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Twins Mean Double Trouble on Soccer Field Jillian Leetch, freshman, and McKenna Leetch, freshman

“When we play, sometimes I will be running down the field, I won’t see her, but I know where she’s at and I can pass the ball without looking and she will be there. It’s like we were both thinking the same thing.” – McKenna Leetch

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t’s not that uncommon to play on the same sports team as your best friend. However, it’s more uncommon when your best friend is also your identical twin.

Since they were four years old, freshmen Jillian Leetch and McKenna Leetch have almost always played on the same team. They started playing a variety of sports, but soon found their love of soccer. Years of playing together, living together and sharing the same DNA have given them some competitive advantages. For example, they believe they have some kind of twin telepathy when they’re on the field. “When we play, sometimes I will be running down the field, I won’t see her, but I know where she’s at and I can pass the ball without looking and she will be there,” McKenna said. “It’s weird. It’s like we were both thinking the same thing.” Being a twin also has its advantage when it comes to tricking opponents. Jillian is a left-footed left forward. McKenna is a right-footed right forward. The women will occasionally switch positions and attack the defense from a direction their opponents were not expecting. But one of the biggest advantages of playing with your twin is having someone who knows you so deeply, who knows how to celebrate accomplishments and how to lift you up when you’re down. “If McKenna is not playing well, then I feel like I’m not playing well,” Jillian said. “I know she’s feeling mad at herself and I can go and talk to her.”

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SUMMER 2018

Profile for Rockhurst University

RU: Summer 2018  

The magazine for Rockhurst University.

RU: Summer 2018  

The magazine for Rockhurst University.

Profile for rockhurst
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