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Vol. 13 • Issue 6 • February 2016

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From the Editor

STAFF WRITERS: Sarah Brokamp Sonia Gregory Angela S. Hoover Jean Jeffers

Jamie Lober Dr. Tom Miller Harleena Singh

COLUMNISTS/GUESTS: Dr. Wesley Johnson Family Practice Associates of Lexington, P.S.C. Kathleen Fluhart, R.N., M.Ac. Artemesia

February 2016

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EDITOR@HEALTHANDWELLNESSMAGAZINE.NET Tanya Tyler Editor, Health&Wellness Magazine Dear Friends, During February, we celebrate Valentine’s Day, so it’s a good time to think about heart health. In fact, it is American Heart Month, so our issue has a lot of interesting and helpful information about the heart – how

it works and how you can keep it healthy. New breakthroughs in heart research and heart disease treatment show promise, but much of the work of getting your heart in shape is up to you. The mantra continues to be exercise more, eat a healthy diet and stop smoking. We’re just a few months into the new year so you still have time to make a resolution to take better care of yourself. We are

John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP Mind Body Studio

here to help support and encourage you on your journey to Health and Wellness.

Tanya J. Tyler Here’s to your good health,

Interim Editor

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Willie B. Ray – Art of Strength Kettle Bell Gym Dr. Kimberly Sears – Village Animal Hospital

Columns

Jenna Brescher and Andrea Newcom Clinical Nutrition, Trilogy Health Services

ROCK POINT PUBLISHING: Brian Lord / Publisher Kim Blackburn / Sales Representative Jennifer Lord / Customer Relations Specialist Barry Lord / Sales Representative Janet Roy / Graphic Designer

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Health&Wellness Magazine can be found in 20 central Kentucky counties and is distributed to over 90% of medical facilities, including chiroprator’s, eye doctor’s and dentist’s offices. You can also pick up your FREE copy of Health&Wellness at most grocery and convenience stores as well as many restaurants throughout Central Kentucky.

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e-mail brian@rockpointpublishing.com © Copyright HEALTH&WELLNESS Magazine 2016. All rights reserved. Any reproduction of the material in this magazine in whole or in part without written prior consent is prohibited. Articles and other material in this magazine are not necessarily the views of Health&Wellness Magazine. Health&Wellness Magazine reserves the right to publish and edit, or not publish any material that is sent. Health&Wellness Magazine will not knowingly publish any advertisement which is illegal or misleading to its readers. The information in Health&Wellness should not be considered as a substitute for medical examination, diagnosis or treatment. Health&Wellness is a proud product of Rock Point Publishing.

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INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE Mindfulness is Heartfulness

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NEWS MAKERS

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ACUPUNCTURE Can Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Help Your Heart?

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ADVICE FROM YOUR LOCAL DOC Exercise Your Heart

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15 Superfoods for Your Heart Make good choices to live a healthy life

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Midlife Fitness Predicts Long-Term Heart Health

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Safe Exercises for Patients with Heart Disease

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Hearts Need Goals

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The Heart-and-Kidney Connection

30

PET HEALTH Protect Your Pet’s Health

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Here’s To Your Healthy Heart!

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FOOD: NATURE’S BEAUTY Oats

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FOOD BITES

Warning Signs of Stroke Learn how to tell symptoms and act FAST

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YOUR FITNESS COACH What Are You Aiming At?

28

What is a Heart Murmur?

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PARENTING FOR WELLNESS Helicopter Parenting

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Dental Care Is Important to Heart Health Gum disease can often indicate heart disease

Departments

38

Heart Attack Symptoms Differ in Women, Men

Calendar of Events

39

Drunk With Love: How Alcohol and Oxytocin Are Similar

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New Treatments for Heart Disease FDA approves new drugs

46

Recovering from a Stroke Know the signs and symptoms

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06 08

Medical Careers from the pages of

Magazine

Features

New Research on Heart Disease Breakthroughs give patients new hope Heart Healthy Diet Watch what you eat to maintain a good heartbeat

DIGITAL

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New Research on Heart Disease

Breakthroughs give patients new hope By Jamie Lober, Staff Writer Cardiovascular health is one of the fastest-growing research fields. “Medical advances have come a long way and we have seen a tremendous drop in mortality rates from heart disease, so we have made a lot of progress through research,” said Tom Harms, communications director with the American Heart Association. “Every 10 years, we set a goal. Between 2010 and 2020 we wanted to reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent and improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent, so we are halfway through that period.” There is still room for improvement. “It is still a battle because when we look at the prevalence of obesity and other risk factors like high blood pressure and diabetes, those numbers continue to grow,” Harms said. But research has made huge strides during the decade. For instance, preparing for surgery has become easier and safer for the majority of atrial fibrillation patients after research found they can temporarily discontinue taking blood thinners. Questions had lingered over the years about how to best manage atrial fibrillation patients before and after procedures without increasing the risk of blood clots or bleeding. “Because atrial fibrillation increases the risk of blood clots, doctors would often bridge patients before and after surgery from the powerful blood thinner warfarin to another faster-acting blood thinner called low-molecular weight heparin,” said Harms. “For patients, the bridging therapy meant a complicated schedule of stopping their regular blood thinner and selfadministering expensive twice-daily injections.” Though this study sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood

Institute was selected as one of the top 10 research advances in 2015, it is important to note this new protocol did not reduce the risk of stroke and actually increased the risk of major bleeding. Other major heart-disease research breakthroughs include: • a study showing treating high blood pressure more aggressively has been lifesaving; • a study with a modern diabetes drug that is the first to reduce deaths from heart complications in people with type 2 diabetes; • a study showing stent retrievers have revolutionized treatment for serious strokes; • new drugs that are slashing bad cholesterol; and • changes to the protocol of giving CPR. “New research suggests cardiac arrest victims fare better when first responders and paramedics pause to give rescue breaths during CPR,” said Harms. Other treatments have been modified. “Less is more in ablation treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation,” Harm said. “New research shows it is not necessary to burn extra tissue in the heart when treating persistent atrial fibrillation.” It cannot be forgotten that healthy lifestyle choices are still the foundation for good cardiovascular health, even though genetics still play a role. “Researchers have identified several tiny snippets of genetic material that may affect cholesterol and fat levels in the blood, a discovery that could help prevent heart disease,” said Harms. Statins, the mainstay drugs, are teaming up with a new medication to lower bad cholesterol. “The new drugs, Praluent and Repatha, are a new class of cholesterol-lowering

medicines called PCSK9 inhibitors,” said Harms. Since high cholesterol is a strong risk factor for heart disease and stroke, researchers have honed in on this area. “For individuals with a genetic predisposition to high LDL, their risk of cardiovascular events is quite high and can be at 200 or higher, so even if you cut that in half with

statins, that is not good enough,” said Harms. “Doctors have long thought that pushing HDL levels higher could help reduce the risk of heart disease, but researchers reported that what matters more than HDL quantity is HDL quality.” At the rate research is coming along, there is great reason to take heart for the future.

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Heart Healthy Diet

Watch what you eat to maintain a good heartbeat By Jamie Lober, Staff Writer When it comes to preventing heart disease, nutrition matters. “Diet is a critical part of preventing heart disease, which remains the No. 1 killer of Americans and is 80 percent preventable,” said Tim Harms, communications director with the American Heart Association (AHA). You need to maintain a balanced diet in which you eat from all four food groups. “Nutrient-rich foods have minerals, protein and other nutrients, but they are also lower in calories and may help you control your weight, cholesterol and blood pressure,” Harms said. “You should emphasize a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, skinless poultry and fish, nuts and legumes and non-tropical vegetable oils.” If you have questions or concerns about your diet, talk to your doctor or a registered dietician about designing a more personalized plan. A good place to begin is learning how to read nutrition facts on labels, which tell how many calories, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium and added sugars are in each serving of a particular food, as well as the amount of vitamins and minerals it contains. The Food and Drug Administration says a daily nutrient value of 5 percent or less is low and 20 percent or more is high. The number of calories recommended for each person depends on their age, sex, body size and physical activity, among other factors. The U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services Office on Women’s Health says a woman between ages 31 and 50 years who is of normal weight and is moderately active should eat and drink about 2,000 calories each day to maintain her weight. Fruits and vegetables that contain fiber, such as beans, oranges, peas, strawberries, apples and bananas, are preferred. Raw vegetables such carrot or celery sticks make excellent snacks. You can even have fruit for dessert. While many people love fruit juice, remember it does not contain the fiber you need and is not as filling as fruit itself. If you are taking medications to lower cholesterol, be aware they can interact with grapefruit or pomegranate juice. A choice as simple as having bread that contains whole wheat, oatmeal, whole rye, whole-grain corn or buckwheat can make a big difference. Instead of a raisin bran muffin, you might try raisin bread with your breakfast or lunch. Know which items to limit, such as saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, red meat and sweet and sugar-sweetened beverages. Most pre-processed foods are loaded with sodium. “People should be aware of the sodium content in their diet,” Harms said. “We have a very aggressive goal for people to limit their sodium to 1,500 milligrams per day. Most Americans are consuming somewhere between 2,400 and even up to 3,400 milligrams of sodium per day, so you want to try to reduce it.”

Maintain a balanced diet in which you eat from all four food groups. Eating fish is a good heart-healthy diet option. Prepare it without added saturated and trans fat. Don’t smother your fish with sauce; use lemon juice or spices instead. “Eat a variety of fish at least twice a week, especially fish containing omega-3 fatty acids like salmon, trout and herring,” said Harms. Select fat-free or low-fat dairy products. “Avoid foods containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oils to reduce trans fat in your diet,” said Harms. Monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats are better. Remember, even though palm oil and coconut oil are vegetable oils and do not have cholesterol, they are still high in saturated fats. Use a nonstick pan or nonstick vegetable spray when cooking.

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If you eat meat, aim for the leanest cuts, and be cautious about how you prepare it. Bake, broil or grill your meat; when dining at at a restaurant, choose steamed, grilled or broiled dishes instead of fried. Use reducedfat, low-fat or fat-free dressings on salads or as dips. Watch your alcohol consumption. “If you drink alcohol, drink in moderation, which means no more than one drink per day if you are a woman and no more than two drinks per day if you are a man,” said Harms. A final key point is to watch your portion sizes. In time you will find healthy dietary decisions become part of your lifestyle, and your cardiovascular health may improve as a result.

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15 Superfoods for Your Heart

Make good choices to live a healthy life By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer of Americans, even though deaths rates due to this disease have dropped in recent years. Many foods can help you keep your heart healthy. While some keep your cholesterol in line, others help lower your blood pressure. Here are 15 superfoods recommended for your heart: 1. Salmon. According to the American Heart Association, you should eat fatty fish such as mackerel and sardines at least twice a week. Salmon is the foremost choice because it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which help reduce your triglycerides. Salmon also has an anti-clotting effect that keeps blood flowing. 2. Legumes. Lentils, beans and chickpeas are excellent sources of protein and a great source of soluble fiber that reduces your bad LDL cholesterol. If you buy canned beans, rinse them before eating to wash off any added salt, as sodium can raise your blood pressure.

3. Nuts. Walnuts, almonds, pistachios and peanuts contain good fiber for your heart. They also contain vitamin E, which lowers bad cholesterol. Walnuts are high in omega-3 fatty acids. Consuming five ounces of nuts each week may reduce your risk of heart disease by half. 4. Soy. Products made from soy, such as soy milk and tofu, are good sources of protein. They contain high levels of fiber, vitamins, minerals and polyunsaturated fats. Soy may lower blood pressure in people who eat a diet high in refined carbohydrates. 5. Citrus Fruits. Fruits such as grapefruit and oranges contain high amounts of flavonoids that help lower the risk of ischemic stroke. They are also high in vitamin C, which helps lower the risk of heart disease. 6. Dark Chocolate. Cacao, the plant from which chocolate is made, is rich in flavanols, which can prevent blood clots and inflammation and lower your blood pressure. They also act as antioxidants and prevent bad cholesterol from sticking to your artery

walls. However, most candy bars and milk chocolate don’t make the grade when it comes to protecting your heart. 7. Oatmeal. It’s high in soluble fiber called beta-glucan, which reduces cholesterol. Avoid instant oatmeal, which often contains sugar, and instead choose quick-cooking oats. One and a half cups of cooked oatmeal gives you the daily requirement of beta-glucan to lower your cholesterol. 8. Raspberries. These, along with blueberries and other such berries, are loaded with antioxidants that mop up damage called polyphenols that cause free radicals in the body. They also deliver fiber and vitamin C that reduce the risk of stroke. 9. Olive Oil. It’s a great choice when you need to restrict saturated the fats found in butter, whole milk and meat. Other healthy options include canola oil and safflower oil. 10. Red Grapes. Red grapes and red wine contain resveratrol, which helps keep blood platelets from sticking together. Small amounts of any other alcohol also reduce heart disease risk. However, one glass of

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red wine a day for women and two for men may have some heart-healthy advantages over other kinds of alcohol. 11. Avocados. These soft, tasty fruits have an anti-inflammatory effect, which prevents hardening of the artery walls. Avocados get their creamy texture from monounsaturated fats, which help reduce bad cholesterol. They can be eaten as is or blended into guacamole. 12. Fat-Free Milk or Yogurt. Most dairy products, fruits and vegetables are high in potassium, which helps reduce blood pressure. Choosing lowfat dairy products helps you avoid saturated fat, which can raise your cholesterol. 13. Green Tea. It contains the antioxidants known as catechins. In a recent study, it was found that those who drank four or more cups of green tea daily reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20 percent, compared to those who seldom drank it. 14. Flax seeds. Flax seeds and chia seeds are high in omega-3 fatty acids. They have a high fiber content, and there are various ways to enjoy them. You can grind them up and use them with other heart-healthy foods, such as oatmeal or berries, or blend them with milk or soy milk to create a smoothie. 15. Pomegranates. They contain numerous antioxidants, including anthocyanins and polyphenols that prevent hardening of the arteries. One study found a daily dose of pomegranate juice showed improvements in blood flow to the heart. Apples are another good option; they also contain many health-promoting compounds. Heart disease affects more than one in every three adults in the United States. But making good food choices can help you achieve a healthy lifestyle. About the Author Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer and blogger who has a keen interest in health and wellness. She can be approached through her blog and Web site, http://www.harleenasingh. com. Connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

Making good food choices can help you achieve a healthy lifestyle.


