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may/june 2013 COMPLIMENTARY

75

th

Single Motherhood

Issue!

Braving the battles, finding the joy

Triple Treasure Exploring the Vintage Treasures Market

Sherlock, Shakespeare and Smoked Duck A short drive to divine dinner and drama

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Cover Story Single Motherhood

Braving the battles, finding the joy. By Amy Brase Cover photo by Dawn Sanborn Photography

MAGAZINE

Women in Leadership

Home

Healthy Living

11

32

48

Taking a Mental Health Break

52

Exercising Friendship

13 Judy Hvamstad

Vice President, Administrative Officer and Human Resources Coordinator with Premier Bank and Leadership Greater Rochester, Class of 2013. By Tracy Will

Tiptoe Through the Tulips

Gorgeous garden spaces for outdoor living. By Trish Amundson

The Layered Look

Indulging in color and texture as well as flavor. By Margo Stich

Travel 37

54 Sherlock, Shakespeare and Smoked Duck All Decked Out

A guide to decking from a local company that has been selling lumber for 98 years. By Penny Marshall

40 26

28

Remodelers Corner

A steeply-sloped hillside transforms into an outdoor oasis. By Penny Marshall

How to: Gnocchi

Slowing down and finding coping strategies in a frenetic world. By Michelle Kubitz Running groups that fuse training with the pleasantness of a social club. By Bob Freund

Food 21

May/JUNE 2013

A short drive to divine dinner and drama. By Alison Rentschler

Shopping 57 Triple Treasure

Three sisters’ creativity draws hundreds to their annual market. By Susanne Novak

By Margo Stich

Seasons of the Vine

By Margo Stich

31 Confessions of a Novice Shroomer

Hunting the elusive morel mushroom. By C.G. Worrell

Community

in every issue From the Publisher In the Know Advertisers Index Community Calendar

7 8 59 60

43 Fifty Years Never Looked So Good

Kellogg Middle School celebrates the half-century mark. By Debi Neville

On the Lighter Side 62 The Paint Shirt Legacy New life for a ratty old smock. By Marlene Petersen

RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

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n

from the publisher MAGAZINE Issue 75, Volume 14, Number 2 May/June 2013 publishers

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA Doug Solinger editor

Marlene Petersen design director

Rue Wiegand

layout designer

Amy Liebl

Graphic designers

Brett Adams Tommy Traxel, MLT Group food editor

Margo Stich

Copy editors

Ashley Pikel Elisa Tally

Marketing Account Manager

Deanne Breitenbach

Community Relations

Susan Franken

photography

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios Mike Hardwick Photography RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications LLC, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $18 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2013 Women Communications LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-529-5385 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com

I am blessed! A

lmost every morning, my youngest son wakes up, puts his long thin arm around me and says, “I love you.” A bit later, my teenage son calls out that he’s leaving for the day and waits for my hug before he goes. When he comes home Photo by Dawn Sanborn Photography. after school, he seeks me out to help him find a snack. Most evenings, my beautiful teenage daughter plays her guitar and sings, lullabying me to sleep. These rewards may sound simple, but we single mothers cherish them. These are the rewards for squeezing a bit more energy out of every day to make sure our children have good food to eat, washed dishes to eat from and clean clothes to wear. These are the rewards for getting them to and from their afterschool activities and still, somehow, finding the time to talk about our day’s highs and lows. The single moms featured in "Single Motherhood: Braving the battles, finding the joy" (page 13) attest to the bravery and joys of single motherhood. Like these single mothers, I thank God I have enough. Enough time, enough energy, enough love, enough patience ­— for my children and myself. I am also grateful for the Rochester community organizations and individuals who play such vital roles in helping me raise my children. I am grateful for the health care providers who tenderly treat us in times of uncertainty with care and concern and throughout our healthy times. I am grateful for the childcare and preschool programs that helped prepare my children for kindergarten. I am grateful for our schools’ teachers and administrators, for the coaches, the camps, the volunteers and the public and private funding that supports them. I am grateful for the friends and church members who hold me and my children close in the absence of extended family. One of those friends, teachers and guiding lights is Joyce Dammer, principal of Churchill Hoover Elementary School, who this year retires after 54 first days of school and 38 years of providing a safe, joyful environment for many children (including my own) to learn and grow. Joyce helps her staff to be the best at what they do, and it shows. We’ll honor Joyce Dammer on Friday, May 31, from 4-6 p.m. at Hoover Elementary School. I hope you’ll join me. Congratulations to Kellogg Middle School as it celebrates 50 years. “Fifty Years Never Looked So Good” (page 43) looks back over the past fifty years at Kellogg Junior High and Middle School. Two of my children—along with thousands of others—have walked through its doors as sixth graders, learned about academics and life and have stepped out as ninth graders more prepared for high school and the world. Past and current students, families, teachers and friends are welcome to celebrate at Kellogg on Friday, May 17. I hope you will join me for this fun community event and become a fan of Kellogg Junior High and Middle School 50th Anniversary on Facebook. As RochesterWomen magazine celebrates our 75th issue, I want to thank Rochester for embracing the magazine. I am grateful for the opportunity to own and run a business that provides me the flexibility to be a successful single mom. Thank you, Rochester, for being the kind of city I want to live and raise my children in. Although our circumstances may vary, we share the kindness, the culture of a community with love and support of a family. May God bless you and yours,

For advertising information: 507-951-2413

Jorrie L. Johnson

We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

7


n the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know Mothers of Multiples Bi-Annual

Clothing and Equipment Sale

Sat, May 4, 8 a.m. –1 p.m., Olmsted County Fairgrounds, Bldg 40 Featuring 30+ sellers, this bi-annual sale is an invaluable resource of good condition baby gear, toys, household items and clothing of all sizes (infant through adult and maternity).

Girl Scout Discovery and Sign-up Fair

Sat, May 11, 1 – 3 p.m., Camp Edith Mayo Bring your daughters out for a free afternoon of outdoor healthy living activities while learning about Girl Scouts and volunteering. For more information, contact Carolyn Gates at 288-4703 or carolyn.gates@girlscoutsrv.org or visit GirlScoutsRV.org.

Step into Summer Mother's Day Lunch Sat, May 11, 10:30 a.m., Rochester Elks Lodge Celebrate motherhood with a luncheon given by the non-profit women’s group of the Elks Lodge in honor of mothers, daughters and girls of all ages, featuring a fashion show from the Dress Barn and a raffle for local scholarships. Cost is $10 per person; registration is required by May 6. For more information, contact Elizabeth Schinigoi at 923-7158 or lizschinigoi@live.com.

Rochester Garden & Flower Club

Annual Plant Sale

May 15–16, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, Horticulture Building Wed, May 15, 4 – 7 p.m. Thu, May 16, 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Find over 150 beautiful annuals and perennials grown locally for Minnesota gardens. Proceeds benefit community service projects in the Rochester area. Admission is free. Contact Janet Jones at 545-2610 or bandj91998@yahoo.com for more information or visit rgfc.org.

Spring Fresh Art Tour

Fri–Sun, May 17–19, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Pepin and Pierce, Wis. Take this self-guided tour through 12 artists’ studios in the beautiful rolling countryside of the Lake Pepin area and the Chippewa River Valley including Wisconsin’s Great River Road, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary. For more information about the tour, contact Kitty Latané at 715-442-2419 or kittylatane@gmail.com or visit freshart.org.

26th Annual National

Cancer Survivors Day Event

Sun, June 2, 11a.m. – 2 p.m., Rochester International Event Center Cancer survivors, their families and friends are invited to a celebration of life! The “Caribbean (Care-of-being) Getaway” themed celebration will include a luncheon followed by a program to honor cancer survivors. Admission is free for cancer survivors and two guests. Additional guests are welcome to attend for a nominal fee of $5 per person. Reservations are required by May 28, 2013. For more information, call 538-6001, email: canceredprog@mayo.edu or visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/cancer-education-rst/calendar.html. 8

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

United Way of Olmsted County's Women's Leadership Council's

Power of the Purse

Tue, June 11, 10:30 a.m., Kahler Grand Hotel The 8th Annual Power of the Purse event includes the ever popular silent purse auction, the Tree of Chance and a luncheon with keynote speech by Liz Murray based on her memoir, “Breaking Night.” Tickets are $50 per person and registration is required by June 1. Contact Bonnie Schultz at 529-4830 or bonnies@uwolmsted.org or visit uwolmsted.org.

18th Annual Women’s Breast Cancer Open Golf Tournament Fri, June 14, Northern Hills Golf Course Grab a few friends and your golf clubs and head out to Northern Hills Golf Course to help raise funds for breast cancer research. Contact Mike Manahan at 281-6170 to sign up your foursome.

Ribbon Challenge Golf Benefit Fri, June 21, 11:30 a.m., The Bluffs at Coffee Mill, Wabasha Join the fun in this 18-hole, four-person scramble supporting Saint Elizabeth’s Medical Center and local cancer prevention and early detection. This benefit is open to women, men and mixed teams and will include games, prizes, raffles and auctions. The fee is $65 per person and advance registration and payment are required by June 14. For more information, visit stelizabethswabasha.org and click on ‘event calendar’ or call Jenny Schlagenhaft at 651-565-5596.

Pollination Celebration

Sat, June 22, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Cascade Meadow Wetlands & Environmental Science Center Take the kids out for a free day of fun and discovery at the Cascade Meadow Wetlands where attendees will explore the plants and animals that sweeten the world through pollination. Contact Andrew Remick at 252-8133 or info@cascademeadow.org or visit cascademeadow.org.

Save the Date! 2013 Relay For Life of Olmsted County

Fri–Sat, July 12–13, Rochester Community and Technical College Team and individual registrations due June 7, 2013. It’s not a race; it’s not a run; it is a relay to keep the fight against cancer in motion. Register as an individual or a team. Teams generally consist of 5–15 members, young and old, family, friends, coworkers, community groups. We all come together for a common cause: supporting cancer research, education, advocacy and patient services. Complete registration at www.relayforlife.org/olmstedcountymn. Contact the American Cancer Society at 424-4604 or rfl.olmsted.teams@gmail.com.


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women in leadership

Judy Hvamstad

Vice President, Administrative Officer and Human Resources Coordinator, Premier Bank Leadership Greater Rochester, Class of 2013 By Tracy Will • Photography by Fagan Studios Hometown: Blue Earth, Minn. Age: 47 Family: Husband, Scott; daughter, Erin; son-in-law, Casey; and a grandchild on the way. Starting out: I earned my bachelor's degree in business from the University of Minnesota in Waseca. Since then, I’ve worked in human resources. I love working with people. Making others a priority: I’m blessed to have the opportunity to interact with a large variety of terrific people every day from employees, managers, partners, customers and tenants to people in the community. I value each relationship. Fun part of your work? My role as the contact for charitable contributions and community events. I get to support non-profit organizations and attend many events. Unexpected part of the job? Monitoring the bank’s parking. I actually like it. It adds to the variety of my work. Learning and leading: I wanted to be part of Leadership Greater Rochester (LGR) because I was interested in becoming more involved in the community and knowing more about Rochester. LGR is a 10-month leadership development course created by the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce. I had heard from others that had gone through the course that it was a unique experience. It not only helps people learn about the community but encourages them to become stronger leaders, too. Behind the community scenes: In LGR, I have had unique opportunities to make many new connections and go behind the scenes in Rochester. Some of my favorites have been tours at Prosthetic

Laboratories, Mayo Clinic’s Foundation House and the Olmsted County Waste-to-Energy Facility. Hands-on involvement: Our LGR class community impact project involves partnering with Channel One Food Bank to build a community-based, hands-on kitchen classroom facility as part of their upcoming warehouse expansion. Why a kitchen? This generation of children may be the first to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents due to obesity, diabetes, inactivity and unhealthy eating. The kitchen will provide education, skills and local resources to empower families to make smart nutritional choices. It will also offer a variety of life-skill seminars, such as financial management and workforce preparation. Making it happen: To raise the money to build the kitchen, the class is hosting a series of fundraisers. The biggest will be “Cooking up Fun with Channel One” on May 10 at the Rochester International Event Center. Everyone is invited for food, drinks and a silent auction. Regional bands will play, and we’ll unveil the winner of our Iron Chef competition that will feature local chefs and local celebrity judges. Kindness remembered: It is so important to me to give back to my community. My father died when he was only 48. I was 12 at the time with three younger siblings. Our community reached out to us in so many ways. I’ll never forget what that meant to me. I want to pay that forward. Just for fun: My husband and I like to explore and sight-see. From picking a new Rochester bike path on weekends to taking a short drive to the beautiful Mississippi or the Twin Cities, there is never a lack of something to do in the area. A place to call home: In southeastern Minnesota, I enjoy most the beautiful landscape and friendly Minnesotans. I love the changing of the seasons. I could never leave that. This is home. However, I’m not opposed to an occasional winter tropical vacation! Words to live by? I believe involvement is the key to knowing your community’s needs and making a difference. Each of us has the power within to change someone’s day with a simple act of kindness. Tracy Will is a freelance writer who has lived and worked in the Rochester area since 1995. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

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cover story

Darcy Buntrock and her daughters Ahna (left) and Emmy (right).

