Page 1

MARCH/APRIL 2013 COMPLIMENTARY

March into

READING MINNESOTA READING CORPS

2, 4, 6, 8… ROAD TRIPS

LET'S DO BRUNCH

NO-FUSS IDEAS FOR SPRING GATHERINGS

YOU’LL APPRECIATE

BACK TO HEALTH 

 


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COVER STORY 15

15 Shopping 10

28

Learning to read with Minnesota Reading Corps. By Amanda Wingren Cover photo by Fagan Studios

MAGAZINE

Remodelers Corner

49

MARCH/APRIL 2013

Reconstruction of a dilapidated duplex improves energy efficiency and aesthetics. By Linda Lia

Spring into Green Reuse, recycle, refresh your wardrobe at local consignment stores. By Jill Swanson

March into Reading

35

Creation and Recreation Cumulus Radio’s Home, Vacation and RV Show celebrates 50 years. By Penny Marshall

From headaches to colicky babies, chiropractic care offers alternative relief. By Michelle Kubitz

Community 57

Breaking the Chains of Modern-Day Slavery Rochester’s Sisters of Saint Francis vie against human trafficking. By K.L. Snyder

Food 36

Back to Health

Let’s Do Brunch No-fuss ideas for spring gatherings. By Margo Stich

Women in Leadership 13

Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology at Mayo Clinic and American Cancer Society Hope Lodge Volunteer. By Tracy Will

Home 24

Travel

Ivy Petersen, M.D.

62 42

Seasons of the Vine By Margo Stich

A Tale of Two Kitchens Tale two: beauty on a budget. By Marlene Petersen

Fun, affordable vacations within easy driving distance. By Cindy Finch

How to Make Maple Syrup By Margo Stich

45

Healthy Living 32

Healing Waters Project Nominate a woman living with breast cancer for a healing water garden.

47

Getting CrossFit The latest exercise challenge hits Rochester. By Bob Freund

2, 4, 6, 8 ‌ Road Trips You’ll Appreciate

On the Lighter Side 70

Before Bentley Pawing down personal boundaries for the furriest member of the family. By Amy Brase

in every issue From the Editor In the Know Advertisers Index Community Calendar

7 8 67 68

RWmagazine.com March/April 2013


March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


from the editor MAGAZINE ISSUE 74, VOLUME 14, NUMBER 1 MARCH/APRIL 2013 PUBLISHERS

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA Doug Solinger

DESIGN DIRECTOR

Rue Wiegand LAYOUT DESIGNER

Amy Liebl GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Tommy Traxel, MLT Group Molly Anderson, MLT Group FOOD EDITOR

Margo Stich COPY EDITORS

Ashley Pikel Elisa Tally MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Deanne Breitenbach COMMUNITY RELATIONS

Susan Franken PHOTOGRAPHY

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios Mike Hardwick Photography Southern Touch Photography RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $18 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2013 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-529-5385 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com

M

Photo courtesy of Southern Touch Photography.

EDITOR

Marlene Petersen

arch marks my first anniversary as editor with RochesterWomen. This year, I’ve edited over 100 articles for publication, read thousands of emails and over 400 story ideas, seen hundreds of incredible photos and had a dozen cups of coffee with the editorial staff while planning each issue— all of which I expected and enjoyed. But two things have surprised me. First, I never thought people would actually read my “from the editor” letters. I always assumed everyone—except my immediate family and closest friends who are bound by blood and other oaths— would just skip my prattle and dive right into the articles. So, many thanks to everyone (and anyone) who reads this, especially my friend Sherry who says she likes my letters because I write the way I talk. Second, I’ve never had a job where I enjoy phone calls so much. People are excited to talk with me and share their stories…a monumental change from my days as an attorney. One of the most unique parts of this job is the lead time necessary to plan each issue. As a writer, I learned you have to get story ideas in early if you want them to be considered, but I didn’t appreciate how far in advance the planning begins. It feels odd planning a December holiday shopping guide before the leaves have changed in September. Even as I write this letter, my sidewalk is filled with ice, but the issue itself sparkles with ideas for spring: fun trips for spring break (page 62), shopping at consignment stores for clothes in shades of bright green (page 10) and spring brunch menu and recipe suggestions, which our staff collectively made and tested before finalizing in “Let’s Do Brunch” (page 36). The Cranberry Fizz and Strawberry Cream Cheese Pie were my favorites. So when you read this letter in March and April, I hope the robins and daffodils I’ve been thinking about since January are finally here. Happy spring! All the best,

For advertising information: 507-951-2413

     ! " #$ Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com March/April 2013%


n the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know 3RD ANNUAL&*+,*)&

JOIN THE WORLD'S BRIGHTEST 5K, ,& Sat., April 27, 2 p.m. Check website for location You may start this race with a shirt as white as the ďŹ rst snow, but over ďŹ ve kilometers you will soak up so much color that you’ll glow. The Color Dash beneďŹ ts The Place— a single neighborhood-based family and youth center shared by Child Care Resource & Referral’s Head Start and Boys & Girls Club of Rochester. Registration deadline, April 17. For more, contact Kristine Stensland, 287-2020 or kristines@c2r2.org or visit thecolordash5k.com.

-..&&*/') Sat., March 16, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Mayo, Century, John Marshall and Lourdes H.S. Area high schools will be accepting gently used bikes on March 16 to beneďŹ t Collective Pata de Perro youth group. Donated bicycles will be used by the youth to learn bike maintenance and will provide a reliable, sustainable form of transportation through the Earn-a-Bike Program. For more, contact Sara Fechtelkotter, (612) 270-4003 or fechtelkotter.sara@co.olmsted.mn.us or visit http://www.co.olmsted. mn.us/OCPHS/news/Documents/BikeDriveFlierFinal.pdf.

Sun., April 28, 9 a.m. Jefferson Elementary School Join Final Stretch, Inc. and the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance (MOCA) in a race just for women. Chosen for its beautiful trails and panoramic lake views, this race beneďŹ ts MOCA’s work with ovarian cancer. There will be women’s cut technical shirts and other goodies for all participants. For more, visit mnovarian.org/event/spring-ing-diva-run/.

&'&( PAWS & CLAWS HUMANE SOCIETY PET WALK Sat., May 4, Cooke Park Registration begins at 9 a.m. Walk begins at 10 a.m. For more, visit www.pawsandclaws.org.

7TH ANNUAL 

)&*+* April 26-27, Autumn Ridge Church Join special guest speakers, musicians and women of all ages and stages of life for a weekend of Christian worship and learning. A popular and wellattended event, this year’s conference welcomes Grammy Award winning Christian singer Laura Story. Register by March 31 for discounted rate. For more information and to register, visit devotedheartsrochester.com.

)&'-* *

HOLY CARP! Sat., March 9, 6 p.m. Elks Lodge #1091, 1652 Hwy 52 N Have a laugh while raising awareness about the growing problem of invasive species in Minnesota lakes and rivers. The Theater of Public Policy (T2P2) presents “Holy Carp!� live improvisational theater using comedic discussion to explore a serious problem facing our waterways. Cash bar and live music after the show. $18/adult. For more, visit holycarp.eventbrite.com or contact Meredith at tuntland@hotmail.com or 281-7696.

'*+* **,*

Fri., May 10, 6:30 p.m.–10:30 p.m., Rochester International Event Center Join this entertaining fundraiser for “The Kitchen at Channel One� hosted by Leadership Greater Rochester Class of 2013 and featuring a showcase of regional bands, a silent auction and the announcement of the local Iron Chef Competition winner. Tickets: $20 at the door, $17.50 in advance and $15 for groups of 10 or more. For more information, visit cookingupfun.eventbrite.com. 0March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

Thurs., March 21, Elks Lodge (Hillcrest Shopping Center) Silent Auction, 5–6:30 p.m. Live Auction, 6:30 p.m. Help the Traverski Ski, Sport & Social Club raise funds ds for pancreatic cancer research by participating in a charity auction to beneďŹ t the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE). Admission is free, and food will be available for purchase. For more, contact Kim Wettleson, 254-5027 or traverskicharityauction@gmail.com or visit traverski.org.

THE 38TH ANNUAL

&,+&),

April 12-13, John Marshall High School Fri., April 12, 7 p.m., John Marshall High School auditorium Sat., April 13, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. John Marshall High School gymnasium Join the Rochester International Association (RIA) for Southern Minnesota’s largest multi-ethnic festival. RIA is a non-proďŹ t organization dedicated to multi-cultural education and exchange. The two-day event will include a multi-ethnic staged show, ethnic food from many countries, kids’ activities and crafts, entertainment and cultural displays. Free admission and food for purchase. For more, visit ria-minnesota.org or contact herta.matteson@ria-minnesota.org.


5

ABC 6 News Good Morning

7

AM Good Morning America

10 AM

The View

11 AM

You

Everybody

AM

Rachael Ray

12 PM

The Chew

2

PM Katie

3

PM Ellen

4

PM The Dr. Oz Show

5/6 PM

ABC 6 News 5 & 6pm

want to spend your day with


shopping

Spring into

Green

Reuse, recycle, refresh your wardrobe at local consignment stores

S

hopping consignment not only saves you money, it helps protect the earth by offering gently used clothing instead of depleting materials and energy to manufacture and ship new ones. Plus, the clothes are gorgeous. Picking out a spring wardrobe at consignment shops is just like shopping for new outfits. Start with a piece you love and go from there. Celebrate the variety of greens in stores this season by combining emerald and chartreuse or a lively lime with a rich olive. It's trendy and as natural as the palette of colors found in a forest, landscape or any garden. Take your cue from the flowers; everything goes with green: violet, rose, bluebells and daffodils; it's the quintessential neutral.

Dark emerald cotton jacket, size small, Clothes Mentor, $10 Soft green pants, size 8, Plato’s Closet, $14 Light green/aqua printed halter tie top, size medium, Nu On U, $6.50 Sparkle bracelet with rhinestones, Clothes Mentor, $6 Emerald, high heel shoes, size 9, Plato’s Closet, $10 Sunglasses, Plato’s Closet, $6 Round earrings, Size it Up, $8

Long spring coat, size 12, Refashion, $46 Print reversible skirt, size large, Refashion, $20 Sleeveless turtleneck, size large, All in Vogue, $5.25 Two-tone green belt, Size it Up, $7 Multi-color green necklace, Plato's Closet, $9 Slip-on leather shoes, size 6, All in Vogue, $9.50 12March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Fresh Accesories Printed scarf, Size it Up, $8 Pebbled-leather purse, Size it Up, $12

Oval green stone necklace and earring set, Phenomenal Woman, $16 (set)

Melon Green and Holo Green nail polish, Phenomenal Woman, $2 (each)

Reading glasses, Phenomenal Woman, $8

Photograpy by Dawn Sanborn

Faux snakeskin bag with cross, Phenomenal Woman, $35

Jill Swanson is an image consultant and author of two books, "Simply Beautiful" and "Out the Door in 15 Minutes." For more information, visit jillswanson.com. RWmagazine.com March/April 201311


13March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


women in leadership

Ivy Petersen, M.D. Associate ssociatte Professor of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clini Clinic Volunteer, American Cancer Society Hope Lodge BY TRACY WILL • PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS HOMETOWN: Medina, Ohio AGE: 53 FAMILY: Husband, Mark; children, Roy, Peggy and foreign exchange student Léonie CANCER FIGHTER: I’m a radiation oncologist. The areas I focus on in my practice are breast cancer, gynecologic cancers and sarcomas. RADIATION ONCOLOGY? We use radiation to treat cancer. VITAL SUPPORT: Patients usually need radiation therapy every day for weeks. Obviously, it is a difficult period for them. But it can also be a time that, as medical professionals, we can be a very important source of support, and that’s powerful. BUILDING HOPE: I was on the committee that coordinated the fundraising and construction of Rochester’s Hope Lodge. I was there for the groundbreaking. Now, my largest time commitment with Hope Lodge is the annual gala, which will be held on May 10 at the DoubleTree Hotel. The theme this year is the Roaring ‘20s. I am looking forward to seeing all the fun outfits and dancing the Charleston. KEY CONNECTIONS: The medical team at Mayo Clinic is a support system for our patients during the day, but Hope Lodge goes way beyond that. It serves as a second family for these people. It provides emotional, mental and physical support for both patients and families. It’s a community for them in a situation where they may otherwise be isolated in a hotel room. QUALITY LIVING: When people find out I’m in oncology, they often assume it’s depressing. It’s not all rosy, but there are many uplifting moments. Even when we may not be able to extend someone’s life, we usually can make them more comfortable. We try to do everything we can to help our patients have a good quality of life, even when they may not have years and years ahead of them. BEST PART OF YOUR JOB? The patients. No question. Being able to help them and be there for them is the most gratifying part of what I do.

