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Options 2012

A GUIDE TO THE OPTION CHOICES IN YEARS 10 AND 11 0


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Introduction The Options Process The Core Examination Subjects The Core Non-Examination Subjects The Specialist Subjects Other Subjects General Points about GCSE Examinations: Tiers of Entry Modular Courses Coursework

Important Dates for Option Choices 23rd February 2012 8th March 2012 15th March 2012 15th March 2012 23rd March 2012 June 2012

Options Evening – Booklets issued Grade Reports Sent Home Year 9 Consultation Evening Options forms issued Deadline to return options forms Final choices confirmed

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INTRODUCTION The decisions you make about your subject choices for Years 10 and 11 will have an important influence on the opportunities you have later on in life. Getting the choice right now will enable you to take the course at College that interests you, begin the apprenticeship in your chosen career, or pursue further study at a Higher Education establishment. Good decisions now can also develop an enjoyment of a subject that will stay with you into your adult life, meaning that the options have an importance beyond career choice. This options booklet is a part of the options choice process at Rodborough. We have already held a presentation evening to provide you and your parents with an overview of the options process. You will also consider the options process within your Social Studies lessons and participate in some activities designed to make you think about the future and how your option choices fit in. This options booklet contains information about the subjects available to you. This information should be studied in detail so that you are able to make a properly informed choice about your subject options. When making a decision about your optional subjects there are three main factors that you should consider: What am I going to do after Year 11? Qualifications you gain from taking these GCSE courses will form the basis of your application to College or employment with training. College tutors and employers want to see a breadth of subjects. Most of you will go on to College but wonâ€&#x;t know exactly what you want to study. There are subjects available at College you havenâ€&#x;t even heard of yet. To give yourself the best opportunity to take the course of your choice you need a balanced range of subjects now. What am I good at? You need to match your choice of subjects to your ability and aptitude. We would like you to look beyond the name of the subject you are choosing. Look at the balance between coursework and final examinations. Consider the time available for study; is it a single or double option? Does the subject matter and method of working suit you? What do I like? Most people do well if they are studying subjects they enjoy. We want you to enjoy your learning. Think hard about whether you like a subject because of the content of the course not the people you are with or the teacher who teaches you. You cannot guarantee either of these last two next year.

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What are the choices? Most people will opt for a range of three or four GCSE options to add to their „core‟ of English, Maths, Science, RE, PE, Social Studies and ICT. Some pupils, who have been identified as particularly able in Modern Foreign Languages or Science, will be offered the opportunity to extend this programme with additional GCSEs taken in reduced time. Other pupils will have an interest in following a vocational course and may opt for a programme that involves one day a week studying a different programme. We will begin by looking at the core option programme and then consider the additional options after that.

Most pupils will have the option of taking four optional subjects at GCSE. However, there are some restrictions on the choices that people have. For instance, all pupils not taking a Vocational Option must take a subject from the Specialist Subject block (either a Humanities or a Technology subject). Similarly, all pupils who are on target to attain a level 5 in a modern language by the end of Year 9 must take a language as one of their option choices. We try to allow pupils as much free choice as possible when making option choices and „build‟ our curriculum around the choices that Year 9 make. We will do our best to ensure that you get as many of your first choices as possible. Due to timetabling constraints this cannot be guaranteed. This is why we have asked you to name reserve option choices. We hope you find this booklet informative and easy to understand. The Information Evening and then the Consultation Evening should help to answer most questions. However, if you want to discuss with us any issues regarding option choices please do not hesitate to contact us. It is better to try and get it right now than regret it later.

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THE OPTIONS PROCESS Once the option forms have been submitted we have to create four option blocks in order to allow us to build the new timetable. We will organise the option blocks in order to allow the maximum number of people to take all of their subject choices. When we reach this point the option blocks become fixed and it is no longer possible to move people between subjects in the same way that we can at the initial options stage. In short, this means that taking your time to get your choices right before you submit your form is really important because there is a limited amount we can do to accommodate late changes to subject choices. Timescale Option forms issued – 15th March 2012 Option forms returned – 23rd March 2012 Choices processed and option blocks formed – May 2012 Pupils contacted where there are issues with their choices – May/June 2012 Subject choices confirmed – June 2012 New courses begin – September 2012

THE OPTIONS It is possible to take a number of different combinations of courses depending on your ability, career aspirations or personal preferences. You should give regard to your career aspirations, interests and the views of your teachers in terms of the progress you have made.

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The Core The majority of pupils will take four option choices in the normal time allocation within school. Pupils will normally leave school with 10 GCSE passes. Subjects studied will include a core of: Examination subjects: Maths English English Literature ICT (½ GCSE course)* Double Science (2 GCSEs „Core‟ and „Additional‟) RE: Philosophy & Ethics (½ GCSE course) * The ICT course begins during Year 9.

Non-examination subjects: Social Studies (including PSHE, Careers Education & Guidance and Citizenship) Physical Education. A choice of four options: All pupils must take a specialist subject and most a language. 1 from the specialist subject block:  Graphic Products Food Technology Resistant Materials Textiles History Geography RE: Philosophy & Ethics (Full Course) 

It is possible to take a Humanities and a Technology subject

1 from the Modern Foreign Language Options (this is optional for pupils below a level 5 in languages): French German 

It is possible to take both French and German as two options rather than take the „Double Linguist‟ Option.

2 or 3 other Options (3 choices is only for pupils below a level 5 in languages): Geography History Physical Education Art Music RE: Philosophy & Ethics (Full GCSE course) Drama BTEC Health & Social Care (2 Options) French German 5


Business and Communications Systems Computer Science Graphic Products Food Technology Resistant Materials Textiles

Variations to the core options programme In addition to the core option identified above, some pupils, who have been able to demonstrate a particular aptitude for either Science or Languages, will be offered the opportunity to extend their option choices. The process is virtually identical to the core except where indicated in the notes below. Some pupils may be best suited to following a vocational option, with part of the course taken on one day that operates outside the normal school curriculum and is usually taught at a different location. a) The Triple Science option: This would include a core of examination subjects: Maths English English Literature ICT (½ GCSE course)* RE: Philosophy & Ethics (½ GCSE course) and Triple Science. Students taking this route would study 6 lessons of Science per week, not 5, from the start of Year 10. In Year 11 Triple Science students have 7 periods of Science rather than 6. The extra Science lesson would reduce Physical Education from 2 lessons to 1 per week. Access to the Triple Science programme is only available to those students who are likely to attain at least a level 6 at the end of Key Stage 3. In most cases pupils working at level 6 in Year 9 would be best advised to follow a double award Science route. b) The Double Linguist option: This would include a core of examination subjects: Maths English English Literature Double Science ICT (½ GCSE course)* RE: Philosophy & Ethics (½ GCSE course) and French (one lesson of which would be taken outside the school day). Taking this route would reduce Physical Education from 2 lessons to 1 per week. One option choice must be German.

