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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013 January/February 2013 COMPLIMENTARY

Extraordinary above and beyond

Buying Rocks

without loosing your marbles

Women

Nicole Curtis DIY network's 'rehab addict'

RWmagazine.com


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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


COVER STORY Above & Beyond

Four Rochester women who put the “extra” into extraordinary.

15 Community 10 Freezin' for a Reason

Cover photo illustration by Amy Liebl and Mike Hardwick

46 How to Crème Brulee

MAGAZINE

January/February 2013

Special Home Section

By Margo Stich

26­–40 Rochester Area Builders Home Show

Plunging into frigid waters to support Special Olympics.

Shopping

27 Remodelers Corner

The remodel of an 1861 limestone home is a passion for the past. By Penny Marshall

24 Buying Rocks without Losing Your Marbles

A gem buying guide. By Barbara Hight-Randall and Marlene Petersen

49 Seasons of the Vine By Margo Stich

Healthy Living 50 Ten Ways to Love Your Heart

By Niloufar Tabatabaei, MD, Amanda Hovey, Emily Applen, RN and Jessica McAlpine, RN

52 Teeth

Food 41 Voyage into Veganism

One family’s adventure with a new diet brings challenges and rewards. By Margo Stich

A guide to caring for little teeth, big teeth and moving teeth. By Michelle Kubitz

32 On a Mission

Meet Nicole Curtis DIY Network’s “Rehab Addict.” By Trish Amundson

Travel 58 Today’s Traveling Women By K.L. Snyder

36 A Tale of Two Kitchens

On the Lighter Side 62 Take It From Me

The wit, wisdom and wishes of an advice columnist hopeful. By Amy Brase

Tale one: opening up the floor plan makes a small kitchen live big. By Debi Neville

in every issue From the Editor In the Know Advertisers Index Community Calendar

7 8 59 60 RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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from the editor MAGAZINE

Issue 73, Volume 13, Number 6 January/February 2013 publishers

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA Doug Solinger editor

Marlene Petersen design director

Rue Wiegand

layout designer

Amy Liebl

Graphic designers

Tommy Traxel, MLT Group Molly Anderson, MLT Group food editor

Margo Stich

Copy editor

Ashley Pikel Elisa Tally

Marketing Account Manager

Deanne Breitenbach

Community Relations

Susan Franken

photography

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios Mike Hardwick Photography RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $18 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2013 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-529-5385 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com For advertising information: 507-951-2413

E

very December, we reflect on the passing of another year—pay tribute to those we’ve lost, celebrate great moments and give a sigh of relief that we passed through hardships. In 2012, RochesterWomen embraced challenges and triumphs, including new staff members and three Excellence Awards from Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association. Please join me in congratulating my colleagues who received much deserved praise from MMPA in November: • Food Editor Margo Stich and Photographer Dawn Sanborn, silver award in the How-to Article category for “How to California Sushi Roll,” March/April 2012; • Writer Amy Brase, silver award in the Profile Article category for the feature “Tiffany Hunsley: On the Road to Recovery,” September/October 2011; • Former Editor Ellington Miller Starks bronze award in the Editor’s Letter to the Readers category for her editor’s letter, September/October 2011. Now, we look to the clean slate of January and set our sights on new celebrations and tasks. Our cover story, “Above and Beyond,” starts us off by applauding the winners of the 2013 Extraordinary RochesterWomen Award. All of the winners are dedicated individuals who go the extra mile to care for the welfare of strangers, the education of area children and the growth of their communities. Read their inspirational stories starting on page 15.

In the March/April 2010 issue, RW did a profile on human trafficking in Rochester. This topic has not gone away. That is why RW and its staff are proud to help sponsor a series of community-wide awareness events hosted by the Sisters of Saint Francis of Assisi, January 10-12. These events will bring together legislators, county attorneys, law enforcement and medical and victim service professionals from all over the city and county to discuss, with the public, human trafficking in Rochester. For details, dates and times, see www.rochesterfranciscan.org. January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. In December 2011, President Obama made this proclamation to call attention to modern-day slavery which forces women and children disproportionately into forced labor, child pornography and prostitution. Minnesota is in the top 13 States for children being recruited into the sex trade. Child pornography is bought and sold in Rochester, and girls as young as 12–14 are at risk for prostitution since it is the average age of entry to this form of human trafficking. We hope you will come out and learn more about human trafficking prevention . In the meantime, enjoy this issue! All the best,

Corrections to November/December 2012 issue: In our feature “Magnificent Menagerie” on the SEMVA Art Gallery, we "Seeds of Hope" inadvertently omitted the brilliant work of Bernadine Jax, who specializes in mandalas, like “Seeds of Hope” pictured here. Also, the original recipe source for the Rocky Road Bars in “Sweet (but small) Endings” was incorrectly printed as “Feed Many 4 Fun! 4 Profit!” instead of “Feed Many! For Fun! For Profit!” For more information about this cookbook, visit www.feedmany.com or call 507-206-6989. We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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n the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know The American Association of University Women Meeting and Program Sat., Jan. 19, 9:30 a.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 1st Floor AND Thur., Feb. 16, 9:30 a.m., Charter House, Edwards Hall AAUW empowers women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. By joining AAUW, you belong to a community that breaks through educational and economic barriers so that all women have a fair chance. Come to a meeting and see what AAUW is all about. For more, contact Maryette Braithwaite, 282-6753 or maryetteb@charter.net or visit aauwrochmn.org.

Breaking the Chains of Modern-Day Slavery

Thur., Jan. 10, 6:30–8 p.m., Rochester Public Library Fri., Jan. 11, 7–8:30 p.m., University Center Rochester, Hill Theatre Sat., Jan. 12, 8 a.m.–noon, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center Minnesota is in the top 13 States for children being recruited into the sex trade, child pornography is on the rise (including in Rochester), and girls as young as 12–14 are at risk for prostitution. Join the Sisters of Saint Francis for three crucial community-wide events that bring together legislators, county attorneys, law enforcement and medical and victim service professionals from all over the city and county to discuss human trafficking in Rochester. For more details, dates and times, visit rochesterfranciscan.org and select “What’s Happening/Events.”

Mothers and More Meetings

Kaden Tjossem

Every second and fourth Tuesday of the month 7 p.m., Rochester Area Family Y, 709 1st Avenue SW, Rochester Mothers & More is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of mothers through support, education and advocacy. It provides opportunities for women to focus on themselves and make meaningful connections with others, while navigating the complex challenges of motherhood. Check out www.rochmoms.org for more information or contact Kristine Greenfield, 289-7058 or kristine.greenfield@gmail.com.

Ninth Annual Schafer's Friends in Need Benefit

Sat., Jan. 12, 11 a.m., Ramada Inn, Rochester Annual pool benefit with silent auction, product vendors & bake sale. Funds from this year’s event benefit 5-year-old Kaden TJossem who is battling bone cancer. For more information, contact Jen Engel, 273-3665 or schaferbenefit@yahoo.com or visit https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Schafers-Friends-InNeed-Annual-Benefit/132931936756726.

Save the date!

International Whisky Tasting fundraiser for Rochester Public Library Wed., March 13, 6–9 p.m., Plummer House Support the Rochester Public Library while sampling hors d'oeuvres, Irish, American (bourbon), Canadian and Scottish whiskies. Register online at www.rochesterpubliclibraryfoundation.org or by calling 328-2343. Early bird registration: $40/person or $70/couple. 8

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

Elevating Women and Girls in Southeastern Minnesota

Better world for our girls

Sat., March 9, 10 a.m.–noon Rochester Community Education, Northrup Education Center Speaker, Jorrie Johnson, MBA, RochesterWomen magazine publisher, will address the status of women in Southeastern Minnesota and will discuss whether this generation is better off than our mothers or grandmothers and what the future holds. Learn what the Status of Women & Girls in Minnesota Research Overview (released in February 2012 by University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Center on Women & Public Policy, in partnership with the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota) says about women today and their future. Discover ways you can make the world better for women and girls. Fee is $9. For more, visit www.rochesterce.org 507-328-4000, Class Code: 8333.231.


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community

Freezin’ for a Reason Plunging into frigid waters to support Special Olympics

E

very February at Foster Arend Park, they come as groups and alone, in costumes and swimsuits, as coworkers and friends. They all have the same plan: a bone-chilling plunge into an icy lake to raise money for Special Olympics Minnesota. Kevin Torgerson organized and founded the first Polar Bear Plunge in Rochester in 2002, with 25 plungers pledging to take the jump for charity. “We decided we wanted to make a splash, and, hey, we could do this,” says Torgerson. Since then, the Plunge has grown steadily in numbers and popularity, and in 2012, over a thousand people pledged and plunged, raising over $250,000 for Special Olympics, which provides year-round sports training and competition for children and adults with disabilities. “No matter what, no matter the weather, the Plunge is there,” says Torgerson. “We’ve got paramedics on site. No matter how cold it gets, we will never call it off.” The event is well-staffed, with Rochester law enforcement organizing the event,

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Special Olympics Minnesota supplying tents, volunteers and supplies, a dive team in the water for safety, and volunteer medics, doctors, and first responders from Mayo Clinic on site. The event is fun and light-hearted for all. Plungers must collect pledges and raise a minimum of $75 in order to jump into the frosty lake. Although most of the icy adventurers go only once, there are the Super Plungers. These dedicated souls (no more than ten per year) jump into the lake 24 times in 24 hours, starting the day before the official plunge and going through the night. After the jump, plungers get their choice of hot tub or sauna to mitigate the cold shock. Pledgers that don’t want to jump but still want to support the event may watch from on-site bleachers facing the water or via live footage of the event from local bars such as Whistle Binkies North or the Wicked Moose.