AN UNEXPECTED TEACHER: One thing that surprised me about working at Mayo Clinic was the opportunity to get involved in education. For 10 years, I was program director for the Radiation Oncology residency. Growing up, being a teacher didn’t appeal to me. But this was different. I found I enjoy teaching adults. I’ve learned how to teach, and it has been very rewarding. WORKING TOGETHER: I’ve been at Mayo Clinic for 21 years. I like the interaction I have with the other staff here, not just in my department, but throughout Mayo Clinic. I’m not stuck in my own little corner. I’m part of the institution as a whole. Being at Mayo Clinic has also allowed me to have opportunities beyond the organization. For example, I’m on the National Cancer Institute’s Uterine Task Force, which reviews studies about uterine cancer. So, I get to interact with people in my field outside of Mayo Clinic. OUTSIDE THE OFFICE: In addition to Hope Lodge, I also volunteer with the Boy Scouts, and I’m active in the choir at Community Presbyterian Church. MAKING IT FIT: The only reason I can do all that I do is because I have the most amazing husband in the world. He’s very busy himself, but he’s incredibly supportive. That makes all the difference. Sharing the load is key… and it makes life more fun. LOCAL ATTRACTIONS: Because my patients stay in Rochester for quite a while, we often talk about things to do. It depends on the situation, of course, but there are lots of good options: visiting Quarry Hill and Oxbow Zoo for families, exploring the walking and biking trails, checking out the Rochester Art Center or Civic Theater. Everyone can find something they like.

Tracy Will is a freelance writer who has lived and worked in the Rochester area since 1995. RWmagazine.com March/April 201314


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1March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


cover story

March into

Minnesota Reading Corps tutors help kindergartners learn letter sounds by focusing on ďŹ ve letters at a time.

g a R e d i n Learning with Minnesota Reading Corps BY AMANDA WINGREN • PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

N

ikki Anglin holds a soft spot in her heart for Minnesota Reading Corps—a state-level branch of the national AmeriCorps program which tutors students in reading. As her son entered elementary school, he struggled with reading at grade level. “My daughters didn’t have trouble with reading, but for some reason, it was much more difficult for him. We weren’t sure what to do to help,� remembers Nikki. When her son was in first grade, he found support from Minnesota Reading Corps tutors. It made all the difference. “I remember we were driving in the car one day,� says Nikki, “and my son was sitting in the backseat reading out loud—and suddenly, it clicked. We saw the light bulb go off. It was so cool,� says Nikki. RWmagazine.com March/April 20131


1March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


INCREASING LITERACY In Minnesota, nearly one in five students does not read at basic literacy levels by the third grade. “At Minnesota Reading Corps institute training in August 2012, I learned that low literacy levels correlate with poverty, crime and unemployment,� says Rochester Women magazine Publisher Jorrie Johnson, who decided to join MRC part-time, as a tutor, to “help youth learn to read and succeed in life.� Minnesota Reading Corps (MRC) tutors work one-on-one with students to help increase literacy in schools and strive to eliminate the gap by bringing all students to an appropriate reading level. “Before third grade, students are learning to read,� explains Sheila Piippo, executive director of MRC in Minneapolis. “After that, they're reading to learn.� Consequently, the key is to catch students that are struggling as they learn to read. After that—once the light bulb has clicked—they are able to approach

their subsequent education with confidence. “When I saw that—what a change they had made, what a boost of confidence it was for my son—I thought, ‘I want to do that,’� recalls Nikki who started tutoring with Minnesota Reading Corps shortly after her son’s success about three years ago and hasn’t stopped since. Nikki has a special education background, which helps with her tutoring (but isn’t necessary), and she admires the research-based, effective methods of MRC. “It is really all about fluency,� she says. “The trick is to speed up the process, with intensive, daily practice, until it clicks.�

INTERVENTIONS The program focuses on reading as a skill and helps students develop those skills by utilizing 11 different “interventions.� Each intervention is specifically designed to improve a particular reading skill. “For example,� explains Anna Peters, recruitment and outreach manager for

Minnesota Reading Corps, “if a student is struggling with reading too quickly and skipping syllables or words, we have a specific pencil tap intervention to keep the tempo of their reading in check.� Other interventions include Word Blending, which is used to teach students how to sound out words, and Phoneme Blending and Segementing, which teaches children to listen to the sounds they hear in words and how to put them together and take them apart. A school-level reading coach and the MRC tutor, in collaboration, choose the interventions needed to help each individual student improve his/her skills. “It is important to note that MRC participation is in addition to, not in replacement of, a comprehensive core reading instructional program,� according to the MRC 2011-2012 State-Wide Evaluation, recently released by MRC, detailing its work and mission. “MRC provides important additional guided practice time in reading for students who need this support.�

&#5 6#

66! . 6  5  768.9

Chart courtesy of Minnesota Reading Corps.

Roughly seven out of 10 Minnesota third graders who received assistance from MRC demonstrated at least grade level performance on state-wide reading assessments after exiting the MRC program.

RWmagazine.com March/April 20131%


10March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


love “When they say, ‘I ow reading!’... you kn build you’re helping them love confidence and a for learning.” innesota — Nikki Anglin, M tor Reading Corps tu Word Blending intervention, demonstrated above, is used to teach students how to sound out words.

FOCUSED LEARNING

Minnesota Reading Corps has grown to become the largest state AmeriCorps program with over 750 tutors serving over 600 sites in 2012-2013.

One of the key features of the Minnesota Reading Corps program is that it focuses on the middle bracket of children: those whose skill levels fall slightly below average. Since these students are not supported by gifted and talented or special education, they can be overlooked in terms of one-on-one support. MRC tutors, the school's reading coach and the students’ teachers choose which students will be selected for extra practice. These students then work with the MRC tutors in daily, twenty-minute sessions. The lessons follow a very specific, research-based curriculum that is designed and set in place by MRC, with target levels correlated according to third grade Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment (MCA) tests. “Every tutor builds relations with students,” says Anna. “The one-on-one attention and dedication of the teachers is what encourages the students to be excited about learning.” For students in kindergarten and first grade, the focus is on recognizing letter sounds and blending syllables. By second and third grade, students are expected to be fluent with text and must reach a standardized rate of words per minute. “These are the students that are close to target, yet not quite there. They’re not special education, but they can’t keep up,” explains Sheila. Minnesota Reading Corps’ job is to scoop up these students that may otherwise fall through the cracks and give them the little boost they need to reach expected literacy levels. When a student has reached the expected literacy level for their grade, they exit the program. “I haven't met a kid under third grade who doesn’t like to read,” says Nikki. “We are setting a foundation for them, laying a groundwork that will support them throughout the rest of their education.” RWmagazine.com March/April 20131:


32March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


nts

“Before third grade, stude are learning to read. After that, they ’re reading to learn.”

ve — Sheila Piippo, executi eapolis director of MRC in Minn

Nikki Anglin works with kindergartners Simon Tessmer (above) and Brayden McQuiston (left below) on learning letter sounds at Folwell Elementary School in Rochester.

CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP Now, in its tenth year, Minnesota Reading Corps has seen enormous success and growth since its founding in 2003. What started as a small branch of AmeriCorps is now the largest state program in the country, with 1,000 tutors teaching in over 650 schools all across Minnesota and over 30,000 students tutored per year. Minnesota was the first state to take the model to scale and implement a thoroughly research-based system. The program’s effectiveness has received national attention and has even been replicated in several other states, including Colorado, Michigan and Washington. “It is the preventive nature of the program that makes it so successful,” explains Sheila. “We look for gaps early on and fix the problem before the student exits third grade.” “Our tutors should be proud,” adds Anna. “The work they have done has allowed us to reach out to other kids across the nation.” As much as MRC does to help advance literacy, MRC notes it is not their work alone that has produced results: “It is important to acknowledge that MRC participating students are also supported by a variety of resources, most notably the instruction and guidance provided by their schools and families,” according to the MRC 2011-2012 State-Wide Evaluation. Minnesota Reading Corps’ goal is to provide tutors to every student in need. That way, the stumbling block and early frustration with reading can be replaced with confidence and enthusiasm. RWmagazine.com March/April 201331


33March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Nikki Anglin gives her student a high five for reading accurately.

TUTORS REACHING OUT It is the willingness of the kids that is truly inspiring to tutors like Jorrie and Nikki. “I love serving with Minnesota Reading Corps," says Jorrie. “Right away, I saw how my tutoring was helping children improve their reading through weekly probes (one minute tests). I enjoy seeing results as well as the smiles and high fives from children who are so very present and excited to learn to read.” “When they say, ‘I love reading!’... you know you're helping them build confidence and a love for learning,” adds Nikki. Tutors serving in the Minnesota Reading Corps, as part of the AmeriCorp organization, give a year of service to the organization and can choose between full or part-time. They receive a small bi-monthly living allowance for the year and upon completion of the requisite hours, are given an education stipend to put towards past loans or future schooling. “It is a financial commitment for the tutors, but their time in Minnesota Reading Corps is rich with stories and experiences,” explains Anna. “It is an opportunity to continue to give back on a one-on-one basis. The students build strong relationships

with tutors, and it is enormously fulfilling for them.” Consequently, volunteers come from all walks of life: recent college graduates looking for a fulfilling job, retired teachers looking to ease slowly into retirement and professionals taking a break from their career. “Last summer, I was seeking more personal fulfillment and had more flexibility in my schedule as my youngestt child was entering full day school as a first grader,” explains Jorrie about what prompted her to join MRC. “I had also known an adult whose literacy skills prevented their career advancement, which motivated me to seek literacy service with Minnesota Reading Corps. It was definitely the right step to take.” In fact, the experience is often so rewarding that approximately one-third of tutors choose to sign-on for another year after their first year is concluded. A recent additional benefit is that volunteers ages 55 or older are able to transfer the educational stipend to their children or grandchildren, lending enticement to those volunteers not looking to go back to school. The Rochester branch of Minnesota

ntinue “It is an opportunity to co -one to give back on a one-on strong basis. The students build and it is relationships with tutors, them.” enormously fulfilling for ent — Anna Peters, recruitm r ge na ma and outreach rps Co for Minnesota Reading

Reading Corps currently works in 16 elementary schools in the city, with 26 tutors, and is always looking for volunteers. “It changes people to give a year of meaningful service,” says Anna. “They leave with new goals and perspectives, knowing that they made a difference.” For more information, to find more stories from tutors or to apply to serve with Minnesota Reading Corps, visit MinnesotaReadingCorps.com Amanda Wingren is a freelance writer living in Rochester. RWmagazine.com March/April 201334


home

,  + '*&

two

Tale two: /-* /

BY MARLENE PETERSEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKE HARDWICK PHOTOGRAPHY

I

n our January/February issue, we brought you

after

part one of our two-part series, “A Tale of Two

Kitchens.� This second tale, like the first, involves a staff member of RochesterWomen magazine acting as her own general contractor in a do-it-yourself project. This tale is from Editor Marlene Petersen.