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Then for both a) and b) a choice of four options: For Double Linguists one of these will be German. All pupils must take a Specialist subject. 1 from the specialist subject block: ď‚… Graphic Products Food Technology Resistant Materials Textiles History Geography RE: Philosophy & Ethics (Full Course) ď‚…

It is possible to take a Humanities and a Technology subject

1 from the Modern Foreign Language Options: French German (must be taken by double linguists) 2 other Options: Geography History Physical Education Art Music RE: Philosophy & Ethics (Full GCSE course) Drama French German Business and Communication Systems Computer Science Graphic Products Food Technology Resistant Materials Textiles

c) The Vocational Option This option has a limited number of places available and an additional application process through the Waverley Federation. It includes the study of work related subjects both in and out of school, which will prepare pupils for College courses and/or the world of work. The pathway includes a whole day study of one subject at NVQ level or equivalent at College or another educational establishment. Pupils taking this pathway will have the opportunity to leave with the equivalent of up to 10 GCSEs. Involvement in the vocational programme is a two-year commitment and pupils will not be supported in their application if they are not felt to be suitable for the course. If you wish to discuss the vocational option then details of the vocational courses are available on request from Miss Spencer.

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Examination subjects: Maths English Science RE: Philosophy & Ethics (½ GCSE course) ICT (½ GCSE course) Non-examination subjects: Social Studies (including PSHE, Careers Education & Guidance and Citizenship) Physical Education. Either: BTEC Health & Social Care vocational Course (This is 2 options – 6 lessons a week). It contains an ICT component and other work related taster packages. Or two free options from: Physical Education Art Music RE: Philosophy & Ethics (Full GCSE course) Drama Business and Communication Systems Computer Science Graphic Products Food Technology Resistant Materials Textiles History Geography One day placement at College following a vocational training course from the following options: Level 1 courses (equivalent to GCSE grades D-G) Motor Vehicle Technical Certificate Caring for Children Active leisure An Introduction to Hospitality Animal Care

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Level 2 courses (equivalent to GCSE grades A*-C) BTEC in Motor Mechanics Media Business Sports Management Hairdressing Engineering Beauty Therapy Wildlife and Conservation Pupils will be identified as suitable for a vocational programme depending on their record at school, including attendance, behaviour and their academic suitability for courses. All pupils opting for a vocational course will be involved in a competitive application process and will need to consider at least two reserve subjects should they not be successful in their application for a vocational course. All pupils considering opting for a vocational course must see Miss Spencer for the appropriate application form and additional information.

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CORE EXAMINATION SUBJECTS English English Literature Mathematics Science ICT (Short Course) RE: Philosophy and Ethics (Short Course)

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE AQA

The English Language course covers all aspects of written and spoken English. Throughout the course, you will study a variety of texts. Reading widely at home is also highly recommended. The course aims to develop your ability to: Communicate accurately, appropriately and effectively in speech and writing Understand and respond creatively to a range of media Analyse and compare a range of texts Tasks will include analytical and creative writing, group and paired discussions, individual presentations and role-play.

Assessment Assessment is divided into three units: Unit 1 – Examination – Response to media and non-fiction texts + Writing skills (40%) Unit 2 – Speaking and Listening – 3 tasks (20%) Unit 3 – Controlled Assessments (40%)  Extended Reading of a prescribed text  Creative Writing: two tasks with different purposes and styles  Spoken Language Study

Career information related to English GCSE English Language and literature help to develop your ability to communicate the spoken and written word. Communication skills are important in all careers, especially those that involve working with a team, managing others or dealing with the general public. Careers in journalism, public relations, law, teaching and advertising rely particularly on effective communication skills. Most college courses and job vacancies will require you to have achieved a C grade at GCSE English Language.

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ENGLISH LITERATURE AQA

English Literature is taught as an integral part of the English course. You will read a range of literature, including a play, a novel and a selection of poetry. Some are classic texts from the Literary Heritage, others are more modern. The course aims to develop your ability to: Read a range of different texts Analyse and make comparisons between texts Communicate clearly in speech and writing Tasks will involve analytical writing, research and group discussions.

Assessment Assessment is divided into three units: Unit 1 – Examination – Modern Prose or Drama + Exploring Cultures (40%) Unit 2 – Examination – Poetry from the Anthology/Responding to an unseen poem (35%) Unit 3 – Controlled Assessment – Shakespeare and the Literary Heritage (25%)

Resources The English Section of the school website has a wide range of resources to help you to support your learning during both the English Language and English Literature GCSEs. GCSE resources can be found on the pages for Year 10 and Year 11.

Career Information related to English Language and English Literature GCSE English Language and literature help to develop your ability to communicate the spoken and written word. Communication skills are important in all careers, especially those that involve working with a team, managing others or dealing with the general public. Careers in journalism, public relations, law, teaching and advertising rely particularly on effective communication skills. Most college courses and job vacancies will require you to have achieved a „C‟ grade at GCSE English Language.