Special Olympics Anne MacGillivray, a longtime Special Olympic athlete participating most recently

in cross-country skiing and swimming, has plunged every year since 2003. “Her favorite part of the Plunge is collecting pledges,” laughs Anne’s mother, Arlysse. “She has sheets of names that she draws upon every year, and she goes door to door collecting donations. Nobody is a stranger, and it’s all small donations. Piece by piece, it adds up. She asks, ‘Are you going to jump with me? You either pledge, or you plunge!’” Every year Anne scouts to find new friends to jump with her, no matter how doubtful they are about the Plunge. “You just have to do it and get it over with,” says Anne. “I’ve made it this far; so can you. Just come on down and try it!” So grab a friend, organize some coworkers, and do what you have to do to make your way to the Plunge, February 9, 2013, at Foster Arend Park. For more information, to see pictures from previous years’ events or to register, visit polarplungemn.org. Amanda Wingren is a freelance writer living in Rochester.

2012 photos courtesy of plungemn.org

By Amanda Wingren


Photos courtesy of Arlysse MacGillivray and the Rochester Polar Bear Plunge

"Are you going to jump with me? You either pledge, or you plunge!”

organizers.

Anne MacGillivray, a longtime Special Olympic athlete participating most recently in cross-country skiing and swimming, has plunged every year since 2003.

­— Anne MacGillivray

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We all know incredible women: co-workers with endless stamina and

cheer; inspiring friends; and dedicated, self-sacrificing mothers and spouses. We count them among our blessings. They are all remarkable and deserve our praise.

Who then constitute "Extraordinary Rochester Women" worthy of public praise? They are women who not only care for their close family and friends but also for strangers, for the education and welfare of children who are not their own and encourage the growth of their communities. They keep going when many of us stop. In the September/October 2012 issue of RochesterWomen, we sent out a call for nominations for the 2013 Extraordinary RochesterWomen Award. We received replies in the form of essays explaining nominees’ qualifications and extraordinary-ness. These supporting letters—shared on the pages that follow—illustrate how our winners caught the admiration of their nominators and how they continue to make a difference in our community. We’d like to extend a special thanks to the following area businesses. With their support, we honor these exceptional women and share their stories.

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DEANNE BREITENBACH Marketing Account Manager deanne@RWmagazine.com 507-951-2413 cell

Reserve your ad space forrRochesterWomen March/April 2013 issue by January 25th!

The most rewarding part of what I do is seeing my clients get results! Even after over 20 years of sales and marketing experience, I’m giddy like a little kid over being a part of Rochester Women. Being in a position to offer a tried and true powerhouse marketing tool like this to the business I work with is a privilege and I’m honored to have the opportunity to be a part of your story. business success story

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


&

cover story

Above Beyond Four Rochester women who put the “extra” in extraordinary Photography by Mike Hardwick Photography

W

hen we called Kathy Johnson, this year’s Extraordinary Businesswoman award

winner, and told her she had won an Extraordinary Rochester Women Award, she replied with disbelief, “Seriously?” It was a common reaction among this Kathy Johnson, Extraordinary Businesswoman Danielle Nikolai, Extraordinary Volunteer

year’s winners whom we are proud to introduce.

Wendy R. Reynolds, Extraordinary Caregiver

Lori Miller-Beach, Extraordinary Overall

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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Kathy Johnson Extraordinary Businesswoman

O

ur family moved here in May 2012 and in our research in moving to Rochester we found Kathy’s business, Rochester Greeters. I immediately contacted her to find out about Rochester. Kathy not only called me back, but once we arrived, she came to my house and sat on my floor (because our furniture had not arrived yet). She brought a wealth of information, along with a wholehearted and welcoming spirit. She is so knowledgeable about the community of Rochester and was able to answer all of my hundreds of questions with kindness and warmth. She made me feel at ease and helped me navigate the new community we would now be a part of. Her kindness and information did not stop at that initial meeting. She continues to be a wealth of knowledge about Rochester and has always given more than a little extra to help me out. I’m sure that she welcomes all newcomers with as much warmth and kindness as she has for us. She recently launched Rochester Newcomers, a club for people and families to connect and meet other folks who have recently moved to Rochester. There are fun gatherings, and it is so nice to know we are not alone in figuring out a new community. We could not have asked for a better welcoming to Rochester than Kathy Johnson and her information and business.

— Laura Quest

Former client of Rochester Greeters, Kathy’s business

“Kathy recognizes that how people are welcomed into Rochester makes a difference on whether they stay. Rochester is a community that has a constant influx of people moving in and out. Kathy is such a good example of being a host and proving that Rochester is a great place to be. She puts ‘Minnesota Nice’ to work in the right way.” — ERWA Judge

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Danielle Nikolai Extraordinary Volunteer

D

ani is the mother of two special needs children and does an absolutely amazing job with them, but that is not why I am nominating her. Danielle does outstanding work in our community supporting local education needs and the Rochester Public Schools. Not only is Dani an active school volunteer—volunteering in everything from PTA and special events to classroom activities—she is one of the main directors for the successful Rochester Public School Foundation Haunted Hallways event. For two years now, Danielle has been the primary interface to each school for Haunted Hallways and has been responsible for the overall decorating plan for the event, a Herculean effort that she does entirely as a volunteer. She successfully drove the involvement of 17 school groups in 2011—obtaining buy-in and support for the inaugural event—and organized over 23 school groups for the 2012 event. She skillfully manages hundreds of volunteers, donates hundreds of hours of her time and juggles all of her competing obligations with finesse. I have known Danielle for over 20 years, and she has always been driven by a strong desire to help make her community a better place and is highly respected by all those she encounters.

—Phillipa Hartley

Vice President of Development, Rochester Public School Foundation

“Danielle’s donation of hundreds of hours of volunteer time speaks to how passionate she is about education, not only with her own kids and her own school, but for the entire district and the advancement of all.”

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

— ERWA Judge


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Wendy R. Reynolds “Think of how many lives Wendy has changed by changing the lives of the children she has taken in and raised. What an example she is for her own children. She has a wonderful, committed heart for care and love. ” — ERWA Judge

Extraordinary Caregiver

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endy is truly an inspiration for me to do better in my life. I believe her doing for others shows a sense of selflessness rarely found these days. Wendy has done daycare for about 15 years and foster care for 11. Though she has had many short-term foster care children throughout that time, she has raised at least a dozen children long-term—two of whom she fostered through age 18. Wendy has three kids of her own, ages 9, 6 and 4 and has recently taken guardianship for her younger sister’s daughter, age 5. She has also been a full-time student for the past two years to complete her bachelor’s degree and recently completed her certificate in parent coaching. She has volunteered at Aldrich preschool and now volunteers in Eyota where her children attend and are very active in sports and Girl and Boy Scouts. She deserves recognition for these achievements; there are so many people’s lives she has touched. She is too modest to admit she is worthy of this nomination. Please help me convince her she is.

— Amanda Schild 20

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Lori Miller-Beach Extraordinary Overall

I

can’t think of a more deserving woman than Lori, who seems to have an endless capacity to give—to her family, her community and even through the businesses she manages. Her goal in life, it seems, is to make everything and everyone around her better, and she has been very successful at this endeavor. I have been a beneficiary of her giving spirit and would like to share a little bit of her story. Lori is a mother of four children, ages 15, 13, 11 and 9 and “backup” mother for her twin sister’s four children on many occasions while her sister travels for work. I also travel extensively, so she parents four to eight children essentially alone. Not only does she give of her time to her own family, she gives to the Stewartville schools as well. She served on the preschool board for five years, was a PTA member and officer for four years and has been a substitute teacher in the district for over three years. In 2010, she was recognized as Stewartville’s “Friend of Education” award winner for her many and varied contributions. She has also served on the city council for the City of Stewartville, recently finishing her four-year term. In that time, she has helped the council complete several core infrastructure upgrades and downtown revitalization initiatives that are crucial for the long-term health of the city and will be felt for many years to come. An interesting byproduct of her work in revitalizing downtown was the inspiration to “walk the walk” by purchasing the property previously occupied by Home Sweet Home to create the Stewartville 22

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

“Lori is engaged in the community in many ways from business to volunteer work and is very passionate about children and what happens to them inside and outside of the classroom. She gives back and raises her children in a community where she can be an example.” — ERWA Judge Heritage House. The Heritage House, as Lori describes it, provides a place “to get together with friends and create memories.” Lori supplied the vision and energy for renovations, furnishings and atmosphere for the house, a stunning Victorian home built in 1901. It is now a Stewartville treasure and the site for weekend quilting and scrapbooking retreats, weddings, special dinners, business meetings, graduation parties and whatever else customers can dream up. Lori will try hard to deflect this praise to the people around her, and there is no question she is blessed by an amazing group of friends who share her enthusiasm for life, friends and community. But I cannot think of anyone more worthy of the Extraordinary Rochester Women Award than my wife, Lori.

—Van Beach


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RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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shopping

buying rocks without loo sins g your marble

By Barbara Hight-Randall and Marlene Petersen Photograpy by Mike Hardwick Photography

D

o you find buying gems confusing? Check out these tips from Certified Gemologist Appraiser Barbara Hight-Randall.

Cut:

Clarity:

Clarity is the integrity of a crystal, its internal, naturally occurring imperfecip on Clarity: tions. It tells us the stone came from the Always ask the jeweler earth, not a laboratory. to demonstrate a stone’s There are five considerations for clarity under a magnifying clarity: size, number, location, color glass. There may be and nature of the imperfections—big microscopic imperfections versus small, colorless versus dark, few that are affecting its price. versus many, close to the edge versus deep in the stone and an included crystal (i.e., inclusions) versus a break in the stone. The number of internal characteristics a gem has affects durability, beauty and passage of light through the stone. The emerald on the left may have perfections but they are not visible to the naked eye. If you look closely at the stone on the right, you will see a large break in the middle of the stone, which detracts from its beauty, interrupts the passage of light through the emerald and makes it less valuable.

T

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

Tip on cut:

Buy the best cut you can afford, even if it means buying a smaller gem. A good cut will enhance the properties of the gem.

Both pictures on the left are the same eight carat, yellow sapphire. The top one is beautiful and very valuable, but if you look closely, you can see right through it. The gem is “windowing.” There is nothing wrong with a gem that windows, but it should cost less than one with similar characteristics that doesn’t. “When you look into a gem,” says gemologist Barbara Randall, “you should see a pool of light with no end.” Compare the picture on the bottom. This is the same sapphire as the one on the top, but it has been recut. This new cut allows more light to refract throughout the gem, so all you see is color, depth, richness and fire. The stone is more valuable now because the cut is a work of art and enhances the inherent properties of the sapphire.