Single

Motherhood Braving the battles, finding the joy By Amy Brase photography by dawn sanborn photography

T

o be a mother is to be intimately involved in something bigger than

oneself. Mothers are often attributed as

Jennifer Gangloff and her daughters Emmerson (left) and Kiki (right).

being the supportive arms that encourage a child to grow and the gentle strength that holds a family together. This is a story of three single moms: Rosemary Ptacek, Darcy Buntrock and Jennifer Gangloff. Each has a unique reason for parenting solo—whether by adoption, divorce or tragedy—but all three have overcome adversity and mothered their children exceptionally well through difficult trials.

Rosemary Ptacek (center) with six of her seven daughters (back row left to right) Rose Ann, Cecilia, Patricia, Francie (front row left to right) Margaret and Pauline. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


Rosemary Ptacek A

s a close-knit family living in a trailer home for six years, Rosemary Ptacek’s seven girls and two boys learned to share more than just meal times around the table. Cecilia, Rose Ann, Kathryn, Patricia, Pauline, Francie, Michael, Margaret and Raymond intimately shared space, routines and life with their parents. Joseph and Rosemary Ptacek felt blessed by their large family. Life was good in Preston, Minn.,…until the evening of August 12, 1976. Rose Ann and Francie had been sent on bicycles to get sweet corn and berries; Patricia was making chicken and dumplings to enjoy with iced tea. “I heard the sirens at 5:30 p.m., and my husband would have been just getting off work,” remembers Rosemary. “That’s when two police officers pulled into our driveway. They told me that my husband’s brakes had gone out on his truck, and he had been killed. It was a horrible day.” The accident forced Rosemary into single motherhood overnight. With nine children, no driver’s license, no life insurance and no income, there was hardly time for processing the intense grief. Rosemary suddenly needed to work outside of home, which she did as the head cook at Preston-Fountain High School. Margaret recalls her mother making a promise that she would keep them all together and that they’d all survive, but they would all have to help. Keeping boundaries was important; curfews had to be respected, and consequences always made an impact. “Respect and responsibility—that’s just the way things were,” says Cecilia, Rosemary’s oldest. “I always felt like we were mature young adults. It sure helped Mom after Dad was gone.” Financially, Rosemary simply put priorities first on the list. If there was any money left over, something else could be purchased. “Never once did we get food stamps, WIC or other assistance,” says her daughter Margaret. It was not uncommon to find a measuring cup next to the Lucky Charms so that there would be cereal left for the girls after the boys got up.

Lessons on love

At one point there were seven teenagers in the house, and it was one of the most challenging seasons of motherhood. “I used to sit in the front window and think there wasn’t anyone who cared a darn about me,” says Rosemary, who condensed her life to faith, family and work because there was no time for anything else. “I had to make so many decisions by myself.” While grief and fatigue could have easily defeated Rosemary (she was also diagnosed with cancer three times), she has always been quick to count her blessings: “I could have had a mess, but my kids were very good. We have always had togetherness, and I am very fortunate,” she says. “Mom always said that what got her through was her faith,” adds Cecilia. Several of the children remember that when their mom used to get frustrated or upset, the car would disappear. Margaret always found it parked in the church parking lot. To this day, Rosemary readily credits her faith and family for holding her together. Once all of her children graduated, Rosemary moved to Rochester and worked at Olmsted Medical Center for 11 years. Now retired, she enjoys reading and playing cards and solitaire on the computer. Rosemary and her nine children, along with their families, gather for holidays, themed girls’ nights and 50th birthday parties. It’s bittersweet time because there’s still an acute awareness that Dad should be in the picture, too. “On Mom’s coin purse there’s a photo of her family,” says Cecilia. “That pretty much says it all. We were her whole life—she’s so unselfish. It’s always family first.” “They think too much of me, really,” says Rosemary with a humble wave of the hand. “I just did what I thought was necessary to raise the kids to be independent. That was my main thing.” RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


Darcy Buntrock

T

here’s a loving warmth that washes over Darcy Buntrock when she thinks about her two daughters. Along with her full-time job teaching seventh and eighth-grade science in the St. Charles School District, Darcy is also a 46-year-old single mother of Ahna, 18, and Emmy, 14. Divorce is never something that young moms expect will happen to them. Darcy’s daughters were just 2 and 5 at the time. Though the divorce was challenging, Darcy remained positive for her girls and herself: “In my mind, there was a transition and realization, though. It was another whole new chapter of life.” Darcy remained busy as she assumed the role of a single mom. “There was no time for ‘woe is me,’ because we had ten minutes to get this done and that done,” she says. “I was making checklists and go, go going. There was no time to process, and suddenly a year had gone by. In some ways, keeping busy and keeping my mind occupied became a coping mechanism. But, the reality is that there were a kazillion things to do and nobody else was going to do them.” Darcy’s church supported her through the transition. “The people at Ascension Lutheran were wonderful,” says Darcy. “Faith is what made this easier than it could have been. I wouldn’t wish divorce or single parenting on anyone, but the benefits of a spiritual life are amazing.” Darcy’s faith got her through some difficult times, including her role as caregiver for both her father and mother who lived with her during their final years. “I witnessed so many modern-day miracles,” Darcy says. “My checkbook should not have made it month to month, but it did. I was the $500 winner of our hockey calendar contest at the exact right time. When the girls’ jeans were two inches too short, a great bag of donation clothes was given to me. I’ve been so much happier and accepting because of my faith. I just know we’ll be taken care of.” Like most single moms, the biggest challenge for Darcy has been finding time. “Time for myself doesn’t happen too often,” says Darcy. “I have to schedule in fun because there’s always so much to do. I tell the girls that we need a game night or movie night. One night I put the girls to bed in their pj’s and then said we were going to Dairy Queen just to be spontaneous.”

Raising women of character

Ahna and Emmy are now in high school. “They are growing up and each new stage is exciting,” says Darcy. “I look at how they’ve grown, each part of their life, and I never want it to end. But then the next part is even better! They are so much fun to be with. I love to watch them making good choices and being true to their words. They’ve had to rely on each other, and that has really made them best friends.” Darcy enjoys being with her daughters, and they gravitate toward relaxing outdoor activities like gardening, camping, hiking and biking; even yard work on their small acreage has become a hobby. Life as a single mom may not be a road paved in relaxation, but Darcy feels content as she reflects on each day. “Life is like a fine tuned orchestra,” says Darcy. “I look ahead at the day and wonder how to accomplish what needs to be done and do it well. I work hard, take someone where they need to go, do this and that. It’s comparable to the woodwinds entering, then the brass, then the strings exit and re-enter. It’s kind of messy, but at the end of the day I look back and realize that it really did go smoothly. At the end of the day, my perspective is ‘Wow! That really came together!’” RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

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Jennifer Gangloff T

here was no particular point in time when Jennifer Gangloff decided to leap into motherhood. For this mother of two girls, it was more of an evolution: “I always just assumed that at some point I would get married and become a mom.” A self-described military brat, Jennifer grew up all over the country, including several years overseas. She became a writer and editor for national and regional books and magazines. Life threw her a curveball in her early 30s when she was diagnosed with leukemia. “My plans were derailed,” recalls Jennifer, who was living in Connecticut at the time. “My initial prognosis was three to five years. When you’re given a prognosis like that, your life is put on hold and cancer becomes the priority.” Despite extensive familial and worldwide searches for a bone marrow match, none was found for Jennifer, but a new medication proved lifesaving. “It’s a type of oral chemotherapy, and it was still in clinical trials at the time,” explains Jennifer. “I was able to participate in the trials, and it became FDA approved one year after my diagnosis. Not only did it change the course of treatment for that type of leukemia, it essentially changed the course of my life.” Jennifer went into remission within a couple of months, and 13 years later she experiences only minor side effects from the medication she still takes to keep her leukemia under control. Though gifted with a new lease on life, the lifelong desire to become a mom and have a family was challenged on several levels. “I survived the prognosis, but my dating relationship did not,” Jennifer says. “Another challenge is that my oral chemotherapy is not recommended for pregnancy because it can cause birth defects. Stopping the medication is just not an option for me; I’d have a full-blown relapse.” So she looked to adoption. “I wasn’t married, and I wasn’t dating anyone, but I wondered if adoption was a possibility for me,” says Jennifer, who had friends that were adopting as single parents. Some agencies were reluctant to work with Jennifer because of her single status and cancer history—even though her prognosis had changed to a normal lifespan—but in March 2008, Jennifer became the adoptive mother of a newborn baby girl born in Utah. The next year, Jennifer decided to adopt another child, coincidentally from Utah, in December 2009.

Single parent, double duty

“There’s no one to trade [parenting] off with,” says Jennifer. “When the kids are sick, there’s nobody else to step up when I’m exhausted. There’s no one to bounce concerns off. I expected challenges, but the expectation is not the same as living the reality.” But she can’t imagine her life without her daughters Kiki, age 3, and Emmerson, age 5. Jennifer describes her life today as crazy in a good way. She just completed her master’s degree in health journalism last year. She’s not currently dating because she hasn’t had the opportunity. Her kids are the top priority for any free time she has. After that comes the typical household chores (but by herself)—everything from cleaning to taxes to fixing leaky toilets. “It’s all worth it,” says Jennifer. “I love my kids so much, and I can’t imagine them not being part of my life. They bring me so much happiness and joy. But this is also a bittersweet time because I know that two other moms made the very painful decisions that allowed me to become a parent.”

v

Ironically, the painful trials that could have ruined Rosemary, Darcy and Jennifer were catalysts that shaped them as steadfast, loving mothers. They rose up after divorce, tragedy and cancer. Surely, the best reward will be the evidence of strength and resilience reflected in their children.

18

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Amy Brase is a writer, wife and mom of three children. She loves to tell the stories of women who have overcome adversity and become more beautiful in the process.


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A perfect “10” recently voted rochester’s Best restaurant, Pescara offers you Breakfast and express Lunch for $10 - seven days a week, 365 days a year.

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Fresh Breakfast Buffet & Fresh Express Lunch So comfortable . . . Buffet Breakfast Monday - Friday 6:30 AM to 10:30 AM it’ll knock you Saturday off 7 AM to 10:30 AM & Sunday 7 AM to 2 PM your feet. Lunch Daily 11am - 3pm We’re the place to meet For all your business meetings, private parties and events, Located in the Doubletree Hotel Pescara has the talented staff ® and ideal venue to create a Stressless is a unique combination unique and memorable event for you and your guests. 150 South Broadway // 507.280.6900 // pescarafresh.com

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food

The Layered Look Indulging in color and texture as well as flavor

By Margo Stich • Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

L

ayered recipes offer an opportunity to feast first with our eyes on the visual complexities of the culinary arts before relishing the unique flavors those layers place on our palate. All restaurant chefs know this, which is why we, as consumers, see them plating everything from appetizers to desserts as architectural presentations. Now here’s your chance to try it at home. Use these recipes to create your own culinary layered looks. Take your creativity to the table in how you serve an item, such as presenting a layered salad in individual martini glasses. Layers allow you to be as creative as you want to be! RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

21


rochesterdowntownfarmersmarket.org

More Markets to Serve Our Community! Saturday Market Opens May 4, 7:30 a.m. – Noon 4th St & 4th Ave SE   Sunday Market Opens June 2, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. 4th St & 4th Ave SE   Tuesday Market Opens June 4, 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. 37th St & 9th Ave NW (Near Hy-Vee)   Thursday Market Opens June 6, 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. @ the Olmsted County History Center 1195 West Circle Dr SW

Classic American Menu Casual, Comfortable Atmosphere Serving steaks, burgers, pot roast, seafood, and salads. Local and organic food sources including Schultz Farm Organic Eggs, Organic Flour from Welcome, MN, and staples from the Wedge Co-op.

