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EVENTS: ST. PATRICK’S PARADE, “IT CAME FROM THE VAULT” 21 FILM: “OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL,” “DEAD MAN DOWN” 28 URBAN JOURNAL: SCHOOLS, NEIGHBORHOODS, AND THE CITY

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 39

JIMMIE HIGHSMITH JR.

MARCH 13-19, 2013 Free

THE WHIGS •

5HEAD

SOVIET DOLLS

BLANKET FORT FESTIVAL

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 27

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

We have to sit together and work as a people.” NEWS, PAGE 4

Cutting out cars. NEWS, PAGE 6

Report: West Main church can be saved. PRESERVATION, PAGE 5

Get Caked, Lettuce B. Frank Bistro, and more restaurant news. CHOW HOUND, PAGE 9

Family feud: JCC’s “August: Osage County.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 20

FEATURE | BY FRANK DE BLASE | PAGE 10 | PHOTO PROVIDED

Finding Paradise It was in the early hours of the morning in Kivulu, a slum in the capital city of Kampala, Uganda, that Rochester musician Jesse Sprinkle (pictured, right) had an epiphany. While working with the Ugandan Water Project, Sprinkle visited a little hut called Paradise. “I went in there and it was late — 2, 3 in the morning — and there were like 10 kids sleeping in this tiny room, and they didn’t have a roof," Sprinkle says. "They had a plastic tarp. It was raining and the water was just falling on these

kids’ heads. It’s one of those things I couldn’t really believe I was there seeing.” Regardless, they called this little place Paradise. Sprinkle is a musician and owner of Bluebrick Recordings in Avon. Since 2008 he has been answering the humanitarian call to Africa, but felt there was more he could do as a musician. In 2012 Sprinkle started Paradise, Uganda, a musically based project that celebrates African musical culture while empowering African children in a world where they don’t have much else.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Dealing with terrorism

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In your column about the president’s counterterrorism efforts (Urban Journal, “Obama’s Second Term”), you said you are concerned that one individual – the executive – could decide which targets would be attacked without any form of oversight, even if the target were a US citizen. And, as you observed by quoting Senator King, that might lead to “deprivation of life, liberty, or property without due process of law.”
 
The problem is that today we confront individuals and groups whose sole intent is to do harm to US citizens or US interests and who do not abide by any rules. Neither are they interested in compromise or any form of reasoned debate on the issues that divide us. Are we to play by the rules of the Marquis of Queensbury while those who wish us ill play by no rules? 

How then are we to respond to this very real threat within the framework of our agreed upon standards and Constitutional commitments? Unfortunately, much as we would like to find one, there is no textbook answer to this dilemma. Ideally we would send our military and intelligence people out to uncover plots and gather information. The advantage of this approach is that it usually leads to hard information. The disadvantages are that it takes time, is expensive, and is subject to international jealousies and boundaries. And it leads to the risk of abuses in the form of torture. 

The other approach involves the use of limited personnel on the ground, extensive employment of information gathering technology and ultimately, employing drones. This approach can achieve results in less time, tends to be accomplished outside of the public view, and results in minimal loss of life. The

greatest drawback of this approach is that the targets are usually killed which means that useful information is lost with the target. 

I don’t have the answer you are seeking. I agree with you that some additional public discussion of how we are to combat the very real threat of terrorism is warranted. However, I do not think we need another commission to study the issue. The press in the form of the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal and your paper are doing a good job of raising the issue before the public. What we need is for political leaders to raise the issue outside of the political context so that the public will focus on it. And we need other community leaders and editors to talk about the problem so that the public will become aware of the danger and understand that it may be necessary to respond to this threat in new and untried ways. JAMES C. MOORE, BRIGHTON

In writing about our war on terror, Mary Anna Towler states “those who wage that battle cannot ignore the US Constitution.” Well, the president is ignoring and disobeying the Constitution. The Constitution states that “powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution… are reserved to the states respectively or to the people.” A federal appeals court ruled that some of Obama’s recess appointments were unconstitutional because the Senate wasn’t in recess. Those appointees are still in their positions, and his owning or running private entities like auto companies, banks, and financial institutions is unconstitutional. We have been Obama-sized. SAM PALERMO, ROCHESTER

Choosing Rochester

On our guest commentary, “Two Brains Refuse to Drain”: Mike and Ana, you’ve raised some excellent points. Rochester would not have evolved as it did had it not been for the economic lure that attracted immigrants and migrants from other parts of the country. Granted, in that time of economic prosperity, it could be argued that Rochester was sustained by both an

information (innovation) and labor-based economy. For this Rochester native who has lived in large metropolitan areas since graduating from college near Rochester, it has taken nearly a decade and the birth of a child to embrace all that Rochester can offer. The idea of returning home is both attractive and frustrating. You’ve covered the attractions, but the frustrating part is finding work that utilizes the talents and skills that have been refined in my years away. If the right career is available for an individual, then Rochester is an excellent place to call home. NICK J

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Michael, I can’t stop smiling! While I ache for a real slice of pizza and a Brooklyn bagel, I am proud of the vibrant culture and promise of our adopted home. Rochester can thrive if young people return here to create new jobs with their energy, vitality, and creativity. But David Brooks is right that many young people seek their fortunes where there is promise for a better future. We have to create those opportunities here. PATTI HALLY BRAZILL

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Yes! I chose to move back to Rochester after living in other major cities. My business has actually grown here. With the internet connecting us to other people anywhere, why not make your home in a place with culture AND community? NINA ALVAREZ

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

What about the parents?