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MATHEMATICS Edexcel

The Mathematics course provides opportunities for you to continue to develop skills in four main areas: Number and Algebra Shape, space and measures Data handling Using and applying Mathematics, with a particular emphasis on problem solving. The lessons continue from the work you did at Key Stage 3. All pupils will follow a traditional course with exams at the end of Year 11. The examination is tiered, as explained later in the booklet, and each level includes calculator and non-calculator exams. Decisions about setting will be taken at the start of the course, using data from the Year 9 SATs exams. Some basic equipment is essential. You will need a calculator (probably a scientific one), a protractor and a pair of compasses. There will be opportunities for you to further develop your IT skills using the facilities in the Learning Resources Centre. A revision aid can be useful throughout the course and not only immediately before the GCSE examination. These aids and all the equipment necessary are sold at school. Many of the mathematical skills which you learn on the GCSE Mathematics course are useful in other subjects, particularly Science, Geography and Technology.

Career information related to Mathematics This subject helps you to learn how to think logically, do calculations accurately, work methodically to solve problems and handle data. These skills are useful for careers including finance, engineering, motor vehicle industry, construction, surveying, retail, carpet fitting, market research, IT, catering. You also need to be able to work with numbers in everyday life – paying bills, checking bank statements etc. Maths is another subject required for entry to many college and university courses and job vacancies.

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SCIENCE AQA

Most pupils in Year 10 take CORE SCIENCE in Year 10 and ADDITIONAL SCIENCE in Year 11. There will be an opportunity for some pupils to take SEPARATE SCIENCE GCSE‟s in Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

Year 10 Pupils will be following the new AQA Science A specification. This involves an equal amount of Biology, Chemistry and Physics content. All of these modules will incorporate the strand called „How Science Works‟. The CORE Science will be assessed by written tests usually taken in January and June of Year 10. Pupils will be entered for either Higher or Foundation tier papers. The coursework or Centre Assessed Unit will be based on normal class practical work and is worth 25% of the final mark. For the majority of pupils (those not taking separate Sciences) the work completed in Year 10 will result in a Core Science GCSE.

Year 11 The ADDITIONAL SCIENCE course will involve pupils following courses covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. They will be assessed via three 45 minute terminal exam papers and there will also be a Centre Assessed unit worth 25% of the final mark. Most pupils will sit these exams in the June of Year 11.

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The Triple Science [Additional] Option Pupils taking this course will gain a GCSE in each Science discipline by the end of Year 11. Triple Science pupils will cover all of the content from the Core and Additional Science courses as well as additional content. Triple Science pupils complete centre assessed coursework tasks in Year 10 and 11 which amount to 25% of the final grades. If you wish to be considered for the Triple Science option then you must indicate this by checking the box on the option form. Only 30 places are available on this route and they will be allocated to those attaining the highest levels in Science in Year 9 who have a positive attitude to learning.

Career information related to Science You will learn how to use equipment safely, collect and use data, work in a team, solve problems and make judgements based on facts. These skills are useful for careers such as engineering, construction, medicine and health care, environmental health, conservation, laboratory work, agriculture, IT, food and drugs production. Chemistry is particularly important for medicine and pharmacy. Physics is important for technical careers. Biology is often needed for health care careers. 15


NATIONAL FIRST AWARD IN ICT OCR

All Year 10 students will complete their study for the National First Award in ICT that they started in Year 9. Successful completion of this vocational course will result in you receiving a one-GCSE equivalent certificate at levels pass, merit or distinction (broadly equivalent to grades C, B and A respectively). The course is designed to equip you with the necessary ICT skills for business and in addition provide you with a thorough grounding in creative multimedia techniques and web design. On completion of this course you will: Be able to use ICT skills to analyse, solve problems and present information. Have the expertise to select appropriate software for new tasks, and also the ability to independently learn new software confidently. Understand how to create and edit with sound and design and create webpages using the latest specifications. Assessment for this course is 100% coursework and is comprised of three units: Creating Sound with ICT (completed in Year 9) Web Design (completed in Year 9) ICT for Business (completed in Year 10) Successful completion of the course is dependent on at least passing all of the units. Successful completion of this course will provide a solid base for further study of ICT at level 3 and beyond.

Career information related to ICT GCSE This develops skills in independent learning, time management, team working, communication and using ICT. These skills will improve your ability to understand the requirements of the world of work and ultimately to perform well in the next stage of your education and employment beyond.

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RE: PHILOSOPHY and ETHICS (Short Course) OCR

You study four to six of the twelve topics: Belief about Deity Religious and spiritual experience The end of life Good and Evil Religion, Reason and Revelation Religion and Science

Religion and Human Experience Religion and Medical Ethics Religion and Equality Religion, Poverty and Wealth Religion, Peace and Justice Religion and Media

The aim of the course is to encourage you to think constructively about life issues, to develop your own point of view and to appreciate the opinions of others. You will learn about beliefs, values and traditions of Christianity, considering the influence of religious beliefs, values and traditions on peopleâ€&#x;s lives. The course caters well for pupils whose religious background is not Christian, as the course can be approached from a variety of viewpoints. You will be taught in mixed ability groups for one period each week. All pupils are required to follow this course. At the end of the course pupils will sit the GCSE examination. This consists of two written examination of one hour each and leads to a GCSE short course award from A* to G, equivalent to a half GCSE. The emphasis will be on using your research skills to increase your knowledge and understanding, discussion and debate on a range of relevant and topical issues, as well as opportunities for role play.

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CORE NON-EXAMINATION SUBJECTS Social Studies Physical Education

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SOCIAL STUDIES A Non-examination Course

Social Studies includes Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHEE) and Citizenship. It aims to provide you with a framework within which you can begin to understand yourself and your role in society. The course is partly discussion based and includes work on Health, Religious Education, Careers and personal finance education. It is taught by a team of teachers, each working within their own specialist area, with pupils moving through a co-ordinated programme in mixed ability groups. Throughout the course there is an emphasis on both the factual and the emotional aspects of personal health. The course deals with family and personal relationships as well as aspects of sex education. It includes such topics as Healthy Eating, HIV and AIDS and drug awareness as well as other sensitive issues concerning adolescence. The course also covers many areas of Citizenship, including Human Rights, the Global Community, Democracy and Politics and the Justice System. Some of these topics may include visits, for example, from Magistrates, the Police and other agencies. This course also covers Careers Education and Guidance which aims to help you raise your achievement and become effective managers of your career in a changing world of learning and work. Currently the three core areas of Careers Education and Guidance are self-development, career exploration and career management and include: Information about work, training and educational opportunities derived from a variety of sources. Experience of work, through work-shadowing in Year 10, mock interviews, visits, business conferences and a work experience placement in Year 11. Individual guidance from the Careers Department and the personal advisor from the Connexions service. Practice in job seeking and application skills. Recording achievement and planning for the future. The work in the Upper School builds upon the Careers work covered in the Lower School. The Careers Department is concerned with you individually and your quest for continuing education or employment. The aim is to help you to help yourself. Throughout Social Studies we encourage you in the development of: Knowledge of yourselves: your qualities, abilities and potential of opportunities: in education, training and employment. Skills in decision making in action planning. Attitudes of self-reliance of responsibility to oneself and others of positive self esteem. 19