Carat and Color:

Tip on Color:

Hue, tone and saturation of color dictate the rarity of colored gemstones, so look for the richness of a rainbow when shopping for them.

Carat Trivia:

For every one carat diamond sold, a jeweler typically sells over one million smaller diamonds, making the sale of a one carat diamond one in a million. Carats are the weight of a gemstone (not to be confused with karats, which are a unit of purity pertaining to gold, 24 karat being the purest). One carat equals 200 milligrams. Large gems are rare, and rarity drives price, so generally, the higher the carat weight, the more you will pay for the gem. But bigger isn’t always better. The blue sapphire (top left) has a greater carat weight but costs less than the one pictured below it. That is because of color. Sapphires that are nearly black, like the one on top, are much more common and, therefore, less valuable. Also, its color falls flat in the center (i.e. extinction) compared to the one on the bottom, whose color looks like an endless, deep blue velvet pool.

Give the Perfect

Valentine’s Gift

for men, for women…for (yourself)!

give the gift of luxurious hair.

give the gift of perfect nails.

Diamond Trivia:

White diamonds: Unlike colored gemstones, colorless diamonds are rarer than body color, and therefore more valuable. The more brilliant the diamond—i.e. the amount of white light it creates—the better. When a diamond is cut properly, light goes in, bounces throughout and comes back out the top to create more white light. A good cut can even create a whiter looking diamond than is inherent in the crystal. Cutting the diamond for maximum light performance, can pump out more brilliance, make the diamond look larger, reduce body color and have potentially fewer visible imperfections.

Final shopping tip:

Find a knowledgeable jeweler and have her show you gemstones with the different attributes, discussing what is important to you and how that affects price. Making comparisons is the key to knowing which gem is for you.

Barbara Hight-Randall is a certified gemologist at Hight & Randall, Personal Jeweler. Marlene Petersen is a freelance editor and writer.

For every one carat finished diamond, you need a two carat rough crystal because half the total weight of the diamond crystal is lost when it is cut.

give the gift of beautiful skin.

give the gift of relaxing massage.

Tip on diamonds:

You will get more diamond for your dollar on a diamond whose color has been enhanced by the cut verses one with intrinsically perfect color (which is extremely rare, thus far more expensive).

find us on facebook RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

25


34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

home

after before

Contractor: Radcliffe Homes

HomeownerS: Cindy and Bill Rapp

Project:

Remodel an 1861 farmhouse with modern comforts while maintaining historic style and exterior appearance.

SUBCONTRACTORS Jim Byrne Construction Collins Masonry Advanced Building Center Chris Derr Plumbing Boe Electric Expert Insulation

By Penny Marshall • Photography by Fagan Studios

Kuisle Siding

s a young girl living in the Twin Cities, Cindy Rapp often visited the rural Rochester home of her aunt and uncle, Paul and Marie Hennessey. “I remember running through the pasture, swinging on the porch swing and playing with the kitties in the barn,” Cindy recalls about the 150-year-old home her relatives owned. “My Uncle Paul would open the hatch to the cistern in the kitchen floor and tell me, ‘that’s where they throw naughty kids.’” Years later, Cindy and her husband, Bill, learned that her relatives’ 1861 limestone farmhouse was going up for auction. Cindy was interested in buying it, but Bill had reservations about updating the interior to make the old home as comfortable as the new one they had built nearby. So, Bill challenged Cindy to come up with a design to remodel the home that would parallel the accommodations they had in their existing home.

Curry’s Custom Cut Gutters

A

Engel Painting Tile Superstore & More Davis Wood Scapes Hutch’s Custom Cabinets North Star Stone & Masonry Bertschinger Masonry

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

Before.

After.

At Luxury Bath Remodeling we know results matter. That’s why we use the most beautiful, easy to clean products in the industry. Add that to our stress free installation and lifetime warranty, and you will see why over 98% of our customers say they would recommend us to friends & family. Call Luxury Bath R E M O D E L I N G Remodeling today & start sitting Pretty. 507-281-5637 / 888-444-4991 2717 Highway 14 West, Suite L www.luxurybathrochester.com Rochester, MN 55901-7598

Hair Color, Cuts, Permanents, Relaxing, Styling Facial Waxing

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hair cutting and styling specialist

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

“F

amily members told me I was crazy and the house wasn’t worth saving,” says Cindy, “but my son Jeff said he knew I had a vision and that my visions seem to work.” Eventually, Cindy arrived at an acceptable floor plan and, along with the promise of a tractor for Bill, went to the auction and bought the house. To make her vision a reality, Cindy needed a contractor. She chose Les Radcliffe of Radcliffe Homes. “The Rapps wanted to remodel the house with present-day amenities but keep the original look and character as much as possible,” says Radcliffe. “The fact that the house was built 150 years ago and was still standing was important in and of itself,” says Cindy who wanted the home to appear—at least from the road—as it had originally.

before

Radcliffe removed an aged walnut tree from the property and incorporated it into the treads on the second–floor stairs and ten window seats throughout the house.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

W

ith help from photos Cindy had of the home taken at the turn of the century, Radcliffe began remodeling. He took the interior walls down to beams and stone, updated every room and added a great room, den/bedroom, sewing room, main floor laundry and garage. A history buff at heart, Radcliffe reveled in the discovery of hand hewn, white oak beams under layers of plaster and paneling. Two of them now serve as beams for the front porch. “The exterior had little change to it so it was easy to follow the architecture of the original structure,” says Radcliffe. Limestone walls bearing over a hundred years of exterior elements are now interior walls in the kitchen/dining room and den. The Rapps used some of the stone from an old wall to create a limestone front walk. “We wanted to expose and use as much of the limestone as we could,” says Cindy. “The stone was actually quarried here. There’s value in retaining historical aspects but you have to be realistic,” says Cindy, who sought to save certain elements of the home without a full-scale preservation. “We knew what we wanted and liked and what needed to be preserved, and we got it.” “Including a tractor!” noted Bill. Penny Marshall is a Rochester freelance writer.

30

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

The Kitchen & Bath Store

3815 Highway 14 W | Rochester | 507.287.0202 GerhardsStore.com

Cumulus Radio 50th Annual

Home, Vacation & RV Show

Graham Arenas, Rochester, MN Olmsted Country Fairgrounds March 15, 16 &17

Limited exhibitor space available Call 507-286-1010 for information or email terry.lee@cumulus.com WhitehavenÂŽ apron-front kitchen sink Kohler.com

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

home

Nicole Curtis 32

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

The host of DIY Network’s “Rehab Addict” and speaker at the 2013 Rochester Area Builders Home Show, Nicole Curtis, shares the triumphs and challenges of restoring old homes in a male-dominant field.

On a Mission By Trish Amundson

Photography by Ariel Photography, Minneapolis, official photographer of Nicole Curtis Design

N

icole Curtis, host of the DIY Network’s series “Rehab Addict,” was in the right place at the right time. Reality TV was just an idea when she met a producer at the DIY Network and shared her mission to save every last old house through home restoration and preservation. Now in its third season, “Rehab Addict” features Curtis up to her neck in drywall dust and old floorboards as she curses and sometimes cries to bring new life to old homes. RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

C 2013 Builders Home Show 34th Annual Show February 8 –10, 2013 Mayo Civic Center

Photo courtesy of Amy Zellmer

Nicole Curtis, host of DIY Network’s “Rehab Addict,” will share her experiences, including:

• The ABCs of renovating • Restoration on a budget • Restoration in the current economy For more information about the home show or services provided by Rochester Area Builders, Inc., visit rochesterareabuilders.com.

urtis, the featured speaker at the 34th Annual Rochester Area Builders Home Show February 8–10, is not an actor. She’s a single mom, licensed realtor and interior designer out of Minneapolis who has been remodeling—actually hammering, sawing and drilling—houses for 15 years. On and off camera of “Rehab Addict,” Curtis gives each home she tackles a personality as unique as her own and inspires millions of home renovation enthusiasts every week.

~

Was it hard, as a woman, to break through in this field? It’s still hard. No one wanted to take me seriously. I worked very hard to “prove” that I knew what I was talking about, which means I spent much time researching, learning and, of course, working for free to build up my “proof” in a portfolio.   Are there very many women who flip homes, especially when bearing restoration in mind? Very few women restore homes. I get so excited to chat with other women who are working in a “man’s job.” My social media outlets have become a sounding board for women in these fields, and I love it. Many think that the glass ceiling has been broken since the business world is full of women at the top, but the construction world is a whole other story—it’s still 1950 here. How did you come to start doing this work? I grew up in a very handy family with very strong-willed women who never waited to get things done. My parents instilled in me that home ownership was the starting block of my adulthood, and at 18, I bought my first home on a land contract with hardly enough money for a down payment, let alone a remodel budget. I quickly learned to paint, repair windows and ask many questions of the local hardware store employees.   How did you learn your skills? I learned skills by watching experts in certain fields and asking questions. What I didn’t know how to tackle, I found someone who did and asked to shadow them. My family got me started at a young age, but, honestly, every day I learn something new.   How do you handle difficult contractors, especially if you feel it is because you are a woman? I am a very strong, outspoken woman. On my jobsites, the minute I let my guard down, I will get trampled.

What advice do you have for women acting as their own general contractor in hiring and working with other contractors? Educate yourself, and do not believe everything you hear. I suggest you get at least five bids (and that’s a minimum) for every project (electrical, plumbing, etc.). By doing so, you will talk to at least five different people who have five different ways of working for you!