I love it when, in the middle of a city schools discussion, someone ALWAYS says that the problem is parenting (Urban Journal, “What If We’re Chasing the Wrong ‘Schools’ Fix?”). Of course that’s a problem. But unless you have a solution for that, the schools still need to deal with poorly parented students. That’s where the discussion has to start. I am continually sorry that Manny Rivera’s Children’s Zone never went anywhere. That would be where the magic would happen. KATHRYN QUINN THOMAS

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly March 13-19, 2013 Vol 42 No 27 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Schools, neighborhoods, and the future of the city Every once in a while, the topic of neighborhood schools comes up in Rochester. And while part of this stems from nostalgia, there’s also a fiscal argument. The Rochester school district spends a lot of money busing children to schools outside of their neighborhood. The reason: the district’s “school choice” system, which lets parents choose a school other than the one closest to them if they believe that’s better for their children. And many, many parents choose a different school. The result is an attendance pattern that looks like a tangled cobweb, with children from each neighborhood being transported literally all over the city. Only 14 percent of the city’s elementaryage children attend their neighborhood school. Some of the others go to a charter school or a private or parochial school. But most choose another school-district school – usually one in their same “zone”: within the same 1/3 of the city. Others go to a district school somewhere else in the city. The reasons are many for choosing other district schools. Some parents like the special programs offered in a few schools – bilingual classes, for instance, or the World of Inquiry’s expeditionary learning. Some choose a school outside their neighborhood because their children can ride a bus there, and they’re worried about safety in their neighborhood. Undoubtedly, the availability of choice has kept some parents from sending their children to non-public schools – or from moving out of the city. But the dispersion could also have a serious negative effect. It can undermine schools’ important role as a community focal point. A strong school can keep families in specific neighborhoods and attract new ones. More and more young adults are finding cities attractive places to live, and Rochester is no exception. But we struggle to keep them once they have children, and it’s no secret that the school district is a big reason. Combine that flight with the choice-created dispersion and here’s the result: While Rochester has individual neighborhoods with predominantly middle and upper-income residents, not a single one of the district’s elementary schools has a student poverty rate of below 50 percent. This is not a small matter. Low test scores and low graduation rates are solidly linked to concentrated poverty – in school districts and in individual schools. Plenty of documentation shows that integrating schools economically helps all the children. It is, in fact, one of the most effective ways of improving poor children’s education. We could reduce the concentrated poverty in Rochester schools by merging them with suburban schools, of course, but that’ll never be politically feasible. So we

We struggle to keep young adults in the city once they have children, and the school district is a big reason.” need to find ways to attract more middleand upper-income families to city schools. One place to start is with the families we have: city families who don’t send their children to their neighborhood school. You can get an idea of how many students we’re talking about from two pages in the school district’s Facilities Modernization Plan (available on the district’s website, or linked from this article on our website). Scroll down to Pages 12 and 13, and you’ll find a chart and a map that dissect the population of elementary-age school children in the neighborhood surrounding each of the district’s elementary schools. (The statistics are September’s preliminary enrollment numbers for this school year, so they may have changed slightly by the time things settled in. But the overall picture is reliable.) You’ll see how many elementary-age children live in each city neighborhood, how many are going to their neighborhood school, and, if they’re not going there, whether they’re choosing another schooldistrict school or a non-district school: charter, private, or parochial. Let me point to one school as a particularly interesting example: School 1. This is a beautiful, small school serving a popular area: Cobbs Hill and the eastern segments of Park and East Avenues. Traditionally, this has been a terrific place to buy a house, raise a family, and continues on page 8 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Study criticizes ambulance services

A report commissioned by Monroe County criticized the ambulance and emergency response across the county, saying that there is no centralized authority to ensure consistent performance, reported the Democrat and Chronicle. Local ambulance company chiefs told the D and C, however, that the study used flawed data and failed to consider cooperative efforts between agencies.

Union, activists at odds on center closing

Representatives of the Public Employees Federation pushed back on the closure of the Monroe Developmental Center. The state plans to close the center on December 31, but union officials say the state doesn’t have a solid plan for where it’ll place the residents. Officials from the Center for Disability Rights say the people served by the center have a right to live in the most integrated setting possible. They also say that union attempts to portray the closing as rapid are misleading, since the closings are part of a multi-year state plan.

4 CITY

Abundance Cooperative growing

News

Abundance Cooperative Market is planning an expansion and may also relocate from its current home at 62 Marshall Street. Abundance is a cooperatively owned natural products retail grocer. Abundance says it wants to expand its produce, deli, bakery, and meat departments, as well as to offer health, nutrition, and cooking classes.