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

A Non-examination Course _______________________________________________________________ During the two years in the upper school, pupils spend a double period each week on Physical Education. The programme continues with many of the activities experienced in the lower school and introduces some new ones. A feature of the Year 11 programme is arranging some activities to take place off-site. These have to be paid for and a contribution made to transport where appropriate. The on-site programme is, of course, provided as part of the curriculum and there is no charge. Year 10 The new activities in this year group are trampolining and weight-training. The activities are divided into blocks which last for half a term in each case. Year 11 The department operates an „optionâ€&#x; programme in this year group. In line with National Curriculum requirements, pupils select one activity to study in depth, which they have previously covered at some time in school. Other choices may then be made from a selection of on or off-site activities.* In past years, the off-site activities have included ice-skating and bowling at the Spectrum and using the climbing wall at the Surrey Sports Park. All these activities are supported by the appropriate centre staff and include an element of skills tuition. Pupils taking the double Languages and triple Science options will have reduced time in the Year 10 & 11 PE programme and will not have full access to all the PE Options in the Year 11 package. Whether on-site or off, pupils are expected to wear the Rodborough PE kit for all activities, with some allowance made for specialist requirements.

* Please note that off-site activities require a payment. 20


Specialist Subjects Food Technology Graphic Products Resistant Materials Textiles History Geography RE: Philosophy and Ethics (Full Course) All pupils must select one of these subjects unless they are following a Vocational course.

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DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY – Food Technology OCR

Food Technology uses the design and technology process to design and make with food. If you enjoy finding out about food and working with it as a material then this is the course for you. You will study: Nutritional needs and food choices of different groups of people Food ingredients, their properties and uses Hygiene and safety Food production Recipe modification and nutritional analysis Industrial case studies Product development and evaluation. Sustainable design You will: Develop and use practical food preparation skills Learn to analyse products that are already on sale Carry out market research Develop your ICT skills and learn about CAD and CAM Learn how to develop, make, market and package a new product Work on your own and as part of a team Controlled Assessment work Controlled Assessments require pupils to develop prototypes for new food products. To do this effectively students work through stages of the design process from analysing the task to developing a brief, research, writing a specification, trialling design ideas, testing and evaluating, modifying designs and making the final product. An example of a task might be: „Design and make a new cake, pastry or biscuit product which is particularly suitable for young children‟. There are two Controlled Assessments, each contributing 30% towards the GCSE leaving 40% of the marks for the examinations. In the examinations there are two written papers one on Technical Aspects of Food Technology and one based around Sustainability. Career information related to Technology As well as developing useful skills for everyday life, technology subjects link with specific careers including - engineering, motor vehicle mechanic, construction trades, chef, interior designer, product designer.

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DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY – Graphic Products OCR

Graphic Products is concerned with the design and making of products using card, paper and other “soft” (compliant) materials. This subject will help you to understand and appreciate the design and manufacture of graphic products. It will help you to be creative in your approach to problem solving and product development. You will use computers to help in developing your design ideas and in creating products. Through a range of projects you will study how to: Draw in different styles and projections accurately Develop a specification for a product Analyse existing products Generate a range of design proposals Use the Internet to research ideas Develop products and plan production Select materials and work with tools and equipment Test and evaluate products. You will: Improve your ICT skills and learn about CAD and CAM Analyse products and the processes used to manufacture them Work practically with graphic media such as card, paper, foamboard etc. Learn about the use of graphics in promoting, packaging and protecting a product, in advertising and in information systems Learn about the application and use of graphics in enriching, learning and developing communication products Develop your understanding of sustainability Controlled Assessment Pupils will be required to complete 2 controlled assessments they are each worth 30% of their final grade. Year 10 controlled assessment: this focuses on researching, designing and making. Pupils will be designing and producing an item of packaging. Year 11 controlled assessment: pupils will be concentrating on making a quality product and they will have the opportunity to produce 2D or 3D graphic products. Examples are: a promotional stand, pop up book or a point of sale Exams Pupils will be required to take 2 exams in Year 11. Each are worth 20% of their final grade. The exams will be on sustainable design and technical aspects of designing and making. Career information related to Technology As well as developing useful skills for everyday life, technology subjects link with specific careers including - engineering, motor vehicle mechanic, construction trades, chef, interior designer, product designer. 23


DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY OCR

– Resistant Materials

This subject is concerned with problem solving by designing and making threedimensional products using „hard‟ (resistant) materials, i.e. wood, metal and plastic. Studying Resistant Materials will help you to understand and appreciate the design and manufacture of products. It will help you to be creative in your approach to problem solving and product construction. You will study: Properties of materials (woods, metals and plastics) Joining, forming and finishing materials Industrial case studies The development of wood products Tools and equipment Sustainability You will: Develop your ICT skills and learn about CAD and CAM Be able to analyse products and understanding of the manufacturing process Carry out market research Develop designs to meet a particular brief or specification Develop practical skills in the workshop with wood, metal and plastic materials Make products e.g. storage box, educational toy, garden products. Controlled Assessment Pupils will be required to complete 2 controlled assessments. They are each worth 30% of their final grade. Year 10 controlled assessment: this focuses on researching, designing and making. Pupils will be producing an educational toy. Year 11 controlled assessment: pupils will be concentrating on making a quality product and they will have the opportunity to make garden product. Exams Pupils will be required to take 2 exams in Year 11. Each are worth 20% of their final grade. The exams will be on sustainable design and technical aspects of designing and making. This option is probably best suited to students who enjoy a „hands-on‟ workshop situation. You are encouraged to work independently and take personal responsibility for progress and production of a quality product. Career information related to Technology As well as developing useful skills for everyday life, technology subjects link with specific careers including engineering, motor vehicle mechanic, construction trades, interior designer, product designer.

