursue excellence, and achieve fantastic results. This is all rooted in a positive and collaborative setting, where mature and open relationships are fostered between you and your teachers. Individual-centred support and tuition are our top priority. Roedean Moira House offers a linear approach to A Level study. This means that you will choose three A Levels alongside a programme of Community Action Service, a research-based project, and Skills for Life and Learning. All external examinations will take place in the second year of the course. The gap between GCSE and A Level is a wide one, and you will be expected to work hard and to use your time wisely. There is plenty of support at hand, should you need it. Choose your subjects with care:

play to your strengths. Class sizes are small and twelve students is usually the maximum number of students in a class. In lessons, your teachers will expect you to take increasing responsibility for your studies. They will guide you through the fundamentals of the course, and you will be set work to consolidate the knowledge gained and develop your understanding of it. The ability to work independently in the Sixth Form is a vital skill in preparation for the type of study and work which you will undertake at university and later in a career. We therefore expect the necessary commitment from Sixth Form students. You will invest time and effort in your academic work, demonstrating a sustained approach and intellectual curiosity. Students in the Sixth Form are expected to spend a minimum of 5-6 hours per week study time outside of the timetabled lessons, on each of their subjects.

The Sixth Form is both challenging and rewarding, and those who benefit most are those who are prepared to work hard and get involved. Our aim at Roedean Moira House is to challenge preconceptions, to open doors, and to give you the necessary skills, insights, and experiences to help you move from School to university and beyond with confidence. 3


Pastoral care is exceptionally high at Roedean Moira House and this is central to the success of our students. All students are allocated a study area and have a tutor, housemistress of Boarding and head of Sixth Form. These members of staff form the network of support, both academically and pastorally, for all students during their Sixth Form career

Pastoral Roedean Moira House is a global community where boarders and day students alike form a strong allegiance with their pyramid and integrated friendships with each other. This warm and friendly community nurtures each student to strive to be the best they want to be. There is no set model and we enjoy the diversity each individual brings. Many of our Sixth Form students have commented on the positive environment and the fact that all students are accepted here and t in. Academic tutorial groups usually have between six to eight students. Your tutor meets with you at least once every day, and deals with the majority of the day–to–day administration. This daily contact with your tutor and fellow students provides the solid foundation upon which the success of your education rests. This is crucial, since it is your tutor who will write the basis of your UCAS reference when you apply to university. Help is always on hand if you need it, together with careers’ advice and guidance in selection of university courses. The Sixth Form constitutes the beginning of the transition between school and later life, when you will have to be independent, confident, and sensitive to the expectations of others.

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Roedean Moira House students are the leaders of the future. Therefore, an understanding of leadership and the diverse range of roles available to senior students are essential elements of our Sixth Form provision.

Leadership As a preparation for university life, increasing independence and freedom offer a link between school security and learning the life skills essential for university success. We expect high standards from you in work ethic, behaviour and appearance because the rest of the School looks to you to set the right tone; you will be role–models within the school, and ambassadors for it outside. We place great emphasis on respect, tolerance, and an appreciation of different values and points of view; we therefore expect all members of our community to contribute positively to this ethos. The pastoral care at Roedean Moira House is supported by a popular life skills programme which includes topics giving access to the key PHSE areas relating to the Sixth Form. All staff understand the complexities of transition from school to adult life, and they aim to ensure that each student leaving Roedean is equipped, happy, and prepared to explore the world and make a difference.

There are many opportunities in the Sixth Form to gain valuable leadership experience. In the first year of the Sixth Form, you can become House Captains, Peer Listeners, run an activity, sit on the School Council or volunteer. These positions enable you to take responsibility for areas of school life and learn to work in teams as well as lead groups.

Pastoral prefects help to run activities in younger tutorial groups. Responsibility is a challenge and the onus is on you to manage your time, both in and out of the classroom, to exploit and relish the opportunities you are given over the two years you have in the Sixth Form.

The highest leadership positions are offered in the final term of Year 12 into Year 13. These are an elected group of Prefects or Standard Bearers and include our Head Girls or School Knights. There is also the opportunity to become music, charity or sports captains, among other roles. These positions are elected democratically and all students are offered external leadership training, to include areas such as communication, team–work, project management, presentation skills, and the basic skills of what makes good leaders.

Academic prefects also champion academic subjects where they run societies and support groups for younger pupils. In your final year, you are encouraged to become Sixth Form buddies, giving support, guidance, and friendship to students arriving new into the Sixth Form.

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Although results in public examinations are key for your future, you will leave Roedean Moira House with far more than just good A Levels. Enrichment is central to any Sixth Form experience, because academic A Level study is not enough on its own to prepare students for university.

Co-curriculum: Sport, Music

Creative and Performing Arts

Sport

Music

Creative and Performing Arts

Drama

All students in the Sixth Form have Games as part of their core curriculum.

Music is exceptional at Roedean Moira House.

The Drama, Dance, and Art departments at Roedean Moira House form a centre of excellence, with students leaving to enter university courses and careers within these fields.

At Roedean Moira House, all students have access to school drama productions

Roedean Moira House offers talented sportswomen highly trained and proficient coaching in the areas of Hockey, Netball, Swimming, Tennis, Cricket and Athletics. There are a number of fixtures and a good range of facilities to support excellence in these areas. Students who enjoy non–competitive team games are encouraged to try a rotation of activities including Zumba, Trampolining, Yoga, Karate, Horse- riding, Volleyball, Badminton, Gym, Archery, and many more. Having a double lesson dedicated to PE/Games is fantastic way to remain fit and healthy, and to have fun!

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The department is equipped with a number of practice rooms, a music computer classroom, and a superb team of visiting teachers in all instruments, singing and percussion. The school offers a full orchestra, senior choir, chamber choir and many smaller ensembles. Each year, the Music department puts on showcases of talent from the more formal Founders’ Day service and Carol Services to more popular themed concerts recently including gig nights.

In Art in the Sixth Form, you can opt for the A Level course or take part in one of the many extra Creative Art clubs after school.

You can become involved in an annual School Play, either front-of-house or behind the scenes. In total, there are three annual productions, one aimed at each stage of the school, so there is plenty of opportunity for you to get involved.

Dance is an extremely popular choice at Roedean Moira House, with many students taking private dance lessons or performing in one of the Dance Showcases throughout the year.

Music scholars and chamber groups regularly perform in lunchtime and evening recitals in the local community. All students are encouraged to learn an instrument or be part of a musical group.

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Sixth Formers leave Roedean Moira House with a strong academic profile, coupled with independence, self– motivation, communication skills, and diligence, whilst also being intellectually stimulated far beyond their A Level studies. The Sixth Form is an exciting stage in your education, and we hope that you will take advantage of the wide range of opportunities available to you at Roedean Moira House.

Beyond the Curriculum In the Sixth Form, we offer a diverse range of assemblies with guest speakers. There are also academic activities to engage in interests beyond the constraints of curriculum learning. Roedean Moira House offers a Debating Club and the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme to name a few. All students in Year 12 are expected to take part in the Community Action Programme, in which students acquire a wide range of skills in order that they might contribute actively to the school and wider community.

Co-curriculum/Enrichment

Trips

Roedean Moira House emphasises the importance of a balanced experience in Key Stage Five. Alongside the all- important A Level qualifications, there is an extensive co-curricular programme of Arts, Performing Arts, Music, Sporting and cultural activities from which to choose. We do encourage every girl to participate in these activities to complement and contrast with their academic studies. Pupils have the opportunity to work towards badges or colours in areas they choose to commit more fully to, as well as to take up leadership roles in running activities for younger pupils.