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

1340 Salem Road SW 424-3086 120 Elton Hills Drive NW 285-4991


Vegetable Terrine A dish made of layered cooked meat, fish or vegetables generally prepared in a rectangular pan and typically served cold as a side dish or main entrée. Spinach layer: One 15-oz. bag frozen chopped spinach, thawed and pressed dry with paper towel 1/2 medium onion, minced 1/4 cup half and half 1 1/2 large eggs 3/4 tsp. garlic salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1/4–1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper (optional to add zip) Mushroom layer: 12 oz. fresh mushrooms, trimmed and cleaned 1 1/2 Tbsp. butter generous 1/3 cup onion, chopped 1 Tbsp. dry sherry (optional) scant 1/2 tsp. salt scant 1/2 tsp. pepper 1 1/2 large eggs, lightly beaten 3 Tbsp. dry bread crumbs Carrot layer: 1 pound fresh carrots, sliced and cooked 1 large egg 1 Tbsp. half and half 1 tsp. dried dill weed 3/4 tsp. salt scant 1/2 tsp. ground ginger Combine spinach layer ingredients in food processor or blender then firmly pack mixture evenly into the bottom of a greased 8x4-inch loaf pan. Clean the food processor. For mushroom layer, finely chop mushrooms in clean food processor; sauté onion in butter in large skillet for one minute then add mushrooms. Cook till limp and onion is translucent but not browned. Stir in sherry, if using; cook mushrooms until all liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. Add salt, pepper, eggs and bread crumbs. Spoon over spinach layer, patting until flat. For carrot layer, puree all ingredients together in cleaned food processor. Spread evenly over mushroom layer. Set pan inside a larger, water-filled pan. Heat the oven to 325°F and bake for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Terrine is done when firm. Remove from oven, cool for 15 minutes, then run knife around edges before inverting on serving plate. Slice and serve cold or warm with French bread or crackers as an appetizer or on a lettuce leaf as a side salad or first course. Serves 8 to 10.

Carrot-Ginger Sandwich Spread This makes a great spread for roast beef sandwiches. 1/3 cup grated carrots 2 Tbsp. finely chopped green onion 1/2 cup mayonnaise

3/4 tsp. minced, fresh ginger 1/2 tsp. soy sauce

1/2 tsp. sugar Stir together all ingredients to blend well. Refrigerate, covered, up to one week. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

23


Layered Pasta Salad 3/4 cup uncooked small elbow or shell macaroni

1cup shredded mild cheddar cheese

2 tsp. olive oil

3/4 cup mayonnaise

2 cups shredded lettuce

7 Tbsp. sour cream

1 cup slivered ham

1 tsp. dried basil

2 hard-cooked eggs, sliced

2 Tbsp. sliced green onions

One 10 oz. bag frozen green peas, thawed and drained

1/2 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. pepper

Cook macaroni according to package directions; drain, then rinse with water, and drain again. Toss macaroni with the oil to lightly coat. Spread lettuce in bottom of a large salad bowl or individual stemmed glassware, then in separate layers add the macaroni, ham, egg slices, peas and cheese. Combine mayonnaise and remaining ingredients; mix well. Spread evenly on top of the cheese layer, sealing to edge of the bowl. Cover tightly and chill at least 12 hours. Normally, this salad would be tossed gently before serving, but to preserve the layered look do not mix before serving. Serves 8 to 10.

Carrot Cake

This recipe was given to Editor Marlene Petersen by her grandmother and is reputed to have been based on the carrot cake at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago at one time.

2 cups flour

1 tsp. salt

1 3/4 cups sugar

4 eggs

2 tsp. baking soda

1 cup canola oil

1/4 cup softened butter

1 Tbsp. cinnamon

4 c ups finely shredded carrots (about 1 pound of fresh carrots shredded in food processor)

1/2 tsp. vanilla

1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg pinch of ground cloves

Frosting: 8 oz. cream cheese

3 cups powdered sugar

1/2 cup high-quality apricot preserves Heat the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour three 8-inch round baking pans. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, clove and salt. In a separate mixing bowl, beat eggs until frothy. Slowly add the oil to the eggs while beating. At low speed, beat in flour mixture. The batter will be much thicker than normal cake batter. By hand, mix in shredded carrots. Divide batter evenly into prepared pans, and bake for 20–25 minutes. Cool 10 minutes in pans, then remove from pans and place on a cooling rack. For the frosting, beat cream cheese, butter and vanilla until fluffy. Slowly beat in sugar until incorporated then beat on high speed until smooth. Frosting may be slightly thinner than regular decorator’s frosting but will firm with refrigeration. To assemble, put first layer on cake plate. With a decorator’s bag, pipe a line of frosting along the edge of the layer and spread apricot preserves on this layer. The frosting will help hold the preserves in place. Top with second layer; pipe with frosting and add preserves. Top with the third layer and frost the entire cake with remaining frosting. Refrigerate until serving. Serves 12. Recipe courtesy of Margaret J. Boyer.

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


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how to

food

Gnocchi By Margo Stich Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

G

nocchi (pronounced no-key) are little potato dumplings that can be served as a side dish with a simple sauce, herbed oils/butters or turned into an elegant main entrée. Meticulous preparation is required, so we spent a morning in Pescara restaurant’s kitchen with Chef Tony Pester learning how to “do it right!”

Special Equipment: Ricer or tamis (a round metal kitchen utensil with small holes through which ingredients are strained by pushing them through the holes with a scraper or pestle).

4 1

BASIC POTATO GNOCCHI Servings: about nine entrées

14 large russet Idaho potatoes 1 pound all-purpose flour (do not substitute bread flour) 1 cup egg yolks (about 16 eggs) 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese (properly shredded fresh works best or purchase a pre-grated style) 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 3 Tbsp. kosher salt

1 2 3 4 5 26

Heat oven to 350° F. Wash and pierce the potatoes with a fork, then bake 60 minutes or until cooked through (never boil; water is the “enemy” of good gnocchi dough). Cool them enough to handle, then score lengthwise with a knife and squeeze them to release steam (this prevents the potato’s starch from over-developing).  nce completely cooled, “rice” the potatoes by placing a small portion of the O potatoes into the ricer or tamis. Pull the ricer handle down (if there is one) or use a scraper or pestle to push the potatoes through the small holes of the ricer. Repeat until all potatoes have been riced. Although time consuming, never skip this step or mash the potatoes; ricing outcome impacts the final texture of the gnocchi—strands shouldn’t be too fine or too thick.  efrigerate riced potatoes on a sheet pan. Once cold, combine them with the R flour by squeezing with your hands as if you were “choking” the potatoes and flour together. Once combined, add remaining ingredients together.  ork the dough with your hands until the deep yellow of the yolks is fully W incorporated to an even color throughout. Dust the dough with flour, then place on a floured surface. Shape into a loaf then cut into four equal portions. Roll each portion into a ball; wrap in plastic wrap, and chill 30 minutes.

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

2

3

6 7

5 6

8

6

7 8

 ith a light-touch kneading motion, work one portion at a W time on a floured surface. Do not use heavy pressure as when kneading bread. Fold, knead gently, then turn 90 degrees. Repeat until dough is a soft, airy consistency. Roll the portion into a strand the width of a man’s thumb, then cut into sections to form small squares (remember these will swell when boiled). Lightly roll squares in flour to dust all surfaces.  ring six cups of water to boil; add 1 ounce olive oil. Turn down B heat slightly, then add gnocchi. Water temperature will drop just after adding the gnocchi, so briefly turn up heat, then turn down to hold at a simmer.  ircle a spoon around the inner edge of the pot to create a C whirlpool effect. Simmer about 1½–2 minutes until gnocchi are floating, then remove with a slotted spoon to a rimmed sheet pan and toss gently with olive oil to coat. Plate with your favorite sauce and enjoy, or cool and place in a sealed container in the refrigerator or freezer for later.

Margo Stich is the RochesterWomen food editor and wishes to thank Pescara and Chef Tony Pester for his wonderful instruction. Try Pescara's new gnocchi dish.


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RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

27


food

Seasons of the Vine BY MARGO STICH

Margo Stich, food editor

Not My Parents' Wine F

orty years ago France produced the finest wines in the world. In the late 70s wines from Germany and Italy were popular with French, Italian and a few Spanish wines were the only wines Americans—Liebfraumilch, which was made primarily for export Americans really knew at that time. My parents drank cheap Burgundy (to appease the American pallet; few Germans would touch that) and or mixed drinks and “highballs.” When I went onto college I entered the Lambrusco (a best seller from Italy). In the 80s, varied new varietals realm of Boone’s Farm (“graduating” since). and wine blends began to appear. In decades since, wines have continOne of the true turning points worldwide was the Judgment of Paris ued to evolve with sales rising overall. (a/k/a The Paris Wine Tasting of 1976), which placed top-quality Consumers today have access to a wide range of wine styles. Californian Chardonnays and Cabernet Sauvignons in competitive Wine club memberships have emerged. Visiting wineries has blind tastings against France’s great Burgundies and Bordeaux reds. become a form of destination travel with consumers getting to know People were shocked when a California wine ranked top in each producers. Haddad also believes that interest in wine has risen partly category (the 1973 Chateau Montelena Napa Valley Chardonnay and due to well-informed wine distributors who passionately strive to the 1973 Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars S.L.V. Napa Valley Cabernet Sauviexplain their product. gnon). This triumph sparked a new era of wine. So “Cheers to you, Mom Oregon m and Dad” as I savor my Oreg gon Pinot Pinnot o “Domestically California was all previous generations thought of Noirs and Argentine Malbecs! ecs! when it came to wine, especially for us here in the Midwest,” notes Tom The 70s saw the creationn of of “pop p wine” wiine” w i when, when, wh h in in 1969, 19 96 69, 9, Haddad of Andy’s Liquor who’s been in the industry for 40 years. He is pop op into int ntto wine n with with the the releasee th Ernest Gallo put some real pop quick to point out that Washington and Oregon followed with hereaf he reeaf afte afte ter, alcoholic-flavored alc lccoh o ollic ic-fl -flav avor o ed d fifizzy zzy zz of Boone’s Farm Apple. TThereafter, notable wines. “And who ever would have thought that wine: rds Wild d Irish sh R sh ose, G yp psyy R osee a nd drinks like Richards Rose, Gypsy Rose and A I makers in Australia, Chile and Argentina could make decent, if eared to o lure lur u e soda so oda a pop pop p drinkers d dri rink rink ri nkerrs inn a nnew ew ew Silver Satin appeared TRIV ho could cou ould ould ld forget fo orrge rge g t the tthhe Riunite Riu iunite ittee ssong ong ffr on rom om direction. And who from not actually good wine.” ic sso ice, o ni nnice!” icee!” the 80s: “Riunite onn ic

UPCOMING EVENTS/TOURS: May 19, Winery Trolley Tour, 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Enjoy bluff scenery and stunning views of the Mississippi as this winery trolley tour visits three bluff country wineries: River View Vineyard & Winery, Seven Hawks and Garvin Heights. Lunch on your own in LaCrosse. For more information, visit rochestermntours.com.

NEWS FROM AREA WINERIES Photos courtesy of Jorrie Johnson

May 25–26, Top the Barrel, 12–5 p.m. Sample wines from the cask at member wineries along the Three Rivers Wine Trail. For more information, visit threeriverswinetrail.com. June 1–2, June Bloom Wine Event, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Sample fine wine, cider and food from wineries on the Great River Road Wine Trail. For more information, visit greatriverroadwinetrail.org/events/junebloom.html. June 22–23, Three Rivers Wine Trail Annual Wine and Art Crawl, 12–5 p.m. Enjoy great local wine and exciting local art at five wineries on the trail: Cannon River Winery, Falconer Vineyards, St. Croix Vineyards, Northern Vineyards and Winehaven Winery. Complete your wine trail passport for a complimentary glass of wine. For more information, visit threeriverswinetrail.com. June 23, Winery Trolley Tour, 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Enjoy wine and art in park as this winery trolley tour journeys to Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery in Spring Valley and then to Lanesboro for the annual “Arts in the Park.” For more information, visit rochestermntours.com. May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery in Spring Valley recently won a gold medal for their 2012 Marquette at the 2013 Finger Lakes International Wine Competition. A total of 3,500 wines from all 50 states and 20 countries entered this year’s competition. Four Daughters’ Edelweiss, Sparkling Moscato, Marechal Foch and Brianna wines also scored well. For a complete listing of results, visit fliwc.com/results/2013results.asp.