/,.(A brittle 1975 Montgomery Ward built-in stovetop and separate oven. 1960s plywood cabinets. Small galley kitchen layout. A $6000 budget.

,(Update the before

aesthetics and functionality of the kitchen by replacing appliances and cabinets and opening up the space as much as possible without moving electrical, plumbing, flooring, heating or walls‌all on a miniscule budget.

&&( I’d love to say our remodel was done in a month, under budget and without a malevolent word spoken. But actually it took two phases (stretched over four years) with a revised budget‌and more than a few unkind— but mumbled—words. Our kitchen after phase one in 2008 but before phase two in 2012. 3March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


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&*;3220( Get a new stove and oven. After three years of cooking with electric burners that were probably a fire hazard, the old appliances had to go. So we bought a stand-alone gas convection oven/stove instead of replacing the built-ins. The stand-alone was less expensive, and replacing the old, bulky built-in cabinetry with one large custom-made base cabinet with pull-out drawers increased our storage and counter space. Cost for phase one: $1396 (stove, $1000; new gas line, $96; cabinet—installed with countertop—$300).

1975 Montgomery Ward stove top before phase one.

RWmagazine.com March/April 20133


We replaced wall cabinets near the stove with a professional range hood and custom-built shelves to keep pots, pans, dishes and utensils handy for cooking and serving.

<;222= E CONTRACTORS M SO H IT W ET DIY BUDG ls for $96 bor and materia ove la l, ca ni ha ec Superior M gas line for st materials $300 wall, labor and ry D an m eu N $1,910 Larry Construction, n ile V ff Je d labor only Joe Yennie an tertops $1,000 Top Shop, coun $1,900 d refrigerator Loweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, oven an pplies $105 s, paint and su m ia ill -W in w Sher pulls $800 nets for bench, bi ca , rs ai ch e, c. decor) IKEA (tabl hite dishes, mis w w ne s, ob kn 70 and ts and 6 $1,1 , 3 base cabine doors an fm of H n do Gor glass cabinet 50 ck lighting $2 Bright Ideas, tra ts $520 t, 4 base cabine le ut O ls ia er ry) Building Mat maple and cher (consigned solid r 12â&#x20AC;? $300 aple pull-out fo m lid so lf he -S e hood) eBay (Rev-a ofessional rang pr d an t ne bi ca elves $80 brackets for sh Home Depot, $180 neous supplies Loweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, miscella <0;11 ,&( an anticipated)

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3March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

&;3213( We were so happy with our new stove that my home improvement palms didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t begin to itch again until our ancient refrigerator began freezing milk (my husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s palms never itch). Then, we realized, it was time for some substantial remodeling. The placement of the fridge next to the stove had always made the kitchen feel cramped and clunky. So we decided to move the fridge when we replaced it. We also wanted to eliminate the remaining 1960s plywood base cabinets and swap the wall cabinets above the stove with open shelving and a professional range hood. This, we hoped, would increase light and venting, keep pots and pans handy, open up the wall space and give the kitchen a professional look. The hardest part about moving the fridge was coming up with a layout that fit our needs but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require us to move plumbing, electrical, heating or walls. With the help of websites like houzz.com and Pinterest; a pencil, eraser, ruler and graph paper ($.99 at Target); and an hour consultation with Beyond Kitchens designer


Replacing solid cabinet doors with glass ones modernized the kitchen and provided a place to display my grandmother's dishes, which I inherited in 2011.

Diane Quinn, I eventually created a design that worked. Then I bought the countertops and cabinets to suit the space. At this point, we reassessed the project and hired two contractors: one to skim coat the drywall damage above the stove where we had removed cabinets and one to remove all the base cabinets, level the floor, install the new cabinets and countertops, replace the ceiling fan with track lighting, install the range hood and fix the hardwood floor as needed. It was the best $2200 we spent. To finish, we built the open shelving near the stove, painted the walls a soft blue and all the cabinets white and refurbished (rather than replaced) the old wall cabinets by the sink. The result was everything we were looking forâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an aesthetically pleasing and far more functional kitchen without breaking the bankâ&#x20AC;Śeven if it took four years. Marlene Petersen is a freelance writer and editor who lives in Rochester. RWmagazine.com March/April 20133%


home

CONTRACTOR: Pat Eckert Construction

HOMEOWNER:

A custom-built arch in the lower living space creates architectural interest and supports furniture placement and traffic flow.

Pat Eckert

PROJECT: BY LINDA LIA • PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

Complete reconstruction of a dilapidated duplex to improve energy efficiency and aesthetics and to convert it into two wellappointed apartments

SUBCONTRACTORS The Design Connection SJS Engineering, Inc. Andy Evans painting & taping XRG Concepts JK Electric

A

s spring arrives each year, the concept of renewal inspires new projects. Pat Eckert, of Eckert Construction, remodels homes with an eye toward conservation and energy efficiency as well as aesthetics and utility. Two years ago, Eckert purchased an older home near downtown Rochester. It is now two delightful apartments, but when he first bought the property it was a duplex with a nearly gutted upper floor, outdated interiors and an energy inefficient infrastructure. 30March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

WT Lighting Kruse Lumber Integrity Heating & Cooling Rochester Quality Overhead Door Rochester Building & Safety


upstairs before

To make the upstairs apartment more spacious, Eckert used an open kitchen/ dining room ďŹ&#x201A;oor plan (pictured above) and vaulted the ceiling (pictured below).

RWmagazine.com March/April 20133:


before

after after

after

After the remodel, Eckert had reduced the home’s air leakage by almost half, putting a much tighter seal on the house and keeping it warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer without additional energy.

At right, Eckert used Deck-Armor™ (a special roofing material) left over from the upper deck conversion, to fashion a custom, modern sink for the upstairs bathroom. 42March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

One of Eckert’s first priorities was to upgrade the property's energy efficiency. He began by commissioning a blower door test, which helps determine a home’s airtightness and reduce energy-wasting leaks. “If I do a blower door test before finishing a house,” says Eckert, “it allows me to handle the problems ahead of time. For example, once the basement is finished, it would be costly to go back and spray foam into leaking walls or make other revisions to address problem areas.” Before the remodel, the blower door test rated the house’s air loss at 4177 cubic feet per minute (cfm) with airflow of 50 Pascals. After the remodel, Eckert had reduced the home’s leakage by almost half, to 2485 cfm, putting a much tighter seal on the house and keeping it warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer without additional energy. Eckert achieved these results by using Microllam® structural beams, which allowed him to install copious amounts of energy-saving, dense spray foam insulation— sealing and insulating the upstairs to R43 (versus the R19 minimally required). He also replaced the leaky, single-pane windows with double-pane, argon gas ones and installed a three-point locking system for the upstairs door, providing a tighter seal and more secure lock.


The Healing Power of Friends and Flowing Water Let us help you honor a woman you admire who is living with breast cancer

The 8th Annual Healing Waters Project, Call for Nominations The Healing Waters Project honors a woman living with breast cancer with the gift of a water garden for her yard. RochesterWomen magazine, Whitewater Gardens, Reinders and Christine's Landscape Design are privileged to sponsor this tradition, but we need your nominations.*

To submit a nomination: • Write a letter or email, 500 words or less, sharing your nominee’s breast cancer story and why you wish to honor her; • Include your name, phone number, address and email and your nominee’s contact information; • Send your letter to marlene@RWmagazine.com or Healing Waters Project, RochesterWomen magazine, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 *Criteria: Nominees must be newly diagnosed or currently in treatment for breast cancer and must agree to be photographed and interviewed by Rochester Women magazine for publication; the water garden must be for the nominee herself (is non-transferable) and must be installed in her yard (where she or her family is the homeowner), which must be in the Rochester vicinity. The water garden will be installed between May and July 2013.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Field

43March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


before

“If you think about the construction of older homes, the construction consists of boards with gaps. Those spaces allow air leakage and drive up heating and cooling costs while decreasing energy efficiency,” explains Eckert. “The best way to conserve energy is to use less of it in the first place. If more air stays in a house, then less air must be heated or cooled to replace it, and less energy is used,” he adds, explaining why he chose to put so much time, money and effort into sealing and insulating the remodel. Eckert also wanted these “green” apartments to be beautiful, so he took extra care during reconstruction to save the 100-year-old wood floors and revitalized the upstairs living space by vaulting the ceiling and refurbishing the deck. In the lower level, Eckert opened up the kitchen/dining area, constructed a dividing arch between the living room and dining room to create visual interest and added a wall off of the living room with French doors to make a bedroom. The result: two new, energy-conscious apartments that are as charming as they are earth-friendly.

before

after

Linda Lia is a freelance writer living in Rochester.

Eckert created a parquet flooring for the upper deck from recycled redwood and added a wooden seat made from reclaimed fence (which covers bathroom vents) and a movable dividing gate .

RWmagazine.com March/April 201344


DEMYSTI FY

Your Camera!

Is your camera calling the shots? Take a journey with award Dawn Sanborn and learn to use your camera in a whole new way. DEMYSTIFY ~ Your Camera Time to take command of your camera settings and get off the auto button! Tuesday March 12th 6-8 PM Tuesday April 9th 6-8 PM

Upcoming Worksho Wor Workshops: k ho ps: p Camera DEMYSTIFY ~ Your Cam amerr a

Time to take command of your camera cam m era ra winning button! settings photographer and get off the auto butto o n!

Tuesday January 8th 6-8 PM Tuesday February 5th 6-8 PM M

DEMYSTIFY ~ Composition Learn the secret behind compositional elements that will forever change the way you see and shoot! Tuesday March 26th 6-8 PM Tuesday April 23rd 6-8 PM

Mini workshops include casual lectures, hands-on assistance, and time for questions & answers. These dates don’t work with your schedule? Try the You+2: Simply grab two friends, let me know a date that works for you, and we will coordinate a time for a workshop!

“I really learned far more today (in two hours) than I did in three weeks at that PowerPoint class!” ~ Erin

4March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

For more Information: dawn.sanborn@live.com 507 252 4662

W o r ksh o p s demystifyyourcamera.com


home

Creation and Recreation Cumulus Radioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home, Vacation and RV Show celebrates 50 years BY PENNY MARSHALL orget wallowing in the whine of winter. Round up family and friends, and celebrate the 50th Annual Cumulus Radio Home, Vacation and RV Show, featuring vendors with products and services for home and vacationing, including RVs, at the Olmsted County Fairgrounds, March 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17.

Graham Arena at the Olmsted County Fairgrounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We continue the tradition because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good way for us to connect with Rochester and the surrounding area,â&#x20AC;? says Lee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually the longest running show of its kind in the area, one of the largest indoor RV displays with one entire arena filled mostly with RVs, boats and golf carts. There really is something for everyone.â&#x20AC;?