Rochester economy stable, but flat

The Rochester-area economy was fairly stable last year, but it wasn’t a particularly strong period for job growth. State Labor Department data shows that from January 2012 to January 2013, Rochester gained a modest number of non-farming related jobs, and lost about 600 private sector jobs. In contrast, the Buffalo area experienced much more robust job growth for the same period with an increase of 3,500 non-farm related jobs and an increase of 4,900 private sector jobs.

MARCH 13-19, 2013

Abdullahi Mohamed and Mohamed Gazali of the Somali Community and Development Association in front of 15 Hudson Avenue. The association has purchased the building. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Big step forward for local Somalis Getting a community of people to come together to raise money for a major purchase is challenging under any circumstances. Now consider that the people involved have deep cultural divisions and mistrust fomented by a civil war. The nonprofit Somali Community and Development Association of Rochester has taken a major step forward by purchasing the building at 15 Hudson Avenue. The group has been renting space on South Plymouth Avenue. “It’s a big move,” says association President Mohamed Gazali.

The association offers education and charitable and religious services including legal advice, crisis assistance, interpretation and translation help, and employment assistance, as well as providing a gathering place for weddings, dinners, and other events. It is not always easy to get the local Somali community to function cohesively, Gazali says, because of their history. Somalia has been involved in a long and brutal civil war with rival factions competing for power. Gazali says the association plans to move to the new site in about six

months, depending on how long it takes to fix up the building. He says he hopes the successful purchase of the building shows members of the local Somali community, as well as the broader Rochester community, that Somalis can work together and can contribute. “I want to be part of the Rochester life,” Gazali says. “I don’t want to feel like some kind of foreigner. I live here. I want to change want goes on in my street. I want to change what goes on in my city. We have to sit together and work as a people.”


The building owner has maintained that the church is beyond saving and has given the city an evaluation from his own team of professionals to back that up. But the new analysis proves that the building can be brought back, says Caitlin Meives, preservation planner with the Landmark Society.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Darnell Lowery, 49, Rochester -- Doreen Hildebrandt 53, Rochester

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

SOURCE: Rochester Police Department AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

PRESERVATION | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Report: West Main church can be saved A new analysis reportedly concludes that the vacant church at 660 West Main Street is structurally sound. The evaluation was commissioned by the Susan B. Anthony Neighborhood Association and funded by the Landmark Society. Dawn Noto, president of the association, would not release the report until city officials have had a chance to review it. The former Westminster Presbyterian Church has been at the center of a preservation battle. Church owner Marvin Maye, who didn’t return a call for comment, wants to tear down the 19th-century church and an adjoining house to build a Dollar General store and two additional commercial spaces. The church is in the Neighbors United neighborhood in southwest Rochester, bordering the Susan B. Anthony Neighborhood and Bulls Head. Some neighbors and neighborhood groups say Maye’s proposal doesn’t fit with the revitalization happening in that area of West Main. They want to find a new use for the church, such as an indoor mall or west-side performance space. Maye has maintained that the building is beyond saving and has given the city an evaluation from his own team of professionals

to back that up. But the new analysis proves that the building can be brought back, says Caitlin Meives, preservation planner with 660 West Main Street. the Landmark FILE PHOTO Society. “The building is not a threat to the general public,” she says. “It’s not going to fall over. There’s no structural reason the building can’t be rehabbed.” The report says that the majority of structural rehabilitation costs would be to repair the building’s brick exterior, Noto says. The report does not include a cost estimate for rehabbing the church, Meives says. Meanwhile, Maye will be in front of the city’s Zoning Board on March 21 to appeal the city’s designation of the church as a building of historic value. The designation makes Maye’s path to getting the church demolished more difficult.

Drilling drama The State Assembly has passed legislation imposing a two-year moratorium on drilling in the Marcellus and Utica shale formations. And the Senate has its own proposal to consider. | The Assembly legislation would temporarily prohibit the state from issuing permits to drill in low-permeability natural gas reservoirs, including the Marcellus and Utica shale. It’s not a high-volume hydraulic fracturing moratorium per se, but would cover the permits that would allow highvolume fracking in the shale formations. | The moratorium, which would last through May 15, 2015, is meant to give the state time to study “any potential effects on water and air quality, environmental safety, and public health,” says the legislation text. | The bill doesn’t have a match in the State Senate, but members of the Senate’s Independent Democratic Conference have introduced moratorium legislation of their own. | Speaking on the Capitol Pressroom radio program, Senator David Carlucci said the IDC legislation calls for a moratorium lasting until several outside health studies are completed. One is the Geisinger Health System’s study of fracking’s impacts on health in Pennsylvania, the other is an Environmental Protection Agency study of fracking’s impacts on water quality.