Day trips and residential trips are run throughout the academic year. These are largely department-based. Students have had opportunities to take part in a Music tour to Italy, Theatre trips and problem solving affinity days. Students also have the chance to attend university undergraduate days.

Weekend Activities

Charity Events Charity work is central to life in the the Sixth Form. In addition to all students undertaking weekly community service each year, the elected Charity Prefects organise mufti days and bake sales among other fund-raising events.

There is a full programme of weekend activities and trips available to boarders and day girls alike.Every weekend throughout the school year, events are put on to provide something different to the working week. In the past, these have included trips to Harry Potter World in London, Thorpe Park, and Chocolate Making, as well as the popular Christmas shopping trips to Brighton and to Bluewater. Educational visits are also run at weekends to museums, art galleries, and theatres.

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Sixth Form Scholarships Expectations of Roedean Moira House Scholarships are awarded as recognition of excellent previous achievement and potential for further successful development. Our aim is to give each student the encouragement, support and guidance they need to be the best they can to realise their full potential. We do not want our scholars to feel that they must always achieve full marks, but we do expect them to try their best and apply themselves enthusiastically to school life. Our scholars should be role models, leading by example in a conscientious approach to their work and a willingness to help others who may be less obviously successful. Scholars in practical subjects (Art, Dance, Drama, Music and Sport) are expected to participate fully in the extra–curricular programme of the department. All scholars are expected to take at least one of their subjects at A Level.

Available awards

Music

Deadlines

You may apply for one of the following three awards:

Tuesday 16th October 2018 – Sixth Form registration dealine and scholarship application dealine

An Academic Award

You will perform two contrasting pieces on the main instrument and one on the second instrument (where applicable) and complete a music listening paper.

Awards in one or two of the following specialist areas: Art, Dance, Drama, Music, Sport

Friday 2nd November 2018 – Bursary application deadline

Awards combining the above (Academic with one or two specialist areas)

Thursday 16th November 2018 – Sixth Form (including Eastbourne) entrance exam day (English, Mathematics, General Paper) + interviews

Academic

Scholarship Application Process

Applications are available from admissions by contacting admissions@roedeanmoirahouse.co.uk Current scholars may apply for a Sixth Form Scholarship; however, successful candidates will not necessarily receive a further financial award.

You will sit entrance papers in Mathematics, English and Non-Verbal Reasoning and a General Paper. You will also have subject-based and general interviews. Art You will discuss your portfolio, complete a drawing test from direct observation and take a written paper. Dance You will perform two two–minute choreographed dances in contrasting styles and complete a practical and physical assessment. Drama You will perform two prepared pieces (one classic and one modern), perform a short improvised piece and read at sight a passage or poem.

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Sport Your performance and involvement in one school sport (hockey, netball, swimming) will be assessed. In addition to the award–specific assessment above, all candidates take a General Paper.

External: Eastbourne Awards Eastbourne Awards are academic awards and are available for local students from state schools and living within a radius of 20 miles of the school. These are means-tested awards; there are a small number of awards worth 100% of the fees, in additions to a number of awards up to a value of 50% of the fees. These awards are based on recommendations from Headteachers.

Validity Scholarships and exhibitions are normally valid from September of Year 12 until the end of Year 13. However, scholars’ progress is reviewed at the end of Year 12 to ensure a level of sustained effort, commitment and achievement is being maintained. 11


“A small nurturing school known for its meticulous care for its pupils, now underpinned with academic rigour by Roedean.” Good Schools Guide 2018

Choosing your A Levels It is very important to think carefully about your subject choices. The key questions to ask yourself are “Am I good at these subjects?” and, perhaps more importantly, “Am I really interested in them?”. You must look realistically at your strengths and weaknesses, and match these to your interests. A Level work is demanding and is unlikely to be sustained in a subject which you do not enjoy. Give serious consideration to those subjects you have not studied before. Assessing your own abilities and interests is not an easy thing to do, and you are urged to seek advice on your suitability for A Level work from your subject teachers and tutors. An uncommitted student will gain little from two years in the Sixth Form, so it is crucially important to choose subjects you wish to pursue in depth.

The University Perspective Feedback from universities suggests that they prefer students to study subjects which sit together well and complement each other, rather than a disparate grouping of subjects done well, which may have been the case in the past. Many leading universities, including Oxford and Cambridge, are becoming increasingly prescriptive concerning the subject combinations which they prefer applicants to pursue at A Level. Therefore, if you are considering applying for a popular course at a competitive university, you should research and seek advice to make sure that you have an appropriate profile. By reading about the subjects, and investigating career prospects and the implications of different combinations, you can more easily begin to identify and define just what it 12

is you want and expect from your proposed studies. Try to balance your academic abilities and interests with your plans for the future. Those of you who have little idea of likely future careers should aim to keep your options open by a wise choice of A Levels; consult subject and careers’ staff. In choosing each of your subjects, bear in mind that you must satisfy the school that your performance so far in this and/ or related subjects justifies your continuation to A Level work in that department.

Arts and Humanities In general, there is more flexibility on the Arts side because very few courses have a strong vocational element. It is important to note that many degree courses and careers accept students who have studied any subjects at A Level, as long as they have shown reasonable success in doing so. Good qualifications in, for example, Classics or English or History or Modern Languages indicate an able, flexible, disciplined and thoughtful mind. Most employers are more concerned with the level of achievement and with personal qualities than with particular subjects. Degree courses now being studied by recent Sixth Formers include Psychology, Fine Art, Business & Sports Management, Natural Sciences and Medicine. Courses in Theology, Art and Design, Politics, Business Studies, and Economics are open to all.

Science and Mathematics A Level selection on the Science side must be the result of informed consideration. It is worth noting too that many of the non–scientific professions also accept students with Science A Levels. If you wish the option of entering a scientific, or technical career, you should choose at least two, but preferably three, subjects from the Sciences and Mathematics. This will give you a much greater choice of Science careers and courses at the end of the two years.

Science and Mathematics Roedean Moira House students have access to high quality UCAS guidance, and they are provided with personal statement writing workshops, interview experience, and support in gaining work experience placements. For those with specific career plans, the choice will be more straightforward. The resources of the Careers’ Department can provide information about A Level requirements and indicate career areas open to students with particular combinations. Take full advantage of this, and research relevant courses and institutions in advance. Medicine is highly competitive: you will need to achieve at least AAA. If you are unlikely to reach this standard, you must consider keeping other options open as far as possible. A combination including Chemistry and Biology will meet the requirements of all courses in Medicine. Courses in Law also continue to be very popular. There are few restrictions on A Level choices for Law but traditional academic subjects are preferred and it is advisable that at least one is a

humanities–based subject. Applicants who also have Mathematics and Science are well-regarded. For Engineering, Mathematics and Physics are essential; a wide range of third A Level subjects is acceptable, depending partly on which branch of Engineering is preferred. If towards the end of your A Level course, you come to realise that your subjects are not suited to your higher education plans, all may not be lost. Some allowances are made for this. Courses may, in some cases, be lengthened by a year to admit candidates who have not taken appropriate A Levels. For example, many languages may be started from scratch, and some universities have a four year course in Engineering which incorporates a preliminary year for those without A Level Mathematics or Physics. In the end you should aim to match your interests, abilities, and needs to the most suitable combination of A Levels. As far as possible, you must be aware of your motives, as well as your academic prospects, and the balance of criteria for choosing your A Levels will vary from one person to another. Well–prepared students who have investigated the subjects they have chosen to study and their possible influence on their future are likely to be happy and successful A Level candidates. There will be an opportunity to discuss your programme of study prior to entering the Sixth Form. 13


Requirements You will normally be expected to have achieved at least a grade 7 or above at GCSE

Faculty Lead: Dr Putland Exam board: Eduqas A651QS

Art and Design

Art has taught me commitment and discipline, encouraged me to challenge myself and has enabled me to exceed both my own expectations and the expectations of my teachers and peers.