BUILT TO LAST

NUTS AND BOLTS

F

Originally called the Family Home Fair, this annual event was first Most homeowners have an ongoing home improvement â&#x20AC;&#x153;to-doâ&#x20AC;? sponsored by the Rochester Chamber of Commerce and was held list; this show is a great place to coordinate ideas and materials. It at the Mayo Civic Center Auditorium. Back then, air conditioning featuresâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;under one roofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the latest trends in design and products was new to the market, and heating, refrigerators, freezers and and offers one-stop access to experts in roofing, lawn care, kitchen tires were the exhibit hot spots. Entertainment was also a big part design, gardening, landscaping, home organization, sewing, of the gathering. A talent stage welcomed acts like Jerry Muradâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insulation, gutters, siding, general remodeling and even health. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a particular project in mind, jot down pertinent Harmonicats (seen on the Ed Sullivan Show), as well as a local talent competition with cash prizes. measurements and details, and bring them with you. They may â&#x20AC;&#x153;I won $50 playing my musical saw in the talent show,â&#x20AC;? recalls come in handy when considering various materials and options that Harley Flathers, former KROC Radio announcer, about the 1954 vendors have on display. Home Fair. That year, 11,000 people attended REST, RELAXATION AND FUN the fairâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;entitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;100 Years of Progressâ&#x20AC;? to 2 #>##>#6 Once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re done with your creation, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll commemorate Rochesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centennialâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and 5   ;)   probably be ready for some recreation. Whether 1,000 were turned away on the night of the talent  5)&  your summer vacation plans take you across show finals because the venue was full. >6 5 # "+  # 56; the country or to a nearby golf course or resort, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In 1963, KROC Radio took over the show and   61 53 vendors and experts in travel, camping/RVs, rebranded it as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Home, Vacation and Farm . ?@AB@C boating and leisure can inspire and assist you with Show,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? says Terry Lee, Cumulus Radio General Fri., March 15, 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm information and a host of products from golf carts Sales Manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It then became the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Home and Sat., March 16, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm to pontoons. Vacation Showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and has since changed to what it Sun., March 17, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm is today: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cumulus Radio's Home, Vacation and Visit over 100 vendors and three RV Penny Marshall is a freelance writer RV Show.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? dealers featuring the latest in services from Rochester. As the number of exhibitors increased over and wares for remodeling, decorating, health, home improvement, vacation and the years, the event relocated in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s to

Photos at right courtesy of Terry Lee.

travel. Free admission and parking.

RWmagazine.com March/April 20134


food

4March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


No-fuss ideas for spring gatherings BY MARGO STICH • PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

B

runch makes weekend mornings marvelous. Featuring classic breakfast and lunch items, this versatile meal can dress up and go formal for special occasions or don casual elegance for more relaxed affairs. So, whether you’re hosting your favorite niece’s bridal shower or just having the book club over on a Saturday, here are ideas for semi-formal and informal brunches, complete with everything from inspiring table settings to tested menus and delicious recipes, pie included.

RWmagazine.com March/April 20134%


Casual Elegance: An informal buffet A

buffet brunch is the perfect solution to accommodating many guests, especially when you want to keep the surroundings casual. But just because the setting is informal, it doesn’t mean the food has to be. The complex, surprising flavors of the Three-Cheese Stuffed French Toast on this menu will add a touch of elegance to your gathering.

French Three-Cheese Stuffed and honey Toast* with local jams Baked ham slices Deviled eggs Peaches and berries uffins Assorted scones and m eese Pie* Strawberry Cream Ch as Make your own mimos

) )

) ) )

)

)

Coffee

)

Three-Cheese Stuffed French Toast 1 loaf Challah bread* (French bread can be substituted)

1/2 cup orange marmalade

1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese

1/2 cup 2% milk

1 cup (4 oz.) mozzarella cheese, shredded

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 cup ricotta cheese

6 eggs

Corn flakes, crushed

Mix the three cheeses and marmalade. Cut bread in 1-inch slices then cut a pocket midway to the edge of the crust in each slice (be careful to avoid cutting too far down); stuff with cream cheese mixture (2–3 Tbsp. per large slice of Challah). Squeeze cut edge together slightly to seal. Beat eggs, milk and salt together. Dip each piece of bread into egg mixture, flipping to get both flat sides, soaking briefly on each side. Coat with corn flakes then place on a platter and let stand 5 minutes before frying. Cook over medium heat, 3–4 minutes on each side, until golden brown. Serve with jam or honey. *Note: amount of bread required will vary given filling amount and egg dip used per slice.

40March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Strawberry Cream Cheese Pie 1 9-inch baked and cooled pie shell

1/2 tsp. vanilla

1 (3 oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened

1/2 cup heavy cream, whipped

1/8 tsp. lemon extract

1/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar Beat together the cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and lemon extract until smooth and creamy. Fold in the whipped cream. Spread over the bottom of the prepared pie shell. Chill a minimum of one hour. Topping: 1/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1/3 cup grenadine syrup

2 Tbsp. cornstarch

1 1/2 pints fresh strawberries, halved

1/2 cup water

1/8 tsp. lemon extract

Combine the brown sugar and cornstarch in a saucepan. Slowly stir in the water. Heat over medium heat to dissolve the sugar, then add the grenadine syrup and lemon extract, stirring constantly until thickened and clear; cool. Stir in the strawberries. Spread evenly over the cream cheese layer. Chill 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 hours to set. Serves 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8. This is best served the day it is prepared as its moisture content causes crust to turn soggy.

RWmagazine.com March/April 20134:


SittingPretty: A semi-formal affair S

et a fun yet formal table with ease by bringing out the fine china, silverware and stemware and giving it a boost of color with bright chargers, fun placemats and an arrangement of spring flowers set loosely in a glass vase.

)

Cranberry Fizz*

)

Garden Strata*

)

Pork sausage links

)

Orange and grapefruit slices

Assorted scones and muffins wi th jellies and honey

)

Garden Strata 2 Tbsp. butter

1/2 tsp. dried basil

1/3 cup chopped onion

1/2 tsp. thyme

1 cup fresh spinach, broccoli or mushrooms, finely chopped

3/4 tsp. salt

6 eggs

1/2 cup whole milk

1 1/2 cups shredded Swiss or Parmesan cheese (or combination of the two), divided

2 cups packed fresh bread crumbs

1/4 tsp. pepper

In a large bowl combine all of the ingredients, reserving 1/2 cup of the cheese. Pour into a buttered 8-inch pan. Sprinkle the reserved cheese on top of the frittata. Bake at 350° F 30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;40 minutes. Serves 6. Local farm-fresh eggs are ideal for frittata or strata.

2March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Cranberry Fizz 2 cups cranberry juice cocktail

2 (12 oz.) cans ginger ale, chilled

1/2 cup grapefruit juice

6-8 fresh raspberries or oranges for garnish

1/2 cup orange juice 1/4 cup sugar

In a glass pitcher, combine juices and sugar; chill. To serve, pour 3/4 cup juice mixture into a champagne glass. Garnish each glass with a raspberry or orange slice. Serves 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8.

Food Editor Margo Stich would like to thank Pier 1 Imports for the table settings and floral arrangements on pages 40-41, Great Harvest Bread Co. for the Challah bread, scones and muffins and LeJardin Floral for the pink and white tulip arrangement on page 36-37.

Classic l American M Menu Casual, Comfortable Atmosphere Serving steaks, burgers, pot roast, seafood, and salads. Local and organic food sources including Schultz Farm Organic Eggs, Organic Flour from Welcome, MN, and staples from the Wedge Co-op.

Breakfast: Fri - Sun 8am Lunch Mon - Sun from 11am Dinner Tues - Sat 120 Elton Hills Drive NW (Next to Dunn Bros) 285.2516 RWmagazine.com March/April 20131


HOW OW TO O

food

MAPLE SYRUP BY MARGO STICH PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

Finished syrup is packed in clean, sterile glass jars rather than cans or plastic because cans will rust and syrup stored in plastic has a shorter shelf life.

I

n cold climates, starch accumulates in the trunks and roots of different types of maple trees before winter. In the spring, it converts to sugar that rises in the sap. This sap is collected through holes bored into the trunks and heated until much of the water evaporates, leaving the naturally sweet syrup we love.

1

Step 1:

2

3

Tree selection. Richard Merrill of Merrill's Merribee Farms in Elgin, a maple syrup producer and year-round vendor at the Rochester Downtown Farmers Market, suggests selecting a sugar (or hard) maple tree versus a soft maple for tapping. Soft maples have grayish bark while hard maples have black or dark bark. He also advises against tapping a tree less than 12 inches in diameter.

Step 5: Here a wood-stoked burner unit heats the sap,

Step 2: Bore tapholes to about a 1-inch depth, drilled

Merrill then removes the hot syrup from the heat source and strains it through layered sheets of felt cloth to remove any naturally occurring crystals or minerals which have formed while boiling the sap.

upward to facilitate sap flow, then insert the spout. The sap drips downward through the spout directly into the collection container or flows through tubing attached to the spout, as shown here.

Step 3: Covered containers help keep rain and unwanted debris from dropping into the collecting sap.

which has been placed in a large rectangular metal pan. It is important to monitor the boiling sap so it doesn’t burn as the syrup forms. Check with a hydrometer as the water evaporates until the density reading is 66°. This “Brix scale measurement” reflects the amount of sugar in the solution.

Step 6: Step 7:

“Foaming” becomes apparent as the hot syrup filters. This foaming can be skimmed off with a long-handled skimmer spoon.

Step 8: Strain a second time to fully clear the syrup; Step 4: When tapping from multiple trees, a hose system 30-40 gallons of sap yields one gallon of syrup. (It takes a bit can be set up to direct all the sap to a collection area. A tubing system, like the one pictured here, eliminates the need to manually haul full buckets. Merrill runs about 1,000 feet of hose in his annual collection. If desired, a T-tap approach can be used rather than a single tap/spout. Merrill uses a pump system to centrally collect the sap before transporting it for boiling.

3March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

more sap from a soft maple than a hard due to the naturally higher water content in the sap of a soft maple.)

Margo Stich is RochesterWomen food editor. She wishes to thank Richard Merrill for his diligence, time and wonderful instruction.


4

 5

Buckets are now full of raw sap.

 

6

7

8 Pecan Whole Wheat Waffles 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup whole wheat flour 4 tsp. sugar 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 3 eggs, separated 2 cups buttermilk (or sour milk) 1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp. butter, melted 1/3 cup chopped pecans, optional

Maple syrup and fresh berries add that special touch to nut-studded waďŹ&#x201E;es pictured here. What a way to start the day!

Combine the dry ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring to mix through. In a large bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, buttermilk and melted butter. While stirring, gradually blend the dry ingredients into the liquid until no lumps remain. In a small bowl, with an electric mixer, beat the egg whites to stiff peaks. Fold whites and pecans into the batter. Bake in a greased waffle iron until golden. Serve hot with maple syrup. Serves 6.

           !!  """#

            



     RWmagazine.com March/April 20134


March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Seasons of the Vine BY MARGO STICH

food

Margo Stich, food editor

Lingo Vino Tips for speaking the language of wine D Com mmon wine terminology: o wine terms seem foreign to you? Rochester now offers several tasty ways to brush up on your wine lingo. Visit a tasting room. Known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;experience tasting,â&#x20AC;? local winery tasting rooms are a great place to figure out tannins, finish and body as you sip on samples. Take a class. Winemaker Justin Osbourne of Four Daughters Vinyard & Winery in Spring Valley, often conducts seminars to explore wine terminology. Barbara Pitcher, local sommelier (i.e., a trained wine professional), also offers classes through her new venture â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pairing to Perfection,â&#x20AC;? an ongoing series of fourweek classes held at SĂ&#x2013;ntĂŠs restaurant. Barbara uses a flight (i.e., selection of small samples) of three whites and three reds to teach participants about wine. Her goal is to teach the steps required to effectively taste wine so discerningly that you could blind taste a wine and identify the varietal. To facilitate discussion, classes are limited to 16. Sessions include culinary tidbits to demonstrate â&#x20AC;&#x153;how profoundly food really impacts wine,â&#x20AC;? says Barbara who recognizes that wine and food palates are personalized and encourages participants to â&#x20AC;&#x153;give yourself credit that yours is valid.â&#x20AC;? For more information, contact Barbara at 952-358-1285 or bcpitcher@pairingtoperfection.com.