What are your favorite and least favorite aspects of this work? My favorite part of this work is finding the story behind the houses, meeting the families that grew up there and, most of all, knowing that the smiles from those people and the communities are all due to a silly dream I had to save old homes. My least favorite aspect is dealing with the red tape. Each of these homes comes with a mile-long list of building code issues. How has your show on DIY Network hurt or helped your business? You can’t get a better arena to get your word out than a national No.1 TV show. My business is to save old homes, and on the days I want to quit, I remember that with each episode I have the chance to inspire 16 million people to believe in saving old homes. It has never been about the money for me. The fact that people want to listen to me is payment enough most days. Trish Amundson is a Rochester area freelance writer and do-it-yourselfer, who helped remodel her 100-year-old home. RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

home

A TALE OF KITCHENS

two

Tale one: opening up the floor

plan makes a small kitchen live big By Debi Neville Photography by Fagan Studios

I

n our recurring home feature Remodelers Corner

we proudly highlight gorgeous

Original floor plan

remodels done by local, professional contractors. In this issue and March/ April, we are presenting two do-it-yourself, small-budget kitchen projects where the homeowner—a staff member of RochesterWomen—acted as her own general contractor. This tale is from our writer Debi Neville. 36

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

Dining room


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

See us at the RAB Home Show February 8-10 Booth #459

O F

R O C H E S T E R

FREE ESTIMATES & FREE INSTALLATION Toll Free 877-373-8535 or 507-289-2728 sales@coolwindowshades.com coolwindowshades.com

after

Removing the non-load-bearing wall opened the kitchen to the adjoining rooms. before

The problem The kitchen is the hub of activity in our home, like many others, but from the moment my husband, Pat, and I built our home 12 years ago, it hasn’t matched our lifestyle. Separated from the adjacent dining and living room by one 10-foot wall with a pass-through style window, the kitchen always felt closed in. Cooking together, entertaining and family gatherings were a problem. Something had to change. The goal: open the kitchen into the adjoining rooms by removing the nonload-bearing wall that separated them. I reasoned it would give me a design that would flow seamlessly with the rest of the house, provide additional counter space and storage, open the area for conversation with company and enhance visual enjoyment. RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


Mayo civic center — www.rochesterareabuilders.com

Friends and family who have seen the new look have said, “It should always have been this way.” We feel that way too. — Debi Neville

The process There was no need to change the footprint of the house. There was enough square footage; it was just underutilized and dysfunctional. So, I drew a plan that would leave one wall of cabinets and appliances in the kitchen and would remove the opposite kitchen wall and replace it with a new, two-sided, 4x8 foot island—complete with open bookcases, casual bar seating, a sink and dishwasher (which were relocated to the island). The only downside to the plan was that taking out a wall and opening the space required new flooring for the kitchen, laundry, dining and living areas. I wanted a professional designer’s opinion before employing the sledgehammer, so I called Diane Quinn at Beyond Kitchens. For a reasonable consultation fee, she took a look at my plans and said my ideas were good and would work. I, then, solicited estimates for the entire project. At approximately $25,000, the bids were more than my very modest budget could support, so Pat and I (having built and rehabbed several homes) decided to act as our own contractor. We made a detailed list of work and materials, keeping in mind our limitations and knowing when to call in pros like Diane. It’s a major part of a successful project. Once all the labor and material bids were in place and checked against our finances, the remodel was scheduled. We called upon our son Drew and nephews Jonathon and Jason to help with various aspects. Setting a realistic timeline with contractors and suppliers keeps the project moving and on budget. We began the tear down on August 1, 2012 and completed the entire remodel by September 1, including the new lower level wet bar where we repurposed some cabinets from the upstairs kitchen. It meant some long days and flexibility on our part and our contractors, but everyone worked together for a terrific outcome. Friends and family who have seen the new look have said, “It should always have been this way.” We feel that way too.

DIY budget with some

contractors $12,500* Beyond Kitchens, cons ultation $80 Veolia, demolition ma terial removal: $562 HIMEC Plumbing, lab or and materials $2,42 8 K&S Electric, labor an d materials $587 Larry Neuman Dryw all, $530 labor and materials Home Depot, bamboo $5,137 flooring and installation Top Shop, countertop and $1,246 under-mount sink Best Buy, Bosch dishw asher $500 Sherwin-Williams, pa int and supplies $98 Fischer Painting, labor $125 IKEA, island cabinets $1,352 Fran Kempf, carpentr y labor $210 Menards, miscellaneou s supplies $210 Sherwin-Williams, pa int and supplies $98 Total cost: $13, 163 (more labor than anticip ated) *Compare to original estimates for work and materials of $24,50 0-$27,000 New appraisal on hom e estimates the value of remodel at $40 ,000

Debi Neville was a realtor, broker and builder for the majority of her life. She stepped out of those shoes to dedicate more time to her career as a playwright, actor, director and busy freelance writer. RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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34th ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 8, 9 & 10, 2013

DEMYSTI FY Your Camera!

Is your camera calling the shots? Take a journey with award winning photographer Dawn Sanborn and learn to use your camera in a whole new way. Upcoming Workshops: DEMYSTIFY ~ Your Camera Time to take command of your camera settings and get off the auto button!

Tuesday January 8th 6-8 PM Tuesday February 5th 6-8 PM

DEMYSTIFY ~ Photoshop

Learn the basics of Photoshop in a relaxed, hands-on setting. Photoshop will allow you to expand your creative options and improve the presentation of your images.

Tuesday January 22nd 6-9 PM Tuesday February 19th 6-9 PM These dates don’t work with your schedule? Try the You+2: Simply grab two friends, let me know a date that works for you, and we will coordinate a time for a workshop!

“I really learned far more today (in two hours) than I did in three weeks at that PowerPoint class!” ~ Erin

Mini workshops include casual lectures, hands-on assistance, and time for questions & answers. For more Information: dawn.sanborn@live.com 507 252 4662

OF MODERN DAY SLAVERY

FORCED LABOR PROSTITUTION PORNOGRAPHY Human Trafficking Awareness Events Thursday, January 10 – 6:30-8:00 PM Rochester Public Library

Friday, January 11 – 7:00-8:30 PM University Center Rochester, Hill Theatre

Saturday, January 12 – 8:30 AM-1:00 PM Assisi Heights Sponsored by:

Sisters of Saint Francis, Rochester, MN For more information: www.rochesterfranciscan.org

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

W o r ksh o p s

www.dawnsanborn.com


food

Voyage into Veganism

One family’s adventure with a new diet brings challenges and rewards By margo stich • Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

L

ast year, Michelle and Brian Lamka set out to revamp their diet. They were motivated by a desire to jump start a healthy lifestyle. After viewing a documentary on the benefits of a vegan diet, they decided to challenge themselves to adopt it. In doing so, they hoped to lower their cholesterol and blood pressure. While ethical aspects of eating animal products are often a basis for veganism, this was not the impetus for the Lamkas. “We love animals but the motivation was to change our diet,” says Michelle. Like many, the Lamkas were told growing up that meat is essential for protein in one’s diet, but the longer they maintained the vegan diet the less crucial this advice seemed and the more important the treatment of animals became. One of the first big tasks was shopping.

The challenge was not just finding vegan products but also those without preservatives. This made label reading essential. Shopping became easier once they discovered where to find the basics: the People’s Food Co-op and the health food sections at Hy-Vee and Trader Joe’s. They even joined a CSA (community supported agriculture) farm share. “It is amazing what you can find,” comments Michelle. “You honestly can find everything without animal products in them.” Their new diet became a hobby, a family venture. Brian and Michelle’s two teenage children were given the option to eat the vegan meals or make something for themselves, but even they joined in at times. “We never forced them to eat what we were eating, but they were willing to try everything,” says Michelle.

The whole family became more adventuresome, trying new things and making conscious, more mindful choices about what their food was made of before putting it in their mouths. Eating out—something the Lamkas really enjoy—was perhaps the biggest hurdle. Finding vegan items in restaurants was tricky but achievable. They found the Nile Restaurant and People’s Co-op were good places to start. Social gatherings were difficult as well, but their increased energy and health have made it worth all the inconveniences. Their advice in trying a new diet: be fully committed. The first weeks are more challenging but then things become a habit. Recipes, such as those that follow, can bring new flavors to the table and help you stick with it long enough to access the benefits of a revamped diet. RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


Quinoa Pilaf

Compliments of People’s

Food Co-op

2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 cup chopped onion

) 1 1/2 cup quinoa (rinsed 2 1/4 cups water soning (an herbal salt) 1 Tbsp. Herbamare sea ies, sweetened 1/2 cup dried cranberr ed 1/2 cup pecans, chopp té r. Add quinoa then sau Sauté onions until tende d an ter, wa d an re ma rba a minute longer; add He utes until min 20 t ou ab for r me bring to a boil. Sim ntly stir in pecans and all liquid is absorbed. Ge five minutes more. Serve for r me cranberries and sim n: ure. Wine recommendatio hot or at room temperat rra Sie n: recommendatio Poppy Zinfandel. Beer . Ale e Pal Nevada

Hoisin Stir-F ried Vegetab over Rice No les and Tofu 1/4 cup hois o d les in sauce 3 Tbsp. sesa m

e oil, divided 1/4 cup soy sauce, divid ed 2 Tbsp. rice vinegar 3 Tbsp. brow n sugar 1 Tbsp. white sugar 1/4 cup veg etable broth 1 tsp. each m inced garlic and fresh gin g

2 tsp. cornst arch 8 oz. thin ric e vermicelli 8 oz. firm to fu, chopped into 1-inch p 4 green onio ieces ns, chopped 1 yellow bel l pepper and 1/2 red bel pepper, cho l pped into 1/2 -inch pieces 1 1/2 cups broccoli, cho pped

er In a small bow l, whisk togethe vinegar, sug r hoisin sauc ars e, 1 Tbsp. over noodle , vegetable broth, garli c, ginger and sesame oil, 2 Tbsp. soy s to cover; so sauc a cornstarch. S k for 10 minut In a large w et aside. Pour e, rice lightly browne ok or skillet, stir- fr y tofu es until soft. Drain well. boiling wate in r d another 2–3 , about three minutes. A 2 Tbsp. sesame oil and 2 Tbsp. soy dd green oni minutes. Stir sa ons, pepper sauce mixture about 4–5 m s and brocco uce until in in li. Stir fr y 5–6. Wine re utes and broccoli is done to the skillet. Allow to simm commendatio co n: Fetzer Ries oking. Ser ve over cooke er until mixture thickens , ling. Beer re commendatio d rice noodles. Ser ves n: Stella Arto is.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

43


Classic American Menu Casual, Comfortable Atmosphere Serving steaks, burgers, pot roast, seafood, and salads. Local and organic food sources including Schultz Farm Organic Eggs, Organic Flour from Welcome, MN, and staples from the Wedge Co-op.