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from working to old age, researchers conditions later in life, but it is possible at the University of Jyväskylä and the chronic activation of stress responses Gerontology Research Center were may result in the “wear and tear” of able to identify four different stress the human body, increasing the risk profiles among occupationally active of old age disability, the researchers individuals aged 44 to 58 years old. say. Their findings were published in These profiles are: The Journals of Gerontology Series 1. negative reactions to work and A: Biological Sciences and Medical depression; Sciences. 2. perceived decrease in cognition; Considering that 30 percent of 3. sleep disturbances; and adult workers suffer from work-related 4. somatic symptoms. stress, these findings are bad news. Some of the subjects suffered The good news is exercise is known occasional symptoms. In others, the to reduce stress. So if you’re in your symptoms were observed at several 40s or 50s, remember these two findtime pointsRonald and were considered ings and get moving now in order to By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Reagantowas the 40th president. be continuous. All four types of stress increase the odds of having better “The Golden Girls” werecorrelated fast becoming friends symptoms in midlife with health in youron 80s. their first season A person’s fitdisability 28 years later. Those who MEN A gallon of gas cost one dollar and twenty cents. ness level at reported long-term stress symptoms in High Fitness: 8 minutes midlife is a strong midlife had more difficulties with the Moderate Fitness: 9 minutes indicator of longbasic activities of daily living – such Low Fitness: 10 minutes term heart health, according to recent as bathing, dressing, shopping, doing research. In fact, fitness level at this Individuals in the high-fitness group light housework, handling financial The exercise you do point in life is proving to be just as reli- have a 10-percent lifetime risk for matters, taking medications and using able as other risk factors, such as chothe telephone – at the mean age of 78. future heart problems, as compared to in your 40s is highly lesterol levels and blood pressure read- a 30-percent lifetime risk for individuAdditionally, the risk for the inability ings. The best indicator for calculating to walk 2 kilometers was two to three als in the low-fitness group. These are relevant to your overall fitness is how fast someone can good guidelines because fitness cantimes higher for those with constant run a mile. Heart disease risk increases not be judged by looks alone. What is stress symptoms in midlife. Occasional heart disease risk in markedly for every minute longer it more important is avoiding low fitness. stress symptoms in midlife also takes one to run a mile. increased the severity of disability, but your 80s.” Most of the health benefits of exercise Ronald Ronald was the Reagan 40th was president. the 40th president. Of course, some fit individuals may less so than for thoseReagan with constant come from moving from low fitness Dr.season Jarett D. Berry —friends have other physical limitations that symptoms. Girls” “The Golden were fast Girls” becoming were fast friends becoming on their first on their onfirst TV.season on TV to moderate fitness. The challenge is “The Golden prevent them from running fast. For The A study could imparting just how poor fitness affects gallon of not gas A completely gallon cost one of dollar gas cost andone twenty dollarcents. and twenty cents. these people, this running-rate test attribute stress symptoms to chronic overall health and motivating those won’t help. However, for most people, in low-fitness groups to improve their the test can give a clear sense of where fitness levels. one falls on a fitness spectrum. People generally know they have Two separate studies by researchlow fitness levels. If someone is physiers at the University of Texas cally inactive, sits for 18 hours a day Southwestern Medical School and the and is exhausted after climbing a flight Cooper Institute in Dallas analyzed of stairs, he or she already knows his or Join us for fitness levels for more than 66,000 her fitness level is low. While getting people. Fitness was measured with off the couch is the best first step, it is carefully monitored treadmills to not advised that sedentary individuals gauge cardiovascular endurance and with a low fitness level go out and try muscle fatigue. The researchers then to run a mile as fast as they can. translated the treadmill results into The more difficult group to selfaverage mile times. This provided a assess is those who meet minimum • simple formula to rate fitness level. guidelines for physical activity, such Join us for Join us for “When you try to boil down fitas regularly walking three times a ness, what does fitness mean?” said week, because this doesn’t necessarily Dinner 4:30-7:00pm with Violinist Bryce Farrar Dr. Jarett D. Berry, assistant professor indicate being physically fit. However, of internal medicine and cardiology moderate levels of exercise are better Carriage Rides by Lexington Livery 5:00-7:00pm at Southwestern Medical School and than nothing, but vigorous activity has coauthor of both papers, which were Dixieland Band 5:30-7:30pm a much more dramatic effect on fitness • 4:00-7:00 Thursday, Thursday, May 9th May 9th • 4:00-7:00 pm pm published in the April 2011 issues of level. – Since 1985 – Circulation and The Journal of the Conversely, research from Finland Dinner 4:30-7:00pm Dinner 4:30-7:00pm with Violinist with Bryce Violinist Farrar Bryce Farrar American College of Cardiology. “In in 2013 found work-related stress Carriage Rides Carriage by Lexington Rides by Livery Lexington 5:00-7:00pm Livery 5:00-7:00pm both these studies, how fast you can symptoms in midlife predict disDixieland Band Dixieland 5:30-7:30pm Band 5:30-7:30pm run in midlife is very strongly associat- abilities in old age. While it has been ed with heart disease risk when you’re commonly acknowledged that stress Kindly RSVP Kindly to 859-278-9080 RSVP to 859-278-9080 by May 6th by–May Seating 6th is – Seating limited is lim old. The exercise you do in your 40s is detrimental to health, work-related is highly relevant to your heart disease stress in midlife negatively impacts risk in your 80s.” functional limitations and disability Fitness varies greatly with age and in old age. Previously, stress has been 690 Mason Headley Road • Lexington, KY 40504 sex, said Berry. The findings of 1-mile thought to be rather uniform in all 859-278-9080 690 Mason Headley 690 Mason Road •Headley Lexington, Road KY 40504 • Lexington, KY 40504 running rates from the two studies are: individuals, with people demonstratwww.LafayetteLexington.com 859-278-9080 859-278-9080 ing more or less the same symptoms. 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INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE Mindfulness is Heartfulness

By John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP, Mind Body Studio The human heart is much more than a muscular pump that circulates blood and oxygen throughout the body. We experience the breadth of our emotions in our heart. Our heart is where we feel the love for our romantic partner, dear friends and family, children and pets. Those who have the experience of holding their newborn child or grandchild for the first time report a feeling in the heart unlike anything they have ever known or even considered themselves capable of feeling. We feel the grief and loss of loved ones in our hearts as well. We even have palpable, heartfelt “driveway moments” listening to stories on the radio that move us deeply and connect us emotionally to people we don’t even know. Research has also identified anger, rage and hostility as internal toxins that increase the risk of heart attacks and death. A 75-year-old patient came to me with a heaviness and aching in her chest that had been there since her husband’s death several months before. She had not cried a single tear during his death or funeral. She had the feeling if she could just cry, this aching in her chest would go

away. Indeed, during two sessions of supportive counseling, she was moved deeply to tears and her heartache went away, never to return. This experience of the heart as more than a physical organ is not limited to humans or even our closest primate relatives. A friend told me of her old dog’s reaction to her bringing home a new puppy. Her old dog went under the house, refused to come out and died. This normal physiological experience of deep emotions in the area of the anatomical heart is part of the emerging science of heartbrain-emotion interactions sometimes referred to as neurocardiology. While much of this field is properly concerned with pathology and disease states, more and more research concerns the health benefits of positive psychological states, emotions, behaviors, attitudes and practices. Mindfulness

Forgiveness research suggests choosing to let go of resentment and revenge can actually add years to your life.

is emerging as a catalyst for these positive psychological states. Mindfulness is an increasingly popular and effective psychological tool for maintaining physical and emotional health and managing stress-related chronic conditions. Mindfulness practice systematically trains the mind to pay attention in a particular way, with curiosity, openness and acceptance. Despite its origins in ancient contemplative practices, mindfulness as taught today is primarily a scientifically validated tool for self-inquiry, self-acceptance and self-care. Another translation of the original words for mindfulness is “heartfulness.” The ancient calligraphy (see illustration) for mindfulness is composed of two parts. The upper

part looks like a roof (protective) or mountain (grounding). This component represents the present moment. The lower part represents a stylized heart, which represents the mind or soul. This can be translated to mean paying attention – staying in the present moment – protects and grounds the heart, the mind or the soul. Practicing mindfulness naturally connects us to positive inner resources and attributes. Awareness of heartfelt emotion increases. Emotional intelligence and positive psychology grow. We learn to integrate our right brain and left brain. In his poem “Two Kinds of Intelligence,” Sufi poet Rumi


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Mindfulness is an increasingly popular and effective psychological tool for maintaining physical and emotional health and managing stress-related chronic conditions.

Lose the s LoseLove thethestress savings. describes the “freshness in the center of the chest” as an inner intelligence we all have, an innate human capacity for connection to our deepest, genuine selves and to other people. Mindfulness can include practices that actively cultivate attributes of the heart. Some of those attributes include forgiveness, lovingkindness, compassion and gratitude. Modern medical and psychological research increasingly suggests cultivation of these attributes of the heart is associated with positive health outcomes. Forgiveness research suggests choosing to let go of resentment and revenge can actually add years to your life. Research also suggests regularly practicing lovingkindness toward yourself and others can result in increased purpose in life, social support, decreased symptoms of illness and life satisfaction, as well as reduced depressive symptoms. The vision of compassion research at Stanford University is to raise appreciation of compassion as an integral component of human health and to develop science-based practices for cultivating it. Research on gratitude shows significant positive

Love the savings.

impacts on personal well-being, life satisfaction and relationships. Whether you are healthy or have a chronic medical condition, mindfulness practices may enhance your physical and emotional well-being and relationships. They may even extend your life.

Lose the stres savings. . LoseLove thethestress

Resources Live longer by practicing forgiveness (Psychology Today) https://www.psychologytoday.com/ blog/fulfillment-any-age/201301/ live-longer-practicing-forgiveness

Love the savings.

Lose the stress. Love the savings. BECAUSE Lose the stress . FLOWERS WILT

Open hearts build lives: Positive emotions, induced through loving kindness meditation, build consequential personal resources (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, November 2008) www.ncbi.nlm.nih. gov/pmc/articles/PMC3156028/

Love the savings.

The Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (Stanford School of Medicine) http://ccare.stanford.edu

49.99 595 4949 49.99 59.99 59 59 494949.99 49.99 59.99 59.99 5959 4949 59.99 59.99 59.99 5959 4949

In Praise of Gratitude (Harvard Medical School) www.health. harvard.edu/newsletter_article/inpraise-of-gratitude

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Safe Exercises for Patients with Heart Disease STRENGTHEN THE HEART TO IMPROVE BLOOD FLOW By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer The heart is a muscle. As such, it needs exercise to stay in shape. Regular exercise strengthens the heart and keeps the blood vessels and arteries flexible, which ensures good blood flow and normal cholesterol levels and blood pressure. Exercise improves circulation and helps your body use oxygen better. When the heart exercises, it pumps more blood through the body and works more efficiently with little strain. According to the American Heart Association (www.heart.org), exercising 30 minutes a day five days a week improves your heart health and reduces the risk of heart disease. You can even break it into quick 10-minute sessions three times a day. With regular exercise, you may improve your heart function, quicken recovery and perhaps get off some of the medications you’re on. There are many forms of exercise you can incorporate into any workout. Here are a few: • Stretching exercises – These include stretching your arms and legs before exercising, which helps prepare the muscles for activity and prevents injury and muscle strain. Regular stretching exercises increase your range of flexibility and motion.

• Strengthening exercises – These are repeated muscle tightening (contractions) exercises, which you do until the muscle become tired. They are not recommended for some people with heart failure. Stick to light weights and lift them more times. You could try weight machines at a gym, hand weights, resistance bands or your own body weight. • Heavy lifting – Make sure pushing and lifting heavy objects and doing chores around the house such as shoveling, raking, mowing and scrubbing floors aren’t off limits. Only do what you can do without getting tired. • Aerobic or cardiovascular exercise – These exercises strengthen the heart and lungs and improve the body’s ability to use oxygen. In these exercises, you continuously perform physical activity using large muscle groups. Aerobic exercise helps decrease your heart rate and blood pressure and helps you breathe efficiently. Aerobic exercise includes anything that gets your heart rate up. It could be walking, biking, jumping rope, jogging, dancing, cross-country skiing, water aerobics, ice or roller skating, rowing and low-impact aerobics.