Former Year 13 student. Why Choose Art And Design? Our A Level course is delivered by a range of art specialists in sculpture, fine art and textiles. Girls have the benefit of being taught by teachers who are practising artists as well as having worked in the creative industries prior to teaching. The course enables girls to follow a personal creative journey which is geared at providing a supportive environment for girls allowing them to develop their own conceptual ideas as well as learn a range of key skills which will equip them for their creative development and beyond.

What will I study? A broad-based course of study, developed though a range of 2D, 3D and time-based processes and media drawn from disciplines which could include Fine Art, Textile Design, Photography and Three-dimensional Design.

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Assessment Details All portfolio work produced over the course is internally assessed by teachers and externally moderated by an outside examiner. For the exam, students have to respond to a theme set by the examination board which is released every January, giving the girls time to research and prepare a personal response before the examination in May.

Useful Attributes The best students of Art and Design have natural creative flair and vision and are ‘creative thinkers’. This allows them to bring the practical aspects of the course to life and to enrich their personal journey. They should be able to organise and record their ideas in a creative way and to use effective Art techniques and materials. Students are encouraged to take trips to London galleries to inspire and to broaden their subject knowledge.

Future Directions Further degree study in Art and Design as well as a career in the creative industries including: advertising, fashion, textiles, graphic design, interior design, architecture, and events planning. In 2016, the creative industries contributed £91.8bn gross value added (GVA) to the UK economy, which was bigger than the automotive, life sciences, aerospace, oil and gas sectors combined. Commenting on the data, the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, Karen Bradley said: "Britain’s creative industries play an essential role shaping how we are seen around the world but as these new statistics show they are also a vital part of the economy." "The sector is now one of our fastest growing industries and continues to outperform the wider UK economy. This is a testament to the talent and drive of its workforce and we are working closely with them to make sure this fantastic success continues."

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Requirements Ideally a B or higher at GCSE and GCSE passes in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (or Double Award Science)

Faculty Lead: Mark Rich Exam board: Edexcel 9Bio

Lucy Nottage is studying Biology, PE and Psychology Studying biology enabled me to achieve better results in PE and Psychology due to Biology giving me a deeper understanding of the concepts and ideas in those subjects.

Biology Why Choose Biology?

Assessment Details

Girls with an interest in a wide range of topics such as disease, the immune system, genetics, evolution, human biology, and biochemistry and who enjoy carrying out investigations will enjoy this course. An enquiring mind, a sound work ethic and an interest in the subject is essential. There is a big emphasis on developing practical skills and understanding the process of how science works. The new Biology specification also requires a slightly higher level of Mathematics than in previous years, but will be addressed as part of the course.

The course has summative assessment where all the content is assessed at the end of two years. There are three written papers; two 1hr 45 mins and one 2hrs 30 minutes long. There is no coursework however, there is a ‘Practical Endorsement’ which is achieved through the completion and internal assessment of a set number of experiments which demonstrate that you have learnt a range of specific practical skills.

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

The best students of Art and Design have natural creative flair and vision and are ‘creative thinkers’. This allows them to bring the practical aspects of the course to life and to enrich their personal journey. They should be able to organise and record their ideas in a creative way and to use effective Art techniques and materials. Students are encouraged to take trips to London galleries to inspire and to broaden their subject knowledge.

There are many careers that can directly stem from doing Biology A Level when combined with other science A Levels such as Chemistry or Physics. These include: Bioengineering, Genetics, Biochemistry, Forensic Science, Neuroscience, Conservation, Botany, Nursing and Physiotherapy, Medical Physics, Medicine and Veterinary Science. However, when paired with other subjects an A Level in Biology can lead to some interesting degree options or careers, such as Biology with a language, Forensic Anthropologist, Forensic Archaeologist, Medical Ethics, Environmental Consultant, Science Writer or Editor, Psychiatrist, Biological Illustrator, Microscope Photography and Imaging Specialist, Wildlife Cameraman or Lawyer, to name but a few.

Biological Molecules; Cells, Viruses and Reproduction of Living Things; Classification and Biodiversity; Exchange and Transport; Energy for Biological Processes; Microbiology and Pathogens; Modern Genetics; Origins of Genetic Variation; Control Systems; Ecosystems. We will study the ecology practical work during a Field Day and girls are encouraged to enter the Biology Olympiad. Special sessions are run to help with this during an activity time slot, and the ‘Biology and Beyond’ activity allows you to explore wider aspects of the subject, such as how the brain works and any other topics you are especially interested in and would like to learn more about.

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Requirements GCSE English (grade C/5); GCSE Drama (preferred, grade C/5)

Exam board: Edexcel

BTEC in Performing Arts Why choose a BTEC Extended Certificate? The Edexcel Level 3 BTEC Extended Certificate in Performing Arts prepares you for employment within the Performing Arts sector. The course offers a qualification, which can extend a learner’s programme of study and provide vocational emphasis within their programme of study. Equally, the course offers a focused qualification for learners who wish to follow a programme of study that is directly related to their work experience, or an aspect of employment that they wish to move into in due course.

Olivia is studying for a BTEC in Performing Arts, A Level Drama and Theatre and A Level Psychology and would like to study Drama at one of the major Drama Schools The BTEC has a lot of practical work to it and it prepares you for working as a professional performer. We have had expert workshops as well as input from teachers who have all worked as professional actors and dancers

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Drama Singing Dance

The BTEC Extended Certificate in Performing Arts has been developed in the Performing Arts sector to focus on: Education and training for Performing Arts employees. Providing opportunities for Performing Arts employees to achieve nationally recognised Level 3 vocationally specific qualification. Providing opportunities for learners to gain a nationally recognised vocationally specific qualification to enter employment in the Performing Arts sector or to progress to higher vocational qualifications.

In Year 12 the two units studied: Investigating Practitioners’ Work (90 GLH) AND Developing Skills & Techniques for Live Performance (90 GLH). These two units are COMPULSORY In Year 13 you one further COMPULSORY unit: The Group Performance Workshop (120 GLH) AND one OPTIONAL CHOSEN unit: such as Musical Theatre but other options are available (60 GLH)

Assessment Details Your course is made up of 4 units which consist of 90, 60 and 120 guided learning hours (GLH) each. These units are internally assessed through assignments set and marked by your tutors.

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Requirements You will be expected to have achieved at least a grade 7 in GCSE/IGCSE Mathematics and English, or an equivalent qualification before embarking on this course.

Faculty Lead: Mrs R Harris-Moss Exam board: AQA 7132

Business Why Choose Business? The modern business world is ever-changing. Think about that new smartphone you bought last week or the new flavour of frappuccino launched by your favourite coffee brand. These are made possible by a combination of ideas, innovative design & production, clever marketing and the expertise of workers. Thinking about all of those processes and people involved allows you to begin to understand what Business is all about.