Breakfast: Fri - Sun 8am Lunch Mon - Sun from 11am Dinner Tues - Sat 120 Elton Hills Drive NW (Next to Dunn Bros) 285.2516

Thank you for helping us fill this plate by supporting Meals on Wheels.

THANK YOU! JANUARY’S MEALS ON WHEELS SPONSOR: ROCHESTER ATHLETIC CLUB

Learn more about how you can get involved by contacting: Family Service Rochester 507.287.2010 www.familyservicerochester.org

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


ea Stew p k ic h C n e d a -L Spice ato paste

2 Tbsp. tom ice, ground lsp al e broth nd ou gr 3 cups vegetabl 1/4 tsp. each es ov 1-inch chunks cl ground tatoes, cut into po d re cardamom and nd ou  p 1 , ground into 1/2-inch ound coriander peeled and cut ts, er ro 1/2 tsp. each gr pp ar c  pe k 4 ac bl , salt and ginger, paprika chunks ks to 1/2-inch chun l oi ive ol . 2 Tbsp lery stalks, cut in ce 2 finely chopped kpeas, drained 2 garlic cloves, 5 oz.) cans chic (1 2 ion, chopped 1 medium red on ed ginger d ped, fresh peel edium heat. Ad ium pot over m 2 tsp. finely chop n, ed m ow a br in l en oi ld t go soft and aside. Hea out nally, until very small bowl; set ab a sio ly, in ca nt er oc ta th ns ng ge co rri to sti stirring Stir spices er. Cook, ntinue cooking, ts and d chopped ging spice mixture. Co pot then stir in potatoes, carro es are ed garlic, onion an rv se re in ir St to bl . d ta es ge Ad ut . in ve m ste til t pa un simmer about eigh to tomato -low. Cover and til stew is m owly, add broth un iu Sl g . ed in es m er ut m to in at m sim o tw inue ce he a boil then redu over pot. Add chickpeas. Cont es more. Serves six. Wine celery. Bring to minut . Unc es 15 t ut in ou m ab , 15 er t e Amber Ale. just tender, abou toes and carrots are very tend endation: New Belgium Fat Tir ta m m po d co re an thickened r meat lovers. Rioja. Beer added to this fo n: Montebuena tio be n da ca en e m m ag co us re sa or sliced, cooked d, cooked ham Variation: cube

Margo Stich is food editor for Rochester Women Magazine. Suggested wine and beer pairings are those of the Andy's Wellner Drive staff.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

45


how to

food

Crème Brulee By Margo Stich Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

Créme Brulee is a classic French dessert made from cream and egg yolks with a brittle caramelized sugar topping. The textual contrast of smooth, warm, creamy custard lying just beneath a fragile glassy sugar coating is culinary perfection for the senses. INGREDIENTS 1 quart heavy cream 1 vanilla bean, split and scraped 1/2 cup granulated sugar 6 large egg yolks 2 quarts hot water 1 cup “Sugar in the Raw”

Equipment needed 6 individual-size ramekins (available at Pier 1 or Bed, Bath and Beyond) A k itchen torch (also at Bed, Bath and Beyond)

1 2

Four basic ingredients comprise this dish: heavy cream, vanilla bean (or 1 tsp. extract), eggs (yolks only) and sugar.

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 46

Preheat oven to 325° F. Cut the vanilla bean in half lengthwise and separate into two sections. Hold the pod at one end and then—using the edge of a knife—begin scraping the beans into a mound, reserving off to the side.

2

3

In a medium saucepan, over medium-high heat, combine the heavy cream, vanilla bean pod and scraped seed. Bring just to a simmer. Once the mixture begins to simmer, remove from heat; discard the vanilla bean. Cover and allow to rest for 10 minutes. Separate the egg yolks from the whites (discard or save whites for a different recipe) placing yolks in a mixing bowl. Add 1/2 cup sugar and whisk well until light in color. Add the vanilla cream mixture, one cup at a time, whisking continually to incorporate well. Skim the froth off the surface and discard.

5

6

Carefully pour the liquid into 6 (7–8 oz.) ramekins. Place the ramekins into a large cake pan. Pour enough hot water into the cake pan to come half way up the ramekins. Place the pan in the oven on the middle rack, and bake at 325° F until crème brulees are set but still trembling in the center, about 45 minutes. R  emove crème brulees from pan and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. Divide the Sugar in the Raw between the six dishes and spread evenly over top. Using a torch, melt the sugar until it forms a crispy top.

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

7

8


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Spectacular Salads, Pizza, Pasta, Sandwiches, and Cheesecake to tempt your palate.

Nile Restaurant Authentic Ethiopian Cuisine including lamb, beef, chicken &fish

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r----- , Saturdays 6-8 pm

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9 Food Editor, Margo Stich, would like to thank Jonathan Klinger, Executive Chef at Thyme Restaurant & Lounge (220 S. Broadway, Rochester) for this recipe and â&#x20AC;&#x153;hands onâ&#x20AC;? assistance in producing this article.

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RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

I ..

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• Dr. Perry has been doing smile make-overs for over 20 years. • Dr. Perry has been a certified Invisalign® provider for over five years. • Was featured on KTTC in 2003 with his computerized one-visit Cerec Crown procedure. • Dr. Perry has been placing Lumineer1M veneers since 1997. • The first dentist in SE Minnesota with the new "Water Lase" dental laser for doing pain free smile lifts during cosmetic make-overs and fillings without Novacaine. • Member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. • Has trained with the top cosmetic educators in the country. I. The Center for Esthetic Excellence. 2. The Hornbrook Group. • Complimentary consultation which includes cosmetic imaging and a 10 point smile analysis.

P~rry D~ntal Soft-touch dentistry for the whole family

• Excellence • Precision • Caring • Soft-touch


Seasons of thevine

food

By Margo Stich

Margo Stich, food editor

Fermented Follies

Inspired by the book title, “He Said Beer, She Said Wine,” (DK Publishing 2008) ­and bored with the dark, cold days of winter, I set out to learn if “she” really says wine and “he” really says beer.

Here’s what a few Rochesterites had to say: “When drinking wine I don’t get filled up; when drinking beer, I don’t have to remember what I paid for that bottle.” — DJS (male, mid-50's)

Photos courtesy of Carmen and George Reid; mural by Greg Wimmer of Rochester.

“To us, preferences appear to be a generational thing influenced by the part of the country where one lives. In our early married days, living on the East coast, everyone around us drank mixed drinks. Somehow it just happened that we turned to wine after moving to the Midwest.” — anonymous couple in their mid-70’s

“Beer or wine? It’s like listening to music…it depends on my mood.” — anonymous female, mid-40’s

“Beer makes my face scrunch up uncontrollably. Wine never does that.” —Marlene Petersen, editor, RochesterWomen magazine

“Beer is event driven; wine is palate driven.” — PC (female early 50's)

“If it weren’t for Miller Light, Budweiser and Anheuser Busch, we wouldn’t have sport games broadcast on TV.” — anonymous male, early 50's

“I used to drink more beer than wine, especially as a young man. In later years, I appreciated the complexity and variety of wines, but I still like a good European beer, as dark as possible.” — anonymous male, early 80’s

“Backaches and menstrual cramps certainly call for a glass of wine!” — Patty Palmersheim

“We have wine for dinner, but you wouldn’t sit around and watch football games all afternoon with a glass of wine.” — Gary Palmersheim

Wine or beer? Send your thoughts to RochesterWomen magazine’s Facebook page. We’ll post some of our favorites in our March/April edition of Seasons of the Vine.

News from Area Wineries With the 2012 growing season over and snow firmly enveloping dormant grape vines, many area wineries have reduced hours or have closed for the winter. Four Daughters, in Spring Valley and Villa Bellezza in Pepin, Wisc., remain open seven days a week year-round. Be sure to check area wineries’ websites for winter hours.

Upcoming Events: Jan. 19, 12th Annual Wit, Wisdom and Wine This marvelous event includes a choice of two guest speakers, an opportunity to socialize over wine while enjoying light refreshments and the challenge of outwitting/ outbidding each other in the silent auction. The 2012 event raised over $25,000 for the Rochester Public Library. Tickets are $75 per person ($85 per person after January 11). For more, visit www.rochesterpubliclibrary.org/ supporting/foundation/WitWine.html or call 507-328-2309. Feb. 15, 21st Annual “Wines of the World” Wine Tasting, 6:30–9 pm, Ramada Hotel & Conference Center   This Valentine’s Day weekend, treat yourself to a night of wine tasting while supporting Bear Creek Services, a Rochester, non-profit organization that provides housing and support services for people with developmental disabilities and traumatic brain injuries. Come sample over 150 wines (and various beers and spirits), enjoy light hors d’oeuvres and chocolates from Chocolaterie Stam, learn about wines from distributors and participate in the silent auction. Tickets are $35 if purchased before February 11th ($40 after and at the door). For more information, visit www.bearcreekservices.org.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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healthy living

10

Habits to improve your health and honor the tenth anniversary of the American Heart Association's Go

Red For Women

campaign.

rH e a r

s o y t a

o v Y o u e L rH e a r

to

o v Y o u e L

tW

By Niloufar Tabatabaei, MD, Amanda Hovey, Emily Applen, RN and Jessica McAlpine, RN

s y a

1. Dance! Dance! Dance! Aerobic exercise is good

for the heart, it keeps you at a healthy weight, reduces plaque buildup in the arteries and lowers your blood pressure. No one is looking, so have some fun! If you don’t like dancing, walk your dog (or your neighbor’s), park further away when running errands and take the stairs instead of the elevator.

2. Know your numbers It is true that an ounce of

prevention is worth a pound of cure. So, know your numbers: what is your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood glucose? Visit with your primary healthcare practitioner to learn your numbers and check out Heart360, an online tool that helps you track and manage your heart health (www.heart360.org).

6. Limit your caffeine and alcohol intake Caffeine and alcohol can have a negative impact on your

heart, including exacerbating abnormal rhythms. Go caffeine-free or replace a soft drink with water, and cut down on your alcohol.