/> / > 

5?B indicates that a wineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body, acid id ds an nd tannins all are in the proper prrop por or ortions.

/ 5"?B the weight on th he palate due to the level of alcohol, residual sugar and glycerol. le  "?B refers to texture on the palate which is due to high tannins and glycerol. + 6?B the flavors left after swallowing or spitting a wine and the duration of these flavors.  # 5?B indicates full body and soft tannins. & # # ?B a reference to the backbone of acid and/or tannins that support a wineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of â&#x20AC;&#x153;b bod odyâ&#x20AC;? y ; necessary for aging.

UPCOMING EVENTS:

WINERY AND TROLLEY TOURS

March 8, Beer Tasting, DoubleTree Hotel, 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:30 p.m., presented by Leadership Greater Rochester Class of 2013 to raise funds for the Channel One kitchen. Tickets: $20 per person in advance, contact Dusty at 280-7240.

RochesterWomen magazine and Rochester Trolley and Tour Company will begin area winery trips this spring. Starting Sunday, March 24, with a visit to Rochester-area wineries: Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery in Spring Valley where you can enjoy wine tasting and culinary creations, Salem Glen Vineyard and Winery and Post Town Winery tasting room. Sunday, April 21, Food Editor Margo Stich will guide a tour through several scenic Mississippi River area wineries: Danzinger Vineyards & Winery, Alma, Wisc., Villa Bellezza Winery & Vineyard, Pepin, Wisc., and Whitewater Wines, Plainview. Sunday, May 19, Margo leads a tour to wineries in the bluff country of the Mississippi River Valley: Seven Hawks Vineyards tasting room, Fountain, Wisc., River View Vineyard & Winery, north of La Crescent, Minn., and Garvin Heights Vineyards overlooking Winona. Sunday, June 16, treat Dad to a special wine and art tour when we visit Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery in Spring Valley then go on to Lanesboro for Art in the Park. For more details and to make reservations, visit rochestermntours.com.

March 13, Whisky Tasting, Plummer House, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 p.m., a fundraiser for the Friends of the Library to benefit the Rochester Public Library. Enjoy a tasting of Beam Global whiskies. Tickets: $40 per person/$70 per couple (early bird registration). Register at www.rochesterpubliclibrary.org/friends/ or call 328-2343. March 22, Early Riserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 39th â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night Out for a Cause,â&#x20AC;? Rochester International Event Center, 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 p.m. Enjoy wine, beer and spirits until 9 p.m. Musical entertainment will follow (9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11 p.m.). This event supports Hearts of Hope, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Rochester Area Family Y, Crisis Nursery, Ironwood Springs Christian Ranch and Boys and Girls Club. Tickets: $25 in advance, $30 at the door. Call 288-6575 for more information. April 26, Paws and Claws 6th Annual Wine Tasting, Rochester Athletic Club, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 p.m. Tickets: $25 in advance at Paws and Clawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main office, 602 7th St NW or $30 at the door. April 26, PossAbilities Wine & Roses, Somerby Golf Community, 5:30 p.m. This benefit offers a silent and live auction and four-course, gourmet mealâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; wines paired with each courseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to benefit children and adults with disabilities. Tickets: $90 per person. For more, visit possabilities.org or call 281-6116.

RWmagazine.com March/April 2013


March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


healthy living

Getting The latest exercise challenge hits Rochester BY BOB FREUND PHOTOGRAPHY BY BOB FREUND Fitness patrons working out at CrossFit Progression.

D

on’t expect treadmills, mirrors or tiny TVs when you step into a CrossFit gym. Instead, you’ll find what CrossFitters call “the box” — large, open buildings that are more like warehouses than gymnasiums. With rubber tiles covering the floors, gymnastics rings hanging from the ceiling and kettlebells lining the walls, the three Rochester CrossFit gyms—CrossFit Credence, CrossFit Progression and CrossFit Unshackled—are all Spartan spaces by design. The message is clear: the box is a workspace.

ALL-AROUND CONDITIONING

FEELING FIT You might expect to see only fit young people, sports players or extreme fitness buffs in a CrossFit gym, and you’ll likely find some. You’ll also find mothers with young children, middle-aged managers and thirty-something registered nurses coming three times a week to classes. At CrossFit Credence, patrons range from as young as age five (in a special kids’ class once a week) to age 66. Joan Eagan, age 56, slimmed and strengthened with CrossFit: “With Dave and Allie at CrossFit Credence, I’ve lost three clothing sizes. . .and I’m stronger in my daily life in what I do.” She even credits her speedy recovery from hip surgery to her CrossFit training. Amy Moses, age 28, ran to keep in shape before joining CrossFit Unshackled. After only a couple of weeks of full training, she says, “I can actually see my muscles, and it’s helped with my endurance.” “This is the only thing that works for me now,” says Kit Gatcheco, the first athlete to join CrossFit Progression. “I think I’m still fit, being 40 years old.”

CrossFit’s origins trace back to 1995, when a coach named Greg Glassman, who trained police officers in Santa Cruz, Calif., opened a gym based on his unique principles. Since 2005, this fitness regime has sought to be the ultimate, all-around fitness program and has exploded into a wellness phenomenon, expanding from 18 gyms to about 4,000 internationally, according to CrossFit Credence co-owner, David Timm. IS CROSSFIT FOR YOU? Since late 2009, three CrossFit gyms have opened in Rochester. Most of CrossFit Progression’s members have some Together, they train about 350 fitness patrons, many athletic background, says co-owner Matt Arnold. of whom are women. The workouts are designed for But past athletic training is not required at any local full-body conditioning, using a range of exercises CrossFit gym. mostly taken from gymnastics, sprinting and Because of the strenuous nature of CrossFit, trainers weightlifting. They typically are short and intense, try to ensure safety and monitor the physical demands with athletes moving continuously from one exercise of the workouts. A doctor’s clearance is not generally to another, and stress functional movements. needed to join but may be advisable, and all three local “We take things you do in everyday CrossFit gyms require newcomers to take a beginner’s life…push, pull, run, jump, squat and throw… course teaching safe exercise techniques, including and put them into a workout,” says Allie Timm, weightlifting regimens. co-owner and trainer at CrossFit Credence. Cost also may play a part in a decision to join. It’s all done on the clock. Speed is a primary Monthly rates may run as high as $200, depending on goal for CrossFitters. Athletes compete to see the gym’s pricing and its membership levels. For more who can finish the workout fastest. But, once information, visit CrossFitCredence.com, they’ve finished, they’re expected to root for CFPFIT.com (CrossFit Progression) and those still going. CrossFitUnshackled.com. “If you’re the last person finishing, you have about 10 people cheering you on,” says Chris Mundt, owner of CrossFit Unshackled, which Kit Gatcheco using gymnastics rings Bob Freund is a freelance writer from Rochester. as part of his CrossFit workout. opened in January.

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0March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


healthy living

Back to Health From headaches to colicky babies, chiropractic care offers alternative relief BY MICHELLE KUBITZ

W

Chiropractic: â&#x20AC;&#x153;the science of adjusting any abnormal articulations of the human body, especially those of the spinal column, for the purpose of giving freedom of action to impinged nerves that may cause pain or deranged function,â&#x20AC;? according to the Minnesota legislature.

ith a focus on wellness through alternative means and about 40 licensed chiropractic doctors in the Rochester area, chiropractic care is taking root in our community. But what is it really and who can benefit from this type of care?

HISTORY OF CHIROPRACTIC CARE

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1895 Daniel David

One of the biggest battles waged by the pioneers of chiropractic care was overcoming the perception that their methods were a heap of quackery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chiropractic is a very misunderstood profession by many,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Monica Nelson of Northgate Chiropractic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, skeptics open to learning about the benefits of chiropractic typically make great patients. We spend time answering questions and clearing up the myths they may have been told through their family, friends, internet, etc. They typically follow through with care if our answers make sense and are reasonable to them.â&#x20AC;? According to the American Chiropractic Association and the State of Minnesota, doctors of chiropractic have stringent educational requirements to become licensed, including pre-medical undergraduate college education and four to five years of professional study at an accredited chiropractic college with significant time spent in clinical training. They are also required to pass a written examination, given by the Board of Chiropractic Examiners, which includes testing in the basic sciences of anatomy, physiology, bacteriology, pathology, hygiene and chemistry as related to the human body or mind; the clinical sciences of chiropractic, chiropractic physiotherapy, diagnosis, roentgenology (radiology) and nutrition; and professional ethics. The time commitment involved with some chiropractic treatments can lead to skepticism for some people, says Dr. Elizabeth Olson of The Connection in Stewartville, who used to be a skeptic herself. Dr. Olson, whose original background was in physical therapy, changed her perception of chiropractic when she began working as a low-force physical therapist at a chiropractic office. After many discussions and after reviewing some of the research that has been done regarding chiropractic, Dr. Olson became attuned to the benefits of the practiceâ&#x20AC;Śand became a chiropractor herself.

Palmerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;known as D.D. Palmer, the father of American chiropractic careâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;performed his first adjustment in Iowa.

1919 Chiropractic became a licensed health care profession in Minnesota.

1963 The U.S. National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) is established to promote consistency and reciprocity between state examining boards. 1994 In the U.S, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research provides the first authoritative report that manipulation is a proven and preferred treatment for most acute low-back pain patients. 2002 Chiropractic services introduced into the military health system by Congress. 2005 The World Health Organization (WHO) publishes guidelines on training and safety in chiropractic, recommending educational standards for services in all member countries.

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*& The typical patient seeking chiropractic care is â&#x20AC;&#x153;usually in some type of pain that no longer responds to self-management and is looking for a more natural means of treatment,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Nelson explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most have tried over-the-counter meds, creams and exercises that may no longer address the root cause of their problem.â&#x20AC;? Dr. Melissa Brennan, Brennan Chiropractic, also sees patients seeking chiropractic care as an alternative way to reclaim their health, especially when it has been ravaged by stress. According to Dr. Brennan, there are three types of stress: mental stress (the worst type); chemical stress from processed foods, medications, lack of nutritional supplements and lack of water; and physical stress from car accidents, sports injuries, and repetitive tasks, such as sitting at a computer all day long without proper posture or other ergonomic corrections. Eliminating or even lessening these stresses will decrease the need for regular chiropractic adjustments, says Dr. Brennan. The most common ailments Dr. Laura Pirkl of Pirkl Chiropractic sees â&#x20AC;&#x153;are a very high percentage of headaches and low back pain.â&#x20AC;? Other issues she treats are body pain, rotator cuff injuries and abnormal gastrointestinal issues. There is also a growing patient base that seeks care as part of a preventive, wellness lifestyle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These patients are proactively getting treated so future problems do not arise,â&#x20AC;? adds Dr. Nelson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They treat it as a facet of their health like exercise, dental hygiene or annual physicals. They utilize regular chiropractic care to have optimal function in the present and prevent pain in the future.â&#x20AC;?

+&)& Never been to the chiropractor? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what to expect from a first-time visit to a chiropractor: â&#x20AC;˘ Thorough patient health history, including diet and lifestyle; â&#x20AC;˘ Physical exam which may include diagnostic studies, such as x-ray; â&#x20AC;˘ Review of findings that includes your diagnosis; and â&#x20AC;˘ Treatment plan for your condition. Course of treatment will vary based on if the condition is acute (new) or chronic (old) and treatment is customized for each patient.

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Activator Tool-assisted technique that is gentle and applies a force to a restricted or imbalanced joint.

Active Release Techniques (ART) A soft tissue treatment that is commonly used for treatment of sports injuries, soft tissue injuries and overuse conditions.