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DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY – Textiles Technology OCR

Textiles uses the design and technology process to design and make with fabrics. If you have an interest in designing and making through the medium of Textiles then this is the course for you. You will study: How fabrics are made Fabric properties and uses The sewing machine Various methods of transferring designs on to fabric Methods for joining fabrics Industrial case studies The development of textile products and sustainable design You will: Develop practical needlework and sewing machine skills Learn to analyse existing textile products Carry out market research Make products e.g. bags, cushions, toys Develop your ICT skills and learn about CAD and CAM Learn how to develop and make a new textile product Work on your own and as part of a team. Controlled assessment Pupils will be required to complete 2 controlled assessments. They are each worth 30% of their final grade. Year 10 controlled assessment: this focuses on researching, designing and making. Pupils will be producing a bag using traditional techniques. Year 11 controlled assessment: pupils will be concentrating on making a quality product and they will have the opportunity to make an educational toy. Exams Pupils will be required to take 2 exams in Year 11. Each are worth 20% of their final grade. The exams will be on sustainable design and technical aspects of designing and making This course will suit you if: You have enjoyed the Year 9 course and wish to develop some of the areas that you have studied You wish to extend your sewing machine skills You are creative and enjoy making functional items You are prepared to back up your design ideas with the necessary paperwork. Career information related to Technology As well as developing useful skills for everyday life, technology subjects link with specific careers including engineering, motor vehicle mechanic, construction trades, chef, interior designer, product designer. 25


GEOGRAPHY GCSE (Syllabus A) AQA

“Geography is the subject which holds the key to our future�

Michael Palin Statistics show that compared to other subjects, Geography graduates are among the most employable. This is probably because they possess the skills that employers look for. In part this is because the subject is a combination of the facts of science and the understanding of the arts. GEOGRAPHERS ARE: Good communicators Spatially aware Socially and environmentally aware Problem solvers Good team players Computer literate Well rounded, flexible thinkers

GEOGRAPHERS CAN: Make a concise report Handle data Ask questions and find the answers Make decisions about an issue Analyse material Solve problems Think independently

What is the course made up of? Unit 1: Physical Geography (37.5%) 1 hr 30 minute examination You will gain an understanding of physical processes and factors that produce the diverse landscapes across our planet. There is an emphasis on the interaction between people and the environment, and an awareness of the need for sustainable management of environments. Section A: The Restless Earth, Rocks, Resources and Scenery, Challenge of Weather and Climate, The Living World Section B: Water Management, Ice on the land, The Coastal Zone Unit 2: Human Geography (37.5%) 1 hr 30 minute examination This unit focuses on the causes of, and processes involved in changes to human environments, both rural and urban. It covers some of the rapid economic developments affecting people across the globe, as well as issues related to population change, migration and tourism. Section A: Population Change, Changing Urban Environments, Changing Rural Environments. Section B: The Development Gap, Globalisation, Tourism Both exams are taken at the end of Year 11. For each exam students must answer one question from each section, plus one other question of their choice. Unit 3: Local Fieldwork Investigation (25%) The coursework component is made up a single planned enquiry. It is a small scale, fieldwork based investigation. The investigation write up takes place under direct supervision in class and is completed in the Autumn Term of Year 11.

Career information related to Geography In developing knowledge of land use and the environment, it is a particular requirement in land management and surveying, geology, ecology, town and country planning, meteorology, landscape architecture, cartography and Leisure and Tourism. It is also useful for careers in the media, public services and business. 26


HISTORY Edexcel

The History GCSE course is the EdExcel option History A (The Making of the Modern World). The course will consist of four units of assessment. Three of these are exam units that are externally assessed, and one is a controlled assessment. Each of the four units is worth 25% of the final GCSE grade. For units 1, 3 and 4 students will complete a 75 minute external examination for each unit. Each unit counts for 25% of the final GCSE grade. The controlled assessment will be internally assessed and is also worth 25% of the final GCSE grade. Students will begin in Year 10 with our outline study. Unit 1: International Relations 1900-1991. This builds and follows on from work that has been done at KS3 in year 9. We will focus on the years 1918-1956 for the purpose of examination and look at three key areas: The Peace Settlements 1918-1928. Why did war break out? International relations 1929-1939. How did the Cold War develop? 1943-1956. Unit 2 will be our Modern World Depth Study, which gives students an opportunity to study in depth a key aspect of modern world history. We will be looking at Germany 1918-1939. This has proved to be a very popular unit in the past, and looks at subjects that have been touched upon at KS3 in more detail. The main focuses of the unit are: The Weimar Republic 1918-33 Hitler and the growth of the Nazi Party 1918-33 The Nazi dictatorship 1933-39 Nazi domestic policies 1933-39 The History department has led a highly popular trip to Berlin for the last three years, in conjunction with the Philosophy and Ethics GCSE groups. We hope to continue to provide this trip as an option for students of the new course. Unit 3 is the final unit and is the modern world source enquiry. In this unit students will have the opportunity to conduct a source-based enquiry within a key context of modern world history. Students will consider war and the transformation of British society 1903-28. The key areas within this unit are: The Liberals, votes for women and social reform. The part played by the British on the Western Front in WWI. The Home front and Social change. Economic and Social change 1918-29. Unit 4 is our controlled assessment unit, which has replaced the old style coursework unit. This is a task based unit and focuses on Historical Enquiry and Representations of History. The unit that we will be studying and producing our coursework on is Vietnam 1960-75. We will look at: The reasons for US involvement in Vietnam. The nature of the conflict and the reasons for US defeat. The impact of the war on civilians and the military, in the USA and in North and South Vietnam. The growth of protest in the USA and the end of the conflict.