Sunny Summer Whites are in season! Stop in for “Wine-Down” Wednesdays • half-price on all bottles every Wednesday starting at 4 pm! • dine in only (not valid with other coupons or discounts)

4040 28th St. NW 507.252.9400 www.NorthMrPizza.com

Rochester Women

May June 2012 ~ Proof Acceptance Please Read Carefully

This proof is submitted to ensure the accuracy of your order. We exercise reasonable care to avoid errors, but the customer is responsible for the final decision with this order, and assumes full responsibility. Clearly mark any corrections. We are not responsible for errors not indicated at this time. Author’s alterations may be chargeable after the second proof at a cost of $25 for each additional proof. Note: The color you view on your monitor or laser proof will not be exact to what we print. Color accuracy of laser proofs and PDF files AINT are at the mercy of the medium.

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From the desk of Rue Wiegand graphics@rwmagazine.com • Must dial area code (507) 216-6233

Rock the Vine Music Festival June 8th Details and registration: www.uwolmsted.org/pop or call 507-287-2000

Wine Meets Art Festival August 10th and 11th

S TILLWATER • 651- 430- 3310 • S C V W I N E S . C O M RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

29


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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Locally Grown Food, Art and Music

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e suit

nti-natur C. G.’s a

food

Confessions of a Novice Shroomer Hunting the elusive morel mushroom By C. G. Worrell

Photos courtesy of C.G. Worrell.

W

hen my foodie friend Doug insisted on a spring visit to Minnesota, I was floored: “You wanna fly all the way from Chicago to hunt mushrooms?” “Yeah. Morels taste better than truffles.” “But that means hiking through . . . nature,” I replied. “C’mon, it’ll be fun.” “What’s so fun about poison ivy?” Nevertheless, I agreed to his request. Morel mushrooms are prized for the rich, earthy flavor they impart to meat and rice dishes. Unfortunately, they only grow in the wild. For three short weeks in May, these culinary treasures burst through the forest floor like pale, tan Smurfs. Mushroom hunters of France use trained pigs to unearth truffles. This luxury doesn’t exist for morels; they must be hunted with the naked eye. To ensure success, we needed a guide. I called my buddy Laura—the only “shroomer” I knew: “Hey, can we tag along the next time you go morel hunting?” “Uh . . . it’s been really dry,” she hedged. “Might end up being a bad season.” Shroomers are notoriously territorial, but I knew Laura’s weakness. “If you take us, I’ll give you a quart of homemade limoncello.” Seconds passed in silence. Should I up the ante? “Okay,” she resigned, “but don’t expect me to share what I find.” Sheesh! It’s like panning for gold. We waited for prime conditions: lilacs in full bloom, rain followed by a warm spell . . . Jupiter aligned with Mars. In early May, mushroom chatter finally hit the blogs, and we drove to Whitewater State Park. Doug wore rugged rock-climbing pants and boots. Laura donned a sporty tracksuit

and sneakers. I pulled on my custom-designed “anti-nature suit.” They laughed. I didn’t care. At Laura’s first secret site, we spritzed on insect repellent and plunged into a thicket of trees—and mosquitoes. I lagged behind, hacking at the wet underbrush with a snake stick. My bee hat made it difficult to see anything. Laura circled a dead elm. “Dang it!” she grumbled. “We’re too late for these babies.” Two fat morels sat at the base, disintegrating into boogery slime. So we motored farther down the road. Doug picked two creeping ticks from his neck while I sat in the backseat, scratching my legs. Stinging nettle had breached my anti-nature suit. At the second location, Laura and Doug dove into another thicket as I hacked through more soggy underbrush. Up ahead Laura chuckled, “There you are my pretty!” Forgetting about snakes, I scrambled to reach her. Laura knelt by a stump, parting the weeds. There stood a five-inch beige mushroom in a blaze of honeycombed glory. Twenty yards away Doug hollered, “Shroom!” With new motivation, I yanked off my stupid bee hat and raced to more dead trees. Over 15 minutes, I found clustering orange mushrooms, sheet-like bracken and plenty of stinging nettle but no morels. I scratched my behind all the way to the car. East of Elba, we bounced along a rutted dirt road. Dead elms beckoned like sultry sirens from either side. We parked and scattered in another dim, wet copse.

Laura hollered, “Shroom!” from 10 yards away, and five seconds later Doug whooped in triumph, too. I was beginning to feel kind of desperate, like the girl who still hasn’t been asked to prom. To my right sat a rotten stump. I poked around its weedy base with my stick. Nothing. Discouraged, I squatted. In perfect stillness I scanned the leaf litter beneath a downed branch. That’s when I saw it . . . a mighty morel standing tall on a bed of moneywort! I plucked this treasure from the earth and yodeled, “Shroom!” Laura and Doug stopped their search to coo over my precious fungus baby. Having landed in a “hot zone,” we combed the glen hollering, “Shroom!” every five minutes. My heart sang! There’s something therapeutic about foraging for food in the wild. We had nettle stings, thorny scratches and mosquito bites, but we also had three For recipes pounds of morels! and shrooming C. G. Worrell is a freelance writer and local veterinarian at Heritage Pet Hospital.

information (including how to distinguish true morels from toxic imposters), visit thegreatmorel.com.

RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

31


home

Tiptoe Through

the

Tulips

Gorgeous garden spaces for outdoor living By Trish Amundson • Photos courtesy of Suzanne Dinusson

E

legantly framing her family’s residence, Suzanne Dinusson’s gardens represent nature’s abundance with blooming perennials, textured foliage and colorful annuals. There, Suzanne hosts a variety of activities such as intimate get-togethers, bridal showers and birthday, graduation and retirement parties. These welcoming garden spaces reflect her and her home and are a haven for her family and guests.

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


Forging a plan “My gardens first evolved when we remodeled our home 16 years ago,” says Suzanne. “We were telling some friends that we needed to get some shrubs, and they mentioned Garten Marketplatz.” The Dinussons visited local perennial farms and obtained recommendations for a landscape design based on various considerations such as shade, water flow, privacy, texture, beauty and even deer. After formulating a design, Suzanne began choosing plants including hydrangeas, hostas, impatiens and roses for her first garden. She now has 10 different gardens. These well-designed outdoor living spaces are an extension of the Dinusson home, where large windows overlook the plush and vibrant grounds. The exterior spaces blend with the home’s interior design and feature similar colors and floral patterns. Curvy, soft floral shapes and a natural cottage look flow throughout both—from the design of heirloom place settings to flower arrangements to a landscaped patio that functions as an outdoor dining room. “We really like being outdoors, and we eat all of our meals outside unless it’s pouring rain,” says Suzanne. The gardens include interesting designs and elements that add privacy as well as winding pathways and terraced flowerbeds of rich tones and lush vegetation. Greenery spills over the edges of decorative pots, flower borders and vine-filled arbors, while ornamental wrought-iron gates, decorative fences, birdbaths and statuary are delightful landscape additions. Quiet patio spaces soothe the soul while wicker furniture and a white wooden glider provide a place to relax.

RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

33


A garden for every party

The Dinussons generously host community members in their gardens, including approximately 500 guests during the 2012 Rochester Garden and Flower Club Annual Garden Tour. Suzanne also donates garden luncheons and dinners as fundraising event prizes to local charities. She enhances the al fresco dining experience at these events by serving different courses in different gardens or by including natural, special touches. “When I’m creating a menu for a special party—friends for dinner or a non-profit luncheon—I incorporate products from the [Rochester] Farmers Market and from nature, such as herbs from a garden, decorative flowers on the plates and a fragrant bouquet on the table,” explains Suzanne. Suzanne tends to her gardens herself and doesn’t mind working up a sweat keeping them in shape, especially when she can enjoy and share the wonderful results. “My gardens are an extension of who I am,” says Suzanne. “They are bright and colorful—and full of beauty and grace. They have a subtle sense of structure, which screens and adds privacy to create living spaces, flowing together like well-planned rooms in a home.” Trish Amundson is a Rochester-area freelance writer and trial-and-error gardener.

34 May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


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2/18/13 RWmagazine.com May/June 20137:06 AM 35


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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


home

All Decked Out A guide to decking from a local company that has been selling lumber for 98 years By Penny MArshall • Photography by Mike Hardwick photography

In 1915

former Iowan H.J. Kruse built a business in Rochester that would, over the course of 98 years, outlast a host of independent competitors. Originally known as Kruse Lumber and Coal, the family-owned store has successfully evolved and continues to operate under the philosophy of its founder: Succeed by offering service and products that are a fair deal to the customer. “We’re not the least expensive but we’re competitive,” says Brian Hodge, current president of Kruse Lumber and son of Harold Hodge who bought the company in 1963 with business partner Harold Payne. “We have lots of experience; we know our products and our service will back that up,” adds Hodge. With such a reputable history in the industry and community, Kruse Lumber was an easy choice for a consultant when we wanted to know more about how to pick out decking. Want to know the pros/ cons of composite decking material over natural wood? Which one is greener and lasts longer? Check out our chart on pages 38–39. Penny Marshall is a freelance writer from Rochester.

Kruse Lumber,

15 as Kruse

founded in 19

oal, as it appe Lumber and C

nd ared in or arou

RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

the 1920s.

37


What the Deck?

Natural wood

So many deck choices! How do you know which type is best for your project? Here is a small sampling of common decking materials and their pros and cons to help you decide.

Pressure Treated How much do the boards cost per linear foot?* (Price does not include deck installation, hardware, railings or other materials.)

$.70–$1 per linear foot

Cedar

Redwood $1–$2 per linear foot

 $4 and up per linear foot

How long will it last?

15–20 years (approx.)

15–20 years (approx.)

15–20 years (approx.)

How durable is it?

Moderately scratch resistant

Scratches and dents easily

Scratches and dents easily

What are my style options?

One style that can be stained or painted in any color.

One style that can be stained or painted in any color.

One style that can be stained or painted in any color.

Clean yearly with deck What are the maintenance After installation, must dry one Clean yearly with deck year before staining; clean cleaner; strip and restain every cleaner; strip and restain requirements? yearly with deck cleaner; strip 1–3 years. every 1–3 years. and restain every 1–3 years.

How are boards installed?* Screw into joist with

traditional, coated deck screws. (Deck screws

Screw into joist with traditional, coated deck screws. (Deck screws

Screw into joist with traditional, coated deck screws. (Deck screws

$.20–$.34 per square foot.)

$.20–$.34 per square foot.)

$.20–$.34 per square foot.)

What is it made of?

100% natural wood treated with chemicals that require specific disposal. Contact Olmsted County Recycling Center, 507-328-7070.

100% natural wood

100% natural wood

What else do I need to know?

Inexpensive, absorbs less heat, not many options for rails

Unique grain/texture only real wood has, absorbs less heat, good for the “weathered” look

Limited availability, unique grain/texture only real wood has, doesn’t absorb a lot of heat

*Cost approximate April 2013

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Source: Kruse Lumber


Composite

TimberTech ®

NOTE: There are many different manufacturers and grades of composite decking. We've chosen to analyze the merits of the two industry leaders.

Trex ®

$  3–$5 per linear foot

$3– $4 per

linear foot

25+ years

25+ years

(warranty varies by product line)

(warranty varies by product line)

Highly scratch resistant

Highly scratch resistant

(durability varies by product line)**

(durability varies by product line)**

20+ styles/finishes

12+ styles/finishes

Clean yearly with soap and water.

Clean yearly with soap and water.

Screw into joist with concealed fasteners.

Screw into joist with concealed fasteners.

(TimberTech fasteners $1 per square foot.)

(Trex fasteners $.56–$1 per square foot.)

51% recycled wood and 49% virgin polymers

95% recycled wood and plastics and 5% bonding agents and color pigmentation

XLM line is 100% PVC No new wood is used.

No new wood is used.