Here are some exercising tips for people with heart disease and heart failure: • Gradually increase your activity level, especially if you haven’t been exercising regularly. Don’t do too much too soon. Give your body time to rest between workouts. • Don’t exercise outdoors when it’s too hot, cold or humid without checking with your doctor. Extreme temperatures can interfere with your circulation, cause chest pain and make breathing difficult. Better options are indoor activities such as walking in a mall or on a treadmill. • Avoid doing too many isometric exercises such as sit ups and push ups. They involve straining the muscle against other muscles or an immovable object. • Stay hydrated – drink water even if you aren’t thirsty, especially on hot days. However, don’t drink too much water. • Avoid exercising in hilly areas. If you must walk in steep areas, slow down going uphill. Don’t forget to monitor your heart rate. • If your exercise schedule has been interrupted for a few days due to illness, bad weather or vacation, ease back into your routine. Start gradually

with low levels of activity and slowly increase them until you are back to where you left off. • Stop exercising if you feel fatigued or short of breath. Don’t exercise if you have a fever or feel unwell. You need to wait a few days for the symptoms to disappear before restarting an exercise. • If you have chest pain or pain elsewhere in your body, stop exercising and contact your doctor. If you have heart palpitations or develop a rapid or irregular heartbeat, call your doctor. • Before starting any exercise routine, check with your doctor, since exercising with a heart condition can put strain on your heart.

Exercising 30 minutes a day five days a week improves your heart health and reduces the risk of heart disease.


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MAKERS Liver Hormone Could Curb Carb Cravings A hormone made by the liver, FGF21, seems to control how much we crave carbohydrates and sugar. This same hormone also helps us slow down when we’re overindulging. FGF21 has already been found to help obese mice lose weight and regain their sensitivity to insulin. A modified form of the hormone is currently in clinical trials to test the effect in humans with diabetes. A recent genetic study has further suggested individuals with altered levels of FGF21 consume more carbohydrates. A follow-up study found mice lacking the hormone chose to drink much higher levels of sugar-sweetened drinks than normal mice. Conversely, those with more of the hormone reduced their sugar intake. The study also found the hormone is produced in response to high carbohydrate levels, where it then enters the bloodstream and sends a signal to the brain to suppress sugar intake. In humans, blood levels of FGF21 triple 24 hours after a spike in blood sugar levels. A different clinical trial shows monkeys given a synthetic version of the hormone also opt for low-sugar food and drinks and consume less alcohol compared to other monkeys. All research indicates FGF21 only seems to affect the intake of simple carbohydrates, such as those found in cakes and cookies, that get quickly broken down into sugars. It doesn’t seem to have any effect on complex carbs that take longer to break down. Though other appetite-regulating hormones such as ghrelin (made by the gut) and leptin (made by fat cells) act more broadly, FGF21 is the first hormone found to act on a specific nutrient. Researchers theorize the hormone may affect the brain’s reward pathways, dialing down the appeal of otherwise enjoyable carbs, sweets and alcohol. Now the search is on for hormones that regulate complex carbohydrates, proteins and fats. If such hormones exist and are isolated, a combination could possibly be used to help people eat healthy, balanced diets. For more details, see the December issue of the journal Cell Metabolism.

FDA Approves Testing of Promising New Cancer Treatment A new cancer treatment therapy that replaces chemotherapy with a monthly injection was approved for initial testing at Baylor Hospital Mary Crowley Cancer Center in Texas in January. Instead of attempting to cure a patient’s cancer, the new treatment focuses on controlling the disease by using cells taken from the tumor growing inside the patient. After harvesting cells from the tumor, an individualized “vaccine” is created. The patient receives the vaccine via injection once a month so the patient’s immune system can keep the cancer in check. This procedure treats cancer like other diseases such as hypertension or diabetes, addressing it as a chronic rather than a deadly disease. Baylor Hospital is the only facility cleared by the FDA to test this new cancer treatment. Full governmental approval of the therapy could take five years.

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Can Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Help Your Heart? By Kathleen Fluhart, R.N., M.Ac., Dipl.Ac., L.Ac., Artemesia

In this region of the country, many people only associate acupuncture with pain relief, so they have no idea of the many conditions that can be treated with acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Chinese medicine includes herbs, massage, breathing exercises, meditation and gentle exercises such as tai qi and qi gong. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have long recognized acupuncture as helpful in the treatment of over 40 different conditions. Within the realm of cardiovascular disorders and disorders that effect circulation, acupuncture has been proven to be useful in the treatment of stress, hypertension, obesity, insomnia and anxiety. Cardiovascular health is a vast topic, so this article will focus on how acupuncture and Chinese medicine can benefit those who suffer from hypertension and high cholesterol. Hypertension High blood pressure (hypertension) makes the heart work harder, which increases the risk of a heart attack, stroke and kidney disease. When the heart works harder than normal, its oxygen demands increase, which can contribute to angina. Over time, high blood pressure can even lead to an enlarged, weakened heart. In Chinese medicine, we are concerned with systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the implications of the apple versus pear body types, but we also want to understand the patient’s underlying pattern imbalances. We do this through feeling the qualities of the 12 wrist pulses and observing the tongue. We recognize two main patterns associated with high blood pressure: “excessive” versus “deficient.” The excessive hypertensive person is often seen manifesting angrily, with a throbbing headache, flushed face and reddened eyes. There is an excess of damp heat in the body and the person may be prone to inflammation

or infections. Treatment would consist of relaxation, clearing dampness from the liver and gallbladder pathways, sedating heat and perhaps the application of cooling herbs. These patients are encouraged to increase their intake of fresh fruit and raw vegetables, to eat about five ounces of nuts per day and to supplement with vitamin C and bioflavonoids to nourish their blood vessels. Patients with deficient hypertension are more likely to present with dizziness, blurred vision or generalized weakness, and they can be more prone to seizures or convulsions. Their treatment will still focus on calming the liver pathway, but treatment does not need to include acupuncture points or herbs that treat dampness. These patients will also need treatments and remedies that tonify to balance deficiencies. They are asked to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables, but it is better for them if the vegetables are steamed or lightly sautéed in olive oil. Garlic is also good for deficient hypertension, as it is warming in nature. In both hypertensive patterns, salt, foods that are aged or fermented with salt, MSG and meat tenderizer should be eliminated from the diet. The following should also be limited, depending on the severity of the condition: meat, soy sauce, alcohol, preservatives, sugar substitutes (especially Aspartame) and diet soft drinks. Motrin, Advil and any other NSAIDs containing ibuprofen should be avoided, as they may also increase blood pressure. Lifestyle changes can be very useful to patients with either style of hypertension. These measures include maintaining a normal weight, avoiding alcohol and tobacco products, having regular non-constipated stools and lowering damaging stress through meditation, tai qi, qi gong or yoga. It is important that people with hypertension learn to identify and manage their stressful triggers.

High Cholesterol High cholesterol is a disorder of lipoprotein metabolism, not a malfunction of the cardiovascular system itself. However, high cholesterol can lead to several cardiovascular conditions, such as hypertension, coronary artery disease and angina. In Chinese medicine, elevated cholesterol is the result of an accumulation of dampness and phlegm in the blood vessels. It is diagnosed by looking at the tongue for a thick coating and checking the 12 pulses in the wrist that correlate to the body’s 12 major energy pathways, looking for an overall “slippery” quality. The focus of treatment is to reduce the plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides by invigorating circulation, dissolving damp and eliminating phlegm using specific acupuncture points, Chinese herbs, diet, exercise and lifestyle changes. The acupuncturist works closely with the patient to educate him or her and to motivate the patient to make healthy changes. As in Western medicine, we advise these patients to avoid alcohol, tobacco products, sugar, refined carbohydrates, aged and cured meats, cheese and fried or greasy foods. Foods that are known to help lower cholesterol include apples, bananas,

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grapefruit, oatmeal and oat bran, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, garlic and olive oil. The best proteins to eat are beans and cold-water fish. Supplements that may help are coenzyme Q10, lecithin and vitamins B5, C and E. Niacin (the type that can cause flushing) is known to lower overall total cholesterol, elevate good cholesterol (HDL) and lower triglycerides. Niacin is probably the best supplement to take, but one needs to exhibit caution since flushing can occur, and large doses may cause stomach pain. Patients are encouraged to exercise to discourage cholesterol from accumulating in the arteries and to help with weight loss. They are also encouraged to sip green, white, oolong or black tea after meals, since these are said to assist with the metabolism of fat. Keep in mind the therapies used by Chinese medicine practitioners to lower cholesterol and blood pressure are not intended to replace Western medicine, especially if cholesterol and/or blood pressure levels are dangerously high. We encourage and expect a patient to have a physician monitor and treat high cholesterol ACU. Continued on Page 45

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Hearts Need Goals

Have you set any for 2016? By Sonia Gregory “How many hearts do you have?” I’ve heard new parents comment that with the birth of each child, they seem to grow another heart. Or maybe just the one they have gets bigger, in a good way. It’s good when our figurative heart enlarges; who doesn’t want to be a big-hearted person or to have someone to call their best friend? Yes, our heart is more than an organ in our chest pumping our blood. It’s been called the seat of emotion or the center of our true self. In healthy holistic living, we would call it an integral part of our body-mind-spirit connection. What motivates you to make the choices you do in life? Many would answer easily: It’s their heart. During Heart Healthy Month, it’s good to think about how we could get in better touch with our heartfelt motivations to make good choices, maybe even starting some new habits. Last month was a good time to make

some health resolutions. Now’s a good time to think about how to keep them. What are your goals? Who do you love and what do you care about? Most of us agree we’d like to be around a long time with the ones we love and have a high quality of life. Choices we make on a daily basis have both an immediate and longterm impact on our quality of life. So why can it sometimes be so hard to make good choices when it come to our health? No one can care for you better than you can care for yourself. But sometimes it seems so hard to do. We have to figure out what’s really in our heart – what we really want. Do we really want to be skinny and give up those donuts we love at breakfast for heart-healthy oats and berries? Do we really want to give up some of our free time to trade in a lazy rest hour for a good workout? Maybe you don’t really like to sweat,

but think about how happy you’ll feel in your heart if you get moving, take care of your health and maybe even push yourself a little past your comfort zone. Hearts left with no stimulus get weak and even atrophy. Figurative hearts need goals and dreams to reach for, too. Does it seem impossible to reach the health and wellness goals you dream of? Write them down and break them into smaller steps that are achievable. Go for the

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one-year goal. Set a date six months out and determine where you should be to reach it. Then break it down into even smaller goals that are attainable. These are best worked out on paper and can be called an Action Plan for the Month, the Week or even just the Day. Make it something you feel confident enough you can achieve. If it’s not, go back to breaking your goal down into the smaller goals that will actually facilitate your achieving it.

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The Heart-and-Kidney Connection More exclusively designed research needed By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer

Having chronic kidney disease amplifies the risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

The American Heart Association (AHA) reports heart disease is the primary cause of death for more than 26 million people in the United States with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Did you know kidney disease is both a cause and a consequence of cardiovascular disease, the No. 1 killer of all Americans? With CKD, the kidneys don’t usually fail all at once but often deteriorate slowly over a period of years. This is good news because if CKD is caught early, medicines and lifestyle changes may help slow its progress and keep you feeling your best for as long as possible. Having a regular physical examine is an important step in the prevention and management of CKD. The connection between the heart and the kidneys is demonstrated in the realization that cardiovascular disease accounts for more than half of all deaths among people with kidney failure. Even early or mild kidney disease places a person at higher risk for a heart attack and some heart ailments, as well as heart disease-related death. Having CKD amplifies the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, whether or not other risk factors for heart disease are present. The con-

nection between these two diseases is becoming increasingly clear with the latest research, but more research is necessary to address these conditions among Americans. In many cases, kidney damage is the result of another illness that has progressed slowly over the years. The two main causes are diabetes and high blood pressure. If your kidney disease is the result of one of these conditions, the best way to manage it is to treat the illness that is causing it. For many Americans, hypertension is a primary issue. Hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). If a person’s systolic pressure is 120 and the diastolic pressure is 80, it is reported as 120/80 mm Hg. The AHA has long considered blood pressure less than 140 over 90 to be normal for adults. However, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Md., released new clinical guidelines for blood pressure in 2003, lowering the standard normal readings. A normal reading was lowered to less than 120 over less than 80. Hypertension increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, and severe

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hypertension can cause extensive and rapidly progressive kidney damage. Newer medications that better treat blood pressure and kidney disease, however, can slow the rate of kidney damage by about 50 percent. Individuals may want to discuss these medications with their physicians. The goals the AHA has set for the nation include a range of strategies and approaches can lead to improvements in cardiovascular health. Among these are self-management skill development in patients using remote telehealth monitoring. In addition, the AHA encourages focused approaches that target lifestyle and treatments at the individual level. This will involve a patient’s healthcare systems