7. Cultivate joy! A decade-long study of more than

1,700 adults published in the “European Heart Journal” reports that adults who have a positive outlook on life reduce their chance of a heart attack. Those who regularly feel and express gratitude for their life circumstances have a better chance of living longer and having a healthier life. Need help with the blues? Cognitive and behavioral therapy can reduce depression and improve your sense of well-being.

tW

3. Sweet dreams Studies show quality sleep decreases

the odds of heart disease. Decreased sleep duration and poor quality sleep—including decreased oxygenation—impact your heart negatively.

4. Laugh to your heart’s content!

Research at University College in London says that hearty laughter relaxes the walls of your arteries, causing increased blood flow for up to 45 minutes. Tell a joke, and promote the release of those “feel good” endorphins.

5. Good eats, heart treats How much, how

often and what you eat do matter. Don’t starve yourself and don’t overeat. Moderation is the best policy. Eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, and reduce your sodium. Your heart will thank you… so will your waist.

8. Change of heart Attend Cardiac Rehabilitation! A session a day will keep the doc away. Research has shown that people with heart disease who participate in Cardiac Rehab can reduce their mortality rate by 45%. If you have heart disease, make sure you have regular follow-ups with your caregivers and take your medications. Appropriate medications and interventions have been shown to increase life span as well as improve quality of life. 9. Nip it in the butt Smoking is a risk factor for heart disease and the sooner you stop, the longer you will have to reap the benefits of being smoke-free. 10. Brush off heart disease Every day, we

discover more about the associations between gum disease and heart disease. So, brush those pearly whites twice daily, floss once a day and get regular dental check-ups.

Dr. Niloufar Tabatabaei is a cardiologist at Olmsted Medical Center (OMC). Amanda Hovey is an exercise physiologist at OMC, and Emily Applen and Jessica McAlpine are rehabilitation services nurses at OMC. 50

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com


13195 Volunteers Wine Tastings: many varieties of on-site produced and award-winning Minnesota wine available.

Needed RW:13195 Volunteers Needed RW

11/15/11

3:34 PM

Page 1

Full menu every day, including Sunday brunch and Thursday night 4-course dinners.

Volunteer!

Check the website for details on this fall’s harvest festival and concerts!

Volunteers Needed for Research Study Mayo Clinic is seeking women and men, between the ages of 18 and 80, for a clinical research study. The purpose of this study is to learn more about hormones as we age and how they affect the pituitary “master” gland, bone density, muscle weakness, and body fat. Studies involve several daytime or overnight visits to the Clinical Research Unit at Saint Marys Hospital. There will also be screening blood tests and a brief physical exam. You will be compensated for your time in the study. For more information, please contact us at (507) 255-1290 or endoresearch@mayo.edu More clinical trials information can be found at http://clinicaltrials.mayo.edu Mayo Clinic is an affirmative action and equal opportunity educator and employer.

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healthy living

Teeth

Caring for little teeth, big teeth and moving teeth By Michelle Kubitz

F

rom the minute our first baby tooth erupts, we begin a relationship with dentistry that lasts a lifetime. But when do we take our children for the first time? What treatments will we need as we age? What can I do to get back the radiant smile of my 20's? All shall be answered in this handy-dandy guide to caring for little teeth, big teeth and even moving teeth.

LITTLE TEETH THE FIRST VISIT

THE SCOOP: Visits to the dentist are beginning at an earlier age than ever before—as early as a child’s first year. But this first visit is more about the concept of dentistry than the actual practice. “It’s mostly talking,” says Dr. Robyn Loewen of Dentistry for Children and Adolescents, Ltd. “Oftentimes after that visit, if everything looks good, we’ll postpone the next visit until age two or three.” QUESTIONS TO ASK: The first visit is a great time to talk with your child’s practitioner about the dental concerns you have: • What happens after a child suffers trauma to her mouth? • What could be the long-term effects of your child sucking on her thumb or a pacifier? • Your child’s diet and optimizing the right nutrients for a healthy smile.

The American Dental Association advises that children should have their first dental appointment by age one or soon after their first teeth erupt.

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

THE FIRST CLEANING

TELL, SHOW, DO: Regardless of how old your child is when she gets her first cleaning, the dental community works hard to tailor the visit and present information in a way kids will understand. Dr. Loewen and Dr. Candace Mensing from Dentistry for Children and Adolescents and Dr. Katie Post of Northwest Dental Group all employ a method called “tell, show, do.” During a child’s cleaning, they tell the child what they are going to do, show her how they will do it and the tools they will use—usually with the help of puppets or stuffed animals—and then they do the actual cleaning. PARENTAL GUIDANCE ADVISED: Post encourages parents to be present during their kids’ appointments: “The parents can learn the whole time that I’m with the kids.” “We always want the parent in the first exam,” agrees Dr. Mensing. “We really want to communicate to the parent while we’re communicating with the child.”

AT HOME

HEALTHY HABITS: In between visits, Drs. Post, Mensing and Loewen recommend parents: • Assist children in brushing 2–3 times daily, two minutes each time, until age eight (when they achieve good manual dexterity). Floss teeth that are in contact with each other once daily. •“Watch your kid’s diet like a hawk,” advises Dr. Loewen. Two common cavity culprits are raisins and fruit snacks. “They are high in sugar and get caught in the backs of kids’ teeth,” says Dr. Post.

PREPARING FOR THE DENTIST 101: Before taking kids to the dentist, there are several things parents can do to prevent a routine experience from turning into a teary meltdown: • Play dentist at home with your kids. Role playing helps children prepare for what they will find at their dentist visit;

• Start visits at a young age. Children who meet and get to know their dentist early “are more comfortable and feel safe with me and comfortable with this space,” says Dr. Post; • Avoid projecting your own fears onto your kids. For instance, try to refrain from asking your children, “Did it hurt?” when they leave the dentist’s office, suggest Drs. Mensing and Loewen.


BIG TEETH Now that you're grown up, you get regular checkups (every six months or so) and brush/floss regularly, what else is there?

What should I be thinking about? If I’m in my … 20s – 30s

Wisdom teeth extraction (if not already done) Cleanings & dental exams every six months Yearly bitewing x-rays (or twice yearly, depending on decay risk) Trying to get pregnant? Get x-rays before While pregnant, keep up cleanings

40s – 50s

Gum recession Broken teeth Increased grinding of teeth Cosmetic concerns: bleaching, filings and crown replacement Deep cleanings

60s +

Root decay Partial and full dentures Breaking teeth Crowns Deep cleanings Source: Dr. Billie Vasdev, Crystal Dental Clinic

Q: Is fluoride just for kids? Local dentists recommend children and adults get fluoride treatments. Fluoride is a naturally occurring element that helps strengthen teeth enamel and fight plaque and bacteria and is “very effective at preventing decay,” according to Dr. Mensing. It’s crucial when teeth are forming and helps with the remineralization of teeth—where minerals return back to the teeth that are eroded through tooth decay. But while too little fluoride can cause more tooth decay and loose teeth, parents should avoid over-exposure to fluoride, according to Dr. Mensing. “Not because it’s harmful,” she explains, “but to avoid fluorosis which is where the enamel of the teeth are marked with white specks or streaks.” Parents can strike a balance for their children’s dental health, as well as their own, by drinking water supplemented with fluoride, using fluoridated toothpaste and seeking fluoride treatments at the dentist.

ABSOLUTE MINIMUMS

PAYING FOR DENTAL CARE: In a budget-crunched society, it’s easy to put dental appointments at the end of the priorities’ list. If a family can’t afford regular dental checkups, what should they do for care? “They should maintain good oral hygiene,” says Dr. Billie Vasdev from Crystal Dental Clinic. This includes brushing 2–3 times per day, flossing and using mouth rinses. Dr. Vasdev also recommends the dental hygiene program at Rochester Community Technical College (RCTC): “It is a fantastic program. For a set fee, the patients get an exam by a dentist, x-rays and an evaluation for a cleaning or a deep cleaning.” For more details, call the RCTC dental hygiene program at 280-3169. 54

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

Other reduced-cost dental services in Rochester include: •C  hildren's Dental Health Services, United Way Building, 273-7257 Sliding fee scale services for kids 0-14 years including dental hygiene, teeth cleaning, fluoride treatments, nutritional counseling and oral hygiene instructions • Salvation Army Good Samaritan Dental Clinic, 529-4100. Please call for information on services offered.


A prevention oriented practice, which delivers comprehensive dental care for the entire family.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

55


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MOVING TEETH

THE SCOOP: Teeth are constantly moving. Over time, shifting teeth can affect your smile. They may even cause or aggravate various mouth and jaw problems, such as temporomandibular disorder (TMD)—painful problems in the jaw muscles, joint or both. THE SOLUTION: “Proper tooth positioning can relieve symptoms related to tooth grinding and TMD and avoid other detrimental effects of malocclusion [misalignment of teeth],” says Dr. Elizabeth Kellogg of Kellogg Orthodontics. Not surprisingly, more adults are turning to cosmetic dentistry and orthodontists to move teeth via braces or retainers to straighten a crooked smile or relieve TMD. Today’s braces are not like the metal ware that was prevalent 20 years ago. In some respects, “moving teeth” is easier than ever. “This is because teeth may be moved by less-obvious appliances such as toothcolored braces, clear aligners and removable appliances,” says Kellogg. Aligners—clear, plastic, removable molds worn most hours of the day but not as a fixed appliance—may help straighten mildly crowded teeth, avoiding traditional braces altogether. How long will you need to wear braces or a retainer to fix jaw problems or get the smile you want? “[It] depends on the individual patient and their malocclusion [misalignment of teeth] and what they want to accomplish,” says Kellogg.

BEAUTIFUL SMILE

SMOOTHER SURFACE: Veneers and lumineers—artificial coverings applied over the front of natural teeth—improve the appearance of chipped, broken or discolored teeth, as well as shorten gaps between teeth, according to Dr. Phillip Perry of Cosmetic Dental Center of Southeast Minnesota in Wabasha. COLOR CORRECTION: Professional teeth whitening lighens and brightens dark or discolored teeth. "The in-office procedure is short and safe," says Dr. Perry, "and achieves dramatic results." Michelle Kubitz is a freelance writer based in Rochester, Minnesota.