TimberTech started in 1997. "TimberTech uses 107 million pounds of post industrial wood flour and post consumer plastic annually to make TimberTech products." — timbertech.com

Formed in 1995, Trex prides itself on annually recycling 300 million pounds each of used polyethylene and hardwood sawdust, materials that would normally end up in a landfill. www.trex.com

** Durability, quality and warranties can vary even within a brand name from retailer to retailer, so before choosing your decking, be sure you have thoroughly researched the specific line you wish to buy so it will perform to your expectations. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

39


after

home

after

after

CONTRACTOR: Custom Retaining Walls

HOMEOWNERS: Dick and Evelyn Berger

SUBCONTRACTORS:

T

aking the plunge of putting in a pool was something that Dick and Evelyn Berger had thought about many times over the years. “We always wanted a swimming pool, but I loved the landscaping and my Eastern Redbud trees were so beautiful that we kept putting it off,” says Evelyn, whose landscape would 40

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Remodeling a steeply-sloped hillside to incorporate a pool. have to be completely remodeled—including removing her favorite trees—to accommodate a pool. After several unseasonably hot summers, the Bergers started thinking more seriously about changing their landscape not only for refreshment from the stifling elements but to add more recreational space as well.

Thatcher Pool and Spa GNS Fence Chosen Valley Electric

“My husband likes to swim laps, and swimming is something we can do recreationally as we age,” she explains. The fact that the Bergers’ yard nests on a steeply-sloped hillside presented some extraordinary deviations from the typical pool installation, such as the need for a massive retaining wall that required special engineering to keep everything in place.

Photos courtesy of Custom Retaining Walls.

PROJECT: By Penny Marshall

ABOVE: To accommodate the Bergers’ pool and the steeply-sloping hill, Custom Retaining Walls built a 76-foot-long by 16-foot-high retaining wall.


For years Evelyn Berger hesitated to remodel her outdoor space because it meant losing the Eastern Redbud trees she loved.

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during The Bergers knew there would be challenges but put their trust in the professionals who know their trade.

“After consulting with an engineer, we basically stabilized the earth using a geogrid [a geosynthetic soil reinforcement] with the retaining wall blocks to stabilize the soil behind the wall,” explains Clint Ernst, president of Custom Retaining Walls, who built the wall needed for the Bergers’ pool. “You could take the face of the 76-foot-long by 16-foot-high retaining wall down and the grid would be standing in place.” Living and entertaining al fresco at the Bergers’ is enhanced by their vista overlooking one of the fairways of the

Rochester Golf & Country Club. “It’s so beautiful in the evening enjoying the lush greenery and watching the deer. Our favorite, though, is watching the sunset,” says Evelyn. Although the project wasn’t completed until last September, Evelyn says they’re already getting so much enjoyment from their new outdoor space and look forward to entertaining poolside this season. Penny Marshall is a freelance writer from Rochester.

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41


community

Fifty Years Never Looked So Good Kellogg Middle School celebrates the half-century mark By Debi Neville • Photography by Fagan Studios

T

he doors of Frank B. Kellogg Middle School in northeast Rochester first opened in late fall 1962 to a flood of seventh through ninth grade students. Known then as Kellogg Junior High, the building was designed for 1,200 students on 17 acres and built for only $13.81 per square foot (which included cost of equipment). Tucked into a wooded hill, it still glistens inside and out and is now home to about 900 students grades six through eight. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

43


Photos courtesy of Kellogg Middle School.

Kellogg Junior High (as it was known then) under construction, winter 1962.

REMEMBERING THE PAST “I was just a young teacher when I took a position here, at Kellogg,” recalls Karen Larsen, a retired classroom teacher and counselor. “I love Kellogg—it’s like my second family.” Having been part of the staff from 1970 to 2002, walking the halls brings back some astute observations for Larsen. “We used to have a pretty small staff. The inclusion of special education brought an abundance of additional teachers and paraprofessionals,” she recalls. “Technology was the second biggest change I saw. My goodness, we never even had a phone capable of dialing out of the building when I started here. Now there’s a multitude of technological advances to use and deal with.” Much has changed, but some things remain constant. “Overall, kids are still kids. You have to love them,” Larsen notes with a smile. Meghan Peterson attended Kellogg and graduated from Century High School in 2009. Now a math major at Gustavus Adolphus College, she is student teaching at Mayo High School. “When I think back on my years at Kellogg, one word comes to mind: friends,” Peterson says. “I made good, lifelong friends. Who was Everyone was friendly—my Frank B. Kellogg? fellow students, the teachers (1856-1937) and staff. It was a terrific • Self-taught lawyer, politician experience which has inspired and statesman who called me to become a teacher.” Rochester home Peterson remembers a • Rochester city, then Olmsted sense of community, doing County, attorney class projects as a team, • Appointed by President working on the yearbook Theodore Roosevelt to the and playing in the orchestra Justice Department (something she hopes will • President of the National never be omitted by Bar Association budget cuts). • United States Senator “I know budget cuts have • Secretary of State under created a different curriculum, President Calvin Coolidge but quality in education will • Winner of the 1929 Nobel always be a priority, I believe, Peace Prize for the at Kellogg.” Kellogg-Briand Pact Continued on page 46. 44

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


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Check out www.discoverWaseca.com/visitors 1-888-9WASECA or 507-835-3260

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Helping to care for your loved one with memory loss. Balancing the demands of life can be challenging. Caring for a loved one with memory loss may be overwhelming. At Cottagewood Senior Communities, we understand and are here to assist you with this difficult transition. Our focus is to enrich our residents’ lives by providing meaningful activities while maintaining their dignity and respect. Our personalized care plans ensure your loved one’s needs are met, giving you peace of mind. To learn more about our Memory Care Community or to schedule a tour, please call 507-286-8528.

Enriching Lives. Supporting Families. 507-286-8528 | 4220 55th Street, NW

RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

45


CELEBRATING THE PRESENT Eighth-grader Zakia Moore loves being a Kellogg Middle School student. “I look forward to school each day. It’s a pleasant building, clean and bright. That’s important. Kellogg has a positive atmosphere. We are pushed to do well, and the students and teachers are really friendly,” says Zakia. Zakia’s favorite subject is English, and she likes the relatively small class sizes. “I think there are about 30 kids in most of my classes. We are pretty competitive with other schools our size,” she says. You can hear the pride in Teresa Fox’s voice while sitting in her English classroom chatting about “today’s” Kellogg Middle School: “I’ve taught here for 12 years, and I think we do a great job of keeping up to date with technological changes, developments in philosophy of education, parental involvement—all the elements which make a good education,” explains Fox. Today’s student body reflects more children living at the poverty level and more with English as a second language, which Fox sees as a challenge for everyone. “Kellogg has a great parent group,” she adds. “It’s very important to involve parents in their children’s education. We are able to correspond via email directly with the parents, and they can check in at any time and see how their Kellogg student is doing.” Co-teaching is something that is now available, and Fox readily sings its praises: “By having a reading teacher, for instance, in the classroom co-teaching with me, kids are not pulled out of the class for help. And all the students benefit from that specialized assistance.” Eighth-grader Zakia Moore and retired teacher Karen Larsen review a lesson at present-day Kellogg Middle School.

BIG BIRTHDAY BASH Bruce Rodgers, eighth-grade social studies teacher and 50th Anniversary Committee chairman, was planning to celebrate the milestone birthday with a little get-together on Friday, May 17. “I’m afraid I’ve created a bit of a monster,” he says with a laugh. “I sent out a few feelers [about the event], and people are coming from all over the United States. Now, it involves an all-out social hour and dinner for retirees paid for by the Rochester Teacher’s Association. The public is invited to an open house—we will have the National Guard representatives here, dignitaries are sending messages of congratulations, there’s a live band, old videos and the library is being turned into a museum.” The walk-down-memory-lane celebration is being supported entirely by private donations and will include the opportunity to peruse old annuals, newspaper clippings, pictures and awards. Connecting with old friends and swapping stories of “back when” will mix well with new students and staff, says Rodgers. Guests will even get a sneak peek at a 2013 capsule Kellogg is assembling. “Rochester has changed so much,” says Rodgers. “When this building was built, we were on the northern border of Rochester. I think Kellogg Middle School represents how well people and institutions can adapt and reflect change and still look pretty darn good.” Debi Neville is a Rochester freelance writer who loves finding historical details all around us.

Current students practice dancing in gym class.

46

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com


ROCHESTER CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

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RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

47


Drive ol carpo ay d s Tue

healthy living

Taking a Mental Health Break Slowing down and finding coping strategies in a frenetic world By Michelle Kubitz

I

magine the carefully organized chaos of your typical day—the balancing act of commitments and loved ones, crossing off items on the never-ending-to-do list. Couple that with our increased connectedness to the world around us. Is it any wonder that all of these factors can make a person anxious? But what if your anxiety doesn’t let up? According to the National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI), “one in four adults – approximately 57.7 million Americans – experience a mental health disorder in a given year.” Although there is a biological component to mental health issues, some of the changes and feelings that impact people are situational (i.e., divorce, career change, coping with the loss of a loved one) and commonly involve issues like generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, general depression and adjustment disorders, according to Heather Geerts, LICSW and Clinical Director at Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center. The good news? Many of these issues can be resolved through “short-term, brief interventional therapy,” says Geerts. The bad news? Many times, women wait too long to address these issues. “Be preemptive so it doesn’t spiral (into something more serious),” Geerts advises.

Stress: not just a mind game Beyond the psychological strain that mental health issues can cause, anxiety, stress and depression can also wreak havoc on your physical wellbeing. “When people are stressed, it impacts many other systems in their body,” explains Kathryn Amundson, Ph.D, LISCW at Associates in Psychiatry and Psychology. “We become more 48

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

t tis en d nts ke me Ma int o p ap

Create

presen

draft

tation of upc oming market ing plan

r Answe rom f email h c chur ittee comm

susceptible to illness because it affects our immune system. Excessive worry raises our cortisol (stress hormone) levels over longer periods of time causing more wear and tear on the body.” Sometimes therapists see where past traumas are “stored” in the body, for example, recurring back pains when remembering a car crash. “If we don’t attend to it in our mental health, our body tells the story in another way,” says Cindy Finch, MSW, LGSW at Highland Meadows Counseling Center, LLC. It is important to address these issues before they become serious problems.

Overcoming the stigma “We’re here if you need us,” adds Finch. “You go to the doctor when you are sick; you talk to friends when you are lonely. Therapy is actually a way to take care of yourself.” However, going to a therapist and seeking help takes a lot of trust and involves people traveling out of their comfort zone. “Something I see as exceptionally important is to be educated [about mental health issues] so you know where to go, know what to do, and know how to navigate the mental health care system,” says Courtney Lawson, Executive Director of NAMI (National Alliance for Mental Illness) Southeast Minnesota. “Therapists are able to provide new techniques and a different way of looking at the situation. This frees up the person to utilize his/her own strengths to move forward,” Amundson adds. “People often overcome their trepidation of therapy when they find a therapist who takes the time to listen to them and provide an environment of acceptance, possibility for change, and hope.”

Wait! Did I

remember to get the frosting for that cake?!

nch Fix lu

es!

What are we going to

have f or dinn er?

Consider seeking the advice of a mental health practitioner if you start displaying any of these symptoms: • Feelings of sadness/unhappiness • Irritability or frustration, even over small matters • Loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities • Feelings of worthlessness/guilt, fixating on past failures or blaming yourself when things aren't going right • Changes in appetite (including decreased or increased appetite), unintended weight loss or increased food cravings or weight gain • Insomnia or excessive sleeping • Agitation or restlessness (i.e., pacing, hand-wringing, inability to sit still); • Irritability or angry outbursts • Slowed thinking, speaking or body movements • Indecisiveness, distractibility and decreased concentration • Fatigue, tiredness and loss of energy (especially when small tasks require a lot of effort) • Reduced sex drive • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions, remembering things • Frequent thoughts of death, dying or suicide • Crying spells for no apparent reason • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches


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Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. Ameriprise Financial cannot guarantee future financial results. © 2013 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

49


When to seek child or adolescent therapy So how does a parent or caregiver differentiate common growing pains from something more serious?