I like studying Business because it’s logical and easy to understand as it relies on a common sense approach. You should study Business because it really can help you to acquire a range of skills such as decision making and problem solving and most importantly helping to develop awareness of the financial world around you. Business is also a good choice if you aren’t sure what you want to do after A Levels, as it can open up so many different opportunities.

Abbie Ring Year 13

Assessment Details

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

There are three 2-hour examinations for A-Level. The examinations comprise a mixture of multiple choice questions, short answer questions and structured questions based on real business case studies.

An active interest in current Business news is essential. Business is developing both in importance and popularity as universities and businesses alike recognise the value of the skills and cognitive abilities students develop in this applied subject.

Business and management courses are hugely popular subjects at university and a great foundation for many careers; it is useful for students whatever career they may have planned.

The revised syllabus, introduced in 2015, is structured to enable students to get a broad practical and theoretical appreciation of topics relevant to today's business environment including the digital economy, corporate responsibility and ethics, globalisation and budgeting.

What will I study? The primary business functions of Marketing, Production, Human Resources and Finance, as well as how external issues affect the strategic decision-making of local, national & international businesses.

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Requirements You will be expected to have achieved a separate chemistry or combined science in at least a grade 7 at GCSE / IGCSE, and at least a grade 6 in Mathematics.

Faculty Lead: Mr Underwood and Dr Clingen

Exam board: AQA 7404

Chemistry is a difficult subject and being good at maths helps. However, you will get a lot of help. It is worth it because it helps explain the world we live in and studying chemistry prepares you for a wide variety of jobs ranging from medicine to pharmacy and forensic science.

Chemistry Why Choose Chemistry? “Chemistry begins in the stars. The stars are the source of the chemical elements, which are the building blocks of matter and the core of our subject.” Peter Atkins, British chemist A Level Chemistry is an essential choice for anyone wanting to study medicine, veterinary science, nursing, dentistry and forensic science and for careers involving pharmaceuticals or petrochemicals. It requires good analytical and practical skills as well as using a lot of mathematics.

What will I study?

Ellyce Holmes is studying chemistry, biology and maths and would like to read Veterinary Sciences at Nottingham University.

Assessment Details The course has summative assessment where all the content is assessed at the end of two years. There are three written papers each 2hrs long. There is no coursework however, there is a ‘Practical Endorsement’ which is achieved through the completion and internal assessment of a set number of experiments which demonstrate that you have learnt a range of specific practical skills.

Useful Attributes To succeed at A Level Chemistry you will need to enjoy a challenge. You will have to be well-organised, persistent, mathematically competent and able to work either on your own or as part of a team. You will need to be able to write in clear concise English and you must be willing to contribute your ideas and argue your case with others.

Future Directions Chemists, as well as working in research in laboratories, can solve crime, monitor the environment or be engineers. A Level Chemistry is essential for any medical careers and those relating to the biological sciences.

In our brand new Science Labs, you will study: Atomic structure, The Periodic table; Bonding and structure; Redox reactions, Organic chemistry; Inorganic chemistry; Formulae, equations and amounts of substance; Modern analytical techniques; Energetics; Kinetics; Equilibrium; Acid-base Equilibria; Transition Metals.

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Requirements

Exam board: Edexcel 9DR0

GCSE English (grade C/5); GCSE Drama (preferred, grade C/5) Comfortable clothes for movement, commitment to regular Theatre visits.

Drama and Theatre Studies Why Choose Drama & Theatre Studies? Drama crosses over into so many parts of our lives. Individuals who are confident and articulate will have an advantage over other candidates at university and job interviews, no matter what their qualifications. This subject enables students to express themselves creatively. It also allows them to discuss many issues that are part of our lives, but that are rarely addressed within other academic subjects.

What will I study? Devising theatre (performance or design) in response to a piece of play text and a key drama practitioner Group performance of two extracts of a play text or a design realisation Performing or designing a monologue or duologue Seeing and evaluating live theatre Written and practical work exploring how to stage two set texts, using the ideas of one theatre practitioner

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Component 1: Devising. Students explore a performance text in light of a practitioner and devise a piece of theatre as a performer or designer. They will record the process in a portfolio. Component 2: Text in Performance. Group performance from a performance text as a performer or designer. Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practice. Choice of one set text from six. This must be explored practically. Choice of one set text from nine. Interpretation of the chosen text as a director for a contemporary audience in light of a practitioner. Evaluation of a piece of live theatre you have seen.

Emily Davison is studying BTEC Performing Arts, A Level Drama and A Level English Literature and would like to read Drama and Creative Writing at University or Drama at one of the top Drama Schools.

It allows you to widen your knowledge about different aspects of theatre being able to lead lessons as well as being led is great. Seeing Kneehigh’s Brief Encounter was fantastic

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

Drama is a perfect subject for transferable skills including communication and collaboration. In Drama we engage with body, voice, heart, mind and soul. You will have a naturally enquiring mind, a fascination for the complexity of human behaviour, and an interest in theatre-going.

Any career in the theatre business, whether it be directing, designing, performing or working in a technical field. It is a subject that feeds well onto a wide range of courses at university and helps you acquire transferable skills for many career paths, such as journalism, law or teaching. Skills in presentation, communication and collaboration, explored in Drama, are useful in many other professions and aspects of life.

Assessment Details A group devised piece (performance or design) with accompanying portfolio (40% of the A Level) A group performance of extracts of a play text or an accompanying design; a performance of a monologue or duologue or an accompanying design - assessed by visiting examiner (20%) Written exam on evaluating live theatre, two set texts and a practitioner (40%)

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Requirements Girls will preferably have achieved at least a grade 6 in English and Maths GCSE/IGCSE

Faculty Lead: Mrs Ruth Harris-Moss

Exam board: OCR H460

You will find that our daily life is full of Economics after you study the subject

Economics Why Choose Economics? “The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design.” Friedrich von Hayek, Economist, 1899-1992 It is important for any student to have an understanding of how the economy works and how to analyse markets, and this course gives students a fascinating insight into the world around them. You will investigate the markets for products you buy every day, such as smart phones and clothes, evaluate the latest government policies, and discover the inside story on trade wars, immigration, and even the complex issues surrounding BREXIT.

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Former Year 13 student

What will I study? How competitive markets work, market failure and government intervention, competition and market power, the labour market, economic policy objectives, indicators of macroeconomic performance, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, application of policy instruments, the global context, the financial sector.

Assessment Details There are three 2 hour examinations for A Level.

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

Economics requires and helps develop high levels of both literacy and numeracy skills. Economics therefore sits in the ‘centre’ of the curriculum attracting students who are able and interested in Mathematics and Science, as well as humanities such as History, Politics and Geography. Students need to be able to explain arguments logically, make calculations and solutions. An interest in news and real-life events are also important and the willingness to discuss, compare and apply arguments is vital.

The subject looks impressive on any CV as it displays high levels of both analytical and communication skills. Due to the broad range of skills and understanding developed during studying Economics, students achieve an exciting choice of possible university courses and career. Not only will students be well suited to a degree course in Economics but also a vast range of Economics-related degrees such as Economic Management, Entrepreneurship and Philosophy, Politic and Economics. In terms of careers students will have many exciting options in terms of national and international business, banking and finance, accountancy, government and charities.

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Requirements You will be expected to have achieved at least a grade 6 in GCSE / IGCSE English literature, or an equivalent qualification, before embarking on this course.

Faculty Lead: Tamara Stevens

Exam board: Edexcel 8ET0/9ET0

When you join English you don’t just take a subject, you join a community

English Literature Why Choose English Literature?