Applied Kinesiology adjustment/correction.

Chiropractic Biophysics (CBP) The CBP Technique emphasizes optimal posture and spinal alignment as the primary goals of chiropractic care while simultaneously documenting improvements in pain and functional based outcomes.

Flexion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Distraction

A non-invasive

technique that utilizes a special â&#x20AC;&#x153;movingâ&#x20AC;? table to stretch and open the joints of a lower back and upper back region.

Gonstead

Manual technique but

distinguished by the many seated, knee-chest

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table adjustments.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chiropractic care offers relief of pain by reducing tissue inflammation and spasm and restoring normal motion and flexibility,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Pirkl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This can alleviate stiffness, headaches, back and neck pain. The care we offer also improves relaxation and impacts our self-awareness, coordination, sense of balance and well-being.â&#x20AC;? Modern chiropractic care has emerged beyond the â&#x20AC;&#x153;snapcrackle-popâ&#x20AC;? of traditional chiropractic. Chiropractors are taking their time-tested, traditional methods and infusing their practices with more options for their patients, including acupuncture, massage therapy and nutritional services. F?  # 5? ?7 6?AG? 5?AH 2March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

Muscle testing is used

to determine location and direction of a joint

Graston Technique

This technique is

a form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization.

Nucca

Upper cervical technique that is applied

to the top bone in the cervical spine.

Thompson Drop

This technique uses the

table as a tool, which has sections that move up and go down with the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight and light pressure to correct their problem areas.


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3March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Dr. Laura Pirkl adjusting an 8-year-old patient.

The amount of pressure used by a chiropractor in adjusting children is â&#x20AC;&#x153;similar to checking the ripeness of an avocado or a tomato at the grocery store.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dr. Laura Pirkl, Pirkl Chiropractic

 Although these all sound like â&#x20AC;&#x153;grown-upâ&#x20AC;? problems, a significant number of chiropractic patients are infants and children. It may be a difficult concept to envisionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;chiropractic adjustments for newborn babies and infantsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but pediatric chiropractic care is a growing niche parents are using to address a myriad of ailments in children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chiropractic care can help with many conditions in children,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Katie Layden from RAK Chiropractic , listing such issues as colic, ear infections, asthma, bedwetting, acid reflux, ADD/ADHD, torticollis (asymmetrical head or neck position) and nursing problems. Pediatric chiropractic doctors donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t twist and turn children into adjustment but utilize gentle, low-impact pressure to achieve proper alignment for babies. The amount of pressure used by a chiropractor in adjusting children is â&#x20AC;&#x153;similar to checking the ripeness of an avocado or a tomato at the grocery store,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Pirkl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re checking their neck and upper cervical processes,â&#x20AC;? she adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have gone into the hospital and have adjusted babies as soon as they are out of the birth canal,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Olson. Although that seems relatively early for a person to start an ongoing relationship with a chiropractic doctor, there is logic in it. "Even in an uncomplicated birth scenario, it is estimated that at least 90 pounds of force is placed on the baby by the uterine contractions and active pushing," Dr. Olson explains, referring to a vaginal birth with no complications for the mother or baby.

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There are more than 60,000 licensed doctors of chiropractic (DCs) in the United States, 3,000 in Minnesota and nearly 40 in Rochester.

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*, Any woman with childbearing experience can detail the aches and pains associated with carrying a child. But are these â&#x20AC;&#x153;growing painsâ&#x20AC;? necessary? According to Dr. Layden, who primarily focuses her education and practice on pediatric, prenatal and postnatal chiropractic care, they are treatable. Some of the common symptoms from which pregnant women seek relief are lower back pain or sciatica (pain and tenderness of the sciatic nerve). â&#x20AC;&#x153;A woman can seek care up until delivery, even while in labor, to reduce pain and aid in progression of birth,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Layden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If they have never had chiropractic care before, they quickly realize how much relief they receive,â&#x20AC;? she adds. Another reason women seek chiropractic care during their pregnancy is for the Webster Technique, a technique used â&#x20AC;&#x153;to reduce intrauterine constraint to help babies position themselves ideally for birth,â&#x20AC;? explains Dr. Layden, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and help with the breech presentation of the baby.â&#x20AC;? According to Dr. Layden, there are no risks for pregnant women in seeking chiropractic care, so long as they are going to a chiropractor trained and experienced in prenatal care. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find a professional that is clinically and educationally experienced in pre/post natal care,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Layden advises. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look for credentials from the ICPA (International Chiropractic Pediatric Association) or other professional associations.â&#x20AC;? Michelle Kubitz is a freelance writer who lives in Rochester.

/*+&+ ***-:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A woman can seek care up until delivery, even while in labor, to reduce pain and aid in progression of birth.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dr. Katie Layden, RAK Chiropractic

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Relief of back, neck or joint pain; Sciatic pain relief; Rib pain relief if baby is too high; Better sleep at night; Easier, faster, more comfortable labor; Better positioning for the baby in utero; May help prevent a potential Caesarian delivery; and Controlling symptoms of nausea.

Source: Dr. Katie Layden, RAK Chiropractic

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Healthy Kids Day Saturday, April 27th, 11AM-3PM

Healthy Kids Day is the Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national initiative to improve the health and well-being of families and to help them get a jump on creating a healthier summer. Adults and children of all ages are welcome! FREE EVENT, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! Join the fun! Visit www.rochfamy.org for more information.   

RWmagazine.com March/April 2013


A beneďŹ t concert to promote awareness of the issue of Human TrafďŹ cking. of Modern Day Slavery Featuring:

#FMMB7PDF Young Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir and

#FMMB'JPSF Choir With guest appearance by:

Minnesota Youth Ballet Academy Proceeds will support the Human TrafďŹ cking Awareness ministry of the

6LVWHUVRI6DLQW)UDQFLV5RFKHVWHU01 $10 per person Register at: www.singoutloud.org Hurry, seating is limited!

March 15, 2013 Doors open at 7 PM - Concert starts at 7:30 PM

Lourdes Chapel, Assisi Heights

Next: Breaking the Chains Part 2 Human TrafďŹ cking Awareness Event May 18, 2013 - 9am-Noon - Assisi Heights www.rochesterfranciscan.org

March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


community

Breaking the Chains of Modern-Day Slavery Rochesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sisters of Saint Francis vie against human trafficking BY K.L. SNYDER â&#x20AC;˘ PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKE HARDWICK PHOTOGRAPHY

T

he slave trade, an ages-old enterprise, has updated its modus operandi, added the internet to its dealings and undergone a name change: human trafficking. Modern-day slaveryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sophisticated but still nefariousâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;perpetuates its ancestorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s evil. Human trafficking is â&#x20AC;&#x153;organized criminal activity in which human beings are treated as possessions to be controlled and exploited (as by being forced into prostitution or involuntary labor),â&#x20AC;? according to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary. Trafficking forces its victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;80 percent of whom are girls and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;into prostitution, child pornography and slave labor. It is organized crimeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fastest-growing industry, profiting the perpetrators $34 billion per year.

RWmagazine.com March/April 2013%


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0March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


SISTERS OF SAINT FRANCIS VS. HUMAN TRAFFICKING In the summer of 2011, the Rochester Franciscan Sisters of Assisi Heights met to set their direction for the next six years. Determined to â&#x20AC;&#x153;speak respectfully and act courageously on the issue of oppression and marginalization of women and children,â&#x20AC;? the Sisters launched a crusade to raise public awareness about human trafficking and its presence in Rochester, the State of Minnesota and the world; educate people to take informed action; and liberate and restore dignity to human trafficking victims. As part of that endeavor, the Sisters held a three-day awareness-raising event this January called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking the Chains of Modern-Day Slavery.â&#x20AC;? It included rallies, a film screening and two informational workshops with panel discussions to answer questions about human trafficking in Rochester. The panels included Rochester and Olmsted County police officers, two trafficking survivors, representatives from the Olmsted County attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office and victim services, State Representative Kim Norton, and two non-profit, human trafficking victim advocacy agenciesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mission 21 and Breaking Free. The workshops drew crowds that filled University Center's Hill Theater and Assisi Heightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; auditorium. They raised awareness of facts and perversions important, and horrible, to learn.

This painting by Mission 21 founder and director, Stephanie Holt, represents the fear and helplessness of human traďŹ&#x192;cking. Her artwork and others were on display at the three-day event.

YES, IT HAPPENS HERE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Human trafficking happens in the world, in the United States, in Minnesota, in Rochester,â&#x20AC;? Sister Marlys Jax told attendees at the event at Assisi Heights. City and county law enforcement officers agreed, explaining that that prostitution and child pornography occur here regularly with approximately 72 prostitution-related arrests and at least 37 child pornography investigations since 2010. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The demand in Rochester to purchase sex is huge,â&#x20AC;? said Investigator Brent Petersen, Rochester Police Department.

Law enforcement officials emphasized that this demand is not coming from Rochesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visitors but from people who live and work in and around Olmsted County. Rochester-based Mission 21â&#x20AC;&#x201D;which helps exploited boys and girls ages 15 and youngerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;added that the average entry-age of children forced into prostitution is 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14. Members of the panels explained that victims of child pornography can be much younger than 12 and that child pornographyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;covertly purchased and viewed onlineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;often leads to the sexual assault of children.

The January events included dramatic presentations by human traďŹ&#x192;cking survivors Shamere McKenzie(left) and Stacy Jewell Louis of Washington, D.C. (right). RWmagazine.com March/April 2013:


“A lot of people think of a man looking at pictures,” Petersen said, “but research shows that 85 percent of convicted child porn possessors admit to hands-on contact with children.” Petersen also stressed that pornography victims include boys and girls: “In that underground world of child porn, pictures of little boys are especially highly prized.” The workshop closed with a prayer service for human trafficking victims, which included a presentation by seven Lourdes High School drama students who brought human trafficking stories to life.

CALL TO ACTION So what can we do to help? Sisters Briana McCarthy and Anne Walch encouraged attendees to: 1. Talk to others about human trafficking; 2. Read about it by Googling “human trafficking” for web-based articles or read the books “Half the Sky” and “The Blue Notebook;” 3. Watch DVDs like “Lives for Sale” and “Not My Life;” 4. Invite organizations like Mission 21, Breaking Free or the Rochester Franciscan Sisters to speak to your volunteer, civic and church groups. Meanwhile, the Sisters continue their relentless efforts against modern-day slavery this spring with “Breaking the Chains, Part 2,” which will feature two events at Assisi Heights: a fundraising concert including Bella Voce Young Women’s Choir, March 15, 7 p.m. at Lourdes Chapel, Assisi Heights, and another awareness-raising presentation on May 18, 9 a.m.-noon.

“Emancipation didn’t end slavery,” expressed Ellen Wick, Lourdes High School student, pictured here participating in the prayer service at the January workshop at Assisi Heights.

Karen Snyder is a Rochester freelance writer.

RESOURCES AND CONTACTS: • Sisters of Saint Francis: rochesterfranciscan.org • End Child Prostitution and Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes: ecpatusa.org • The Code: thecode.org • MN Girls Are Not For Sale: MNGirlsNotForSale.org • Shared Hope International: sharedhope.org • Mission 21: mission21mn.org • Breaking Free: breakingfree.net

Sister Briana McCarthy leads the event participants in song. 2March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


Join us as we honor eight outstanding leaders during this fundraising luncheon. Noon, Thursday, April 18, 2013 Hilton Minneapolis Women of Distinction Presenting Sponsor

Reserve today at GirlScoutsRV.org       

RWmagazine.com March/April 20131


travel

2, 4, 6, 8… Road Trips You’ll Appreciate Fun, affordable vacations within easy driving distance of Rochester BY CINDY FINCH

I

f a tropical vacation doesn’t fit in your budget or timetable, but cabin fever has reached its pitch, consider several fantastic destinations just a few hours from Rochester. Whether you’re looking to get away for a few days or a week, RochesterWomen magazine(RW ) staff and readers recommend four road trips that are inexpensive, full of amenities and only two, four, six or eight hours driving time from home.