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approaches, which encourage, facilitate and reward the patient’s efforts to improve health thinking and wellness behaviors along with their providers. Among the highest priorities for both the AHA and the American Association of Kidney Patients is more research designed exclusively for patients with both CKD and cardiovascular disease. How kidney disease causes cardiovascular disease is still largely unknown. Most major cardiovascular disease research trials have excluded patients with kidney disease. Nine out of 10 cardiovascular disease trials do not provide adequate information on the kidney function of subjects in their studies, even though studies have proven kidney disease plays a major role in increasing the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Everyone can benefit from several lifestyle

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changes that include reducing salt and fat intake, losing weight, getting regular exercise, quitting smoking, reducing alcohol consumption, managing stress and scheduling that annual physical examination. Sources and Resources American Association of Kidney Patients (2016). Educating the Kidney Patient with Heart Complications. Available at: https://www.aakp.org/ education.html American Heart Association (2016). www.heart.org About the Author Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

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ADVICE FROM YOUR

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LOCAL DOC

Exercise Your Heart

IT’S NEVER TOO LATE TO START A NEW FITNESS REGIMEN By Dr. Wesley Johnson, Family Practice Associates of Lexington, P.S.C. The heart is a muscle. So, like all muscles, it will benefit from exercise. Aerobic activity is the best type of exercise for your heart because it improves the heart’s ability to deliver oxygen to your muscles by making the heart and lungs work harder than when they are at rest. The heart becomes stronger and works more efficiently, leading to increased endurance and reduced oxygen demand. The American Heart Association (www.heart.org) recommends getting at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week. This works out to 30 minutes a day, five days a week. (Preferably, you will strive to exercise every day.) Moderate exercise includes brisk walking, jogging, biking or swimming, as well as doing yard work or household tasks. The objective is to get your heart rate to 100 beats per minute for the duration of the routine. It is best if you do at least 30 minutes all at once. Any additional exercise is also beneficial. You can fit more in by climbing the stairs at work or parking farther from the entrance to the mall or grocery store. To develop overall stamina, flexibility and fitness, add some strengthening and stretching exercises to your regimen. For people who have been sedentary and are determined to get

into shape in this New Year, walking is usually the best way to start. It is low impact and all you need are a good pair of shoes. If you don’t like to exercise alone, find a walking buddy – the four-legged variety are always ready to take a stroll. If you have joint problems or arthritis, you might want to try swimming, which puts no strains on your joints, or a recumbent bike. How can you tell if perhaps you are overdoing things? When you are walking briskly, it should be difficult but not impossible to carry on a conversation. If you have trouble breathing or feel pain or pressure in your chest or the upper part of your body, stop at once and seek medical attention. Other warning signs you should not ignore include breaking into a cold sweat, feeling dizzy or lightheaded or having a very fast or irregular heart rate. Your exercise

program should invigorate you, not exhaust you. As you get more fit, you’ll find you can increase your duration, distance and intensity, but be sure to do so gradually. When you first start out, walk five minutes at a good pace, then walk one minute at a faster pace. You’ll be able to increase these intervals as you continue working out. You are sure to see numerous good results if you stick to your exercise routine, such as lowered blood pressure, weight loss and better cholesterol readings, including a reduction in LDL (bad) cholesterol and an increase in HDL (good) cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you will find regular exercise helps your body use insulin to control your glucose levels. You will very likely sleep better and have a better attitude with less stress. Once you start exercis-

ing and discover how good you feel, you’ll want to keep it up. But be sure to speak with your doctor before beginning any new physical activity plan. About the Author Dr. Wesley W. Johnson completed his Family Practice residency at the University of Kentucky in November 2004 and is Board Certified in Family Medicine. He joined Family Practice Associates of Lexington in December 2004. Dr. Johnson’s particular interests include chronic disease management, pediatrics and aviation medicine. He is retired from the Kentucky Army National Guard. He holds a commercial pilot certificate in both airplanes and helicopters.


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Here’s To Your Healthy Heart!

So do yourself and your heart a favor - add a glass of red wine to your day! Cheers from the Clinical Nutrition team!

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Above: Resident Nancy enjoys a Wine and Canvas event at a Trilogy Health Services campus.

By Jenna Brescher and Andrea Newcom, Clinical Nutrition at Trilogy Health Services Heart disease is the number one cause of death in America. We all know the best way to prevent heart disease is through diet and exercise - decreasing the amount of sodium and saturated fats in our diet and increasing our daily physical activity. While it is true that diet and exercise should be included for overall wellness, there is another slightly more enjoyable way to improve your heart health. Have you ever heard the saying, “A glass of red wine a day keeps the doctor away?” If not, we’re telling you now! Although it should be noted that the American Heart Association (AHA) suggests no more than one or two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink per day for women, drinking only one glass of red wine a day does have health benefits. One benefit of red wine is that it helps increase HDL cholesterol, the “good” cholesterol, which helps keep blood from sticking together inside

blood vessels. The grape’s skin contains flavonoids and an antioxidant called resveratrol, which support our HDL in reducing blood pressure and reducing total cholesterol. Just remember when choosing your beverage that the grape’s skin is not used when making white wine, making red a better choice for our heart. A glass of wine can also have a relaxing effect on the body because of its alcohol content. Relaxation reduces stress, and excessive stress is harmful for our heart. Some research has indicated that other types of alcohol, such as beer, might have the same HDL cholesterol raising effects as red wine; however, there is more evidence supporting red wine at this time, so stick with the tried and true! Always remember that moderation is key when considering drinking alcohol for heart health benefits. Drinking more than the recommended amount per day can have damaging effects on your heart, body and overall health.

A glass of red wine a day keeps the doctor away

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Warning Signs of Stroke Learn how to tell symptoms and act FAST By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer

Nearly 800,000 people in the United States will experience a stroke each year, which is one stroke every 40 seconds. Stroke is an emergency that can happen at any age, any time to anyone. A stroke indicates a lack of blood flow to the brain. It can be caused by a clot in a blood vessel or a ruptured vessel. The sooner you get help, the less likely you will have serious problems, and the better your chances of recovery. If the cause is a clot, the patient needs clot-busting medicines within minutes or hours of the stroke to have a chance of recovery. For every minute a stroke goes untreated and the blood flow to the brain remains blocked, a person loses about 1.9 million neurons. This means the person’s memory, movement, speech and much more can be affected. Thus, learning the warning signs of a stroke can help save a life. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the unique thing about stroke symptoms is that they come on suddenly, without any warning. These symptoms include: • numbness or weakness in the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body; • trouble walking, loss of balance or coordination and dizziness; • trouble seeing out of one eye or both eyes;

• trouble speaking and understanding or confusion; • severe headache with no known cause; • feeling an urge to be sick; and • overall fatigue. The exact symptoms vary depending on the affected area of the brain. Strokes often affect one of the brain’s two hemispheres, the left and right. Stroke in one hemisphere affects the opposite side of the body. To check someone for symptoms, try the FAST test as suggested by the National Stroke Association (www. stroke.org): • Face Drooping: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Is the person’s smile uneven? • Arm Weakness: Ask the person to raise both arms. Is one arm weak or numb? Does one arm drift downward? • Speech Difficulty: Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Is the speech slurred? Is the sentence repeated correctly? • Time to Call 911: If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 911 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you know when the first symptoms appeared. Acting FAST makes a difference, and to prevent long-term disability or death, the NIH emphasizes the

For every minute a stroke goes untreated and the blood flow to the brain remains blocked, a person loses about 1.9 million neurons. importance of getting help within an hour. In addition, according to the American Heart Association (AHA), a person doesn’t have to exhibit all of the warning signs to be having a stroke. If someone is having just one or two of them, get help immediately. Your actions can make a difference in the treatment and recovery of

the person having stroke symptoms. According to the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, those patients who were treated with blood-clot-dissolving drugs within three hours of symptoms had at least a 30-percent greater chance of recovering without any major disability.


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Al-Anon

Free support group for anyone affected by someone else’s drinking. Local meetings and information at www.LexingtonAlAnon.org or call 859.277.1877.

Free Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Chronic Disease Self-Management Program is an effective and free workshop for people with chronic health problems and care-takers. The program teaches skills for managing a variety of chronic diseases. Session topics include techniques to exercise, use of medication, communication with family and healthcare professionals, nutrition, and stress management. The program meets once a week for two and a half hours over six weeks at Baptist Health Lexington Green location. For more questions or to enroll, call (859) 260-5122 and ask for Chronic Disease SelfManagement Program.

Mondays

Free Yoga Classes for Vets, Servicemembers and their Family Members Every Monday from 9:30am–10:30am at Ageless Yoga Studio, 611 Winchester Rd., Suite 200. 859-303-6225. Pre-register online at agelessyogastudio.com. Click “class” tab to sign up now! Email info@ agelessyogastudio.com for more info.

Mondays & Wednesdays

MELT Method Hand, Foot and Body Healing Class by Shayne Wigglesworth Mondays and Wednesdays at 12pm Discover pain-free living at any age! Enjoy a gentle foam roller class to reduce pain, inflammation, stress, anxiety and more! MELT Method certified instructor Shayne Wigglesworth will teach you healing techniques you can use for self care at home. All materials and rollers are provided. Perfect for all ages, body types and experience levels. Learn more at www. centeredlex.com or call 859-721-1841

Tuesdays Community Flow

This weekly restorative class integrates gentle yoga, breathing techniques, meditation and wellness tips for all ages and levels of physical condition. 10:30am– 11:30am. Donation only (great portion of all donations go to the Backpack Food Program at Ashland Elementary.) Inspiring, Educating & Supporting our World through the Moving,  Visual & Healing Arts! Daily classes, therapies, workshops & a great spot to host your next event! 309 N Ashland Ave Ste.180, Lexington, KY 40502. 859-721-1841. www.centeredlex.com

Tuesdays Swing Lessons

Every Tuesday, starting September 30: 8pm–10pm at Tates Creek Recreation Center, 1400 Gainesway Dr. $5.00 per person per lesson. Call for more information: Glenn and Rosalee Kelley 859233-9947; OR Peter and Robin Young 859-224-3388.

Tuesdays

Community Yoga Class with Lauren Higdon Every Tuesday 10:30am–11:30am at Centered Studio, 309 n Ashland ave suite 180 in Lexington. This weekly restorative class integrates gentle yoga, breathing techniques, meditation and wellness tips for all ages and levels of physical condition. Classes may include chair yoga, restorative, yin yoga, tai chi, and more. Perfect for beginners as well as experienced yogis! Donations-based class.

Wednesdays Mindfulness and Relaxation for Health

6:30-8:00pm. No prior experience of yoga or meditation required. Mobilize your inner resources for promoting health, self care and managing the stress of caregiving, burnout and chronic disease. Cultivate your innate happiness, peacefulness and compassion. Study and practice in a supportive group. Gentle yoga, mindful movement, deep relaxation, sitting meditation and discussion. Cost $5-$10/ person sliding scale. Instructor: John Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859-373-0033. Full details at http:// www.mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1055

Fridays

Argentine Tango “Dance of the Heart” 7:30-9:00pm. Passionate and Romantic- Mindful and Meditative. A uniquely transformative social skill, art form and movement therapy. No partner or dance experience required. You may drop-in to any class (this is not a series). Cost $5$10/person sliding scale.Instructors- Dr. John Patterson and Nataliya Timoshevskaya. Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive, Lexington, KY 859-373-0033 Full details at http://www.mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=214

February 2 Eat, Move, Lose Weight Support Group

12 – 1 pm, Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Department PH Clinic South, 2433 Regency Road. Free weight-loss support group appropriate for anyone wishing to lose weight or maintain weight loss. Share struggles and ideas with others. Held first and third Tuesdays most months. For more information or to pre-register, call 288-2446.

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Every Week

FEBRUARY 2016

Ongoing

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February 2

Low-impact aerobics and Kettlebells Classes 6-8 pm, William Wells Brown Community Center, 548 East Sixth Street. Bi-weekly through April. Weight room also open 5 – 9 pm. Free and for adults age 18 and above. Sponsored by Lexington Parks and Recreation. For more information, contact Jill Chenault-Wilson at 389-6678.

February 5

The 2016 Central Kentucky Heart Ball Presented by White, Greer & Maggard Orthodontics American Heart Association is having their annual Heart Ball; this year they honor Laura Bell Bundy. Silent and live auction. Tickets are $300. Contact Mike Turner, Special Events Director, 859-3176878, mike.turner@heart.org for more information.

February 6

Senior Aerobics / Solid Gold 10am – 11 am, William Wells Brown Community Center, 548 East Sixth Street. Weekly through April. Free. Sponsored by Lexington Parks and Recreation. For more information, contact Jill ChenaultWilson at 389-6678.