What will I study?

Literature teaches us what it means to be human and challenges our deepest beliefs. A Level English is delivered by passionate and enthusiastic teachers who challenge our students to think more deeply about the ideas of great texts from William Blake and Shakespeare to Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker. Along with the class work, the English Department is known for their many trips to the theatre and lectures to support the students’ study. English is considered a ‘facilitating subject’ by the Russell Group.

Year 12: Post 2000 poetry; Tennessee Williams’ ‘Streetcar Named Desire’; Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray; Preparation of coursework (comparison of two texts chosen by student) Year 13: Coursework completion, Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure and Chaucer’s Wife of Bath.

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Assessment Details

Megan, Former Year 13 student

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

The skills for set texts are a continuation of those acquired at GCSE, but at a higher level. You will use your existing knowledge but increase the scope of your contextual understanding and learn more useful literary concepts and terminology to aid analysis. To achieve a higher grade in this subject you will need to develop your analytical skills, read widely, but most importantly, think about the ideas expressed in literature.

English Literature combines well with anything Arts or Humanities related, but also makes a good complement to Science subjects. English Literature provides an excellent basis for undergraduate study, including in areas such as Journalism, Law and Medicine. It will prepare you for any career in which argument, close and contextual analysis, and effective communication are necessities.

Three written papers (80%) Coursework (20%)

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Requirements You would be expected to achieve at least an 8 or 9 at GCSE/IGCSE Mathematics

Faculty Lead: Andrew Wood Exam board: Edexcel 9FMO

Further Mathematics

Jessica Brialey is hoping to do an apprenticeship in a science based company No essays! Although Maths is infinite and there are many ways to solve a question, there is normally only one answer and when you’ve got it, you’ve got it!

Why Choose Further Mathematics?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

Mathematics is central to our understanding of the world in which we live, to our control of the environment, and to the organisation of our society. It underpins science, technology, medicine, economics and government. Mathematics is central to our understanding of the world because it is the language we speak when asked to explain it. Our A Level Further Mathematics is delivered by teachers who teach their specialist areas in the applied modules. In year 13 we are able to offer each cohort a choice in their modules. Girls are given a variety of teaching methods, resources and support in order to achieve their potential.

Proof, Complex numbers, Matrices, Further algebra and functions, Further calculus, Further vectors, Polar coordinates, Hyperbolic functions, Differential equations, plus two topics from further Pure, further Statistics, further Mechanics or Decision Maths

Will you persevere until you get there? Do you get great satisfaction from getting the right answer? Do you like cracking codes and solving puzzles? These are all the traits which are relevant to studying Mathematics. You will develop the ability to approach a problem from different angles until you find that one method that opens the solution up for you.

Progression to a variety of university degrees with potential for careers in teaching, engineer¬ing, medicine, business, finance, ICT and many more. Mathematics qualifications are some of the most sought after in the world and open a vast array of opportunities.

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Assessment Details 4 x 1½ hour exams, 2 are compulsory pure Maths papers and 2 are optional further Pure, further Statistics, Further Mechanics or Decision papers.

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Requirements

Exam board: AQA 7037

When I chose my A Levels originally, Geography was the least popular of my options, but it soon became my favourite subject. For someone who was not sure what degree to do, Geography was a good choice and has kept my options open.

You will be expected to have achieved at least a grade 5 in GCSE/IGCSE Mathematics and English, and a grade 5 in Geography, before embarking on this course.

Geography

Former Year 13 student.

Why Choose Geography?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

The A level Geography syllabus aims to develop an understanding of both the physical and human environment. It covers a variety of topics and issues and enables students to gain a wide range of skills. Geography helps you understand the world around you. Geographical skills relevant to human and physical geography will be studied. There will be 4 days compulsory fieldwork for students taking the A Level course in order to complete a fieldwork investigation. We are also investigating an opportunity to take the students on a trip to Iceland in October 2020.

Physical The ‘Water and Carbon Cycles’ topic focuses on the major stores of water and carbon at or near the earth’s surface and the dynamic, cyclical relationships associated with them. ‘Coastal Systems’ focuses on coastal zones, which are dynamic environments in which landscapes develop by the interaction of winds, waves, currents, and terrestrial and marine sediments. ‘Hazards’ is the optional topic, and focuses on geophysical and climatological hazards and how human society responds to these threats through adaptation and mitigation. Human ‘Global Systems and Governance’ focuses on globalisation – the economic, political and social changes associated with technological and other driving forces which have been a key feature of global economy and society in recent decades. ‘Changing Places’ focuses on people’s engagement with places, their experiences of them, and the qualities they ascribe to them, all of which are of fundamental importance in their lives. ‘Contemporary Urban Environments’ is the optional section, and focuses on urban growth and change, as well as on environmental and social challenges for human populations in cities. Geographical Investigation The class will also undertake fieldwork as part of a Geographical Investigation, which may be based on either human or physical aspects of geography, or a combination of both.

Geography students should have an awareness of current world events and affairs and a keen interest in the relationship between human populations with their physical environment on a variety of scales from the local to the global.

Most universities offer degrees in Geography and there are a wide range of joint degrees where Geography may be studied with either a Science or a Humanities subject. Geography helps you understand the world around you. The close link between this subject and the world around us makes for a long and varied list of related careers, for example, working with development or aid agencies, environmental work, using Geographical Information Systems, tourism and recreation, land management and conservation. Employers want people who can analyse their work, who are numerate and literate, who can ask questions and then find the answers, who are spatially aware and who are environmentally and socially aware. All these skills are used in Geography.

Assessment Details At A Level there are two exams of 150 minutes each (worth 80% in total) plus the geographical investigation (worth 20%)

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Requirements

Exam board: AQA 7042

You will be expected to have achieved at least a level 6 in GCSE History.

Alexandra, Year 12, loves History and is applying to read at York University. Tsarist and Communist Russia is a great topic to learn about for A level. It is all really interesting. I would recommend this course to anyone who is excited by history and wants to develop their knowledge.

History Why Choose History?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

History offers all girls the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills and judgement into their studies. Studying History not only provides a context for your own life, but also helps you to develop an understanding into the world into which you have grown up an delivers a set of invaluable transferrable skills. At a time of growing fundamentalism and intolerance in the modern world, the study of History will enable you to view complex problems objectively, thus promoting tolerance, the ability to see different sides of disputes and a growing understanding of the complexity of world events.

In Year 12 the course has to cover a period of British history, and non- British history. Component 1 is non-British, and will focus on European history, relating to 19th Century autocracy and 20th Century dictatorships in Russia. Component 2 is the British course with a focus on modern 20th Century events examining the impact of World War One and welfare upon British government and society.

The course builds on the analytical skills developed at GCSE, although it is not essential to have studied GCSE History to study the A Level course. Students with a strong curiosity about the past, a lively sense of enquiry, and the capacity to read beyond the confines of the syllabus would be especially welcome, although we do our very best to offer support to all our students. History is about events, but events happen because of people. Action or inaction, right or wrong. These things can only truly be evaluated when looked at from a distance.

History is highly valued by for its academic rigour by both universities and employers. The skills obtained can give potential progression to a wide range of university courses and subsequent careers. History graduates often progress into law, politics, journalism, media, marketing, management, and teaching. More specialist careers include museum curator, archaeology archivist, and researcher.