3March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


A

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

ll-aboard for fun! Hailed as “The Waterpark Capital of the World,” Wisconsin Dells offers adventure for the whole family. A two-hour drive east of Rochester, off I-90, the trip to this four-season destination is short enough to keep everyone in the family happy and much easier (and less expensive) than flying to Florida. The Dells boast multiple large indoor water park resorts, fun food, endless activities, interesting scenery and great shopping. The copious activities give kids time to play and parents time to relax. “The Dells is a playground for everyone,” says Peggy Nixa, AAA travel agent and Today’s Traveling Women founder. “This destination offers an abundance of scenic, natural beauty with its beautiful rock formations and man-made thrills for the kids.” Even during the early spring months, summer fun continues at the indoor water parks and adventure spots.

Besides the popular water parks, other “don't miss” attractions are the scenic Dells Boat Tours, amphibious vehicle Ducks tours, a day at a spa in many of the local resorts and shopping at the Tanger Outlet Center, which includes upscale stores such as Polo/Ralph Lauren and Tommy Hilfiger. RW reader and Wisconsin Dells traveler Kate MacDonald also recommends a visit to the family attraction Wizards’ Quest, an indoor labyrinth where the goal is to rescue four imprisoned wizards by answering riddles and finding clues hidden throughout the labyrinth. Need help finding a Dells resort? RW teen readers recommend The Kalahari, Great Wolf Lodge and Wilderness resorts because of the high-speed water slides and the variety of food and entertainment which abound at all three resorts. For more information, visit wisdells.com.

RWmagazine.com March/April 20134

Photos courtesy of the Wisconsin Dells Visitor & Convention Bureau, Inc.

2 hours:


Photos courtesy of the Galena Convention & Visitors Bureau.

4 hours: L

ooking for a fun girls’ weekend or romantic getaway? Head for Galena, Illinois! A scenic, four-hour drive down Highway 52 south brings you to this quaint destination that charmed RW Editor Marlene Petersen last September. “I found myself wondering, ‘How is it I have never heard of this town? It is so beautiful!’” she recalls. Set on the Galena River, Galena overflows with opulence from historic houses and B&Bs to wonderful food, wineries and unique shops…even a plethora of spas if you want a little down-time. For lodging, try The Irish Cottage Boutique Hotel. The rooms offer standard hotel accommodations that are welcoming and well-appointed. The hotel also offers several nice common areas—including a library complete with leather chairs—a pool, a spa and the Frank O’Dowd’s Irish Pub & Grill. The menu at Frank O’Dowd’s includes an ample wine selection, Irish beers, ciders and whiskeys and traditional Irish pub food like Shepherd’s Pie and Fish and Chips. There’s even live entertainment on weekends, including traditional Irish music and dancing. When you’re ready to see the sights of Galena, be sure to stop by the Old Train Depot Visitor Information Center and meet their friendly, helpful staff who can offer itineraries based on the number of days you’ll

March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

Galena, Illinois

be in town. They have brochures for various tours and entertainment, as well as menus from most—if not all—of the restaurants in and around Galena. On an illustrated map you get to keep, they will walk you through the charming town’s many offerings. Trolley and walking tours visit fascinating historic homes and the Ulysses S. Grant Museum, dedicated to the famous general and 18th U.S. president who lived in Galena shortly before and after the Civil War. During the day, walk along Main Street and enjoy the beautiful scenery or pop into a few shops, including gourmet kitchen stores, confectionary shops, antique stores, coffee and tea shops, bookstores and a few with a

little of everything, like La Vie en Rose. Tired and hungry from shopping? Grab a bite at Sweetheart Bakery on North Main. Enjoy their daily lunch special, like beef stew in a bread bowl, a soda and a fresh-baked cookie for less than $6. If it’s nice outside and not too crowded, eat at a leisurely pace outside on their umbrella-covered patio. At night, don’t miss a plate of Lobster Ravioli at Fried Green Tomatoes Italian restaurant. Be sure to ask for a table near their large picture windows so you can enjoy their luscious desserts as you watch the sun go down and the old-fashioned street lights come up. For more, visit galena.org.


Rochester Trolley & Tour Company and Rochester Women Magazine 2013 Monthly Winery Trolley Tours Rochester Women Magazine Food Editor Margo Stich and Seasons of the Vine columnnist or Rochester Women Magazine Publisher Jorrie Johnson will hostess each tour.

Sunday March 24 ~ 10:30 am - 5:30 pm Bluff Country Wine Trail Trolley Tour Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery, Spring Valley, Minn. Wine tasting includes ďŹ ve wines, sommelier talk and optional Sunday brunch.

Salem Glen Vineyard and Winery, Rochester, Minn. Wine tasting includes seven wines, sommelier talk and tour of wine production room.

Post Town Winery, Rochester, Minn. Wine tasting includes seven wines, cheese, crackers, chocolate and complimentary wine glass!

Only $59 per person. Reserve your seat now!

Sunday April 21 ~ 10 am - 5:30 pm Great River Road Wine Trail Trolley Tour Danzinger Vineyards & Winery, Alma, Wisc. Wine tasting includes inspiring view and tour of winery.

Nelson Creamery ~ Menu available on trolley and will pre-order your lunch. Villa Bellezza Winery & Vineyards, Pepin, Wisc. Wine tasting featuring ďŹ ve wines and stroll in the piazza.

Whitewater Wines, Plainview, Minn. Relax and enjoy wine tasting and take a walk around the pond and vineyard.

Only $64 per person. Reserve your seat now!

Sunday, May 19, 2013 ~ 10 am - 5:30 pm Great River Road Wine Trail Trolley Tour Seven Hawks Vineyards, Fountain, Wisc. River View Vineyard & Winery, La Crescent, Minn. Garvin Heights Vineyards, Winona, Minn.

Sunday, June 16, 2013 ~10:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:30 pm Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Winery and Art in the Park Trolley Tour Four Daughters Vineyard & Winery, Spring Valley, Minn. Art in the Park, Lanesboro, Minn

Save these dates for late summer - fall winery tours! Sunday, July 16, 2013 Cannon River Winery and Falconer Vineyards and Winery Trolley Tour Sunday, August 18, 2013 Hastings/Stillwater Winery Trolley Tour Sunday, September 15, 2013 Vino in the Valley and Winery Trolley Tour Sunday, October 20, 2013 Fall Harvest Winery Trolley Tour Sunday, November 17, 2013 Mississippi River Valley, Tundra Swans and Winery Trolley Tour Saturday or Sunday December 7 or 8, 2013 Christmas in Plainview and Wabasha Winery Trolley Tour For more information about each monthly winery tour, visit www.RochesterMntours.com, look for an ad in each issue of Rochester Women magazine and Rochester Women magazines Facebook page!

Advanced Reservations Required ~ www.RochesterMNtours.com ~ 507-421-0573 Trolley departs Olmsted County Government Center Parking Lot ~ 151 4th St SE, Rochester, MN 55904 *Schedule subject to change Trolley is heated and enclosed November through April!

RWmagazine.com March/April 2013


6 hours: A

Omaha, Nebraska

lthough it may seem much further, Omaha, Nebraska, is less than six hours from Rochester and is another great family getaway option for kids who love adventure and parents who are on a budget. “The zoo is a reason to go to Omaha all by itself. It is mind-blowing,” says Amy Liebl, RW layout designer. She and her family recently enjoyed the offerings of Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, which boasts the world’s largest indoor rainforest, largest indoor desert and largest indoor swamp. There is also an IMAX theater. Kids can have hands-on fun at the zoo’s Red Barn Park where they can “Play. Pet. Dig. Discover” with an interactive animal experience. There’s also a Prehistoric Play Park and Fossil Dig Site. The dig site allows kids to dig and uncover fossils from Nebraska using paleontologist tools, just like a real fossil dig site.

Love nature up close? Check out the insect and butterfly pavilion while you’re there. Amy also recommends a visit to the Omaha Children’s Museum, listed in the top 15% of children’s museums nationally. The museum has hands-on exhibits in science, culture and the arts for children of all ages. For Amy’s family, the best part of the interactive experience was the museum’s signature exhibit Super Gravitron, a massive ball machine with pneumatic, hydraulic and mechanical sections. For lodging, consider the Ramada Plaza of Omaha hotel, a large family-friendly hotel which adjoins the Coco Key Water Resort, an indoor tropical water resort complete with indoor slides, rides and a lazy river. Or check out the family accommodations at the Hawthorne Suites with a free breakfast buffet and apartment-style amenities. For more information, see visitomaha.com.

Photos courtesy of Amy Liebl.

8 hours:

Photos courtesy of Margo Stich.

A

Ann Arbor, Michigan

re you a foodie looking for a trip that packs a punch but doesn’t carry the price tag of Chicago, New York or California? Ann Arbor, Michigan is a day’s drive from Rochester that lands you at a progressive, delectable destination! RW Food Editor Margo Stich recommends Ann Arbor for its acclaimed restaurant dining, sidewalk cafes, one-of-a-kind shops and unique bookstores. She loves the “general ‘pulse’ of the city and its openness to pedestrians.” Clean and innovative, Stich says Ann Arbor offers fine and notable dining such as: Vinology, with its seasonally-rotating menu, inventive small plates and specialty artisan cheeses; Logan’s, where varied cuisines come together in a unique manner served in modern, simple ambiance; The Earle, serving provincial Italian and French country cuisine in an elegant setting; and The Grange, where Chef Brandon Johns brings local, fresh ingredients to new heights. For something more casual, Stich recommends, Zingerman’s Deli, started in 1982 by two college students unable to find a good Reuben. Looking for ethnic cuisine? Try Frita Batidos for Cuban specialties or Ayse’s for guaranteed authentic Turkish fare. Ann Arbor, which inspired Bob Seger to write his famous song “Mainstreet” about

March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

his hometown, also boasts numerous microbreweries and pubs. “Beer flights” are readily available and offer a great way to sample some of the best brews in the Midwest. Ugly Dog Vodka distillery, just outside Ann Arbor, is a unique experience…if not just for the opportunity to sample bacon flavored vodka (which proved quite tasty). Prefer tea? Check out TeaHaus where one can relax over a cup of tea and pastry, purchase tea accessories or choose from among “the wall” of loose teas for brewing at home. If you’re looking to assemble a picnic or just check out unique food items, try Sparrow Meat Markets and Produce or Morgan and York on Packard Street for a broad selection of wines, spirits and beers, as well as cheeses, imported candies and other gourmet victuals. Because Ann Arbor is home to the University of Michigan, it has abundant cultural opportunities and outdoor activities for the sports enthusiast, whether as spectator or participant. Several free museums are also on the university campus, including natural history, archaeology and art museums as well as the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library. Ann Arbor is an ideal destination for the foodie spring through fall. Bon voyage and bon appétit!

Cindy Finch is a traveler who lives in Rochester. She is from California by way of Las Vegas and Mexico. Her favorite places to travel are shaken, not stirred, and include warm, tropical sunsets and late night dancing on the beach.