February 6

Day of Mindfulness for Body, Mind and Heart 9:00am–4:00pm. Goals of this retreat-like workshop are to: relax the body, quiet the mind and open the heart, prevent burnout from work and caretaker stress, help you mobilize your own inner resources for healing, learn mind-body skills for managing stress-related chronic conditions, cultivate your innate happiness, peacefulness and compassion. Instructor: Dr John Patterson, Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive Lexington KY 859-373-0033. Pre-registration required. Cost: discount for UK employees, spouses and retirees who register on the UK Wellness Program web site. $35-$75 sliding scale for nonUK participants. Full details at http://www. mindbodystudio.org/?page_id=1020

February 8, 18, 23, and 26 Living Healthy with High Blood Pressure

Living Healthy with High Blood Pressure is an educational session for people who have been diagnosed with hypertension or high blood pressure. Participants of this supplementary High Blood Pressure session will learn how to better manage their condition. Topics covered during the workshop include: What is High Blood Pressure, Problems with Salt/Sodium, Intake Knowing Your Numbers. This session will be offered on Monday, February 8 from 10am – 12:30p; Thursday, February 18 from 2:00p – 4:30p; Tuesday, February 23 from 5:00-7:00pm; and Friday, February 26 from 3:00-5:30p at the Lexington Public Library; Beaumont Branch; 3080 Fieldstone Way. Please contact Lydia Jacobs at the Bluegrass Area Agency on Aging and Independent Living at 859269-8021 or ljacobs@bgadd.org with questions.

February 9 Yoga Class

6:15-7:15 pm, William Wells Brown Community Center, 548 East Sixth Street. Bi-weekly through April. Weight room also open 5 – 9 pm. Free and for adults age 18 and above. Sponsored by Lexington Parks and Recreation. For more information, contact Jill Chenault-Wilson at 389-6678.

February 9

Free Educational Workshop: Vision Therapy Educational Workshop to show how vision therapy can improve, enhance and develop visual performance by teaching the visual system (eyes, brain, body) to correct itself. 6:45pm – 7:30pm. Hosted by Dr. Rick Graebe at the Children’s Vision and Learning Center, 105 Crossfield Drive, Versailles, KY 40383. Free; no registration required. 859-879-0089 for additional information.

EVENTS Continued on page 29


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ONGOING EVENTS Bluegrass Ovarian Cancer Support Exists to assist Central Kentucky women and their loved ones during diagnosis, treatment and survival of ovarian and other gynecological cancers. Come meet with us the third Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at Joseph Beth Booksellers, Bronte Bistro Cafe meeting room.

Perinatal Loss Grief Group First Tuesday of the month, 7pm, Center for Grief and Education. A group for parents who have experienced loss due to miscarriage, stillbirth or infant death. Contact Debbie Mueller at (859) 260-6904 for more information.

Compassionate Friends Support Group A support group for parents, siblings, or grandparents who have lost a child regardless of the child’s age or length of time that has passed since that day. The meeting is the 1st Tuesday of every month 6:30pm–8:30pm at Hospice of the Bluegrass, 2321 Alexandria Drive, Lexington. Also meets the 1st Tuesday of every month 7pm-9pm at Hospice East, 417 Shoppers Drive, Winchester. Doors open one-half hour before meeting times to provide the opportunity to visit with old friends and acknowledge new ones.

Spouse Loss Support Group Tuesdays 6-7:30pm. Hospice of the Bluegrass. A five-week support group for individuals who have experienced the loss of a spouse or significant other. Contact Lexington office at (859) 2772700 for more information or to register.

Coping After Loss First Wednesday of the month, 5:307pm, Center for Grief and Education. A brief educational program offering an introduction to grief information and hospice bereavement services. Contact the Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

Free Transportation to Cancer Screening Fayette County residents can receive free transportation through HealthLink Transit, a partnership between Kentucky Pink Connection & the Lexington--Fayette Urban County Government. Transportation provided by taxi or gas cards to cancer screening. Call (859) 309-1700 to arrange a ride.

2nd Chance Ambassadors Lexington: a support/volunteer group comprised of organ transplantation recipients, donor family members, those on the waiting list and community members interested in transplantation meets the 3rd Sunday of each month at Word of Hope Lutheran Church, located at the corner of Man O’War and Armstrong Mill Road.  Meetings begin at 4:30. For questions, please contact Charlotte Wong, Education Coordinator, Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates Lexington office at (859) 278-3492 or toll free (800) 525-3456.

Center For Women’s Health Center Classes Held at Frankfort Regional Medical

Call Mediline at 502-226-1655 or toll-free 800-242-5662 to register or for more information. Classes include: • Prepared Childbirth • Baby Care For The Early Weeks • Breast Feeding Basics • “That’s My Baby” • Sibling Classes

Cancer Classes The American Cancer Society offers women undergoing cancer treatments the opportunity to attend the Look Good... Feel Better workshop. This free workshop helps women deal with the appearancerelated side-effects of cancer treatment in a private setting. Each participant receives a complimentary custom cosmetic kit. The American Cancer Society offers Prostate Cancer Educational and Support Classes called Man to Man for men with prostate cancer. This is an educational and networking program that provides information about prostate cancer and treatments options. For more information about these classes, please call Kristy Young at 859-260-8285. For cancer information 24 hours a day, please call 1-800-ACS-2345 or go to www.cancer.org.

Survivors of Suicide

to have disabilities. All instructors certified through Yoga Alliance. For more information, visit www.grassrootsyoga.org.

ANAD Overcoming Eating Disorders Support Group Free support group for people who want to improve their relationship with food and body image. Safe, comfortable place. Facilitated by Megan Roop, RYT, supervised by Tina Thompson, MS, RD, LD, Bluegrass Nutrition Counseling, sponsored by ANAD. Introduction meeting on October 3 from 7:15-8:30pm at Bliss Wellness Center, 2416 Sir Barton Way, Ste 125. 8 week session Oct 17Dec 5 from 7:15-8:30pm. Contact Megan Roop 561-779-0290 for details.

Diabetes CHATS Nathaniel Mission Health Clinic CHAT: 1109 Versailles Road, Suite 400 from 4pm to 5:15pm the 4th Tuesday of each month. The Refuge Clinic: New Location, 2349 Richmond Road-Suite 220, Lexington, KY, 40502. 859-225-4325. Free. Sponsored by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept and UK Healthcare.

Free Cardio Classes

First & third Tuesday of the month, 6-7:30pm, Center for Grief and Education. For adults affected by the loss of someone by suicide. Contact the Lexington office at (859) 277-2700 for more information or to register.

9-10am. Every Saturday morning in the month of February at Body Structure Medical Fitness Facility, 2600 Gribbin Drive, Lexington. This class will increase your heart rate and respiration while using large muscle groups repetitively and rhythmically to create a great workout. (859) 268-8190.

Bosom Buddies

Taoist Tai Chi Society

A support group designed to meet the ongoing needs of women with breast cancer. The purpose of Bosom Buddies is to create a safe and comfortable environment in which women diagnosed with breast cancer can receive information and emotional support during and after treatment. Meets are the third Thursday of every month 6:00pm at the Frankfort Regional Hospital: Frankfort Medical Pavilion, Conference Room C. 279 King’s Daughters Drive, Frankfort, KY.

BRCC Volunteer Opportunities The Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center provides a 24-hour crisis line, hospital and court advocacy, crisis intervention counseling, long-term therapy, and information and community referral to victims of sexual assault as well as family members and friends. Volunteers at BRCC have the unique opportunity to provide valuable direct services to those impacted by sexual assault. Volunteer opportunities: Crisis Line Volunteer, Medical/Legal Advocate. For more information, please call: (859) 253-2615.

Stop Smoking Class Series 5:30-6:30, weekly until April 17. Tates Creek Library, 3628 Walden Dr. Based on the Cooper-Clayton method. $10/week for 10 weeks covers the cost of nicotine replacement. Call 288-2457.

GrassRoots Yoga Classes Chair yoga: 10:30–11:30am Tuesday and Thursday. Hatha Vinyasa Flow: 5:30– 6:30pm Thursday. Yoga Basics for Stress Relief: 5:30–6:30pm Friday. Partial proceeds from all yoga classes benefit the Latitude Artist Community for adults considered

We offer classes in Louisville and Lexington. All classes are led by nationally accredited volunteer instructors in a friendly and helpful environment. The meditative movements of taijiquan can reduce tension, increase flexibility and strength, and improve circulation and balance. To contact us, phone 502.614.6424 or e-mail kentucky@ taoist.org.

Consumer Support Groups (Individuals with a Mental Illness) Every Sunday, 869 Sparta Court, Lexington. 2:30-4:00pm. 859-309-2856 for more info. NAMI Lexington is a local affiliate of NAMI, the “National Alliance on Mental Illness”  we provide numerous support groups and recovery programs for families and Individuals living with mental illness.

Low-Impact Aerobics Classes 6-7pm and 7-8pm. William Wells Brown Community Center, 548 East Sixth Street, Lexington. Weekly until midMay. 2nd hour offers a variety of other movement classes, including boot camp and Yoga. Free and for adults age 18 and above. Sponsored in part by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept. and Lexington Parks and Recreation. For more information, contact Mark Johnson at (859) 288-2391.

Yoga • Meditation • Stress Reduction The Yoga Health & Therapy Center offers daytime and evening Yoga classes with slow stretch, breathing awareness and relaxation training. Small classes provide personalized instruction. New

yoga students receive a series discount. Meditation classes and ongoing group practice sessions available for all levels. Stress-Reduction classes based on Yoga principles and practical skills also offered. Free parking provided for most classes. For information, please call 859-254-9529 or visit www.yogahealthcenter.org.

Mind Body Studio The Mind Body Studio is a service of John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP, Certified in family medicine, integrative medicine, mind body medicine and integral yoga, Dr. Patterson specializes in stress-related chronic disease and burnout prevention for caregivers and helping professionals. Mind body skills and lifestyle behaviors may help prevent and provide safe, effective and affordable relief of chronic conditions that are often poorly controlled by conventional medicine alone. Our integrative medicine consultations, group classes, workshops and coaching can help you meet your unique health and wellness needs through experiential education to help you mobilize your natural healing ability by integrating mind, body, spirit and our relationship to each other and the earth. Visit our website to schedule an appointment with Dr. Patterson or see a schedule of classes in yoga, mindfulness, meditation, Pilates and dance. “Mindful, empowered self care is the heart of healing” 517 Southland Drive, Lexington 859-373-0033. www. mindbodystudio.org.

Monthly Reiki Classes Turn your hands into healing hands! Reiki is Universal Life Force Energy Learn to improve your mind, body, and spirit! Classes taught by Robert N.Fueston, Reiki Master/Teacher and Acupuncturist, 17 years of experience and Member of The Reiki Alliance. Approved for Continuing Education hours (CE hours) for Massage Therapist. CE’s for nurses pending. Register online at www.robertfueston.com. 859-595-2164.

Ongoing Journey Circle This circle meets the 4th Sunday of every month and is for those who are experienced in the practice of journeying OR are interested in learning more about this ancient spiritual practice. Join us every month as we will be journeying on different topics that will be discussed at time of circle. Please feel free to bring drums, rattles etc. Questions or need directions or have questions? Please feel free to email/call me: 859-4922109,info@jennifershawcoaching.com

Overeaters Anonymous Overeaters Anonymous (OA) is not a diet club. We do not count calories or have scales at meetings. OA is based on the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. There are no dues or fees. OA is self-supporting through member contributions. The only requirement for membership is the desire to stop eating compulsively. Please go to oalexingtonky.org for meeting dates and times. OR are interested in learning more about this ancie


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Most heart murmurs aren’t serious.

What is a Heart Murmur?

Treatment depends on cause, patient’s medical status By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer A heart murmur is an unusual sound heard during a heartbeat. It is made by turbulent blood in or near your heart. It can be very faint to very loud; it sometimes sounds like a swishing or whooshing noise Heart murmurs can be present at birth or develop later in life. A heart murmur is not a disease, but it may indicate an underlying heart problem. There are two types of heart murmurs. • Innocent or harmless heart murmurs are not caused by heart problems. A person with an innocent murmur has a normal heart. These types of murmurs are common in newborns and healthy children, and most kids have heart murmurs sometime in their life. The murmurs are simply sounds

made by blood flowing through the heart’s chambers and valves or through the blood vessels near the heart. The extra blood flow through the heart may cause innocent heart murmurs. Pregnant women often have innocent heart murmurs due to extra blood volume. They do not need treatment because the heart murmurs usually go away after the woman gives birth. Innocent murmurs don’t cause any symptoms and having one doesn’t require you to limit your physical activity or take special precautions. Even if you have an innocent murmur throughout your life, you won’t need treatment for it. • Abnormal heart murmurs may have signs or symptoms of heart

problems. Most abnormal murmurs in children are caused by congenital heart defects, which are problems with the heart’s structure that are present at birth. Abnormal heart murmurs in adults are often caused by acquired heart valve disease, which develops as the result of another condition, such as infections, diseases and aging. People with abnormal heart murmurs may have signs and symptoms that include an enlarged liver, chest pain, dizziness or fainting, enlarged neck veins, chronic cough and swelling or sudden weight gain. There may also be a bluish color on the skin, especially on the lips and fingertips, poor eating and failure to grow normally (in infants). Also, shortness of breath may occur only with physical exertion. Some medical conditions such as hyperthyroidism or anemia can cause heart murmurs that aren’t related to heart disease, and treating these conditions should make the heart murmur go away. Most heart murmurs aren’t serious, but if you think you or your child have a heart murmur, tell your doctor. Risk factors that increase your chances of developing a heart murmur include a family history of a heart defect and medical con-

ditions such as hypertension or endocarditis. Doctors sometimes detect heart murmurs during routine checkups for another condition. Diagnosis of the cause of the murmur may involve tests such as a chest X-ray, a physical examination, electrocardiograph (ECG), echocardiogram and blood tests. The treatment for heart murmur depends on its particular cause and the underlying medical status of the patient. Many murmurs need no further evaluation and can simply be monitored because they are normal, while other murmurs that are associated with infected valves require antibiotics. Some valves are structurally damaged and need surgical repair. Infants and children who have congenital heart disease may need the help of a cardiologist to determine the need for medication or surgery. Maintaining a lifelong hearthealthy lifestyle may help prevent some heart-valve issues. Some things you can do include keeping your cholesterol, blood pressure and diabetes under control. Regular exercise, weight management and quitting smoking also contribute to a healthy heart.