Assessment Details

In Year 13, the course will carry on with these two components looking at developments in both democracy and dictatorships after World War Two. In addition girls will cover component 3 which requires the study of an historical issue of their choice, culminating in a 3000-4000 word essay.

Component 1: A 1½ hour examination in year 12 and a 2½ hour examination in year 13. Component 2: A 1½ hour examination in year 12 and a 2½ hour examination in year 13. Component 3: Coursework unit which is assessed internally, for year 13 Level only.

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Requirements You will normally be expected to have achieved at least a grade 7 or above at GCSE

Faculty Lead: Mrs Vallantine Exam board: AQA 7652/7662/7692

Languages: French, German and Spanish Why Choose Languages?

What will I study?

We offer a stimulating language learning environment taught by specialist teachers in small classes. Students improve their knowledge of global current affairs and contemporary issues in a topic based course using a range of resources. Study visits to all three countries are encouraged to develop advanced language skills. The Individual Research project allows the linguists to develop research skills from a wide variety of sources.

Aspects of society in the language studied; current trends and issues Aspects of artistic culture Literary texts and films Aspects of political life Research project based on personal interest

Assessment Details

Engaging with other cultures and countries whilst learning a language to a high level will provide you with lots of opportunities for the future

Former Year 13 student.

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

Learning languages is good for brain function and improving your memory and problem solving skills. It also increases self-confidence and communication strategies.

A language can be valuable for girls who are considering careers in engineering, business, management, finance, education, politics, translating, or public relations. Employers look favourably on candidates who have studied languages, and a qualification in a foreign language can help differentiate you from other candidates in your chose field.

At A Level there are two written papers of 2½ and 2 hours. One pays particular attention to Listening, Reading and Translation into English and the language studied. The second paper focuses on critical/literary essay writing. The oral assessment involves a discussion of a stimulus card and the individual research project.

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Requirements It is preferable to have gained at least a grade 6 in Latin GCSE

Faculty Lead: Tamara Stevens

Exam board: OCR H443

Aut disce aut discede (Either learn or leave.)

Latin Why Choose Latin?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

“To be entirely ignorant of the Latin language is like being in a fine country on a misty day. The horizon is extremely limited. Nothing can be seen clearly except that which is quite close; a few steps beyond, everything is buried in obscurity. But the Latinist has a wide view, embracing modern times, the middle age and antiquity; and his mental horizon is still further enlarged if he studies Greek.”

Language vocabulary acquisition through the study of prose authors and unseen verse authors Study of two Latin Prose Literature set texts Study of two Latin Verse Literature set texts Study of additional literary works to support learning

You will have a logical, enquiring mind with a careful eye for detail and an interest in history, literature and politics. Developing linguistic precision takes time and effort, and you will need to be resilient, organised and diligent. You will need to spend time preparing and learning the literature set texts as well as the required vocabulary and grammar for Latin language.

You can use classical studies to strengthen your knowledge and credentials, even if your main focus lies in a related field, e.g. theology, philosophy, law, political science, medicine, history of science, religious studies, archaeology, anthropology, literary studies, history, history of art, linguistics, creative writing, communications, mythology, theory and history of education.

Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher Latin language work builds upon the foundations laid at GCSE. Comprehension and transla¬tion skills are developed, knowledge of word endings is consolidated and a defined vocabu¬lary list is mastered. Analysis and logical thought are key skills that are developed here. Exploring Latin literature prose and verse enables you to engage directly with some of the greatest minds of antiquity.

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Former Year 13 student

Assessment Details Four written papers at the end of Year 13 Unseen translation 33% Prose composition/comprehension 17% Prose Literature 25% Verse Literature 25%

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Requirements Applicants will be expected to have achieved at least a grade 7 in Mathematics GCSE/IGCSE.

Faculty Lead: Andrew Wood Exam board: Edexcel 9MAO

Mathematics

The good thing about Maths is that there is a right answer – when you’ve got it you’re done! Riya, Former Year 13 student If school is the brick for learning, Maths cements it all together. Anna, Former Year 13 student

Why Choose Mathematics?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

“Without mathematics, there's nothing you can do. Everything around you is mathematics. Everything around you is numbers.” Shakuntala Devi, writer and ‘human computer’

Proof Algebra and functions Coordinate geometry in the (x, y) plane Sequences and series Trigonometry Exponentials and logarithms Differentiation Integration Numerical methods Vectors Statistical sampling Data presentation and interpretation Probability Statistical distributions Statistical hypothesis testing Quantities and units in mechanics Kinematics Forces and Newton’s laws Moments

The ability to tackle problems head on, to be excited by a challenge and a puzzle on paper, are all the traits which are relevant to a student suited to studying Mathematics. You will develop the ability to approach a problem from different angles until you find the one method that opens up the solution for you.

Progression to a variety of university degrees with potential for careers in teaching, engineer¬ing, medicine, business, finance, ICT and many more. Mathematics qualifications are some of the most after in the world and open a vast array of opportunities.

Since the beginning of recorded history, mathematic discovery has been at the forefront of every civilized society, and in use in even the most primitive of cultures. The needs of math arose based on the wants of society. The more complex a society, the more complex the mathematical needs. Primitive tribes needed little more than the ability to count, but also relied on mathematics to calculate the position of the sun and the physics of hunting. Our A Level Mathematics is delivered by teachers who teach their specialist areas in the applied modules. In Year 13 we are able to offer girls a choice in their applied module. Girls are given a variety of teaching methods, resources and support in order to achieve their potential.

Assessment Details 3 x 2 hour exams, two for Pure Maths and one for the applied work.

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Requirements

Faculty Lead: Mr J Sharp

This course is for students who play an instrument or sing, and are of Grade 5 standard or higher. A grade C/5 or above in GCSE Music is desirable, but not essential, as is membership of an instrumental group or choir.

Exam board: OCR H543

A level Music is a fascinating subject. It gives me a wide range of opportunities for musical and academic development, and to uncover more of my potential. I like A-level Music because it is a real challenge for me, and I have learned many new things in areas such as composing, performing, and musical analysis. I have not only gained knowledge, but also happiness, in the class.

Music Why Choose Music?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

Whatever your aspirations, the study of Music will develop a lifelong passion for, and understanding of, a common language. It will also encourage creative and logical thinking, which is something universally respected by employers and universities.

Music A level is assessed in 3 areas; Performing, Composing and Listening & Appraising. In the latter of these, students study 4 topics from a possible 6 areas of study. Of these, 2 are compulsory – AoS1: Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, and AoS2: Popular Song – Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band, and 2 are chosen from the following topics: AoS3: Developments in Instrumental Jazz from 1910 to the present day AoS4: Religious Music of the Baroque Period AoS5: Programme Music 1820–1910 AoS6: Innovations in music 1900 to the present day A level Music students have the opportunity to perform at many events, both inside and out of school, over the course of their study. It is hoped that this will be both as a soloist, and as a member of one of our many school ensembles. The Arts faculty runs many trips throughout the year, both locally and further afield, to see concerts and shows. Students will also have the chance to participate in workshops from visiting specialists.

A level Music is a subject that demands a high level of independent work, especially in the practical disciplines of performing and composing. As such, students must be motivated, inquisitive, organised and able to self-critique. A good standard of written English is necessary, as is the ability to read musical notation. Above all, though, students must have a real passion for music.

Our A level musicians often go on to study Music at university or conservatoire, and then into a career in music performance, education or research. It is also an important subject for anyone who is looking at a career in the theatre or dramatic arts. For advanced instrumentalists or singers it can be of great benefit in helping develop a better understanding of music and its performance conventions. Many people who go on to study other subjects find that the music that they did at school provides an excellent foundation for participation in a variety skills such as performing and listening.