Career information relating to History The study of History is particularly valuable for careers in law, journalism, museum and archive work, architecture and theatre wardrobe work. You will learn how to find things out for yourself and to tell the difference between facts and opinions. In addition, writing essays and giving presentations based on your own research will develop your reasoning and communication skills.

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RE: PHILOSOPHY and ETHICS (Full Course) OCR

This course follows the arrangements for Religious Studies from 2009 and is entitled „Philosophy and Ethics‟. (Religious Studies) You study ten to twelve of the twelve topics: Belief about Deity Religious and spiritual experience The end of life Good and Evil Religion, Reason and Revelation Religion and Science

Religion and Human Experience Religion and Medical Ethics Religion and Equality Religion, Poverty and Wealth Religion, Peace and Justice Religion and Media

The aim of the course is to encourage you to think constructively about life issues, to develop your own point of view and to appreciate the opinions of others. You will learn about beliefs, values and traditions of one or more religions, considering the influence of religious beliefs, values and traditions have on individuals, communities and societies. You will consider these issues at a local, national and global level and recognise that these aspects vary in significance between different religious communities. The course caters well for pupils whose religious background is not Christian, as the course can be approached from a variety of viewpoints.

Career Information related to Philosophy and Ethics. This course deals with the fundamental issues in life and, though a valuable subject in careers such as journalism, law, teaching, social work and politics, it offers everyone the ability to discuss, challenging one‟s own and others‟ viewpoints, providing a sound philosophical and ethical approach to life in general. 28


OTHER SUBJECTS Art Business and Communications Systems Computer Science Drama French German BTEC Health & Social Care (Double Award) Music Physical Education

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ART AQA

You will undertake a variety of experiences employing a range of art and design media and techniques. Examples of art, craft and design are introduced and you will be asked to respond to these in the context of your own work by making notes, producing written work, by discussion and through practical tasks. Major pieces of practical work will be produced from some of the following: Drawing and painting Mixed media Printmaking

Sculpture Graphics Photography & Digital Manipulation

Assessment of the course is divided into: Coursework

60%

Controlled test

40%

You must present three extended collections of coursework for assessment, each of which includes preliminary studies, development work, the final piece(s) and historical and critical work. Producing a piece of sculpture is a requirement of the course. The three units submitted will be: work developed from a dayâ€&#x;s visit to a place of interest development of a chosen theme work developed from a study of natural forms. Homework is set for a minimum of 1 hour per week, although it must be noted that candidates will be expected to spend additional time working on their portfolios. Coursework will be completed by the second week of the Summer Term in Year 11. The controlled test contains seven questions. You answer one question. Test papers are issued in January with five weeks allowed for preparation work. The test itself lasts for ten hours over 2 days in February and the final piece will be produced unaided, under supervision. You must discuss your chosen topic with your teacher. The use of Art studios at lunchtime and after school by all Art pupils will be encouraged. A one-day visit will be arranged in Year 10, usually to Bosham, a small harbour village in Sussex. Information for the environment unit will be collected on this visit. A trip to a London gallery is also organised at the start of the Summer term after school hours. This visit is used to develop an aspect of work for the third unit. You will need access to a camera and preferably have your own drawing pencils (Grades 4B, 2B & B,) and Acrylic Paints. A ÂŁ30 donation is also requested to cover the cost of brushes, paints and portfolios. Career information related to Art This will help you to develop your creative, practical and communication skills. Careers involving art & design include graphic design, product styling, illustration, art editing, architecture, make-up artistry, photography, sign writing, theatre design, stage and set design and floristry

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BUSINESS and COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS AQA specification No 4134 What we aim to do The aim of the course is to develop knowledge and understanding of business systems and how data is processed, stored and communicated within a variety of business contexts. In other words, there is a strong focus on developing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills to an advanced level within KS4 using the context of business. Students particularly focus on ICT skills in word processing, desktop publishing, databases, spreadsheets, and presentation and graphics software applications. Students also consider new technologies and there is theoretical and practical work on the Internet as a subject of study in its own right. What we Study The themes that make up the subject content are - The Business Environment, Workplace Organisation, Human Resources, Communication, The Use of ICT and Computer Applications in the Business Environment. The latter topic area studies practical file management, word processing, spreadsheets, charting, databases, presentation and graphics. Within these subject areas students are set a range of theoretical and practical tasks requiring the use of ICT to solve business problems. For instance, an investigation into the pros and cons of e-commerce for businesses might be set. Students research e-commerce on the Internet as well as other sources and produce a PowerPoint presentation on their findings. The study of business problems through case studies is another strong feature. How your work will be assessed ICT Systems in Business ICT in Business Investigating ICT in Business

40% - 1 hour written paper 35% – 1 hour 30 mins computer based exam 25% - Controlled class based assessment.

Additional Information / Special requirements Some aspects of the course can be technical and students should bear in mind that this is a full GCSE course - it is not an option for „topping up‟ ICT skills. There is a business theory paper and students will need to apply themselves as much to this as to the development of ICT skills. Since the course has a strong emphasis on practical skills, it will be advantageous for students to have a computer at home. Students should learn much that is useful to them when they undertake work experience.

Career information related to Business and Communication Systems A number of courses in ICT, Computing and Business Studies at GNVQ or AS/A Level. The Information and Communication Technology sector is a big employment growth sector and there are many careers available. Specialist skills are at a premium.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE AQA

This is a new and exciting qualification allowing students to explore the technical aspects of computing and go beyond just using applications to designing and creating your own. This course will challenge and enhance your problem solving skills and provide you with a wide range of programming skills necessary to create creative solutions to technical challenges such as mobile app creation, games programming and dynamic web design. On completion of this course you will: Have a firm grounding in core problem solving and programming skills. Understand the low level working of a computer. Be able to analyse, create and test your own applications. Have a thorough understanding of programming concepts that will enable you to learn new languages independently. The first programming language you will study is Python, although we will look at C, JavaScript, PHP, SQL and others as and when the language is suitable for the problem. The assessment for this course is: Coursework – 60% The coursework is two extended pieces of controlled assessment that will draw on many areas of the syllabus and require you to design, develop and test a complex system. All of the fundamental skills you will require for this task will have been covered in class although you are free to explore programming concepts beyond what is taught in lessons when creating your system. You will have a choice of two tasks from four categories: mobile applications, gaming, dynamic web application and a more classical computer science problem. Exam – 40% This is a 90 minute paper exam that will test the theoretical parts of the course (such as number systems and data representation) along with more practical programming-based questions. We do not expect any student to have any previous experience of programming although to succeed in this course you should have an enquiring mind and enjoy technical challenges. Successful completion of this course will provide a firm foundation for studying computing at level 3 and at university (most Computer Science degree applicants will have less practical skills and theoretical knowledge than you will have learned by the end of this course). It is also worthy of study in its own right as it emphasises independent learning and problem solving. Programming is now an important skill in sciences, engineering, mathematics and many creative and many artistic subjects.