Consider the following behaviors: •Refusing to attend or declining performance in school •Feelings of hopelessness •Extreme irritability •Alcohol or drug abuse •Acts of bullying or being bullied

Expressing feelings in their own language Adolescent and child therapy

F

rom play therapy to teaching adolescents coping skills to succeed in their daily lives, the modern world has many solutions for children who may grapple with mental health issues. A lot of media attention is focused on adolescent mental health issues that require medication. But at Highland Meadows Counseling Center—where the majority of patients are 11-25 years old—a lot of issues that drive teenagers to seek help are problems that might be familiar to anyone who survived high school. “One of the common issues is with social interactions, whether that be with their classmates or parents,” explains Amy Carey, MSW, LGSW. “Or romantic relationships,” adds Cindy Finch, MSW, LGSW. “There are a lot of teens who feel that they can’t keep up with their parents’ expectations,” says Mandy Hyland. “Or society’s expectations,” Carey chimes in. This causes anxiety. While therapy serves as a sounding board for teenagers, there is also a teaching component. Sometimes, teenagers just need to hear advice and learn positive coping skills from someone other than their parents. “I often say to parents, there are many things I’ll say to your child that you’ve said a thousand times, but they’ll listen to me because it’s not you,” explains Sarah Stelzner, MSW, LICSW. Some of the negative coping skills that the therapists at Highland Meadows see from teenagers include self-harm, chemical abuse and engaging in dangerous relationships.

50

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

“We look at how these coping skills work in the short term,” Stelzner says. “But what is the damage to them in the long term?” These coping skills—thinking through a situation before reacting and replacing harmful behaviors with healthy ones—are building blocks that teenagers will be able to utilize in the future and in adulthood.

Actions speak louder than words What works for adolescents and adults when seeking therapy doesn’t necessarily work for younger children, so therapists have developed techniques to encourage communication and expression from children, such as play therapy, which is particularly helpful for ages 6-10. “Play therapy is a special technique to assist young children in using what is their most effective means of communication, namely play,” explains Kathryn Amundson, Ph.D., LISCW with Associates in Psychiatry & Psychology. “Toys are the children’s ‘words.’ It allows children to release their feelings. Children are able to express their concerns through play.” Some of the tools that may be used in this type of therapy include sand trays, art therapy, puppets and “mutual storytelling.” Play therapy is particularly useful for children who are going through divorce or to help them process a loss. “It is important for children who do not have a language for grieving or loss,” says Amundson. Another helpful “tool” that Amundson has in treating children (as well as adults) is her 9-year-old Samoyed named Lexi, a certified

•Negative feelings about themselves •Extreme fearfulness or excessive worrying •Uncontrollable anger or outbursts •Obsessive dieting and exercising or overeating Trust your gut. Parents know better than anyone what their child’s norm is and can see emerging patterns. Source: Heather Geerts, Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center and Sarah Stelzner, Highland Meadows Counseling Center

therapy dog and former champion show dog. “With children and adolescents, we simply sit on the floor with Lexi between us, and it’s amazing how much easier it is to talk about difficult topics while petting the dog,” Amundson says. One of the hardest aspects for parents seeking treatment for their children is the belief that it will reflect negatively on them as parents. “The truth of the matter is that there are a multitude of influences that impact behavior,” says Geerts, listing environmental reasons, traumatic incidents that impact one child differently than it would another, etc. “It’s not just parenting. Is that a component? Absolutely.” Helping a child or a teenager cope with mental health issues can also mean helping parents or caregivers cope as well. Sometimes, coping takes the form of reassuring parents that their families aren't the only ones going through these problems. “Things happen in a lot of families,” Hyland adds. “A lot of what is happening in their child’s life happens to others.”


Common mental health issues Depression (situational, seasonal) Anxiety and stress (family issues, job insecurity, upcoming changes) Life transitions (moving, new job, different school, retirement, health changes) Relationship issues (stressed relationships, separation, divorce, remarriage)

Trauma/crises (PTSD, abuse, sudden losses) Academic/school issues (academic struggles, bullying, friend conflicts) Grief and loss (death of parents, grandparents, significant others)

Source: Kathryn Amundson, Associates in Psychiatry and Psychology

NAMI Southeast Minnesota has specific workshops that are geared toward children and children’s mental health issues, such as Kidshops, for children ages 7-18 who have a parent or a sibling living with a mental illness. Another workshop geared toward parents is Children’s Challenging Behaviors, which provides tools and coping strategies to help parents with their children’s behavior.

Sources:

Michelle Kubitz is a freelance writer based in Rochester.

practitioner

Company

Website

Kathryn “Katie” Amundson, Ph.D, LICSW

Associates in Psychiatry & Psychology

appmn.com

Sarah Stelzner, MSW, LICSW Amy Carey, MSW, LGSW Mandy Hyland, MSW, LICSW Cindy Tri, MSW, LGSW, CPP Cindy Finch, MSW, LGSW

Highland Meadows Counseling Center, LLC

highlandmeadowscc.com

Courtney Lawson, Executive Director

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Southeast Minnesota

namisemn.org

Heather Geerts, LICSW

Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center

zumbromhc.org

Children and adolescents with mental health concerns need to get help as soon as possible. Parents and caregivers should seek help if children display any of the following warning signs: • Refusing to attend or declining performance in school • Feelings of hopelessness • Extreme irritability • Alcohol or drug abuse • Acts of bullying or being bullied

• Negative feelings about themselves • Extreme fearfulness or excessive worrying • Uncontrollable anger or outbursts • Obsessive dieting and exercising or overeating

Child Guidance Clinic staff provides comprehensive, Gary Chaikin, MD

intensive mental health

Thomas Diana, PhD, LP

services for children and their families. Lisa Johnson, ARNP

Laura Davis, MA

Marie Davidiak, LICSW, MSW

343 Wood Lake Drive SE Rochester, MN www.zumbrombc.org 507-289-2089

Keith Gascho, LPCC

Child Guidance Clinic RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

51


healthy living

Exercising

Friendship

Running groups that fuse training with the pleasantness of a social club

T

wo women planning to move to Rochester contacted local fitness business Moms on the Run after locating it on the Internet. They signed up for runner’s training in advance of their arrivals because they wanted to hit the ground running socially. Unlike book clubs that are social but sedentary, Moms on the Run and several other running groups in town are taking their gatherings on the road to offer participants fitness with friendship.

Moms meeting moms Of the two objectives, the need for group interaction might be even bigger than the desire to get in shape, says Amy Stockton, owner and running instructor for Moms on the Run in Rochester. Her training business, which is part of a chain that began in the Twin Cities suburb of Forest Lake, promotes “Fitness, Fun and Friendship.” It caters to the busy mom trying to improve her health, and it protects that atmosphere by limiting membership to women. “We are all moms, and many women are not comfortable exercising in front of men,” says Stockton, a mother of five. “We are a safe and non-intimidating environment.” Her female participants often discover common ground for friendship, which Stockton cultivates: “Women talk the whole time (at classes). They’re really just getting to know each other.” Although her groups are sociable, the training program is no coffee klatch. “We don’t just go out and run,” says Stockton, who holds a degree in athletic training and 52

May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Chatty Chicks at the Rochester Area Family Y after the 2010 Med City Marathon, includes (back row from left) Deanna Tompkins, Colleen Timimi, Brenda Fyles, Cherie Jensen, RaeAnne Boldt, (front row from left) Kari Aske and Nina Sargent

sports medicine, “we do interval training.” This form of exercise involves repeating running patterns during a workout to increase stamina and strength.

Training for fitness and racing A more fitness-focused (but still social) running club, open to both men and women of all running levels, is Swift-Kick Running, named because “you either have one [a swift kick] or you need one,” says Michelle Jamieson, owner of SureMichelle Instruction in Rochester. “The group dynamic is huge!” says Jamieson, who has been training athletes for 20 years. “It’s a wonderful motivator.” Jamieson offers both spring and fall programs which meet on Saturday mornings to condition runners for races ranging from the Med City Marathon in May to the many 5K (three mile) courses that have become common at community festivals. Runners all go at their own pace and engage in conversation with fellow runners while helping each other meet their running goals. Last year’s groups included many beginning runners who wanted to complete their first 5K. Jamieson invites participants to “come run with friends and have fun preparing for your big event!”

Chatty Chicks Chatty Chicks, a loosely organized group, has been running together for five years, according to co-leader Brenda Fyles. They gather at 5:45 a.m. to run three times a week.

After walking a short distance somebody says, “Go,” and they’re off, often clumping together in groups of two or three. “Nobody is ever running alone,” says member Colleen Timimi. In fact, when one member was training to run a marathon, others changed their workouts to accompany her at the farthest distances, adds co-leader Cherie Jensen. But, outside of personal goals, this group isn’t as concerned about the time of the run. “We’d rather be able to enjoy it and have fun than go all out and be dead [tired] at the end,” says member Deanna Tompkins. Chatty Chicks has about 12 core members with about 75 others receiving the group’s emails. Members range in age from 27 to 52 and are almost all women. “A few ‘Dashing Dudes’ come every once in a while,” says Fyles. The socializing doesn’t stop at the end of the last mile. Chatty Chicks holds Christmas gatherings for members, cooperates in charitable events and has an occasional whimsical gathering, like getting together to sew tutus which the same runners wore in a subsequent race. For more information on running groups in Rochester, contact Moms on the Run at AmyStockton@momsontherun.com or 507-218-2050; Sure Michelle Instruction at Info@suremichelle.com or 507-319-6712; and Chatty Chicks at brendaFyles@charter.net. Bob Freund is a freelance writer based in Rochester.

Photo Courtesy of Deanna Tompkins.

By Bob Freund


Š2012 Alzheimer’s Association. All rights reserved.

Rochester|Mankato|Red Wing|Winona|Owatonna

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travel

Sherlock, Shakespeare and Smoked Duck A short drive to divine dinner and drama By Alison Rentschler

I

f you’re looking for an evening getaway this summer, a 30-45 minute drive could find you solving a mystery with the world’s greatest detective or witnessing treasonous murder in a Scottish castle at one of the excellent theatres in southeastern Minnesota. To make the outing irresistible, try our recommended spots for dinner before or after the show.

Lanesboro: an elementary evening Located in picturesque Lanesboro, the Commonweal Theatre Company is a professional theater now celebrating its 25th season. Producing a variety of plays from comedies to dramas, musicals to classics, the Commonweal presents performances that are transcendent and relevant. “We choose solid stories with commitment to the art and get to the heart of the story,” explains Associate Artistic Director Adrianne Sweeny. With seating on three sides of the stage, every audience member is close to the stage, and there isn’t a bad view in the house. “The Commonweal Theatre offers an intimate atmosphere,” explains Sweeny. “The audience gets swept away by the production.” This spring and early summer, the Commonweal will feature “A Doll’s House” by Henrick Ibsen, April 14–June 11; “Blithe Spirit” by Noel Coward, May 10–Sept. 7; and “Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure” by Steven Dietz, June 21–Oct. 28. For more information visit commonwealtheatre.org or call 800-657-7025 or 507-467-2525. Be sure to make a reservation to dine at Intermission, conveniently located next door to the Commonweal. A fine dining experience with casual style, Intermission’s menu includes a variety of entrees such as salads, fish and pastas. “I use fresh ingredients, and everything I serve

is prepared in house,” says David Harrison, owner of Intermission. The menu changes weekly at this seasonal establishment, so go soon and be sure to check out a few of David’s specialties like pan-seared walleye, smoked duck breast with a dried cherry demi-glace and chocolate raspberry torte. For more information, call 507-467-3381. Photos courtesy of The Commonweal Theatre and Intermission restaurant.

Mantorville: a melodramatic midsummer

Photo courtesy of Mantorville Theatre Company.

"Nunsense" at The Mantorville Theatre Company

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The Mantorville Theatre Company, now in its 41st season, is located in the Mantorville Opera House in the heart of historic downtown. Plays at this fun venue are professionally directed, but volunteer actors perform in the shows which include entertaining melodramas during the summer, a murder mystery dinner theatre in the fall and a variety of other plays throughout the year. The Mantorville Theatre Company will continue its tradition of audienceinteractive summer melodramas this year with “Professor Pembroke’s Predicament” or “A Curse Comes Home” by Gregory Miller, June 14–July 7; “Dogsbreath Devereaux, the Dastardly Doctor” or “Nurses, Foiled Again!” by Billie St. John, July 12–28; “Willy Picadilly’s Woes” or “Is This How the West Was Won?” by Sally Audis, Aug. 2–18 and “One Bad Apple” or “Rotten to the Core” by Sandra H. Miller, Aug. 23–Sept. 15. For more information visit


Photo courtesy of Michal Daniel and GRSF.