2,181 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,080 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to March 11. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from February 22 to March 7: -- Spc. Cody D. Suggs, 22, West Alexandria, Ohio iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


TRANSPORTATION | BY JEREMY MOULE

Pedal empowered Considerable work has been done in some Rochester communities to encourage people to set aside their cars more often in favor of bikes, the bus, or their own two feet. To date, however, much of the work has focused on infrastructure: curb cuts to make it easier to step on to sidewalks, lockers so cyclists have a safe place to park their bikes, and crosswalk signals to count down the time a pedestrian has to cross. Local active transportation advocates say they are proud of that work, but more needs to be done. They need to keep pressuring public officials to invest in bicycle and pedestrian friendly infrastructure, they say. And they want to do more to encourage the public to walk, bike, or ride buses more often. Advocates have a new ally in their efforts. Last month, Elizabeth Murphy joined the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency as an active transportation specialist. She’s the first person to hold the newly created job, which exists because of an expansive, multi-year public health grant received by a coalition of community groups, including the University of Rochester Medical Center and the Monroe County Department of Health. Murphy’s is not the first position in the Rochester area to focus on aspects of active transportation, a term that generally means non-car transportation that requires some physical activity. For example, the Genesee Transportation Council has a bicycling and pedestrian program manager. And the City of Rochester’s planning department includes employees who focus on cycling and pedestrian issues. What Rochester lacks is outreach and publicity for active transportation, says Erik Frisch, transportation specialist in the city’s planning department. That’s part of what makes Murphy’s charge of promoting active transportation throughout Monroe County important. One of the main thrusts of her job is to build connections between people and groups — from government officials to concerned residents on a single block — who deal with active transportation issues. She might, for example, work with school districts to identify and develop safe walking routes for students. Or she might assist community groups and events, like Color Brighton Green’s Curb Your Car Week, to build up active transportation efforts. “We haven’t had the capacity or someone to help coordinate those sorts of efforts,” says Rachel Pickering, associate director of community engagement at FLHSA. Murphy will approach active transportation from a community health perspective, as well as a transportation 6 CITY

MARCH 13-19, 2013

planning issue. That means stressing the health and environmental benefits, as well as the community benefits. “It’s not going to be four times faster to ride your bike to work,” she says. “But there’s still a reason to do it.” Murphy is a Rochester native, though she’s

lived outside of the area for several years, most recently in Boston. She says she sees herself as an outsider who brings ideas that have worked in other communities. She led walkability workshops in California, for example, and worked for the US Department of Transportation’s Volpe Center, which conducts transportation planning research and education, in Boston. “I’ve been lucky to see what people are trying in a lot of other places where there’s been a lot of success with promoting walking, biking, and transit,” Murphy says. In Boston, she lived near a business that offered bicycle valet parking to customers and organized large group rides. Murphy says she’d like to work with business here on active transportation efforts and events. Ultimately, those things get people comfortable with walking, biking, or transit, she says. “I think you need fun events,” she says. “It’s not advocacy. It’s just people participating in things that they think are fun, interesting, or creative.” Murphy and Pickering also say they’d like to work with the region’s largest employers to encourage their employees to walk, bike, or take the bus to work. But Murphy says she also doesn’t want to presume that what worked somewhere else will work in the Rochester region. Different groups are already promoting active transportation in the Rochester area. The Conkey Cruisers, for example, holds rides on the El Camino trail in the northeast part of the city. And there are bike racks on Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority buses. Just last fall, the city was given Bicycle Friendly Community status by the League of American Bicyclists. A contributing factor in the recognition is the city’s Bicycle Master Plan. City planners

gathered substantial public input for the document, which has driven much of the city’s investment in bike infrastructure, including bike lanes and publicly accessible repair stands. The Towns of Penfield and Brighton have completed similar plans and Greece is starting the process. Communities and agencies in the region have also emphasized improving and marking trails, resulting in a countywide network of connected, practical trails. Murphy says the trails are a major asset for the area. Murphy’s work will dovetail with other programs. For example, the Healthi Kids Initiative, a coalition led by FLHSA, is evaluating how and where city children play and coming up with ways to make that play safer. Murphy is involved in the effort, which includes how children get to the play areas. One of Murphy’s first major undertakings is to

Elizabeth Murphy is an as active transportation specialist at the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency. She will work on programs to promote walking, biking, and bus ridership. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

organize the April 30 Genesee Finger Lakes Active Transportation Summit. The event will build on a similar, previous event: the 2011 Greater Rochester Active Transportation Symposium. It will feature two keynote speakers, including House Representative Earl Blumenauer, who represents Portland, Oregon, and is wellknown in the active transportation world. One of the summit’s goals is to get decision-makers and advocates in the same room, Murphy says. “Under that umbrella we can all work together and really make some positive change within our communities,” she says. But Murphy says she also wants to get a feel for what people and communities in the area want and what would change how they get from place to place.

The summit may give Murphy a good start. Richard DeSarra, a longtime Rochester cycling advocate, says he hopes the summit gives Murphy ideas for future projects. The afternoon portion of the summit will be devoted to workgroups. And Murphy says she hopes to come away with recommendations, projects, and plans to help move active transportation forward in the Rochester area. “I want to believe that this is an issue we can work on everywhere,” she says. “It’s going to look different in different places in different communities.”


rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


Schools continues from page 3

send children to school. School 1 has 307 students. Want to know how many of them live in that neighborhood? Two. The rest come from other neighborhoods – from throughout the city. It’s not that there are no children in the School 1 neighborhood. Although the number has declined over the years, 99 elementaryschool-age children do still live there. They just go to school somewhere else. Thirty-six of them go to other city schools. And 61 go to private, parochial, or charter schools. The school my children attended, School 23 in the Park Avenue neighborhood, has similar statistics. Of the 310 elementaryschool-age children who live in the neighborhood, only 69 go to School 23; 155 go to other school-district schools, and 86 go to non-district schools. I wouldn’t argue for a return for a strictly neighborhood school system. For one thing, neither School 1 nor School 23 would have enough students to operate efficiently. The district would almost certainly close them both. Busing is their lifeblood. And if all of the bused-in children returned to their home school, some of those schools might be seriously overcrowded, and the district would have to expand them. More important, that would make the school district even more racially and economically segregated than it is now. The Rochester school district has a commendable history of trying hard to offer choices – and to do it in a way that doesn’t create elitist schools that favor wealthier students over poor ones. But as the poverty rate has risen, and student achievement has fallen, it has become increasingly hard to overcome the effects of that poverty. The district still offers excellent programs. There are pockets of success. And if the district can strengthen those pockets, and build on them, it will be able to do two things: help its poorest children, and convince some families that they don’t have to move or turn to charter school, private schools, or parochial schools. The district could start by attracting enough middle-income families to lower the poverty rate to below 50 percent in several schools. It wouldn’t be easy. Parents choosing a non-neighborhood school to get special programs like World of Inquiry’s wouldn’t change their decision. But the school district’s reputation leads some parents to choose a charter school or a private or parochial school without ever considering their neighborhood school. In addition, some families say they haven’t been able to get their children admitted to their neighborhood school. The district’s 8 CITY

MARCH 13-19, 2013

As the district’s poverty rate has risen, and student achievement has fallen, it has become increasingly hard to overcome the effects of that poverty.” policy is to “guarantee” families first choice in their neighborhood school. But we continue to hear reports – from parents and from school staff – that that doesn’t always happen. Attracting more middle-income students to their home school would require a careful study of the schools-choice program. It would require making sure that the children who wanted to attend their neighborhood school could do so. It would require a top-quality, intensive marketing and recruitment program, identifying families who have pre-schoolage children and selling them on public schools: visiting them personally, holding neighborhood picnics, hosting school tours, reaching out to real-estate agents, running ads – doing everything possible to attract middle-income families back into city schools. And it would take participation not only by school district officials, school board members, individual school staffs, and the parents in those schools but also by city officials and neighborhood leaders. This wouldn’t solve our concentrated poverty problem district-wide. It would integrate only a handful of schools. Others would be solidly poor – but they already are. It wouldn’t turn any school into a school serving only the middle-income children who live nearby. Many children would still be bused from one neighborhood to another. And it would be a start. It would help many of the city’s children. It would attract and keep families in the city. Rochester neighborhoods are ideal for families. They offer tree-lined streets with sidewalks and easy-to-maintain yards. Key services – YMCA branches, libraries, museums, restaurants, stores, parks, concerts, movies – are within walking or easy-driving distance. But for many families, concern about schools has overwhelmed the city’s attractions. We ought to be able to turn that around. And I think we can. Somebody will have to lead, though. And we need to start now, before we lose more families.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Talk on slavery

Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library will present a book discussion, “Gather at the Table: the Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade,” at 12:12 p.m. on Thursday, March 14. The event will be held at the Central Library, 115 South Avenue.

Three mayors on urban revitalization

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present a talk, “Cities Reinvented,” at

11:45 a.m. on Thursday, March 21. Mick Cornett, mayor of Oklahoma City; Stephanie Miner, mayor of Syracuse; and Leonard Redon, deputy mayor of Rochester will speak about leading their cities through revitalization. The event is at Inn on Broadway, 26 Broadway. Ticket information: www.rrcdc.org.

Business, jobs, and liberal arts graduates

RIT will hold “Kern Symposium on Liberal Arts and Business,” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, March 15. The symposium is a blend of lectures and group-discussion examining how research in traditional liberal arts fields inter-

sects with the issues currently facing US businesses. A list of speakers can be found at www.rit. edu/cla/kern/speakers. php. The event will be held in Student Innovation Hall and is free and open to the public. Registration is strongly recommended: www.rit.edu/cla/ kern/program.php.

Stop the drones rally

Local anti-war activists and members of the faith community will hold an anti-drone warfare protest from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 13, at 12 Corners in Brighton.

Correcting ourselves

In the February 27 cover story on ice fishing, we listed an out-of-date price for a New York State fishing license. Licenses now start at $29 per year ($5 for seniors over age 70). The March 6 article on applying to the Rochester Fringe Festival incorrectly suggested that fees were associated when applying to the festival. Applying is free, and acts can do so as often as they like. Festival fees kick in when an act is accepted by a venue.


Dining eat for $7.35 alongside a sausage patty, a slice of ham, and the 100 percent pure maple syrup that the Cartwright family has been making for the last century. But the window is fast closing on the 2013 season; it ends Sunday, April 14, so you pancake connoisseurs had better act fast. For more details, visit cartwrightsmapletreeinn.com, or call 567-8181.

Food for thought

It’s time again for the 4th Annual Edible Books Festival at the Central Library of

Rochester, which offers professional and amateur bakers of all ages the chance to bring a beloved book to life through the medium of food, be it cake, sculpted produce, chocolate, pasta, or any other edible items. The April 7 event will feature cooking demos and tastings, but the deadline for entry into the contest is Saturday, March 30. Visit libraryweb.org for the proper forms, or call 428-8350.