Career information related to Computer Science A number of courses in ICT and Computing or AS and A Level. The Computing and Information and Communication Technology sector is a big employment growth sector and there are many careers available. Specialist skills are at a premium. Specific related careers are commercial programming, web page creation and development and games design.

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DRAMA AQA

This is an exciting and creative GCSE course, which provides you with the opportunity to study play texts together with a variety of other practical forms of Drama including improvisation and devised theatre. This may lead to performances to outside audiences which can include local primary schools as well as parents, fellow pupils and staff. For those of you less focused on acting, there are opportunities for work in stage lighting, sound, costume, make-up design, set design, properties, masks and stage management. Evaluation of performance is an important aspect of the course. You will learn the skill of the theatre critic, assessing both your own work and that of others. You are encouraged to visit professional and local amateur productions. The school arranges a number of visits during each academic year. The course is assessed using: Practical work controlled assessments 60% (2 pieces) Written paper 40% Controlled assessment marks are awarded for: Preparation and exploration of skills Final presentation either performance or demonstration of design skill. The written paper consists of three sections: Section A – Practical work completed during the course Section B – Study and performance of a scripted play Section C – Study of a live theatre production seen The essential requirements for this course are the desire to work effectively within a team, become involved in performance work and the ability to approach each drama activity with commitment, energy and enthusiasm. You will be expected to see a number of live productions during the course. Career information related to Drama This will involve you in team-working, creativity, communication and co-operation. Through performing you can gain self-confidence and this will help you to succeed in your future career. Related careers include performing, stage management, technical theatre, TV production, teaching, training, sales and public relations.

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FRENCH Edexcel

French is offered to GCSE level to ALL pupils who have studied it in Year 8 or 9; however pupils who have reached a level 5 in languages should choose either French of German and will be advised by their teachers which option is most suitable for them. Some pupils may take the opportunity to study both languages as part of the extended pathway. The GCSE French course will build on the knowledge gained in lower school, covering the four skill areas of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. The topics studied at GCSE are: Media and culture Sport and leisure Travel and tourism Business, work and employment The key subject aim is to enable students to develop: An understanding of French in a variety of contexts A knowledge of French vocabulary and structures Transferable language learning skills The ability to communicate effectively in French Awareness and understanding of countries and communities where French is spoken The course will be assessed through a series of controlled assessments for speaking and writing and summative assessments for reading and listening. Students will learn through the medium of the target language including the use of: Video and audio tapes/CDs Role play ICT Group and pair work with the foreign language assistant. In the upper school pupils taking languages are encouraged to participate in exchanges. We may organise a week long exchange with schools in our twin town of Joigny (France). This provides pupils with the opportunity to experience the culture and practise their language skills in an authentic setting. In Year 11 pupils may choose to do their work experience abroad. Career information related to French Languages are not just for translation, teaching and tourism. In an increasingly international market, languages are necessary for many career choices including marketing, sciences and engineering. Students offering a language qualification may be favoured by Higher Education providers and may also have the opportunity to study abroad at University level as this is often offered as part of degrees.

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GERMAN Edexcel

German is offered to GCSE level to ALL pupils who have studied it in Year 8 or 9; however pupils who have reached a level 5 in languages should choose either French of German and will be advised by their teachers which option is most suitable for them. Some pupils may take the opportunity to study both languages as part of the extended pathway. The GCSE German course will build on the knowledge gained in lower school, covering the four skill areas of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. The topics studied at GCSE are: Media and culture Sport and leisure Travel and tourism Business, work and employment The key subject aim is to enable students to develop: An understanding of German in a variety of contexts A knowledge of German vocabulary and structures Transferable language learning skills The ability to communicate effectively in German Awareness and understanding of countries and communities where German is spoken The course will be assessed through a series of controlled assessments for speaking and writing and summative assessments for reading and listening. Students will learn through the medium of the target language including the use of: Video and audio tapes/CDs Role play ICT Group and pair work with the foreign language assistant. In the upper school pupils taking languages are encouraged to participate in exchanges. We organise a week long exchange with schools in our twin town of Mayen (Germany). This provides pupils with the opportunity to experience the culture and practise their language skills in an authentic setting. In Year 11 pupils may choose to do their work experience abroad. Career information related to German Languages are not just for translation, teaching and tourism. In an increasingly international market, languages are necessary for many career choices including marketing, sciences and engineering. Students offering a language qualification may be favoured by Higher Education providers and may also have the opportunity to study abroad at University level as this is often offered as part of degrees.

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HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE (Double GCSE) BTEC Extended Certificate

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care is a 30 credit qualification that consists of at least two of the specialist optional units from the list below and at least two others. Unit 1 2 3 4 Unit 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Specialist Optional Units (at least two) Communications in Health and Social Care Individual Rights in Health and Social Care Individual Needs in Health and Social Care Ensuring Safe Environments in Health and Social Care Optional Units (at least one) Vocational Experience in a Health and Social Care setting Cultural Diversity in Health and Social Care Anatomy and Physiology for Health and Social Care Human Lifespan Development Creative and Therapeutic Activities in Health and Social Care Health and Social Care Services The Impact of Diet on Health

Credit 5 5 5 5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

This course is studied over two years and you will complete four or more units of coursework. There are no exams in this qualification and it is the equivalent of 2 GCSEs. You can achieve this qualification at either Pass, Merit or Distinction levels. Pass is the equivalent of GCSEs grade C, Merit is 2 x grade B, and a Distinction is 2 x grade A. We use Tulips Nursery and the Harbour Day Centre as part of this work. Your work shadowing & work experience provide a great opportunity to add to your vocational experience in a health and social care setting. We aim to enjoy the subject matter and encourage a positive use of leisure time. We give pupils the opportunity to „parentâ€&#x; one of our electronic babies and provide feedback on the level of care provided. Some of our lessons will take place off site. This course suits pupils who are organised, able to seek advice and act on it. Pupils who are more successful at coursework and are perhaps less confident in an examination situation usually do very well. For further information about the course please speak to Miss Spencer or Mrs Grace.