Winona: a date with The Bard of Avon Celebrating its 10th-anniversary season this year, the Great River Shakespeare Festival (GRSF) in Winona showcases Shakespeare’s timeless tragedies, histories and comedies. These midsummer nights’ tales, performed by professional actors from all over the United States, begin June 26 and include both daytime and evenings performances through August 4. If you have never seen Shakespeare performed, GRSF Jonathan Gillard Daly and Stephanie Lambourn in the 2012 Great River Shakespeare Festival production of “King Lear.” is a great place to experience the Bard for the first time. “Time and again we have patrons who tell us they never thought they would enjoy—or even fully understand—live Shakespeare, but after seeing a play at GRSF, they understand the story so well and enjoy the clarity of the storytelling,” says Irene ErkenBrack, sales and marketing director at GRSF. This summer, GRSF will be producing Shakespeare’s comedy “Twelfth Night” and his history play “King Henry V” on the main stages while the intern/apprentice project features his classic tale “Macbeth.” Visit grsf.org or call 507-474-9376. To make it a day of theater in Winona, check out a matinee at GRSF and then take a break for an early dinner at Signatures before returning for an evening performance. Signatures restaurant offers casual specialties at The Grill—fried stuffed pickles and hand-dipped Wisconsin white cheddar cheese curds—or fine dining entrees such as dry-aged rib eye and New York strip. All of these are served with unparalleled customer service in a tranquil setting. Visit signatureswinona.com or call 507-454-3767.

Vintage Treasures Market June 13 – 15, 2013

Thursday, June 13, 4 – 7 PM

Special Event Shopping with Music, Food & Beverage Admission $20 Adv. & $25 @ gate Friday, June 14, 9 – 6 Saturday, June 15, 9 – 4 29452 Co. Rd. 11, Fountain, MN Contact: 507-250-1690 or s.fjerda@yahoo.com

mantorvillain.com or call 507-635-5420. So go on out and spend an evening cheering on a heroine or booing a villain (or vice versa) at these energetic offerings. For a complete evening in Mantorville—and discounted tickets—check out the dinner and theatre combination at the Hubbell House Restaurant, kitty-corner across the street from the Mantorville Theatre Company. Located in a historic building that was once a hotel and popular stagecoach stop in the 1800s, the Hubbell House embraces its heritage while serving fine steaks, chicken, pasta and more. Visit hubbellhouserestaurant.com or call 507-635-2331.

Photo courtesy of the Hubbell House Restaurant.

Photo courtesy of Signatures restaurant.

Alison Rentschler is a writer living in Rochester who enjoys travel, theatre and good food.

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Stop in and fill your heart, mind, & soul with new insights.

Lanesboro, Minnesota

The latest in trendy fashions arriving daily!

The Antique Lover Buffets, porch beams, trunks, dressers, & more!

Personal

Shopping Assistant!

The Funky! You’ll love the variety of fashions & accessories!

Val or her associate will be on hand with fashion tips & tricks!

Open at 10 am, 7 days a week• 507-467-2292

www.bittersweetlanesboro.com • bittersweetboutique@live.com

Mill House Market 130 s. Washington street lake City, MN 55041

Junk market, primitives, vintage finds, re-purposed items, everyday & holiday home decor. Design services available. Hours: thursday-saturday 10-5; sunday 11-4; Monday 10-5 www.millhousemarket.com 1-507-259-6038

Visit These Two Great Shops! Mother’s Day Sale May 9-11

Thurs. May 9 - 4 p.m. - 8 p.m. Fri. May 10 - 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat. May 11 - 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

25% off Junk Market! (includes vintage, repurposed, antiques and junk decor)

Shop ...

Junk Market, Primitives, Vintage Finds, Antiques, Repurposed Items, Handcrafts, Seasonal & Everyday Home Decor! www.rustichouse.co

Rustic House - An Occasional Shop 317 W. Bdwy. Plainview, Minnesota 507-259-6038

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shopping

Triple Treasure Three sisters’ creativity draws hundreds to their annual market By Susanne Novak • Photography by Mike Hardwick Photography

S

hoppers who appreciate the energy required to transform an old, discarded item into something new and interesting will thoroughly enjoy the Vintage Treasures Market in Fountain, Minn., June 13–15. Now in its fifth year, the market draws people from across the area, all searching for The Item that will become a conversation piece.

Philanthropic beginnings The market originally began as a fundraiser for breast cancer by three survivors of the disease but since has grown into a well-attended, annual shopping event that is a passion three sisters now share. Sharon Vreeman, a two-time breast cancer survivor, originally held an auction for repurposed and recycled items at her business, The Victorian Lace Tea Room in St. Charles, Minn., with two other survivors, one of whom has since passed away. “We had done all kinds of projects to raise money for breast cancer,” recalls Sharon.

Known as the "Pfarkel Sisters," three actual sisters Sharon Vreeman, Dianne Perry and Janell Kraut (pictured left to right) enjoy creating vintage treasures from discarded items. RWmagazine.com May/June 2013

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TradiTional FavoriTes

Hambone Music Festival Words Players – multiple dates Rochesterfest Triathlon Virtual Walking Tour Carillon Concert Food Vendors PossAbilities Ice Cream Social Teen Night Celebrity Game Night Family Fun Night Karaoke Night Million $ Golf Hole in One Grand Parade Rochester Orchestra and Chorale Country Night – Marshall Star Band Breakfast on the Farm Street Dance – Vertigo – U2 Tribute Band

new evenTs

Festival of Colors – June 22 Pollination Celebration – June 22 Old Time Radio Revue – June 27 Hot Air Balloon Moonglow – June 28 Hot Air Balloon Race – June 29 & 30 Open Streets – June 29 River City Rhapsody-Rochester, Drum Corps – June 30

and, much more! Buy a Button $5

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

“People told us to sell things instead of just doing an auction, so we switched gears.” Embarking on a new adventure, Sharon asked her two sisters, Dianne Perry and Janell Kraut, to join her. Together the three sisters now find and transform furniture, farm implements and antiques into one-of-a-kind home décor and other useful items. Known as the “Pfarkel Sisters” (after the 1960s hit comedy show Rowan and Martin’s “Laugh In”), Sharon, Dianne and Janell have embraced the misnomer that has become their trademark. “[The Pfarkel Sisters] were red headed, which we are, and they always did everything together. They couldn’t do anything without the other,” Sharon says. “Janell’s husband said that we were just like them, and it is true; we can’t do anything without each other. We have been known as the ‘Pfarkel Sisters’ since 1995, and we have put it to good use.”

Janell and Dianne creating their unique repurposed items.

Repurposing with purpose “We repurpose and recycle,” explains Sharon. “We go to garage sales and citywide clean-ups. Anything that is going to be discarded, we look at with potential. If we can fix it up and give it a new use and a new life, we will.” Her personal favorites are big pieces of cabinetry. “We specialize in farm items, particularly things that are rusty that we can turn into some other item,” Sharon says. “Generally, we have home decor items. Most of the time they are decorative, but it depends on the find. We recently did a big grain mill from the 1800s. We repurposed it, and the buyer was going to use it in her kitchen as a base to the center island.” The three-day event features 15–20 different vendors, this year including Just Precious Vintage, Junk Devotion and Marge Utley. Prices for items range from $10–$700, and cash or check is the preferred method of payment.  “We definitely have a passion for this,” says Sharon. “My sisters and I are all in it together. When we are done sanding and painting, we sit on the front porch, have a glass of wine and visit, and Made from a conveyor belt used on a farm, these that is my favorite part.” scraps get new life as a wine rack. The market, which runs rain or shine, opens on Thursday, June 13, with a special shopping Vintage extravaganza from 4–7 p.m. where patrons will Treasures enjoy live music along with food and beverage Market with the purchase of a $20 advance ticket or a $25 June 13–15 ticket at the gate. Shopping continues Friday and 29452 County Saturday. Parking is free. For more information, Road 11, Fountain, contact the “Pfarkel Sisters” at s.fjerda@yahoo.com Minn. (located four miles NE of Fountain; about or 507-250-1690.  35 miles from Rochester). Susanne Novak is a freelance writer who loves browsing thrift stores in search of the perfect piece to refurbish.

Thursday, June 13th, 4–7 p.m., Special Event Shopping, $20 in advance, $25 at the door Friday, June 14th, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Free Saturday, June 15th, 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Free


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Evenings and weekends by appointment

Trulson Dental Clinic

dental care for the whole family Together, Dr. Trulson and Dr. Nordblom welcome new patients to their practice. Set up an appointment today! Dr. Deborrah Nordblom

Trulson Dental Clinic (507) 533-4719 • 1901 1st Ave NE, Stewartville

Affiliated Emergency Veterinary Service................................................ 30 Allison's Upholstery & Window Fashions.............................................. 30 Alzheimer's Association MN/ND............................................................. 53 Ameriprise Financial - Kari Douglas....................................................... 14 Ameriprise Financial - Nancy Emerick................................................... 49 Anew Aesthetic Medical Center............................................................... 35 Ansara Laser & Cosmetic Medical Center............................................ 19 Bicycle Sports................................................................................................... 53 Bittersweet Boutique & Antiques............................................................. 56 Black Elephant Studios, Inc........................................................................ 30 Bluestem Center.............................................................................................. 30 Bluff Country Co-op....................................................................................... 55 Budget Blinds................................................................................................... 41 Cameron Law PLLC....................................................................................... 19 Cascade Animal Medical Center.............................................................. 14 Chocolaterie Stam.......................................................................................... 44 City Looks Salon & Spa ............................................................................... 64 Clements Chevrolet-Cadillac-Subaru..................................................... 63 Commonweal Theatre................................................................................... 55 Coram Specialty Infusion Services..............................................................2 Cottagewood Senior Communities.......................................................... 45 Creative Hardwood Floors, Inc................................................................... 41 Cumulus Radio, KYBA Y-105..................................................................... 49 Davis Asset Documentation....................................................................... 30 Dawn Sanborn Photography.............................................................. 9 & 16 Degeus Tile & Granite................................................................................... 36 Dentistry for Children and Adolescents, Ltd...........................................9 Drury's................................................................................................................. 20 Dunn Bros Coffee........................................................................................... 22 Essence Skin Clinic..............................................................................16 & 27 Fagan Studios................................................................................................... 27 Family Service Rochester, Meals on Wheels........................................ 12 First Alliance Credit Union.......................................................................... 49 Foresight Bank................................................................................................. 51 Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery......................................................... 29 Hair Studio 52......................................................................................................9 Heartman Insurance...................................................................................... 36 HOPE Ranch..................................................................................................... 14 Intrigue Hair Studio........................................................................................ 10 J.E.T.S. Gymnastics ........................................................................................ 45 Johnny Mango's ............................................................................................ 22 KAAL ABC 6..................................................................................................... 25 King Orthodontics........................................................................................... 19 Kruse Lumber................................................................................................... 42 Lacina Siding & Windows, Inc......................................................................3 Lanesboro Rhubarb Festival....................................................................... 30 Le Jardin Floral................................................................................................. 10 Luxury Bath....................................................................................................... 35 Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union.................................................. 56 Mike Hardwick Photography...................................................................... 47 MLT Group ....................................................................................................... 16 Mon Petit Cupcake......................................................................................... 55 Mr. Pizza North................................................................................................ 29 Neher Confection............................................................................................ 30 New Horizon Academy................................................................................. 12 Northern Lights & Furnishings.................................................................. 39 O'Brien & Wolf, L.L.P. Law Offices............................................................ 36 Olmsted Medical Center.................................................................................6 Optical Vision w/Flair.................................................................................... 47 OxiFresh Carpet Cleaning............................................................................ 25 People's Food Co-op...................................................................................... 25 Pescara............................................................................................................... 20 Pine Needles Quilt and Sew....................................................................... 44 Pique.................................................................................................................... 29 Premier Banks.................................................................................................. 10 The Promise Walk for Preeclampsia ....................................................... 45 RC Nails.............................................................................................................. 12 Reiland's Hair Clinic....................................................................................... 49 Rochester Academy of Music & Dance................................................. 47 Rochester Area Family Y.............................................................................. 27 Rochester Catholic Schools........................................................................ 47 Rochester Downtown Farmers Market.................................................. 22 Rochester Garden and Flower Club........................................................ 30 Rochester Greeters........................................................................................ 30 Rochester Trolley & Tour Company.............................................................4 Rochester Women's Business & Resource Directory 2014............ 29 Rochesterfest................................................................................................... 58 Rustic House..................................................................................................... 56 Sargent's Gardens.......................................................................................... 35 Schulz Organic Fertilizer.............................................................................. 30 SEMVA Art Gallery......................................................................................... 27 Shorewood Senior Campus........................................................................ 39 Silhouette Shoppe.......................................................................................... 59 Sip N Shop Soiree..............................................................................................3 Sisters of Saint Francis.................................................................................. 10 Squash Blossom Farm................................................................................... 30 St. Croix Vineyards.......................................................................................... 29 Trulson Dental.................................................................................................. 59 Tyrol Ski & Sports............................................................................................ 36 United Way of Olmsted County.......................................................29 & 53 Val U Blinds....................................................................................................... 12 Vintage Treasures Market............................................................................ 55 Waseca Area Tourism and Visitor Bureau............................................. 45 Zumbro River Café......................................................................................... 22 Zumbro Valley Mental Health.................................................................... 51

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Calendar Events

Check out our Community Calendar online for ongoing programs and additional listings at RWmagazine.com Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen July/August 2013 issue is June 1, 2013. Complete form at http://www.rwmagazine.com/index.php/submit/submit-event.