A vanilla cupcake with chocolate frosting (left), vegan chocolate cupcake with white frosting (middle), and mini vanilla cupcakes (right) from Get Caked in Village Gate. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Sweet somethings [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Culinary doyenne Alice Waters has suggested that the best way to finish a meal is with a single, perfect peach. But that’s probably only because she hasn’t had one of Kelly Halligan’s Fruity Pebbles cupcakes, consisting of vanilla cake flecked with Fred Flintstone’s favorite cereal and topped with a swirl of vanilla frosting. Now, Mother Nature obviously knows what’s She’s doing, but so does Halligan, who recently moved her baking business out of her home and into Village Gate as Get Caked. Halligan’s route to bakery owner has been an indirect one. Originally on track for a degree in biochemistry, an unexpected leave of absence from her job found Halligan brainstorming income opportunities, and before too long she and her mom were offering cookies at craft shows. Naturally the scientist in her began developing her own recipes, and soon Halligan had her home kitchen certified so she could sell her wares by word of mouth. “It made me really happy,” says Halligan. Biochemistry didn’t stand a chance. “I just had a really good feeling about the Village Gate,” Halligan says of her decision to drop roots in the evolving space, one that provides a lot of hungry traffic thanks to the gaggle of neighboring restaurants. But visitors to Get Caked have some tough decisions to make. Molasses, double chocolate chip,

or oatmeal cookies? Black forest, chocolateraspberry, or lemon cupcakes? Halligan’s selection rotates, and she’s got a good number of vegan options as well, like her deeply chocolate cupcakes, which are actually not a result of tinkering in the kitchen lab. “It was my grandma’s recipe,” she says. “It just happens to not have milk, eggs, or butter.” Halligan hopes to soon hit upon a glutenfree cupcake that meets her standards; in the meantime she’s trying out new flavors (like that Fruity Pebbles one) and doing consultations with people interested in her custom creations. Halligan is also exploring the possibility of supplying some of the other Village Gate eateries with treats from Get Caked, and she’s even toying with the notion of an evening delivery service for baked goods... an idea for which, if you’ve ever had your way with a sleeve of Chips Ahoy at 9 p.m., there would no doubt be an enthusiastic market. Get Caked is located in the Village Gate at 274 N. Goodman St. It is open Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.10 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Prices start at 80 cents. For more information, call 319-4314 or visit getcakedroc.com.

Lettuce rap

Well, the good news is that the Lettuce B. Frank food cart will be out and about again in

the spring. The even-better news is that you don’t have to wait for the daffodils to enjoy a carrot-and-chick-pea slider ($6), because David Potwin has now opened Lettuce B. Frank Bistro in the same Swillburg landmark that houses the Cinema Theater. The brick-and-mortar version of Lettuce B. Frank offers some enduring favorites as well as new variations on Potwin’s seasonal “farm-to-foil cuisine,” currently meaning such items as a reuben made with Small World sauerkraut ($9), plus roasted squash, greens, and caramelized red onion with white bean spread ($7) that’s available open face, in panini form, or atop housemade flatbread. There’s dessert, too, like Oreo tiramisu ($4), Fuji apple crisp ($3), and a decadent two-bite cake shot ($2.50) assembled with Jameson chocolate cake, Guinness ganache, and Bailey’s buttercream. Lettuce B. Frank Bistro is located at 957 S. Clinton Ave. It is open Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Food prices range from $2 to $9. For more information, call 708-9515 or visit lettucebfrank.com.

Stack ‘em up

For about two months every year, Cartwright’s Maple Tree Inn in Angelica, NY, just east of Hornell, offers its famous buckwheat pancakes, served all-you-can-

Openings

Crust Pizza Kitchen is now open in East

Rochester at 115 W. Commercial St., serving — you guessed it — pizzas and calzones, as well as subs, salads, wings, fish fry, and the Landfill Plate, available in many combinations. Wanna know more? Visit crustpk.com or call 218-0818. Webster’s newest eatery is the Brimont Bistro, which offers, among other things, its take on classic French cuisine like duck confit, coq au vin, and beef bourguignon. It’s located at 24 W. Main St. in the village; check out the menu at brimontcateringcorporation.com, or call 872-3170. La Placita, one of the Public Market’s most popular food vendors, has opened a South Wedge outpost called La Casa. Located at 93 Alexander St., La Casa serves Mexican faves like nachos, tacos, and carnitas, plus tamales, ceviche, and a few breakfasty dishes. Call 730-5025 or visit La Casa’s Facebook page.