Heart murmurs can be present at birth or develop later in life. A heart murmur is not a disease, but it may indicate an underlying heart problem.


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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2016 EVENTS continued from P. 26

February 10 Diabetes Basics

1-3 pm, Senior Citizens Center, 1530 Nicholasville Road, Free. Learn the basics for managing your diabetes effectively. Topics include describing diabetes, types of treatment, possible complications, medications and healthy coping. Sponsored by the LexingtonFayette Co. Health Dept. For more information or to preregister, call (859) 288-2446.

February 13

Day of Mindfulness for Body, Mind and Heart Goals of this retreat-like workshop are to: relax the body, quiet the mind and open the heart, prevent burnout from work and caretaker stress, help you mobilize your own inner resources for healing, learn mind-body skills for managing stress-related chronic conditions, cultivate your innate happiness, peacefulness and compassion. Instructor- Dr John Patterson, Mind Body Studio 517 Southland Drive Lexington KY 859-3730033. Pre-registration required. Cost: Discount for UK employees, spouses and retirees who register on the UK Wellness Program web site. $35-$75 sliding scale for non-UK participants. Full details at http://www.mindbodystudio. org/?page_id=1020

February 13 Nursing Your Infant

9 am - noon, UK Good Samaritan Hospital, Conference Room A, 310 S. Limestone St. $25 per couple, only for those delivering at UK. For more information or to pre-register, call 323-2750.

February 16 Eat, Move, Lose Weight Support Group

12 – 1 pm, Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Department PH Clinic South, 2433 Regency Road. Free weight-loss support group appropriate for anyone wishing to lose weight or maintain weight loss. Share struggles and ideas with others. Held first and third Tuesdays most months. For more information or to preregister, call 288-2446.

February 17 Diabetes Nutrition Basics

Diabetes Nutrition Basics, 1-3 pm, Senior Citizens Center, 1530 Nicholasville Road, Free. Learn about healthy eating, carbohydrate counting and how to apply to your everyday life. Sponsored by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept. For more information or to preregister, call (859) 288-2446.

February 18

Breastfeeding Basics Class 7-8:30 pm, Babies R Us, Hamburg Pavilion, Lexington. Free class for

expecting parents, covers how to breastfeed, knowing baby gets enough, and pumps and supplies. Sponsored by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept. Registration required: call Babies ‘R Us Baby Registry at 859-263-8598.

February 21

An Afternoon of Mindfulness, Meditation and Deep Rest 1:30–5:30pm. The goals of this afternoon retreat are to: slow down, relax the body, quiet the mind and open the heart, prevent burnout from work and caretaker stress, mobilize your inner resources for healing, learn non-drug approaches for managing stress-related chronic conditions, cultivate your innate happiness, peacefulness and compassion. Facilitator: John A. Patterson MD, MSPH, FAAFP. Mind Body Studio 517A Southland Drive Lexington KY 859-3730033. Pre-registration required. Cost: $20-$40 sliding scale. Full details at http://www.mindbodystudio.org/?page_ id=1117

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Send us your event listings If you are hosting a health-related event that is free to the public, list it here for FREE! (Events that are not free to the public can be posted in our calendar for $35). E-mail your event date, location, description and contact information to: brian@rockpointpublishing.com

February 23

Reiki Introduction & Practice 6:30pm- 8:30pm. 2508 Wallace Avenue, Louisville, KY 40205. Free.  Those who do have not Reiki training—come for an introduction & to experience it.  No experience required. Those with Reiki come to receive the Reiki energy & practice on others.  Free reattunement to your last level of Usui or Karuna Reiki® upon request if you have your certificate. Contact JoAnn Utley at 502-777-3865 or jutley5122@bellsouth.net to register.  More info at  http://joannutley.byregion. net

February 23

Health Chats about Diabetes 4-5 pm, Nathaniel Mission, 1109 Versailles Rd, Suite 400. Free. Sponsored by the Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept.. For more information, call (859) 288-2446.

February 24

Health Chats about Diabetes En Español 6 – 7 pm, Bluegrass Community Health Center, 1306 Versailles Rd. Call Jason for more information: 263-2507.

February 28

Natural Childbirth Class Series 4:30 – 6:30 pm (weekly through March 27), Baby Moon, 2891 Richmond Rd., $178 per mama/couple. Visit www.babymoon.org to register.

March 1

Breastfeeding Essentials II Class 7:15-8:45 pm, Baby Moon, 2891 Richmond Rd., $28, follow-up to Breastfeeding Essentials I class focusing on pumping and returning to work. Visit www.baby-moon.org to register.

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February 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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Scruffy, owner Dr. Kim Sears; diagnosed with heart disease two years ago

PET HEALTH

Protect Your Pet’s Heart By Dr. Kimberly Sears, Village Animal Hospital

February is about love and following your heart, so let’s follow your pet’s heart. We want you to learn a few common symptoms and conditions you may encounter with your pet so you can be prepared and an active part of your pet’s health care team.

Our canine and feline family members often suffer from heart conditions just as humans do. It is rare for them to have “heart attacks” as we do, but they do suffer from heart conditions affecting their heart muscle or heart valves. Some

breeds are more predisposed to certain heart conditions. Knowing this about your pet allows you to proactively watch for common signs or participate in preventative screenings to catch heart problems early, giving your pet the best chance

Working with animals requires patience, understanding, and, above all, compassion; both for the animal and for their owners

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of a long, healthy and happy life. Large and giant breeds of dogs such as Great Danes, Boxers, and Doberman pinchers have an increased incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy. Smaller breeds such as the King Charles Spaniel are known to be prone to heart valve conditions such as mitral valve disease. Some common symptoms of heart disease pet owners miss are coughing or difficulty breathing. Often pet owners associate these symptoms with old age or allergies. Signs vary depending on the stage of the disease, and sometimes cats and dogs experience sudden death, depending on the severity of heart disease they have. Cats, especially Maine Coons and Ragdolls, tend to have problems with their heart muscles such as Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Heart disease in cats can be tricky and is often referred to as a silent killer. Some cats with heart disease have heart murmurs or arrhythmias (abnormal rhythms or beats) while others do not. Some cats with heart disease show signs and symptoms of it while others do not. This is why annual exams for your cat is so important. Cats are known to be great at hiding ailments (and under your bed). If your veterinarian has noticed signs of heart disease, he or she may suggest more comprehensive diagnostics like an EKG, echocardiogram or radiographs to determine the best and safest treatment protocol for your cat. Do you know what is the most important part of your pet’s annual veterinary visit? It is the physical examination. For a pet to see the vet once a year is the equivalent of you going to the doctor once every seven years. For senior pets, when things


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2016

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Some breeds are more predisposed to certain heart conditions. tend to change more rapidly, it is recommended you have your pet examined every six months. We know it looks as though your pet is getting the best massage and rubdown ever as your veterinarian runs her hands all over your pet’s body and looks in its ears, eyes and mouth and listens to its heart and lungs. The veterinarian is looking for early subtle signs or changes in your pet. When listening to your pet’s heart, your veterinarian can tell if there is a disruption of blood flow if she notices a murmur or an arrhythmia. If your veterinarian finds indication of heart disease, she may have you start monitoring your pet more closely at home. It is always very helpful for pet owners to pay close attention to their pets’ sleeping respiratory rate (SRR). We encourage this. It is likely the most sensitive indicator for heart failure (building of fluid in the lungs) in the animal. This is a great home monitoring aid and it involves you, the pet parent, so you can pick up clinical signs earlier. When you are recording your pet’s SRR, you are looking at how many breaths your pet takes per minute. It is ideal to do this when your pet is sleeping comfortably in an environment that is not too hot or cold. We recommend pet parents do this daily for two to three days so you can create your pet’s baseline or normal value. Once you know your pet’s normal SRR, you can decrease your monitoring frequency to one or two times per week. If your pet’s SRR changes significantly between measurements, you should contact your veterinarian. The normal SRR in cats and dogs is less than 30 breaths per minute. Young cats (not young dogs) tend to have a higher SRR than older cats. Dogs and cats with

For this reason, all the staff at Village Animal Hospital have a common bond: a daily goal to give our clients and their pets the most up-to-date and best possible medical care

Boone, owner Chelsey Schrock; receiving special attention due to his breed

subclinical heart disease can still have fewer than 30 breaths per minute. When your pet’s SRR is consistently above 30 breaths per minute and it has underlying heart disease, that is suggestive of heart failure. Cats that consistently have more than 30 breaths per minute with pre-existing heart disease warrant further evaluation, but it can be normal in some cats. For pet parents who love phone apps, we highly recommend one called “Cardalis.” It is FREE and will track your pet’s SRR data for you. You can easily email the results

• Wellness Care Plans • Routine Medical Care • Vaccinations • Holistic Care Services • Ultrasound

Each one of our staff is committed to this goal, making Village Animal Hospital a wonderful environment to work in

• Radiology • In-House Laboratory • Surgical • Dental

right to your veterinarian. We love it! If you have any concerns about your pet’s heart health, we encourage you to always ask your veterinarian. We are always available to address any questions you have. If you have concerns, please take advantage of our free new patient exam and let one of our veterinarians listen to your pet’s heart. We want you to be a major player on your pet’s health care team and encourage you to ask questions.

• House Calls • Hospice • Euthanasia • Other services also provided

We hope you will feel this commitment from us when you visit, and come to trust us with all of your pet care needs!


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FOOD

February 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

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GET YOUR FIBER, LOWER YOUR CHOLESTEROL, SOOTHE YOUR SKIN By Tanya Tyler, Editor/Writer Are you feeling your oats? If you’re starting your day with a big bowl of oatmeal, you certainly should be – and it’s all good. Whether they’re rolled, crushed or ground, oats are higher in protein and healthy fats and lower in carbohydrates than most other whole grains. Oats, oat bran and oatmeal contain a type of fiber known as beta-glucan. Laboratory research has demonstrated beta-glucan can enhance the immune system’s response to bacterial infections. It helps neutrophils move to the site of an infection more quickly and enhances their ability to eliminate the bacteria. Beta-glucan helps stabilize blood sugar and is also very beneficial for lowering cholesterol. Studies have shown people with high cholesterol who ate just 3 grams of soluble oat fiber every day – the amount in one bowl of oatmeal – can lower their total cholesterol by 8 percent to 23

Oats percent. Every 1-percent drop in serum cholesterol results in a 2-percent decrease in heart disease risk. In one study, people who ate about 21 grams of fiber per day had 12 percent less coronary heart disease and 11 percent less cardiovascular disease compared to those who ate 5 grams of fiber daily. Basically, oats help remove cholesterol from the digestive system that would otherwise end up in the bloodstream, saving hearts and lives. The World’s Healthiest Foods Web site says another study shows antioxidant compounds unique to

Discover how good oats are for your body – inside and out.

oats, called avenanthramides, help prevent free radicals from damaging LDL cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Researchers at Tufts University exposed human arterial wall cells to purified avenenthramides from oats for 24 hours. They found these oat phenols significantly suppressed the production of several types of molecules involved in the attachment of monocytes (immune cells in the bloodstream) to the arterial wall, which is the first step in the development of atherosclerosis. Postmenopausal women with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or other signs of cardiovascular disease get some cardiovascular benefits from eating oatmeal. In a study, women who ate at least six servings of whole grains each week showed a slower progression of atherosclerosis (plaque build up in the blood vessels). A diet rich in fiber from whole grains such as oats gives significant

protection against breast cancer for pre-menopausal women as well. If you literally want to feel your oats, try using them as a skin soother and softener. Grind about a half cup of uncooked rolled oats into a powder with a food processor. Place them directly into hot bath water or wrap them in cheesecloth and drop it into your bath. You can make an oatmeal-based face mask to ease irritation and moisturize your skin. Put one-third cup of oatmeal in a bowl and pour half a cup of hot water on top. Mix, then add a tablespoon of honey and 2 tablespoons of plain yogurt. Apply the mixture to your face, avoiding the eyes, and leave on for 20 minutes. Remove with a damp cloth. Discover how good oats are for your body – inside and out.