May 11

The Promise Walk for Preeclampsia,

Assisi Heights, 9 am, www.promisewalk.org/rochester May 11 Step into Summer Mother’s Day Lunch,

*(507 area code unless stated)

Rochester Elks Lodge, 10:30 am fashion show, basket raffle for local camp scholarships, sponsored by BPO Does, fee, register by 5/6, 923-7158, BPODOES.org

MAy

May 11

Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine.

May 1 – 5 “The Producers,” Rochester Civic Theatre,

Tony award winning musical comedy smash! Times vary, tickets, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org May 3 – 5 100 Mile Garage Sale, various cities along the Mississippi River, 452-0735, map, visitwinona.com

May 4 19th Annual Pet Walk Fundraiser, “Rescue Rocks,” Paws and Claws Humane Society,

Take Steps Walk for Crohn’s, East Silver Lake Park, 3 pm registration, 4 pm walk, 651-917-2437, cctakesteps.org

May 11 Girl Scout Discovery and Sign-up Fair at Camp Edith Mayo, 1-3 pm, come learn about the

Girl Scouts and volunteerism, 288-4703, carolyn.gates@girlscoutsrv.org May 15 & 16 Rochester Garden and Flower Club Annual Plant Sale, Horticulture Building at Olmsted County

Cooke Park, 9 am registration, 10 am walk, 288-7226, pawsandclaws.org

Fairgrounds, 5/15, 4–7 pm, 5/16, 8 am–1 pm, rgfc.org

May 4

May 16

Rochester Downtown Summer Farmers Market opens! (4th St & 4th Ave SE), 7:30 am–noon,

29th Annual Ironwood Springs Annual Benefit Auction, 4 pm, tours, silent/live auctions,

273-8232, rochesterdowntownfarmersmarket.org

533-4315, ironwoodsprings.com

May 4 Mother’s of Multiples Spring Sale,

Bldg 40 @ Olmsted County Fairgrounds, 8 am–1 pm, used clothing, equipment, 281-1898, SOMNMOMS.org May 5 Walk MS: Christopher & Banks 2013,

Soldier’s Field Memorial, 10 am. Walk to create a world free of MS. Pledges required, register now, 800-582-5296, specialevents@mssociety.org, walkMS.org May 10 6th Annual Evening of Hope “Back to the Roaring 20s,” DoubleTree Hotel, 6 pm, dinner, silent

and live auctions, music and entertainment. Funds raised support the Sandra J. Schulze American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, 651-255-8146, mallory.olson@cancer.org, rochesterhopelodgeevents.org May 10

May 17 8th Annual Stay out of the Sun Run (SOS), Holy Spirit Catholic Church, 6:30 pm. Supports

melanoma research. 282-4576, sosrun.org May 17 – 19 She is…Outdoors, a women’s spring weekend event at Eagle Bluff! Fee includes 6 meals and

2 nights lodging, 467-2437, eagle-bluff.org May 18 Tour de Cure Ride, supports the Diabetes Association, 7 am, East Silver Lake, diabetes.org

May 18 PAIIR’s 19th Annual Transportation Fair, Goose Egg Park, (201 8th St NW), 10 am–1 pm,

learn about a variety of vehicles from the people who drive them, free, 328-4020, rochesterce.org/paiir

Cooking Up Fun with Channel One,

May 19

Rochester International Event Center, 6:30–10:30 pm, a fundraiser for “The Kitchen at Channel One,” hosted by Leadership Greater Rochester Class of 2013 with featured regional bands and silent auction, tickets, cookingupfun.eventbrite.com

tour, wine tastings at three wineries and cupcakes! Advanced reservations required. 421-0573 or www.RochesterMNTours.com. See ad on page 4.

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May/June 2013 RWmagazine.com

Winery Trolley Tour, Rochester Trolley and Tour Company, 10 am–5:30 pm, includes trolley


May 19

*June 23

Roll & Stroll for JDRF, Soldiers Field Park, noon

Rochesterfest Triathlon,

registration, 1 pm walk, run or ride & raise funds for Juvenile Diabetes Research, deadline, jdrf.org

Foster Arend Park, 8 am, finalstretch.com

May 25 –26 Y Med-City Marathon, kids race 5/25 at 11 am,

adult race 5/26 at 7 am, complete information and registration at 254-2703, medcitymarathon.com May 31 – June 9 “Kill Me Deadly,” Rochester Civic Theatre, times vary, tickets, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

*June 24 Possibilities Ice Cream Social,

Mayo Park, 5:30–8 pm, rochesterfest.com *June 25 4th Annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes,

Mayo Civic Center Circle, 4 pm register, 5:30 pm walk, womens-shelter.org *June 26

JUne

Family Fun Night, Civic Center Dr SE, 5:30–8:30 pm, rochesterfest.com

June 1

*June 26 – 30

Chester Woods Trail Run, pre-register,

10-mile or 5K, rochestertrackclub.com June 1 Tour de Pepin, non-competitive bike tour of the Lake Pepin area, 800-369-4123, lakecity.org

June 6 “Thursdays on First & Third” opens,

every Thursday through Aug 29, Downtown Peace Plaza, 11 am–8:30 pm, weekly market, vendors, food and entertainment, 424-2866, downtownrochestermn.org June 11 United Way of Olmsted County Women’s Leadership Council “Power of the Purse,”

Kahler Grande Hotel, 10:30 am, silent purse auction and luncheon with keynote speaker Liz Murray, register by 6/1, 529-4830, uwolmsted.org/pop June 16 Winery Trolley Tour, Rochester Trolley and Tour Company, 10:30 am–5:30 pm, includes bluff

“Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” Honor’s Choirs of SE MN, Autumn

Ridge Church, 8 pm, 252-0505, HonorsChoirs.org *June 28 Rochesterfest Grande Parade, 6:15 pm start,

parade route at rochesterfest.com *June 29 26th Annual Country Breakfast on the Farm,

shuttle available, 6:15–11:30 am, rochesterfest.com *June 29 Zumbro River Community Festival,

Camp Victory, (Wabasha Cty Rd 7), 4:30–10:30 pm, a free family day of activities, 843-2329, zumbrorivercommunityfestival.org, rochesterfest.com June 28 – 30 42nd Annual Water Ski Days, lakecity.org

country scenic trolley tour and wine tasting. Advanced reservations required. 421-0573 or www.RochesterMNTours.com See ad on page 4.

JUly

June 21

20th Annual Relay For Life, RCTC Field House,

July 12

Ribbon Challenge Golf Benefit at The Bluff’s at Coffee Mill, 11:30 am, 18-Hole, 4-person scramble

6:30 pm–overnight, relayforlife.org/olmstedcountymn or acsevents.org

teams, supports Saint Elizabeth’s Medical Center cancer prevention and detection, entry fee, register by 6/14, 651-565-5596, stelizabethswabasha.org/events

Palette to Palate, Reds, Whites and Brews,

*June 21 – 30 31st Annual Rochesterfest,

for a complete schedule visit Rochesterfest.com (*All events with * are part of Rochesterfest) *June 21 & 22 Hambone Music Festival, Olmsted County

History Center grounds, Friday, 4 pm–12:30 am, Saturday, noon–10:30 pm, hambonemusicfestival.com, olmstedhistory.com

July 12 Rochester Art Center, 6–9 pm, 282-8629, info@ rochesterartcenter.org, www.rochesterartcenter.org July 13 St John’s Block Party, W. Center St &

5th Ave NW. Plan to attend the final year of this all-day music festival for food, fun and fellowship, 288-7372, sjblockparty.org Pick up RochesterWomen July/August issue beginning June 28!

MAGAZINE

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on the lighter side

The Paint Shirt Legacy New life for a ratty old smock By Marlene petersen • Illustration by Amy Liebl

A

nyone who’s ever taken on do-it-yourself projects has one. No one talks about it. No one ever sees it except the dog… and household family members if it can’t be helped. Mine sits in a shadowy corner of my house 314.2 days of the year hidden behind things I treasure in order to keep anyone from discovering it. It only emerges for messy projects—deck cleaning, drywalling and painting. Yes, it’s the paint shirt. My mother had one too. It was a short-sleeved, pigment-smeared, faded blue T-shirt I saw nearly every Saturday of my childhood because we were on a single-mom shoestring budget and there was never money to hire anything done (or even buy a new paint shirt). So, lawn mowing, out it came. Leaky faucet, it was there. Ritual weekend cleaning, the shirt was on the job. A habitual home decorator, Mom would throw on that tatty, color-coated smock and paint a room nearly once a year, even if she had to have a garage sale to raise the money for the supplies. She was a wiz at painting; all she needed was a roller, a brush and that shirt. It would have been an unremarkable frock, really, except for one thing: its design. The words “I.C. Hot” emblazoned the front in cherry red and a D.C. Comics® picture of Wonder Woman™ sprang into action all over the middle. Mom had worn and washed it so many times the “I,” “O” and “H” of “I.C. Hot” crackled, curled and peeled in several places. So how is it possible that I saw this shirt repeatedly for the better part of 10 years and never wondered who or what I.C. Hot was or why Wonder Woman was there, especially when the shirt's carefree, comical style was such a marked departure from the tailored, no-nonsense mother I knew. (The only frivolous thing I ever saw her do was dance around our living room to “Jesus Is Just Alright” by the Doobie Brothers.) It wasn’t until just last year­—not long after she passed away, when my older brother and I were reminiscing about all the times Mom had us clean, decorate or paint on a Saturday morning as kids—that I asked about that shirt. “I.C. Hot was a band some friends of hers were in, and they made it for her,” he explained one Saturday night over the phone. “What?” I exclaimed in disbelief, “Mom had friends in a band? When did she ever go see them?” “I dunno. We had babysitters from time to time. Maybe then.” “So what was with Wonder Woman?” He didn’t know. Maybe Mom reminded the band of Wonder Woman or maybe it was just because it was the 70s and Wonder Woman was so cool? Either way, after years of thinking that her ragged top was just a

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discarded item that meant nothing to her, I’d found out it was actually proof that my straight-laced Mom had a groupie buried deep within. Suddenly that tattered rag seemed pretty cool. Not long after that, on a day I missed Mom horribly, a colleague reminded me that all the things my mother did for me I am now doing for my daughter. It is the meaning of a legacy. I just hope, one day, my daughter thinks of me in my dilapidated paint shirt with as much love as I did my mother…even if there’s no Wonder Woman on the front. Marlene Petersen is a freelance writer and editor of Rochester Women magazine.


It hauls. And it hauls.


Profile for Rochester Women Magazine

May/June 2013  

This issue features a cover story about three extraordinary Rochester area women who have braved single motherhood, theatre and dinner event...

May/June 2013  

This issue features a cover story about three extraordinary Rochester area women who have braved single motherhood, theatre and dinner event...

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