Closing

Chester Cab fans will be saddened to

learn that Howie Nielsen will be closing his Park Avenue pizzeria within the month. Nielsen, who also owns Sticky Lips Pit BBQ, cites rapidly rising costs as a factor in the shuttering of the 30-yearold business. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


[ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

t was in the early hours of the morning in Kivulu, a slum in the capital city of Kampala, Uganda, that Rochester musician Jesse Sprinkle had an epiphany. While working with the Ugandan Water Project, Sprinkle visited a little hut called Paradise. “It’s actually a home run by a married couple and it’s in the slums,” Sprikle says. “I went in there and it was late — 2, 3 in the morning — and there were like 10 kids sleeping in this tiny room, and they didn’t have a roof. They had a plastic tarp. It was raining and the water was just falling on these kids’ heads. It’s one of those things I couldn’t really believe I was there seeing. It’s the kind of stuff I could only imagine seeing in documentaries, and I was sitting right there.” Regardless, they called this little place Paradise. “And to us, we would view it as a crappy little shack in the backyard you put tools in or something,” Sprinkle says. “These kids go there so they’re not sleeping on the streets where the cops will take them or random people can come and beat them up, so they’re actually in a safe place. And we look at it, ‘Eww, it’s a dump.’ So that next day I asked the people what is it going to take to get a real roof. And they said a few hundred bucks. So we got a work party together that week, tore off the old roof and put something solid up there.” Sprinkle is a musician, producer, father of four, and owner of Bluebrick Recordings in Avon, New York. He has a prolific output of recordings, both as a solo artist and as a member of multiple bands, including Dead Poetic and Demon Hunter. Since 2008 he has been answering the humanitarian call to Africa — he’s already traveled to the continent six times — but felt there was more he could do with his specific skillset as a musician. In 2012 Sprinkle started Paradise, Uganda, a musically based project that celebrates African musical culture while 10 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

empowering African children in a world where they don’t have much else. Uganda is a country located in eastern Africa, south of Sudan. According to the

CIA World Factbook, the life expectancy in Uganda is 53 and the average annual income is $490 USD. According to UNICEF, ongoing civil unrest, human rights abuses, and the AIDS pandemic have resulted in 2.5 million orphans living in the country. It seems hopeless, yet Sprinkle still felt compelled to help. “I’d always wanted to go to Africa,” he says. “And the timing seemed right to use my musical skills for something a little bit beyond what I was using them for. So the Ugandan Water Project took me there multiple times before I started to think how I could get my own niche. The organization was humanitarian, but they always incorporated music in events. And there’s always music involved to some degree when you’re with the people. It’s a very musical thing. There were always events going on there with music incorporated into them.”

Being a musician, it didn’t take long for Sprinkle to get sucked in. “I always did a little bit here and there,” he says. “When I went out with the Water Project, I would get little chances to work with these kids, but the focus was also elsewhere. I wanted to do something where I could just focus on this. As soon as I began volunteering with the street kids in Kampala, which is kind of separate from the Water Project, I started realizing that their whole life is music.” The slums of Kampala are rife with orphans, truly parentless street kids running wild, Sprinkle says. “When I see kids on the street, like where I grew up in Seattle, a lot of it was just kids mad at mom and dad that ran away,” Sprinkle says. “But these are true blue orphans. They’re just this really great group of kids. I know they’ve made an impact on a lot of people’s lives. They’re really a rowdy, resilient bunch.” Sprinkle saw the untapped talent in these children. “Not a lot of them play instruments per se,” sprinkle says. “But they’re very rhythmic and they’re very


Local musicians Jesse Sprinkle (below left) and Kurt Johnson (below right) are hoping that by teaching Ugandan children musical skills, they can help improve the lives of the improverished young people. PHOTOS (THIS PAGE & OPPOSITE) PROVIDED BY JESSE SPRINKLE

lyrical and they’re very vocal. They have a kind of a deep-rooted musical culture we don’t have here. But not a lot of them have guitars and things like that, so we’d teach them guitar or they’d teach us East African songs, trading back and forth.” This cool, cultural quid pro quo got the

wheels in Sprinkle’s head turning. Why not produce a record with these kids? He would help focus their energy and enthusiasm, and they in turn would broaden his horizons. And any proceeds from the project could be funneled back to help their truly challenging way of life. In August 2012, Sprinkle approached The Moho Collective’s guitarist/ multi-instrumentalist Kurt Johnson about joining him as a partner in the project. Johnson had studied cultural anthropology and music from around the world, and his brilliant interpretation, exploration, and augmentation of cultures and music made him a perfect fit for what would become the Paradise, Uganda Project. Johnson says, “We were tracking guitar for one of Jesse’s songs and he said, ‘You should come to Africa with me.’” Johnson was jazzed at the prospect. “Honestly, I’d been waiting about four years for him to ask me that.” So with Johnson on board, and taking the name from that battered orphan hut,

Paradise, Uganda was born in 2012. Now Johnson, Sprinkle, and violinist Aaron Hall are set to travel to Uganda in April to record an album with local musicians and the children. “The message that came as we were creating this project,” Sprinkle says, “was the fact that we named it Paradise after this home. I want to believe we can tell people paradise is a term that can relate to us no matter where we’re at, no matter how much we have. It’s a lesson to even us in the United States, that people who don’t have anything can say this little place is paradise to them. And if we can help people create that paradise in different ways…” But what about those that may find music trivial, or fairly low on the list of priorities in the face of more pressing concerns like AIDS, hunger, or civil unrest? “I think we get more opposition [in the United States] than we do over there with people saying, ‘How is music going to help these people?’” Sprinkle says. “But I think we want to start with music and go further. I try to look at it as realistically as possible. We’re welcomed with enthusiasm. I know they genuinely love us. Some people may view it as a means to an end. But I don’t really care, as long as there are some real relationships happening and there’s some progress being made. Sometimes you’ll get people