It is a natural choice for students who are competent on their instruments and who wish to gain a deeper musical an historical perspective.

Assessment Details Performing (25% or 35%) is externally assessed via audio recording – students give either a 6 minute (25%) or a 10 minute (35%) recital. Composing (25% or 35%) is internally assessed and externally moderated – students produce either at least 2 compositions, totalling a minimum of 4 minutes in length (25%) or at least 2 compositions, totalling a minimum of 8 minutes in length, and 3 technical exercises. Listening & Appraising: Historical Studies (40%) is externally assessed - a single paper with questions taken from the 4 chosen topics, from 6 possible areas of study.

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Nancy, Year 13, is studying Music, Maths and Physics at A level, and is hoping to go on to read Music at university or conservatoire

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Requirements You will ideally have achieved at least a grade 6 at GCSE Photography.

Faculty Lead: Mrs Georgina Ring Exam board: Eduqas A656QS

Photography

Grace Fuller, Year 13, is studying Photography, Textiles and Psychology and would like to read Film Production at University

Studying A-level Photography has really let me challenge and push myself in creating concepts and ideas to express emotions and narrative. The A-level course lets me explore and create my own ideas which I am passionate about.

Why Choose Photography?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

“Through the Arts, girls learn what they need to succeed in life.”

Students will work in a range of genres of photography mastering digital skills and manipulation techniques. They will gain an understanding of specialist vocabulary allowing interpretation and conveying of ideas and feelings in photographic work. Moving imagery and animation provides a contrast to still photography providing diverse avenues to explore. An awareness and appreciation of the place photography plays in history and contemporary society plays a vital role within the course; problem solving and contextual studies through a personal investigation and externally set theme provide opportunities to develop their own style and creative journey.

To succeed at A-level Photography you need to be willing to take risks and push yourself out of your comfort zone in order to fully express yourself and flourish. An ability to organise your time, research independently, plan effectively and present creatively are advantageous but are all skills which you will develop and hone during the course which are valued by employers.

Progression on to university or Art College degrees leading to careers in such diverse areas as publishing, advertising, illustration, graphic design, digital art, television/film direction, creative/art direction, cinematography.

Mrs Georgina Ring, Head of Photography Learning through the arts leads to creative thinking, confidence and problem solving – all skills which are prized by employers and which young people need. Girls learn to collaborate, persevere, to see mistakes as opportunities to learn; they improve by accepting constructive feedback; they learn that communication is more than just words. In the UK, the digital and creative industries employ 2.1 million people, an increase of 19.5% in 5 years, and accounted for 1 in 11 of all jobs in the UK in 2017. The Creative Industries are a natural export strength, providing the UK’s third largest export sector.

Assessment Details All portfolio work produced over the course is internally assessed by teachers and externally moderated by an outside examiner. The coursework project is 60% and the examination project is 40% of the final mark. For the exam, students have to respond to a theme set by the examination board which is released every January, giving the girls time to research and prepare a personal response before the examination in May.

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Requirements Girls will be expected to have achieved at least a 5 in Science, and at least a 5 or 6 in GCSE PE, although this isn’t compulsory. Proven commitment to sport in at least one area is desirable.

Faculty Lead: Amie Legate

Exam board: OCR H555

I have gained an understanding of not only how to achieve my full potential in the sporting environment but also how to play a key role in the development of others Former Year 13 student

Physical Education Why Choose Physical Education?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

The A Level PE course is a fantastic opportunity for those girls interested in the world of sport to investigate the many attributes that contribute to the elite athlete as well as gain an in depth understanding of anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, sports psychology and the history of sport.

The syllabus takes a multi-discipline approach, encouraging the development of different methods of acquiring, developing and evaluating practical skills drawn from a wide range of disciplines, with the focal point being the performer, and the improvement of effective performance. Interaction between the theory and practice of Physical Education is a key factor throughout. Course content includes socio-cultural and historical studies, skill acquisition and sports psychology, physiology and anatomy, and physiology of exercise.

The desire to be part of a team, but to also excel individually is a common trait of those studying Physical Education. This course allows students to link practical and theoretical study.

A Level Physical Education can open up a range of career opportunities including: sports development, sports coaching, physiotherapy, personal training or becoming one of the next generation of PE teachers. The transferable skills you learn through your study of Physical Education, such as decision making and independent thinking are also useful in any career path you choose to take.

Students receive a well-rounded and full introduction to the world of PE, sport and sports science. This complete grounding in the subject provides a fantastic base from which to build when they move on to higher education, employment or further training. Recently Roedean Moira House A Level PE girls have gone on to become physiotherapists, teachers and sports psychologists.

Assessment Details A Level: Three written papers worth 70% in total and a practical assessment worth 30%.

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Requirements Students intending to study Physics should preferably have at least a grade 7 in both GCSE/IGCSE Physics and Mathematics.

Faculty Lead: Mr Underwood / Dr Kaye Exam board: Edexcel 9PH0

Jessica is studying Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, and would like to read Physics at University Physics is such a fascinating subject, and so useful in so many situations. I love the different practical applications it has and also the more theoretical side of it too

Physics Why Choose Physics?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

“There is no science in this world like physics. Nothing comes close to the precision with which physics enables you to understand the world around you. It's the laws of physics that allow us to say exactly what time the sun is going to rise.”

Year 12 covers the core Physics: Core Physics I covers Mechanics and Electric Circuits. Core Physics II includes Materials, and Waves and the Particle Nature of Light.

You will have to be well-organised, persistent, mathematically competent and able to work either on your own or as part of a team. You will need to be able to write in clear concise English and you must be willing to contribute your ideas and argue your case with others.

There is potential for progression onto university degrees leading to careers such as engineering and medicine, as well as management, accountancy and IT.

Neil de Grasse Tyson, American astrophysicist Our A Level Physics is delivered by specialist teachers in a dedicated and newly refurbished laboratory. The course is theoretical but has a substantial practical component. Girls will have the opportunity to participate in activities beyond the classroom and can become involved in university master classes and “Headstart” Engineering Courses.

Year 13 topics include: Advanced Physics I – (Mechanics, Electric Circuits), Further Mechanics, Electric and Magnetic Fields, Nuclear and Particle Physics. Additional Physics II – (Materials, and Waves and the Particle Nature of Light), Thermodynamics, Space, Nuclear Radiation, Gravitational Fields and Oscillations. General and Practical Principles in Physics: Synoptic questions drawn from two or more different topics.

Assessment Details The course has summative assessment where all the content is assessed at the end of two years. There are three written papers; two 1hr 30 mins and one 2hr 30 mins long. There is no coursework however, there is a ‘Practical Endorsement’ which is achieved through the completion and internal assessment of a set number of experiments which demonstrate that you have learnt a range of specific practical skills.

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Requirements You would be expected to have achieved a B grade at GCSE/IGCSE Maths, English Language and Biology. 10% of the Psychology A level is now mathematics. 40% is Research Methods.