Trivia:

According to the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO), one-third of Americans are unhappy with their smile.

Of the people surveyed: 36 percent believe they would have a better social life if they had better teeth; 77 percent of women think crooked teeth are worse than a receding hairline in a potential love interest; 22 percent of Americans who are unhappy with their smile think that better teeth would lead to a better love life; 78 percent of Americans perceive adults with crooked teeth to be unsuccessful; 14 percent of those unhappy with their teeth felt that they might be missing out on a better job. Source: American Association of Orthodontists

Resources: General oral health websites for more information: mouthhealthy.org: American Dental Association (ADA) sponsored cite to promote oral health education aapd.org : American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) website specifically targeted towards children mylifemysmile.org: American Association of Orthodontics (AAO) sponsored cite for the general public

Local dentists consulted or quoted in the article: crystaldentalclinic.net: Crystal Dental Clinic, Dr. Billie Vasdev dentistryforchildrenrochester.com: Website for Dentistry for Children and Adolescents, Ltd., Dr. Robyn Loewen and Dr. Candace Mensing dremkellogg.com: Website for Kellogg Orthodontics, Dr. Elizabeth Kellogg northwestdentalgroup.com: Website for Northwest Dental Group, Dr. Katie Post perrydental.com: Website for Cosmetic Dental Center of Southeast Minnesota, Dr. Phillip Perry

RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

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travel

n e m o W g n i l Trave

Today's

“P

eople get so excited about travel,” says Peggy Nixa, certified travel counselor and field manager for the Rochester/ Burnsville AAA office. “And no wonder. It’s fun to see cultures and sights and make memories.” According to Nixa, 90­–95 percent of travel plans and decisions are made by women. With that in mind, Nixa organized a club four years ago in Burnsville specially designed for women of all ages interested in travel called Today’s Traveling Women (TTW). The club presents opportunities to learn about different destinations, gain travel tips and meet other women who love to travel. “It includes all modes of travel,” says Nixa, “group, luxury, budget, with children, multi-generational (grandmothers and grandchildren), girlfriend trips, couples’ travel and those looking for a traveling companion.” After finding great success with the Burnsville TTW, Nixa is now starting a chapter in Rochester.

Rochester’s Traveling Women TTW Rochester held its first meeting in November. The meeting included games, an opportunity to meet other women who travel, a featured speaker who discussed travel safety issues, as well as two travel agents who spoke about recent visits to Orlando and Croatia. “It was interesting to hear what they saw and what they learned,” commented frequent traveler Lucinda Stockwell, who usually travels alone, but attended the first TTW Rochester meeting hoping to learn about group tours and other opportunities. She found all of that and a bonus: a prospective travel companion. With traveling costs higher for single travelers, Stockwell was excited 58

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

to find someone who shared her enthusiasm for Southwestern art and history, a yen to visit New Mexico and a reliance on pre-trip research. At TTW meetings, information about tempting trip options abound, from two-week journeys, such as a South African safari, an Alaska Iditarod (dogsledding) adventure and a Pacific Coast wine cruise to local day trips like the annual “Grapes of Laugh" excursion. “Grapes of Laugh,” an area wine-tasting day trip, is enormously popular with the Burnsville TTW club, says Nixa, who suspects the Rochester group will love it, too. Last September’s itinerary involved a melodrama at the Mantorville Opera House, a meal at the Hubbell House and sips of Minnesota wine at Cannon Valley Winery in Cannon Falls. Plans for Rochester’s TTW club include spring and fall day trips. Nixa is currently considering a swing through the Swedish Circle (Chisago Lakes area), a St. Paul gangster tour and a possible autumn trip to Galena, Ill. TTW’s next meeting is 6:30 p.m., January 31, at the Ramada Inn, Rochester. Nixa promises “an informative presentation, travel tips, tour options, food and fun.” For more information, call AAA’s Rochester office at 507-289-1851 or email peggy.nixa@mn-ai.aaa.com. Karen Snyder is a Rochester freelance writer.

In 2013, Rochester Women magazine's travel section will be exploring different travel possibilities. Post your favorite travel story ideas or questions on RW’s Facebook page or email them to editor@RWmagazine.com.

Photo courtesy of Rochester AAA and Peggy Nixa.

By K.L. Snyder

New traveling club in Rochester offers women information and camaraderie


ADVERTISERS INDEX

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12th Street Dental........................................................................................... 51 AAA Rochester................................................................................................ 59 Adourn Furniture Rehab.............................................................................. 31 Affiliated Emergency Veterinary Service................................................ 17 Allison's Upholstery & Window Fashions.............................................. 17 American Heart Association, Go Red For Women................................4 Ameriprise Financial, Ehleringer, Douglas, Stolz & Assoc.............. 19 Anew Aesthetic Medical Center..................................................................4 Ansara Laser & Cosmetic Medical Center............................................ 23 Brenda Hahn, Mary Kay Cosmetics......................................................... 17 Bicycle Sports................................................................................................... 51 Boys & Girls Club of Rochester....................................................................4 Bricewood.......................................................................................................... 40 Bridgets Cafe.................................................................................................... 23 Budget Blinds................................................................................................... 21 C.O. Brown......................................................................................................... 38 Cameron Law PLLC..........................................................................................9 CarpetsPlus....................................................................................................... 28 Cascade Animal Medical Center.............................................................. 19 Chanhassen Dinner Theatres..................................................................... 59 Cindy Finch, Wellspring Family Counseling.......................................... 17 Circle Drive Dental......................................................................................... 55 City Looks Salon & Spa................................................................................. 64 Coram Specialty Infusion................................................................................2 Cornerstone Designs Inc............................................................................. 21 Creative Hardwood Floors........................................................................... 37 Crystal Dental................................................................................................... 55 Cumulus Radio Home, Vacation & RV Show....................................... 31 Davis Asset Documentation....................................................................... 17 Dawn Sanborn Photography...................................................................... 40 Degeus Tile & Granite................................................................................... 28 Dentistry for Children and Adolescents, Ltd........................................ 55 Dunn Bros Coffee........................................................................................... 44 Essence Skin Clinic........................................................................................ 12 Fagan Studios................................................................................................... 38 Family Service Rochester, Meals on Wheels........................................ 44 First Alliance Credit Union.............................................................................9 Four Daughters Winery................................................................................. 51 Garden of Massage....................................................................................... 17 Gerhards First Supply Showroom............................................................. 31 Hair Studio 52................................................................................................... 25 Hanson Construction and Specialty Cabinets..................................... 28 Heartman Insurance...................................................................................... 19 5:5 Federal................................................................................................... 34 Home HOPE Ranch..................................................................................................... 34 Kellogg Orthodontics..................................................................................... 51 King Orthodontics........................................................................................... 56 Le Jardin............................................................................................................. 42 Luxury Bath Systems..................................................................................... 28 Madonna Towers of Rochester.................................................................. 11 Maplewood Homes........................................................................................ 34 Mayo Clinic........................................................................................................ 51 Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union.................................................. 38 Mike Hardwick................................................................................................. 12 MLT Group............................................................................................................6 Mr. Pizza North................................................................................................ 47 New Horizon Academy....................................................................................6 Nile Restaurant................................................................................................ 47 Northern Lights & Furnishings.....................................................................6 Northwest Dental Group.............................................................................. 53 O'Brien & Wolf, L.L.P. Law Offices............................................................ 23 Olmsted Medical Center.............................................................................. 63 Overby Orthodontics...................................................................................... 55 People's Food Co-op...................................................................................... 42 Perry Dental...................................................................................................... 48 Phenomenal Woman Consignment Shop.............................................. 21 Pique.................................................................................................................... 17 Premier Bank.................................................................................................... 34 Radcliffe Homes & Remodeling................................................................ 31 Refined Skin Medi Spa................................................................................. 47 Reiland's Hair Clinic, Inc.............................................................................. 23 Riverside Concerts............................................................................................6 Rochester Area Builders, Inc...................................................................... 26 Rochester Area Family Y.................................................................................9 Rochester Community Education............................................................. 44 Rochester Greeters........................................................................................ 17 Rochester Trolley and Tour Company..................................................... 42 RT Autism Foundation................................................................................... 17 Salon Touche.................................................................................................... 28 Scanlon, Nietz & Murch, LLC..................................................................... 17 Shorewood Senior Campus........................................................................ 14 Sisters of Saint Francis, Human Trafficking Awareness Events.... 40 Step It Up Professional Development Seminar for Women............ 44 The Connection................................................................................................ 21 Thyme Restaurant and Lounge................................................................. 47 United Way of Olmsted County................................................................. 14 Waseca Area Chamber of Commerce.................................................... 59 West End Salon...................................................................................................3 Wild Ginger Boutique.................................................................................... 21 Winona Radio................................................................................................... 59 Zumbro River Cafe......................................................................................... 44

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Calendar Events Check out our Community Calendar online for additional listings at RWmagazine.com Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen March/April 2013 issue is February 1, 2013. Complete form at http://www.rwmagazine.com/index.php/submit/submit-event. Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine. *(507 area code unless stated)

january Jan 5 The Wedding Extravaganza Mayo Civic Center, 9 am-3 pm, fashion show, 12:30 pm, exhibitors, prizes, live music, 876-2187, weddingXtravaganza.com Jan 10-12 Breaking the Chains, Human Trafficking Awareness Event The Rochester Sisters of Saint Francis, present a series of community-wide events to raise awareness about human trafficking in Rochester. For more on these free events, visit rochesterfranciscan.org Jan 12 "Honk, Squeak, Scratch, Boom" Mayo Civic Center Suites, 9 am-3 pm. Free instrument trial workshop for 4th-6th grade future musicians, (bring your parents or other interested adults), no cost, 286-8742, rochestersymphony.org Jan 12 New Beginnings: Heal, Trust, Believe Join us for a night of empowerment for women! Worship leader Kati Dean and inspirational speaker Cindy Finch, Rochester Assembly of God, (4240 18th Ave NW), 6:30-9:30 pm, childcare not available, 288-0868 Jan 12 Rochester Chamber Music Society presents: Rochester Young Artists Christ United Methodist Church, 7:30 pm, rochesterchambermusic.org Jan 19 12th Annual “Wit, Wisdom & Wine” Rochester Public Library, 6:30 pm, proceeds support the mission and vision of the library foundation. Speakers, silent auction, raffle, hors d’oeuvers and wine tasting, 328-2343, rochesterpubliclibraryfoundation.org Jan 19 & 20 59th Annual Eagles Cancer Telethon Mayo Civic Center, Sat 8 pm-Sun 4 pm. Local entertainment and food vendors. Proceeds benefit cancer research in SE MN. Help support the fight against cancer while enjoying a fun-filled event! eaglescancertelethon.com