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February 2016

FOOD BITES

By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer

Honeybee Collapses and Pesticides

The most widely used insecticide, neonicotinoids, which are marketed by European chemical companies Syngenta and Bayer, harm bees and other pollinators at even tiny doses. Environmentalists have been pressuring the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to recognize this threat for more than a decade. On Jan. 6, the EPA released a report confirming the five neonic pesticides are the cause of bee die-offs. The EPA could potentially take action to restrict or limit the use of the chemical by the end of this year. Of the five neonics, imidacloprid is the most prominently used and the only one to have been closely investigated by scientists. The EPA risk assessment team found bees are harmed when they are exposed to imidacloprid at levels above 25 parts per billion, a common level for neonics in farm fields. “These effects include decreases in pollinators as well as less honey produced,”

said the EPA in a press release. Cotton and citrus crops are the most likely to expose honeybees to harmful levels of imidacloprid. The EPA still needs to assess the remaining four neonics as well as imidacloprid’s effects on other species, such as birds, butterflies and water-borne invertebrates.

Fracking and Water

Congress commissioned the EPA to study the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on drinking water five years ago. The EPA’s draft study was released last June to solicit input from advisors and the public. This draft study found fracking has already contaminated drinking water. It was further found that fracking can also affect drinking water resources outside the immediate vicinity of a hydraulically fractured well. Despite these findings, the EPA concluded “there is no evidence fracking has led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources,” citing data limitations and uncertainties and the paucity of longterm systemic studies. Since the draft

report’s release, the oil and gas industry declared the science was settled and fracking is safe. But now the EPA’s own science advisors are repudiating the study’s major conclusion. The 31-member scientific review board said on Jan. 14 the study is “inconsistent with the observations, data and levels of uncertainty.” The panel will hold a public teleconference on Feb. 1 before sending its final recommendations to the EPA. Although it’s good news that the scientific panel is speaking out, water issues are just one harmful component of the fast-tracked fracking process. After trying to prevent fracking fluids from becoming public knowledge, these chemicals have since been found to pose catastrophic risk to human health, according to a study. In an analysis of more than 1,000 chemicals in fluids used in and created by hydraulic fracturing (fracking), Yale School of Public Health researchers found many of the substances have been linked to reproductive and developmental health problems, and the majority had undetermined toxicity due to insufficient information. Last year a group of seismologists, researchers and oil and gas industry representatives released a report that connected hydro fracturing to the surge in earthquakes in Oklahoma. The state has seen a 730-percent increase in earthquake activity since 2013 because

of fracking. From Jan. 1-14 this year, Oklahoma has had 69 earthquakes, one of which registered a magnitude of 4.7 and another that registered 4.8.

Fake Olive Oil is Still a Thing

It is estimated that 69 percent of all U.S. extra virgin olive oils are fake, according to tests by the University of California-Davis. In two studies, UC Davis researchers analyzed 186 olive oil samples against standards set by the International Olive Council (IOC), as well as methods used in Germany and Australia. They found 73 percent of the samples of the five top-selling imported “extra virgin” olive oil brands in the United States failed the IOC sensory standards tests. Sensory defects indicate the samples are oxidized, of poor quality and/or adulterated with cheaper refined oils. The failure rate ranged from 94 percent to 56 percent, depending on the brand. None of the Australian and California samples failed, but 11 percent of the top-selling premium Italian brands failed, including Bertolli, Carapelli, Colavita, Star and Pompeian.

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February 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

Dental Care Is Important to Heart Health

Gum disease can often indicate heart disease By Dr. Tom Miller, Staff Writer

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re you aware that heart disease and oral health are linked? Research has shown people with moderate or advanced gum (periodontal) disease are more likely to have heart disease than those with healthy gums. Gum disease is called gingivitis in its early stages and periodontal disease in the later stages. It is caused by plaque buildup along and below the gum line. Gum disease affects 80 percent of American adults, but often the condition goes undiagnosed. Many of the risk factors for gum disease are the same as those for heart disease, such as tobacco use, poor nutrition and diabetes. Warning signs of gum disease include red, tender or swollen gums; gums that bleed while brushing or flossing; gums that seem to be pulling away from your teeth; teeth that are loose or separating from each other; and/or chronic bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth. Individuals who have chronic gum disease are at higher risk for a heart attack, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). One of the problems with advanced gum disease is that the anaerobic bacteria spread beyond the oral cavity to other systems and organs within the body, including the heart. Some researchers have suggested gum disease may contribute to heart disease because bacteria from infected gums can dis-

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For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2016 lodge, enter the bloodstream, attach to blood vessels and increase clot formation. It has also been suggested that inflammation caused by gum disease may also trigger clot formation. Failing to treat gum disease will cause this process of clotting to proceed even faster, although the precise mechanism remains a mystery to scientists. Clots decrease blood flow to the heart, thereby causing an elevation in blood pressure and increasing the risk of a cardiovascular accident. Coronary artery disease can ultimately lead to heart attack and death. It is caused by a thickening of the coronary arteries due to fatty proteins clotting together and obstructing blood flow. No conclusive reason can be found why heart disease and gum disease are connected, but one thing that is certain is anaerobic bacteria often lead to the increased risks. In time, the infection will progress until growths develop in the affected region of the heart. These growths may then clot, break off and travel to other organs in the body and cause other health problems. Symptoms include a prolonged fever that may last for weeks or even months; chronic fatigue; headaches; night sweats; and/or dark lines under the fingernails. Gum disease may ultimately lead to a number of additional medical

problems. Infective endocarditis is an infection found in the heart that will manifest within the heart valves or even the chambers. Nearly half of all cases of infective endocarditis are caused by a bacteria called streptococcus viridans found in the mouth; it is also responsible for periodontal disease. Prevention of gum disease may seem a low priority because of the relatively mild and painless symptoms that first appear. However, failing to learn how to prevent gum disease could potentially prove fatal because it may develop into a severe health issue if left untreated. Clinical research has shown many systemic diseases, including heart disease, have oral symptoms that can be key to prevention or early intervention. Dentists can help patients who have a history of heart disease by examining them for any signs of oral pain, infection or inflammation. According to the AGD, proper diagnosis and treatment of tooth and gum infections in some of these patients have led to a decrease in blood pressure medications and improved overall health. Treating gum disease means keeping the anaerobic bacteria in the mouth under control. This is where good oral hygiene comes into play. In addition to brushing and flossing,

use mouthwash or similar product made from all-natural ingredients to help fight bacteria. Products made with alcohol or other chemicals will lead to dry mouth and a loss of the all-important saliva that naturally controls bacteria. Gingivitis can be managed as long as the infection does not reach the gum line. After that, periodontal surgery will be necessary to restore proper dental health. This is why it is so important to practice good oral hygiene daily so you don’t end up fighting both gum disease and heart problems later. Begin by taking the first step, which is having regular dental exams and cleanings. These are necessary to remove bacteria, plaque and tartar and detect early signs of gum disease. Oral health holds clues to overall health. Oral health can provide pre-

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Sources and Resources Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) (2016). Oral Health Fact Sheets. www. agd.org/2/practicemanagement/factsheet/ Heart Disease Health Center (2015) WebMD. www.webmd.com/heart-disease/features/your-guide-gum-disease

Individuals who have chronic gum disease are at higher risk for a heart attack.

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vention or early intervention for heart health. If you have heart disease, be sure to tell your dentist about your condition as well as any medications you are currently taking. Carefully follow your physician’s and dentist’s instructions about health care and use any prescription medications, such as antibiotics, as directed.


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It is important for women to learn about and be aware of the risk factors of heart disease.

Heart Attack Symptoms Differ in Women, Men By Harleena Singh, Staff Writer Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Heart attacks occur when the blood flow to the heart is blocked by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries. A heart attack strikes someone about every 43 seconds in America. The symptoms of heart attack are different in women and men. Women do not always experience crushing chest pain that radiates down one arm, as men often do. When they have a heart attack, both men and women usually experience similar chest pressure, although women can have a heart attack without chest pressure. Many women experience “silent” or vague symptoms. Nausea, jaw pain and pressure are all symptoms of a heart attack in women, though they are also symptoms women often brush off as stress, the flu or simply feeling unwell. Though these symp-

toms seem subtle, the consequences could be deadly if the victim does not get help right away. Other symptoms of heart attack in women include: 1. Chest pain. This is the most common heart attack symptom. In women, it may feel like a fullness or squeezing, and the pain can be anywhere in the chest, not just on the left side. 2. Shortness of breath, lightheadedness, or nausea. You could be having a heart attack if you’re having trouble breathing for no apparent reason, especially if you’re also having one or more other symptoms. 3. Fatigue. Some women often complain of tiredness and say they cannot do simple activities, such as walking. They feel extremely tired even if they are sitting still without moving much. 4. Sweating. Women who are hav-

ing a heart attack often break out in a nervous, cold sweat, which feels more like stress-related sweating than perspiration. 5. Stomach pain. Some people may mistake stomach pain indicating a heart attack with the flu, a stomach ulcer or heartburn. Other times, women experience severe abdominal pressure. 6. Pain in the neck, jaw or arms. This pain is more common in women than in men. The pain can be gradual or sudden and may increase or decrease before becoming intense. Most women who consider themselves healthy often misdiagnose the symptoms of a heart attack because they don’t think it could happen to them. Therefore, it is important for women to learn about and be aware of the risk factors of heart disease and live a hearthealthy lifestyle. You can lower your risk of heart disease by making regular visits to your doctor to find out if you are at risk. Do not smoke, and try to stay away from those who smoke. Keep your blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes in check. Keep a healthy weight by eating right. Eat less salt and stay active. Walking daily can reduce your chances of having a heart attack. Being sad, angry and stressed may add to heart attack risks. To prevent heart attacks, try to avoid hormones if

you are in menopause. Not everyone gets all the symptoms mentioned above. However, if you have chest discomfort, call your doctor or go to the hospital immediately. Women generally wait longer than men to get help, so be sure you do not delay.


For advertising information call 859.368.0778 or email brian@rockpointpublishing.com | February 2016

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Drunk With Love: How Alcohol and Oxytocin Are Similar

Could be key to unlocking new addiction treatments By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer Ah, love … known scientifically as the hormone oxytocin. This “love hormone” facilitates bonding, increases trust and promotes altruism. But as with anything, there are two sides to it, and recent research is revealing the dark side of oxytocin. Namely, this hormone can increase aggression, risk taking and prejudice. An analysis of a large body of research has concluded that oxytocin’s effects on the brain and behavior look a lot like something else that has a light and dark side: alcohol. This means oxytocin may be a key to unlocking new treatments for alcohol addiction. Psychology researchers at the University of Birmingham in England

found in a meta-analysis that both oxytocin and alcohol reduce fear, anxiety and stress while increasing trust, generosity and altruism. Both also increase aggression, risk taking and “in-group” bias (favoring people similar to oneself at the expense of others). The scientists, led by Ian Mitchell, suggest these similarities probably exist because oxytocin and alcohol act at different points in the same chemical pathway in the brain. Oxytocin stimulates the release of the neurotransmitter GABA, which tends to reduce neural activity. Alcohol binds to GABA receptors and ramps up GABA activity. Oxytocin and alcohol both have the general effect of tamp-

ing down brain activity, which could at least partially explain how and why both oxytocin and alcohol lower inhibitions. The meta-analysis results were published as a paper in the August 2015 issue of Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. An earlier study by these same researchers suggests oxytocin and alcohol not only act in the same neural pathway, but they may physically interact with each other. Inspired by clinical trials that demonstrated a nasal spray of oxytocin reduced cravings and withdrawal symptoms in alcoholics, the psychologists showed oxytocin prevented drunken motor impairment in rats by blocking the

GABA receptor subunit usually bound by alcohol. Mitchell posits this interaction is specific to brain regions that regulate movement, thereby sparing the usual motor deficits associated with alcohol but still influencing social and affective processes. These findings suggest that getting “love drunk” may impede a person from getting truly drunk. This study was published in the March 2015 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. The researchers hope scientists will develop oxytocin-based treatments for alcoholics in the near future.