Career information related to Health and Social Care Any pupil considering a career working with people, teaching, nursery nursing or any type of care or social work would find this course highly relevant and a sound preparation for future studies. 36


MUSIC AQA

It is essential that pupils wishing to take GCSE Music can already play an instrument and continue to take lessons throughout their upper school course until the time of the practical examination in the Autumn term of Year 11. It is a requirement that pupils taking GCSE Music must participate in at least one extra curricular music activity run by the department in order for them to complete their ensemble performing exam. There are five areas of study: Rhythm / Metre Timbre /Dynamics

Harmony /Tonality Structure / Form

Texture / Melody

This course is taught through three Strands of Learning: The Western Classical Tradition Popular Music of the 20th and 21st Centuries World Music There are four components to the course – Composing Music, Composing and appraising Music, Performing Music, and Listening to and Appraising Music. Unit 1: Listening to and Appraising Music 20% (80 Marks) Taken at the beginning of the exam season, usually the first GCSE exam in May of Year 11. You will sit a one hour paper listening to musical extracts based on the five areas of study and answering a mixture of question types – multiple choice, structured responses and extended responses. Unit 2: Composing and Appraising Music 20% (40 Marks 2 x 20) You will complete a composition starting in the November of Year 11 on two of the areas of study chosen by you linked to a Strand of Learning set by the examination board. This composition will be completed under Supervised Time (Max.20hrs). It must be recorded and accompanied by a score and written annotation (10%). A written appraisal of the process of composition and the final outcome – a two hour, Controlled Time exam. (10%) Unit 3: Performing Music 40% (60 Marks) You will need to perform two different pieces; one Individual and one ensemble performance lasting no more than five minutes at a Grade 4+ standard. This will be completed by the end of the Autumn Term in Year 11. Unit 4: Composing Music 20% (30 Marks) You will be asked to produce one composition per half term during Year 10, working during lesson time plus at least 1 hour homework per week (done outside of lessons using Music ICT facilities). You will submit a composition that explores two or more of the five areas of study. You have up to 25 hrs Controlled Assessment Time. The composition will be submitted for examination on CD with a written commentary and printed score.

Career information related to Music Studying music will develop your performing and composition skills and develop your self confidence. The music business offers a wide range of careers including performing, composing and arranging, artist and tour management, sound recording, music therapy, music publishing and promotion, music education and music media.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION AQA

The Physical Education course aims to develop practical skills and associated theoretical knowledge across a range of sports activities. The course is based on: Practical Written examination

60% 40%

The practical assessment covers 4 activities chosen from at least 2 of the following groups 1. Games e.g. football, netball, rugby, basketball, volleyball, rounders, badminton, tennis 2. Gymnastic activities e.g. artistic or compositional gym, trampolining 3. Dance 4. Athletics 5. Swimming – competitive or personal survival 6. Outdoor and adventurous activities e.g. skiing, horse riding At least 2 performances must be as a player/performer but there is also the opportunity to adopt different roles; e.g. choreographer or coach – all practical work is assessed throughout the course during Years 10 and 11. The written examination is a single 1 ½ hour paper covering topics such as the importance of health, fitness and training in relation to enhancing physical performance. The paper itself consists of multiple choice, short answer questions and extended answers based on a scenario issued prior to the examination. There may also be an opportunity for some pupils to be entered for a double award in this subject.

Career information related to Physical Education Helps you to build leadership and team-working skills, sports skills, communication and awareness of health & safety. There are many careers in sport ranging from being a sports professional to coaching, teaching, sports development, team management, marketing administration. You don‟t have to take GCSE PE in order to go on to advanced level study as long as you have good GCSE grades in Science and English as well as proven sports ability.

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TIERING IN GCSE EXAMS The arrangements of examinations into tiers or bands of grades is a common feature of many of the GCSE examinations which pupils will be taking in 2014. This involves grouping grades together within a band with papers that allow pupils aiming for those grades to show what they know, understand and can do. Usually these subjects are divided into Foundation and Higher, as illustrated by the table below. Higher Foundation

A*-D C-G

Final decisions on level of entry are usually not made by staff until February of the year in which the examination is taken. In many cases (with the notable exception of Maths) the subject content is the same across the tiers with the difference being the depth in which a topic is tackled. Pupils will be entered for the tier which is best suited to their demonstrated abilities at the time of entry. The subject areas which only have one tier of entry include: Food, Graphics, Textiles, RM, History, Music, Art, Physical Education, Drama and Religious Studies. Further details are included, where necessary, in the subject specific information earlier in the booklet.

MODULAR COURSES

Some courses have now become Modular. In some subjects, pupils may be entered for either the Modular or Linear course, depending on their Tier of Entry. A Modular Course is assessed through several modules, so pupils will take some of their GCSE/NVQ exams even as early as Year 10 and, in many cases, will already have decided up to 50% of their final grade before the final block of exams in two years‟ time. The style of learning is different to that needed for Linear courses, where the majority of the grade is decided in one final examination at the end of the two years. Your learning style might help you decide which subjects to choose in some cases.

COURSEWORK

Most GCSE courses now require pupils to complete coursework „controlled assessments‟, which takes place in school under the supervision of the class teacher. Subjects vary in the number of controlled assessments they do, the length of the controlled assessments and the percentage of the final grade they count for. Again, different learning styles will mean that some pupils will find it easier / harder to study a subject with a lot of coursework and this is therefore also a factor to consider when you make your choices.

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Options Booklet 2012  

Options for Year 9 Students

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