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RWmagazine.com March/April 2013%


Calendar Events Check out our Community Calendar online for ongoing programs and additional listings at  

Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen May/June 2013 issue is April 1, 2013. Complete form at http://www.rwmagazine.com/index.php/submit/submit-event. Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine. *(507 area code unless stated)

. . ?@?B?G   & E#>   ; Ironwood Springs Christian Ranch, a weekend of quilting and fellowship, Ironwoods Miracle Lodge, 533-4315, miraclelodge.com/events . ?@?B?. ?@C?  >& # L  $ Selling locations and times can be found at girlscoutsrv.org/activities_for_girls/cookies/ . 3;1N42;7 32N3%   6       +  6. L ; Graham Park, Bldg 41, 9 am-noon, Market Manager, 273-8232, rochesterdowntownfarmersmarket.com . 3  5  6 J. 5 6

 "; Mayo Civic Center Exhibition Hall, 7:30 pm, 328-2200, riversideconcerts.com . 4 &>M  "3: #> O6 ? !? ?  PQ sponsored by Sterling State Bank, Rochester International Event Center, 5-7:30 pm, proceeds beneďŹ t the Good Samaritan Health Clinic, tickets, 252-7220 or 288-3663, salvationarmynorth.org/events . %    >?  R6?"Q? 766 ??F  / 5  M  #K> 5 6; Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, 6 pm, local speakers, fee includes light meal, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org . ?S?B?@T >5 R6?

?  ?7 6 6?  ?UA?  M 6 "?7 5#  V?O>

R6?5M # 6?  ? 5 > 5QP?Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, times vary, tickets, CDT Manager, 281-3335, childrensdancetheatre.org . : > M    5 >6 & # 6  . 6 ;/   >5!  #  >6; presented by Jorrie Johnson, RochesterWomen magazine publisher, Northrup Education Center, 10 am-noon, Rm 319, class code: 8333.231, fee, 328-4000, rochesterce.org 0March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com

. :N12  > 6 6 K> (, M  5   7 66; Zumbro Lutheran Church, (624 3rd Ave SW), times vary, 252-8427, choraleartsensemble.org . 1 O/ L ? ? 6? !?. 5 ?"? &>M "QP?a Sisters of St Francis beneďŹ t concert with the Bella Voce and Bella Fiore choirs, Lourdes Chapel, Assisi Heights, 7 pm, limited tickets, SingOutLoud.org

of Modern Day Slavery

. @A?B?@C 2 M 6 "##>#6  ; )  N)& ; Graham Arenas at Graham Park, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, times vary, 286-1010 . 1   6 &"7 "  6 N > ; O#  ?  6V?.#6 ?.

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 > "Qâ&#x20AC;? Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, 7:30 pm, 286-8742, rochestersymphony.org . 1:  >5 #  >5   ( WK    5 &# MM> ! # " UMR, University Square, Fourth Floor, Room 417, 7 pm, author and historian Brenda J. Childs discusses her new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community,â&#x20AC;? r.umn.edu/UMRCONNECTS. . 31 ." >    

 &  "K !; Elks Lodge, (1652 Hwy 52 N), 5 pm silent auction; 6:30 pm live auction,, food for purchase, 254-5027, mayoclinic.org . 34  #  !  K '# I>L; Rochester Recreation Center, proceeds support local youth participation in sports, 7:30 am registration; 10 am race, andersonraces.com/events . 34 > 8 > 9;Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, 7:30 pm, 328-2200, riversideconcerts.com . 34N3 4% #>  6  5  M 6& ; Graham Park, 4-H Bldg, 10 amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 pm each day, local women carvers! Free admission, 285-1620, rochesterwoodcarvers.com . 3  " >> " # ;  6  >> " 5  #  7 ";10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm, includes trolley tour and wine tastings at three wineries. Advanced reservations required 421-0573 or www.RochesterMNtours.com. See ad on page 65.


, 7    6 &"7 "  6 N > ; O  > 5QP Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, 7:30 pm, 286-8742, rochestersymphony.org 7 % + >6+M  5

; Lewiston, MN, 8K & 1 mile, registration 9 am-noon, race at 1 pm, proceeds beneďŹ t cancer research, foolsďŹ ve.org 7 14N1;7 32N31   6  /#>5 6&7   &  6  !  6; homes, townhomes, and subdivisions featured in various stages of completion throughout Rochester, 12-5 pm, free, 282-7698, rochesterareabuilders.com 7 14   !   6; Mayo Civic Center Exhibit Hall, all, local celebrity dancers paired with pro dancers go toe-to-toe to beneďŹ t youth arts education, 424-0811, bamadio@rochestermnarts.com, RochesterMNArts.com

7 30 O&7  ?+ > QP?? ? 6?  6Q Bethel Lutheran Church, 4 pm, 252-0505, HonorsChoirs.org

7 >31  " >> " # ;   6  >> " 5  #  7 "; 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm, includes trolley tour, lunch and wine tastings at three wineries. Advanced reservations required 421-0573 or RochesterMNtours.com. See ad on page 65.

7 30 &7  +> M# ;JeďŹ&#x20AC;erson Elementary, Rochester, 9 am, 5k, 10k, Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fun Run, register at ďŹ nalstretch.com

.-

7 >31 & 5, 5$& 5 $   > K   ! "( >L   >  L666 6; 2-3:30 pm, free will donation, register by 4/13, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org

7 3 & 77; ! 66 > M > 7  &   !   ; Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, 9 am-5 pm, RWmagazine.com. See ad page 18.

7 3% M5."! >5 5 8   9; Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, 7:30 pm, 328-2200, riversideconcerts.com 7 3%  M )>> " " > K  ; Sylvan Park, Lanesboro, 10 am-2 pm, kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, informational booths, farmers market, plant sale, 467-2437, eagle-bluďŹ&#x20AC;.org/events

7 1: O

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 #>>; International Event Center, 6 pm, rochesterbetterchance.org

 LJ#7RochesterWomen."IX# 66#  K   7 >3;3214

7 3 O ?M  ? !? ? 5? 6 6QP? Somerby Golf Club, 5:30 pm, beneďŹ ts PossAbilities of Southern MN, 281-6116, possabilities.org  7 3%  ? > ?6Z ? >5R6?/  6?A'[ Location TBD, race start, 2 pm, a beneďŹ t for The Place-a single neighborhood-based family and youth center, kristines@c2c2. org, register by 4/17, thecolordash5k.com  7 3% .  ! 6. ! /K 6; Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club, 8 am registration, 9 am start, 282-0649, marchforbabies.org

."?G?B?."?A 122.>   &> ; cities along the Mississippi River, 452-0735, map, visitwinona.com, mississippi-river.org

MAGAZINE

MAGAZINE

7 3 11 #> K " > K  ; Mayo Park, Downtown Rochester, 11 am-1 pm, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, live music, food, info, free trees available, rpu.org 7 ?UY?B?7 ?US? />#!! #  "&#5   # ; Southeast MN, E Wisconsin, NE Iowa, 10 am-5 pm. Spend the day in beautiful bluďŹ&#x20AC; country visiting artists in their studios-shop, and enjoy! Free, 800-428-2030, bluďŹ&#x20AC;countrystudioarttour.com

."   6     &# +  6 . L  7 6;(4th St & 4th Ave SE), 7:30 am-noon, 273-8232, rochesterdowntownfarmersmarket.org ." >L.&( 6 7 N/ L63214; Soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Field Memorial, 10 am, walk to create a world free of MS. Register now! Pledges required, 800-582-5296, specialevents@mssociety.org, walkMS.org ."12 Y? #>?M  ? !? 7 ?B?O/ L? ? ?    ?UTR6QP DoubleTree Hotel, 6 pm, dinner, live and silent auctions, music and entertainment. Funds raised support the Sandra J. Schulze American Cancer Society Hope Lodge. Information or tickets at Mallory.olson@cancer.org, 651-255-8146 or rochesterhopelodgeevents.org

RWmagazine.com March/April 2013:


on the lighter side

Before Bentley Pawing P awing d down own p personal ersonal b boundaries oundaries ffor or tthe he ffurriest urriest m member of the family BY AMY BY AMY BRASE BRA BRA RASSSEE

n, Dear Grown-Up Childroneof carrying them in my pocket.

treats with the intenti oday I bought chicken liver ll as “Epic Exampless of ings I’d Never, Ever Do,” as we This belongs on the list of “Th og My Love for You.” t I, myself, just wasn’t a dog kids to long for a puppy. Bu r ur Ou . ent rod or I suppose it’s only natural for rd , bird, liza , I also had no desire for a cat you for ly k)) ate nk) nk tan tun n for ow Un ir . the son d per er and cleane frogs (who never left the wat atic aqu two h wit t stin rt sho tch. was about as far as I could stre an person from the time as heartless, I’ve been a hum ma ma r you of k thin you t Les ed our yard free of poop, my beating hearts. I’ve just preferr h wit ds see py pop re we you budget free of vet ser vices. clothes free of slobber and our minds. Repeatedly, wee r daddy and I had changed our you if ed ask you ly, ted pea Re s one day. But could we animals for your own familie ose cho ld cou you t tha red answe a trip to the zoo? interest you in a Webkinz™ or tos, but it was rt on cute Pinterest puppy pho hea of nge cha my me bla ld I cou nt window during who peeked through our fro really a feral, black, hissing cat kled herring while pic and fetch warm milk to me led pel com and ps subzero tem detests cats is an porch. To say that your daddy building a warm shelter on our over an unsightly p slee t spark lit in my core. If I los understatement, but a small rned), it was retu " coa take to a farm but twice "Co cat (which we tried twice to to love a sweet puppy. quite possible I could grow hing. I turned to weakness that changed everyt I remember the moment of s kid with a puppy!” just do it! Let’s surprise the u e he us bbeccaaaus or somethingg be your daddy and said, “Let’s tful day and life felt too easy res lly sua unu an n bee had Apparently, it h d®. We filtered everything throug grinned and pulled out his iPa d all possible deal breakers. ore ign we e, tru e and e com pur am h r dre your six little eyes light up wit Once we decided to make you Up with a Dog.” When we saw w Gro to ed Ne s Kid ur “O the conviction of decision was right. austively for Ninety y My Neck Was Licked Exh incredulous joy, we knew the Da e “Th as y tor his ily fam in go down ing down my personal Bringing Bentley home will Brase wasted no time in paw tley Ben le Litt .” om Ro re Mo Heart Made Minutes” and “The Day My hide chew toys, he er felt more violated. nev had I e exception of his antler and raw boundaries. I’m sur the th Wi us. on w gro to an en his bedding went et puppy beg As hoped, our (mostly) swe nally needed help wiping. Wh asio occ and g nin trai y pott dog. Maybe it was his sleep training, Bentley was no longer just a t fit right in. He was teething, tha w kne I er, ash hw dis I saw in all of you that dishes into my . Mostly, it was the nurturing into my washing machine and lap my on ed ggl snu he en py dog eyes wh luxuriously soft fur or his pup e of dog aroma. than our free time,, almost made up for the essenc It ily. ember that we love you more rem made him part of our fam to you nt wa I ry, mo me our Bentley will ood is a distant ds sometimes. God willing , min Someday when your childh our nge cha to ugh he eno together through the se smell. We love you hundreds of miles, romped for our carpet and our new hou him ide bes d k lke ack wa bac e k ether as we loo to college. You’ll hav and devotion. We’ll laugh tog y ilit have seen all three of you off sib pon res in ally nti s and grown expone ily because of Bentley. yard on endless summer day , and we’ ll all be a better fam tos pho kid le litt r you to t at his little puppy photos nex canine tely do not include clipping Her favorite hobbies absolu in. aga er nev say er nev l wil Amy Brase is a writer who uth. en poop out of Bentley’s mo toenails or prying Cocoa’s froz

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%2March/April 2013 RWmagazine.com


March/April 2013  

This issue features a cover story about learning to read with the Minnesota Reading Corps, no-fuss ideas for spring gatherings featuring cla...

March/April 2013  

This issue features a cover story about learning to read with the Minnesota Reading Corps, no-fuss ideas for spring gatherings featuring cla...

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