Faculty Lead: Ms F Alexander

Exam board: AQA 7182

Psychology

Psychology has enriched my A Level experience, and given me a thirst for knowledge; not only is it a fascinating and enthralling subject, but it has paid dividends to the success in both my academic and extracurricular experiences Year 13 student

Why Choose Psychology?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

Why is it that some people suffer from stress, anxiety and mental illness and yet others seem unaffected? Why is it that some people have amazing memories and others seem to forget things really quickly? How do we learn? Why do we conform or obey authority? Psychology looks at issues like these as part of the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. Psychology is a science subject at the forefront of cutting edge research with real world applications, ranging from explaining the process of social change to developing artificial intelligence. Understanding our human experience is constantly being challenged and therefore in the world of Psychology nothing in certain, we wrestle with competing ideologies and have to accept the uncertainty of any theory we examine. Psychology has links with many disciplines including Biological and Computer science, Sociology and Philosophy. This mix of disciplines makes Psychology a demanding yet fascinating subject, popular with students who want to challenge themselves academically.

Paper 1 Introductory Topics in Psychology - You will learn about a variety of psychological concepts, theories and research studies in relation to social influence, the nature of memory, and attachment in early childhood. Paper 2 Psychology In Context - You will learn about psychopathology (mental disorders) as well as the different ‘approaches’ in psychology, including behaviourism, the cognitive approach and the biological approach. You will also consider how psychology has developed over time, its origin and whether it can truly be considered a science. Knowledge and understanding of research methods, practical research skills and mathematical skills will also be examined in paper 2. These skills will be developed through practical research activities involving designing and conducting research and analysing and interpreting data. At least 10% of the overall assessment of psychology will contain mathematical skills equivalent to level 2 or above. At least 40 % of the overall assessment will assess skills, knowledge and understanding of research methods. Paper 3 Issues and Options in Psychology (A level only). 3 options are chosen from the following: Relationships; Gender; Cognition and development; Schizophrenia; Eating behaviour; Stress; Aggression; Forensic psychology and Addiction. Issues and debates in psychology are also examined. This paper also contains extended response questions.

Psychology is a challenging subject and does not suit students who do not like Biology or Statistics. Successful Psychology students have good levels of numeracy and literacy and are keen to develop strong analytical, communication and evaluation skills. You must enjoy reading, researching and working independently.

Students who study Psychology develop the ability to present analytical arguments, carry out research, and evaluate the research of others. These are skills valued by universities and employers. A Level Psychology forms an excellent basis for Psychology oriented higher education courses and careers. As a qualified Psychologist, you could make a crucial contribution to most areas of life including education, health, the economy and crime. Psychology is also valuable for those considering related areas of study such as medicine, counselling, law or education. A degree in Psychology is well-regarded by employers, Psychology graduates in the UK have one of the highest employment rates of any graduate discipline.

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Assessment Details Students completing the full A-Level will sit three papers as follows: Paper 1: 2 hour exam paper worth 96 marks and is 33.3% of the A-Level. Paper 2: 2 hour exam paper worth 96 marks and is 33.3% of the A-Level. Paper 3: 2 hour exam paper worth 96 marks and is 33.3% of the A-Level.

Requirements

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Requirements The examinations enable girls to demonstrate their subject knowledge through set essay questions. For this reason a sound ability in English language is useful.

Faculty Lead: Mrs O Barber

Exam board: OCR H573

Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics) Why Choose Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)?

Assessment Details

“It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” Aristotle

Students undertake 100% examinations. It is a linear course with three exams taken at the end of Year 13.

Chloe studied Philosophy and Ethics and took her A level summer 2018 alongside Psychology and English Literature. She is starting university in autumn 2018

This course enabled me to turn my knowledge of different ideas into questions about life – there are no answers just good debates that have really supported my confidence to express my opinions.

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

An enquiring mind, the ability to think independently and to be respectful and understanding of differences of opinion.

Girls go onto university to study a range of courses after studying Religious Studies such as Politics, Law, Diplomacy, Finance and Medical Ethics and subjects allied to Medicine.

At Moira House, A Level Religious Studies is a course that focuses on Philosophy and Ethics with Development of Christian Thought (DCT). Through the course you will develop strong skills in the analysis and evaluation of arguments. You will also explore fundamental questions of the nature of reality, the existence of God and questions of right and wrong.

What will I study? Students study Greek Philosophy, arguments for the existence of God, Ethical theory and applied ethics (euthanasia, sexual ethics and conscience). They also complete a third unit in the Development of Christian Thought studying issues such as gender identity, liberation theology and the problem of evil.

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Requirements Entry by portfolio of work

Faculty Lead: Dr Putland Exam board: Eduqas A653QS

Textile Design

I have really loved working in a creative and original way for this A level. It has been challenging and fun to learn new skills and to think in new ways. I have particularly enjoyed silk painting, hand embroidery and fashion design and dress making.

Why Choose Textile Design?

What will I study?

Useful Attributes

Future Directions

“Textile Design allows girls to experiment with a wide range of traditional and cutting edge textile techniques. It centres around manipulating fabrics to produce innovative pieces of work which communicate imaginative and personal ideas.” Caroline Cooper, Teacher of Textiles

Girls are expected to work in a multi-disciplinary way to create ideas, concepts, materials and techniques for a wide range of Art Textiles outcomes. The girls can choose to work in areas which interest them. They could for example focus on the field of fashion or they could decide to work in a more Art focussed way. Textile design is sub-divided into the following three disciplines and girls will be required to work in one or more disciplines to communicate their ideas:

Above all you will learn to develop as an original artist and/ or designer, with highly developed practical skills and the ability to communicate and present your ideas in an impressive and confident way. You will learn to be a resourceful independent learner and thinker with the ability and tenacity to solve problems and to work well with others.

Further degree study in Art and Design as well as a career in the creative industries including: advertising, fashion, textiles, graphic design, interior design, architecture, and events planning.

Textile Design is a versatile discipline which involves the creation, selection, manipulation and application of a wide range of materials and processes. It is an exciting new subject which we have introduced into our curriculum and will be taught by experienced subject specialists. A wide range of transferable skills are developed through this course, such as project planning, organisation, professional presentation of visual work, time management, independent research skills, creativity and innovation. These skills will prove invaluable to future employers and will support students in a wide range of further education courses.

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Christine is studying Art, Art Textiles and Photography and would like to read Fashion Design at University

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Textiles for interiors Fine art textiles Fashion textiles

Within these areas girls can learn to generate ideas using drawing, painting, photography and computer aided design. They will explore a range of textiles skills such as printing, batik, silk painting and embroidery. Textiles construction techniques will be taught including pattern cutting, toile making, and dress making skills. Depending on the girls’ own individual interest they may develop fashion ideas and look at fashion promotion and styling. Drawing skills be important throughout the course, with a focus on developing a personal style with a variety of media and techniques. Students will learn to develop final ideas which are inspired by their own thorough supporting research. This research will demonstrate a strong interest in the world around them and will include contextual studies based on artists and textiles designers.

Assessment Details The work produced in Year 12 is internally moderated using the exam board criteria. Work produced in Year 13 is internally assessed by teachers and externally moderated by an outside examiner. There are two moderated units of work which take the form of extended projects, usually presented in a sketchbook with one or more major final pieces at the end for each project. For the exam, students have to respond to a theme set by the examination board which is released in February, giving time to research and prepare a personal response before the examination in May. The final piece for the exam unit will be produced under exam conditions. The students are given 15 hours over a two or more days to complete this.

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RMH SIxth Form Curriculum  

Choosing your A Levels? Read through our Sixth Form Booklet to see the range of subjects we have on offer, from Photography to Psychology.

RMH SIxth Form Curriculum  

Choosing your A Levels? Read through our Sixth Form Booklet to see the range of subjects we have on offer, from Photography to Psychology.

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