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January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

Jan 21 18th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. “We Have a Dream” Breakfast by the Rochester Chamber of Commerce Foundation and the Rochester branch of the NAACP, Canadian Honker Events at the Ramada, 7:30 -9:15 am. Keynote speaker, Rochester Public School Superintendent Michael Munoz, fee, pre-registration required, rochestermnchamber.com Jan 23 – 27 Frozen River Film Festival Winona State University, times vary. More than 40 documentary films, workshops, speakers and musical performances! visitwinona.com/events, frff.org Jan 24 Diversity Council Annual Celebration at the Rochester Art Center featuring Breaking Ice, an award winning theatre ensemble from Pillsbury House Theatre, 5:30 pm, free! RSVP at 282-9951 or info@diversitycouncil.org Jan 25 RT Autism Awareness Foundation presents: The 2013 Mending Minds: “Gala for Autism” Rochester International Event Center, doors open at 5pm, mendingmindsgala.org Jan 31 13th Annual Beat the Odds Award Night Celebration International Event Center, Social hour at 5 pm, a recognition of high school seniors who have overcome significant odds to become successful, register, 281-7771, lisa.baldus@roch.edu Jan 31 Deuces Wild! Dueling Pianos Wicked Moose Bar & Grill, 8 pm. Proceeds benefit the Rochester Senior Center, tickets, wickedmoosebarandgrill.com

February *indicates an official event of Winterfest XI January 31 – February 10 For a complete list see rochesterwinterfest.com Feb 1 • National Wear Red Day! Feb 2 Go Red For Women Day at Apache Mall Celebrate 10 Years of Go Red For Women! 952-278-7903, rochestergoredforwomen.org *Feb 2 Frozen Goose Run UCR Atrium, noon registration, race, 1 pm, 10K/5K Run-Walk, benefits the Optimist Club Childhood Cancer Campaign, 282-9968, frozengoose.com


*Feb 2 Hearts and Diamonds Spectacular: Celebrating 10, benefits Ronald McDonald House Somerby Golf Club, Byron, 5:30 pm, 252-2195, rmhmn.org Feb 5 Rochester on Tour at the Capitol, “Innovating Growth” Rally with Rochester leaders and community members to promote our city! 8 am-9 pm, register, 288-1122, rochestermnchamber.com Feb 7 – 9 SocialICE Peace Plaza Downtown, 4-10 pm, the largest outdoor ice bar in upper Midwest! DJ & Live music, specialty drinks, downtownrochestermn.com *Feb 8 & 9 Special Olympics MN Polar Bear Plunge-Rochester Foster Arend Park, Fri, 2 pm, Sat, 1:30 pm, public viewing, pledges, plungemn.org, rochesterwinterfest.com Feb 9 2013 GATEway Science Fair Landow Atrium, Mayo Clinic Gonda Building, 12:30-4:45 pm, Grades 3-6, gatewaysciencefair@gmail.com, rochestergateway.com *Feb 9 “A Singing Valentine” Join Chorale Arts Ensemble and friends for one of the greatest date nights in Rochester! Rochester International Event Center, reservations, 6 pm. Enjoy fine dining, auctions and love songs, 252-8427, choralartsensemble.org

Feb 15 Bear Creek Services Annual Wines of the World Ramada Hotel & Conference Center, 6-9 pm. Tasting stations, appetizers, silent auction, photo booth and more (reduced ticket pricing before 2/10), 288-7195, bearcreekservices.org Feb 16 Rochester Chamber Music Society, The Chiarina Piano Quartet Christ United Methodist Church, 7:30 pm, rochesterchambermusic.org Feb 17 VOICES: Music of the Stage and Screen featuring all Honors Choirs ensembles, Bethel Lutheran Church, 4 pm, 252-0505, honorschoirs.org Feb 23 “3 Dimensions of Mozart,” Rochester Symphony Orchestra & Chorale 7:30 pm, Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, rochestersymphony.org Feb 23 11th Annual “A Chair Affair,” a gala benefit for the Boys and Girls Club Rochester International Event Center, tickets, 226-0107, achairaffair.org Feb 23 Bye, Bye Birdie Ride, Wine, Dinner and Show! Join us as we trolley to the Cannon River Winery and the Chanhassen Dinner Theatre to enjoy this award winning Broadway musical. Depart, 3 pm, return, 11:30 pm. Advance reservations, details, 421-0573, RochesterMNtours.com, chanhassentheatres.com. See ad on p. 42.

March

Feb 8 – 10 34th Annual Rochester Area Builders Home Show Mayo Civic Center, Fri, 3-8 pm, Sat, 9 am-6 pm, Sun, 11 am–4 pm, 282-7698, rochesterareabuilders.com

Mar 8 – 10 Children’s Dance Theatre presents their 25th Anniversary production: “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, times vary, tickets, CDT Manager, 281-3335, childrensdancetheatre.org

*Feb. 10 Lace Up Against Breast Cancer Half-Marathon & 5k Run/Walk Registration, 8 am, Half, 9:30 am, Run, 10 am, Mayo High School. Proceeds benefit Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Research 284-9114, luabc.org

Mar 9 Elevating Women and Girls in Southeastern Minnesota, Better world for our girls Presented by Jorrie Johnson, MBA, Rochester Women Magazine publisher, Northrup Education Center, 10 am-noon, Rm 319, class code: 8333.231, fee, 328-4000, rochesterce.org

Feb 14 Go Red for Women Luncheon Rochester International Event Center, 10 am-1 pm. Keynote speaker, Sharon L Mulvagh, MD of Mayo Clinic, rochestergoredforwomen.org

Pick-up RochesterWomen March/April 2013 issue beginning March 1, 2013!

MAGAZINE

Apr 26 Step It Up, A Professional Development Seminar for Women Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, 9 am-5pm, RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com January/February 2013

61


on the lighter side

Take It From Me

The wit, wisdom and wishes of an advice columnist hopeful By Amy Brase t’s confession time. For years, I’ve fantasized about having my own advice column. What a thrill it would be to receive angst-filled letters from loyal readers and then wave a magic wand of wisdom over their predicaments. It’s not that I think I have magical wisdom. If true, my own life would be considerably less messy! But I do believe in the power of words, especially when they are from complete strangers. I could be that stranger! I’d need a catchy pen name to establish credibility. “Dear Amy” is sort of dull and already taken. It’s also hardly anonymous. With a pseudonym, my personality could be the sweet grandma next door with timeless teachings. Or the witty girlfriend down the street with hilarious one-liners. I could even be the edgy, straightforward chic with a no-nonsense style. My real life peeps know that I am none of those things. In fact, I fear they would say I’m a sweet, straightforward chic with grandma style. This is precisely why I’d need to invent a personality. Writing in a voice other than my own is just one of a few minor road blocks. I’m not a doctor. I am not an expert of anything. I have a penchant for telling people exactly what they want to hear. These are all trivial details that I believe could be conquered by hiding behind my keyboard. Blush-worthy topics? Bring them on! I dare say I could even field questions from men.

62

January/February 2013 RWmagazine.com

ADVICE Dear (really cool & superbly unique pen name), I’m struggling to fin d the perfect Valentine’s Day gif t for my wife. We’ve been married for twenty years, and I’ve run out of ide as. We’re quickly becoming that coup le who does nothing to celebrate and says that Valentine’s Day is jus t an overrated Hallmark holiday. He r friends will probably get roses, chocolate and handwritten love no tes. What’s the one thing that will totally blow her away? I don’t have a lot of money, but I’m willing to dig de ep this year. Sincerely, Romantic in Roches ter Let’s take a moment to bask . A sincere letter from a loyal reader. An opportunity to help countless others facing the same dilem ma! (Yes, this letter is purely fictional, but now is not a good time to pop my bubble. ) Dear Romantic in Ro

chester,

You are not alone! Va lentine’s Day is a holiday of shared an gst. I commend you for your devotio n to your wife and your courage to write to a women’s magazine for advice. You’ve come to the right place. Wha t I’m about to tell you is golden informa tion. If you follow these two steps, you’l l rightfully earn your place among th e most romantic men in Rochester.

Ask _ ­­ ________

(really cool & superbly uniq ue pen name)

1. Fight your natura l instincts. Every holiday leads you to believe the most thoughtful gift come s in pink striped packaging. False. St ep away from the website! Victoria ma y have a secret, but it’s not the way to your wife’s heart on Valentine’s Day, her birthday or your anniversary. Th e angels will try to convince you that lingerie is a pretty gift for her wh en it’s really a gift for you.

2. There’s a secret we apon in your home that you shou ld become acquainted with. It’s better than roses. Sweeter than chocola te. Men who have discovered this trick have the best love lives around . Your new best friend is the toilet bo wl cleaner. Truth be told, Victoria’s Se cret has nothing on Mr. Clean. Gift her wi th a handwritten note that will make all of her friends jealous…tell her you’l l be the bathroom cleaner today and fo revermore. Yours truly, (really cool & superbl y unique pen name) Amy Brase is a future advice columnist hopeful. Stay tuned for a future investigation into the top five pe rils of lingerie.

Caricature by Amy Liebl

I


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January/February 2013  

This issue features articles on the annual Rochester Extraordinary Women award recipients, Nicole Curtis, DIY Network's "Rehab Addict" and '...

January/February 2013  

This issue features articles on the annual Rochester Extraordinary Women award recipients, Nicole Curtis, DIY Network's "Rehab Addict" and '...

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