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February 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

New Treatments for Heart Disease FDA approves new drugs By Angela S. Hoover, Staff Writer

Two new drugs for the treatment of heart disease and related conditions are helping subsets of the nearly 27 million Americans with heart disease live longer and with fewer hospital admittances. About 610,000 individuals die from heart disease in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This equates to one in every four deaths. Heart attacks, high blood pressure and other diseases can weaken the heart muscle and cause congestive heart failure, in which the heart muscle fails to forcefully pump blood to the body’s tissues. Symptoms include

shortness of breath and fatigue. Heart failure is the most common reason for hospitalization for Medicare patients. About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure. Of these, about 2.2 million are diagnosed as New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV, which means their capacities for daily living are more severely limited. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the Novartis drug Entresto (LCZ696) for this subset of heart failure patients last July. In a clinical trial (ParadigmHF), the drug was highly effective, with a 20-percent reduction in death

or repeat hospitalization compared to current therapies. Traditionally, 20 percent or more patients are re-admitted to the hospital within 30 days. Entresto was tested head-to-head with ACE-inhibitor Enalapril, the former gold standard of treatment for patients whose condition is classified as NYHA class II-IV. The clinical trial showed Entresto outperformed Enalapril and had a similar tolerability profile. Entresto is a 1:1 ratio of valsartan (angiotensin receptor blocker) and sacubitril (neprilysin inhibitor). The twice-a-day tablet enhances the protective neurohormonal systems of the heart while also suppressing the harmful system. New Drug for High Cholesterol Elevated levels of “bad” LDL-C (low density lipoprotein cholesterol) are considered a risk factor for developing coronary heart disease. For the past 25 years, statin drugs that controlled cholesterol have lowered the risk of heart attack or stroke by about 35 percent. However, some patients cannot tolerate statins or are unable to take large enough dosages to effectively reduce cholesterol levels. Other

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times, a patient’s LDL-C is high due to an underlying genetic cause that statins cannot reduce adequately. A new drug therapy, PSCK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9) inhibitor, has been shown to reduce LDL-C by as much as 50 percent to 70 percent. This class of drug is an antibody that targets the PCSK9 protein. The LDL receptor in the liver removes LDL-C from the blood. When the PCSK9 protein binds to the LDL receptor, the receptor is broken down and can no longer remove LDL-C. By blocking the PCSK9 protein’s ability to function, more LDL receptors are available in the liver to remove LDL-C from the blood. It is given as an injection every two weeks or once a month. Patients can easily self-inject these drugs using an automated injector. The FDA approved two PSCK9 inhibitors last summer for adult patients with heterozygous familial hypercholersterolemia (HeFH and HoFH) and patients with clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (heart attacks and strokes) who need to lower their LDL-C. HeFH and HoFH are inherited conditions that cause high levels of LDL-C. PCSK9 drugs are to be used in conjunction with the maximally tolerated statin therapy and diet. Praluent (alirocumab), marketed by Sanofi-Aventis U.S., was approved in July. It comes with some side effects, however: itching, swelling, pain or bruising at injection site, colds (sneezing and runny nose) and flu. Some patients may have allergic reactions, including a rash with purplecolored spots, and hypersensitivity reactions that require hospitalization. Repatha (evolocumab), marketed by Amgen, Inc., was approved in August. Repatha also comes with the risk of side effects such as colds (sneezing and runny nose), upper respiratory tract infections, flu, back pain, injection-site pain, redness or bruising and allergic reactions such as rash or hives.

About 610,000 individuals die from heart disease in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control.


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What Are You Aiming At? Set specific goals, write them down, create momentum – succeed!

By Willie B. Ray, Personal Trainer, Art of Strength Kettle Bell Gym 1301 Winchester Road #129 Lexington, KY 40505

Zig Ziglar once said, “If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.” And each of us knows from our own experiences that he is right. The general flow of human life tends to be toward ease and comfort. One day flows into the next, and many of us never quite get around to turning our good intentions into reality. Those “good intentions,” while no doubt admirable, tend to remain unrealized mainly because they are too vague. Vague ideas are impossible to focus on and aim for; they are moving targets. Do you have moving targets in your life? Perhaps you want to eat a more healthy diet or lose the winter weight that has crept up on you. Maybe you just want to establish a regular workout routine and stick with it this time. The keys to your success are two-fold: steady the target and create momentum. How to Stop a Moving Target Imagine a target shooter trying to hit a small bull’s eye on a distant target. He begins to aim, but then the target suddenly moves to the right, and before he can position himself to aim again, the target darts to the left. Will he ever hit that target? Not likely. Without setting specific goals, your good intentions are exactly like that moving target. You would like to lose some weight, feel a little better, make a change in your diet – but without clearly defined goals and methods, you can’t focus and make it happen. The way to steady the target so you can

finally hit the bull’s eye is to define your goals and write them down: • How much weight do you want to lose? • What kind of changes do you want to make in your diet? • How many days per week do you want to exercise? • Which article of clothing do you wish would fit your body again? • How much weight would you like to lift while strength training? Once you know where you want to end up, you are much more likely to get there. But you have to start moving toward your goals. That is where momentum comes in. Create momentum to reach your goals. In his book, “Eat that Frog,” Brian Tracy discusses the Momentum Principle of Success. In Tracy’s words: “This principle says that although it may take tremendous amounts of energy to overcome inertia and get started initially, it then takes far less energy to keep going.”1 There is much wisdom in his words. Sometimes the hardest part of reaching a goal is just getting started. That first day of doing things differently or the first experience of bypassing an unhealthy treat in favor of a food that will give you more energy can be daunting. It isn’t easy and it certainly isn’t fun. So how do you get that momentum? How do you start moving? Accountability is the answer. Having someone else involved in your efforts can be the most important factor in your success.

It is hard to change lifelong habits on your own. You need radical motivation that comes from involving others in your efforts. Setting deadlines, making commitments and entering contests all provide an external motivation that will carry you through even the toughest temptations. And once you get started, you will find that the momentum principle kicks in and it becomes easier and easier to keep going. Goals + Momentum = Success Start NOW! You can make that moving target come to a screeching halt and blast the bull’s eye right out of it by taking a few minutes to write down what you want. Don’t make your goals too broad; be specific. And then begin brainstorming ways to get others involved with you; that will provide your momentum. Success is within your reach. You can do this! Oh, and remember, we’re here to help you the entire way! Please feel free to contact me at supernat_ us@yahoo.com or (859) 221-4479. Yours in Health, Willie B. Ray Sources 1. Tracy, Brian (2007-01-01). Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time (p. 107). Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Kindle Edition.

The keys to your success are two-fold: steady the target and create momentum. Win a WEEK of FREE FITNESS Valid for new clients’ first visit only

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February 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

PARENTING FOR WELLNESS

Helicopter Parenting

The negative effects of caring too much By Sarah Brokamp, Staff Writer

The world is a big, uncertain place, and the idea of sending your child into it alone can seem unfathomable. Parents like the idea of their children never being hurt, encased in a safe place of the parents’ own making, free from any treachery. However, this magical bubble is neither realistic nor beneficial. Placing barriers around your child is dangerous, even if you think it’s only cautionary. Every parent should draw lines to protect their child, but it is important to strive for the comfortable middle ground between being suffocating and being neglectful.

A good example of a parent who is “helicoptering” is a mother/father who demands to read their child’s texts or who does not allow the child to make phone calls without the parent listening in. Most of the time parents do these sorts of things out of fear. They want the child to have good influences, so they feel they need to check every person the child comes in contact with before allowing the child to befriend them. It is okay to be wary of other people in your child’s life, but you must also let your child make some judgments

on his or her own. Allow the child to decide who is a good influence and who isn’t. Give your child the necessary tools and advice to judge a person respectfully and accurately – but also give the child the privilege to use those tools and advice. If the child does not exercise what he or she has learned from you and you do all the work for him or her, your child will become too dependent and, frankly, useless when he or she is thrown into society. You cannot keep your child in your home forever; there is a point where certain decisions are made

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entirely and only by the child. When helicopter parenting is enforced, extreme dependency is not the only problem encountered. Low self-worth is a definite and common effect of the helicopter style of parenting. If your child is used to having you take the reins in every slightly difficult situation, he can start to feel he is not capable of handling anything hard or demanding. After a certain time, the child will pass problems on to you without thinking about it. If you have a hovering style of parenting, you will take these problems and fix them, even if the child has the ability to fix them on her own. When you do this, you are sending the message that your child is incapable. If he sees peers handling similar problems on their own, a sense of inferiority might also arise in the child. You cannot be a step-in bodyguard for every conflict your child is certain to face. When you carry issues for your children, you are stunting their development and refusing to cultivate self-sustainment. A common and often overlooked act of helicopter parenting is doing your child’s homework or standing over his shoulder and correcting every mistake he makes. You send your child to school to be educated. When you take the responsibilities of learning from him, you are countering the premise of wanting your child to be knowledgeable about the world. You send your child to school to not only learn but to make mistakes and get to know himself or herself. A child who gets straight A’s because a parent is sitting behind the curtain doing the work can be just as damaged as a child failing on his own. A good child-parent relationship is based on trust. If you trust your child to make good decisions and work hard, she will take that trust seriously. She will feel important, dignified and capable. Your child can reach a high level of maturity and independence with trust. He will come to you with problems he is not equipped to handle, but he will also have the self-esteem to take on those problems that appear manageable. If you commend your child for actions she did not accomplish entirely by herself, the praise can seem artificial. Instead, strive to teach your child that true success is brought by the steps you take on your own.

If you trust your child to make good decisions and work hard, she will take that trust seriously.


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Autism’s Location in the Brain Found French scientists have found autism can be seen in the brain’s folds. There, a new biomarker was discovered that can be detected in children as young as 2 years old. The abnormality shows itself in a shallower-than-usual fold located in Broca’s area, the region of the brain responsible for language and communication that autism affects. The researchers focused on the sulcal pit, a new geometric marker situated at the deepest point of every sulcus in the cerebral cortex, which is where all the folds of the brain develop. Features in these folds are built at a very early stage in brain development and are probably genetically influenced. This means the characteristics will be different in every individual and can be compared. The scientists found a direct correlation between the depth of the folds and a child’s social abilities. The less deep the sulcus in autistic children, the more skewed the child’s performance in communication and language production. The researchers are confident these finding will help with autism diagnoses and management of patients. Before these findings, doctors could only diagnose autism by monitoring interaction for clinical signs. Now, a diagnosis can be made from inside the brain instead of just using observational opinions. The results were published in the January issue of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neurosciences and Neuroimaging.

Researchers focused on the sulcal pit, a new geometric marker situated at the deepest point of every sulcus in the cerebral cortex, which is where all the folds of the brain develop.

ACU. continued from Page 17

and/or hypertension. We emphasize an integrative approach by working with the body’s energetic systems through acupuncture and by relaying thousands of years of wisdom about the benefits of Chinese herbs, teas, diet, meditation, breathing techniques and gentle exercise. Like Western medicine, Chinese medicine emphasizes the importance of stress reduction and an appropriate amount of good-quality sleep. One thing many people do not realize about acupuncture is that most people fall asleep during their treatments. At my clinic, we refer to these as “acu-naps.” There is nothing like lying on a warm table in a cozy room with good body alignment (using props and pillows, if needed), soothed by soft music or precious quiet to allow the body to remember how to relax and heal!

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February 2016 | Read this issue and more at www.healthandwellnessmagazine.net |

Recovering from a Stroke

Know the signs and symptoms By Jean Jeffers, Staff Writer Strokes are a leading cause of long-lasting injury, disability and death. In the United States, approximately 700,000 strokes occur each year. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (www.nhlbi.nih.gov), a stroke occurs when oxygen-rich blood circulating in the brain is not able to get to and nourish one or more sections of the brain because of a blockage or bleeding. That section then dies; its function is lost. A person who suffers a stroke may experience drooping on one side of the mouth; weakness or paralysis of the arms or legs, usually on one

side of the body; difficulty speaking or understanding conversation; and difficulty seeing. The damaging effects may be temporary or permanent, depending on the extent of the injury. The two main types of stroke are: • Ischemic — This occurs when an artery that supplies oxygen-rich blood to the brain becomes blocked. This is the most common type of stroke. • Hemorrhagic — This occurs when an artery in the brain leaks blood or ruptures. The pressure from the leaked blood damages brain cells. High blood pressure and aneu-

rysms are examples of conditions that can cause this type of stroke. A condition that is similar but less severe is a TIA (transient ischemic attack), which occurs when oxygenrich blood is blocked temporarily to a portion of the brain. If you or someone you know experiences the symptoms of a stroke, seek medical attention immediately. The sooner treatment is started, the less injury you or the person may have. Some medications used in the treatment of stroke must be given in the first few hours. Call an ambulance to take you or the person to the hospital; life-saving treatment

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may be given on the way. Prompt treatment can help avoid a disability or even death and may also lessen the occurrence of a second stroke. Early treatment of ischemic stroke would include intravenous thrombolytic (“clot-buster”) therapy with alteplase or intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy (opening of the blocked artery) with stent retriever devices. Medications used for early treatment of ischemic stroke include aspirin and anticoagulants. The treatment of a hemorrhagic stroke depends upon the cause of the bleeding (i.e., high blood pressure, use of anticoagulants, head trauma). Initial care of a hemorrhagic stroke includes controlling the blood pressure and stopping any medications that could increase bleeding. Sometimes surgical treatment is recommended to prevent or stop the bleeding and reduce the pressure inside the skull. A primary care physician will generally add a baby aspirin to the medical regimen of a person considered at risk for a stroke. After a stroke, rehab may be necessary and may include speech, physical and occupational therapy. Complications after a stroke may include blood clots, difficulty eating and drinking, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bleeding in the digestive system and heart attack and heart failure. Nursing care after a stroke would include measures to treat and/or prevent complications. For example, attention may be given to nutrition for someone who has difficulties eating and drinking. Prevention of stroke includes: 1. Maintaining normal blood pressure. 2. Limiting saturated fats and watching cholesterol. 3. Refraining from smoking, and drinking in moderation. 4. Controlling diabetes. 5. Maintaining a healthy weight. 6. Getting regular exercise. 7. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.

If you or someone you know experiences the symptoms of a stroke, seek medical attention immediately.


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