Paradise, Uganda Project Fundraising Concert W/JESSE SPRINKLE AND KURT JOHNSON SATURDAY, APRIL 6 RICHMOND’S, 21 RICHMOND ST. 8 P.M. | $5 SUGGESTED DONATION | PARADISEUGANDA.COM

“We’re literally just going and meeting up with kids on the street. We’re not typically fundraisers. We’re musicians.”

looking at you as the rich white man. But for the most part, it’s very encouraging.” Johnson knows how it may look to detractors. “We show up there,” he says. “A few white dudes who have raised a bunch of money, to make music with them… I don’t want that to be a problem. This is the beginning of a larger relationship. And a roof here and there, food, shoes and clothes…that’s all going to be part of this while we’re doing it, that’s for sure. Anybody who has made music knows that something happens sometimes where you forget where you are, forget everything that’s going on around you.” “Hopefully we can make a difference in some lives that will affect the big picture in the long term,” Sprinkle says. Within this big picture is an internal conflict for these American musicians. They can go home to a roof, a dry bed, and food. “There are two sides to that,” says Sprinkle. “It is convenient for us to go there, knowing we can then go home. But the people out there really value that we came halfway across the world to their culture. Because they know Americans are scared of being in Africa, and either getting sick or bitten by something.” Sprinkle says that most of the people they work with in Africa “know that we’ve sacrificed to be out there. They

don’t have the physical, tangible things we do, but they have a sense of joy we envy. Whenever I get home from trips, I have this strange depression wondering how to relate that universe to my home. How do you reconcile?” The Paradise, Uganda project addresses

this disparity though its celebration of musical diversity and harmony. For everything that is different between the two cultures musically, there is something they both share, whether it’s in time signature, rhythm, or the lyrics. Understanding this makes for a healthy musical discourse that reflects on all aspects of the lives involved. Sprinkle says they’re not changing the world overnight. Life lessons take a lifetime, after all. “My hope,” Sprinkle says, “is that this project will bring [the children involved] purpose and direction and hope. And, perhaps for a handful of kids, a way out. If we can give the message, ‘You’re important enough that we’re going to come across the world to do an album continues on page 30 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Teddy Geiger Friday, May 10. Water Street Music Hall. 204 N. Water St. $15-$20. 7 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] New Found Glory Friday, May 17. Water Street Music Hall. 204 N. Water St. $19.99. 7 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com [ POP/ROCK ] Train Saturday, July 13. Darien Lake PAC. 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $20-$75. 7 p.m. 599-4641. darienlake. com

The Whigs

FRIDAY, MARCH 15 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $13-$15 | 325-5600, WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ ROCK ] Hailing from the indie-rock hotbed of Athens,

Georgia that’s produced the likes of R.E.M., of Montreal, and Drive-By Truckers, the members of The Whigs have spent their career creating bruising, no-frills rock that would sound equally at home on classic-rock radio as it does on current rock stations. The trio’s fourth album, “Enjoy The Company,” was released in September, and continues its output of Southern-fried garage-rock revivalism. The band has shared stages with the likes of Franz Ferdinand, The Killers, and Kings of Leon, all the while honing its blistering live show.

— BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

St. Patty’s Massacre THURSDAY, MARCH 14-SUNDAY, MARCH 17 MONTAGE MUSIC HALL, 50 N. CHESTNUT ST. $8/DAY, $25/FOUR-DAY PASS THEMONTAGEMUSICHALL.COM [ HARD ROCK/METAL ] If you think you can handle it, if

you think you’re hard enough, this is a four-day, 36-band heavy-music gangbang to satisfy the hard and heavy junkie in all of us. It’s the cream of Rochester heavy rock with sets performed by bands like Vanity Strikes, Burial Harbor, Aggressive Betty, Ghostfeeder, Hate Machine, The Dead Catholics, and Keaton, to list a few of the loud and proud and angry in this town. Be warned the volume may stunt your growth. Shows start Thursday at 6 p.m., Friday at 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday at 3 p.m.

PHOTO COURTESY BLACK WILKINS

— BY FRANK DE BLASE

SEE US AT THE HOMESHOW! Anderson® The most trusted name in windows and doors

Visit either one of our showrooms today and receive a FREE TICKET to the

HOME & GARDEN SHOW March 23rd & 24th

120 Stonewood Ave. (just off Lake Ave) | 585.663.0430 1230 Lehigh Station Rd. Henrietta | 585.334.5500

www.mflumber.com 12 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

Find us on


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK] The Dady Brothers. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. $2, free w/FLCC ID.

The Everleigh Club, Barbarossa, California Cousins, Ever Upward. Tala

Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

The Tossers w/Continental, 1916. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8 p.m. $12-$15.

Traditional Irish Session w/ Cathy & Lynn. McGraw’s Irish

ROC_CHIP 28 FRIDAY, MARCH 15 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $5-$7 | 454-2966, BUGJAR.COM [ CHIP ROCK ] Buffalo’s Danimal Cannon is in town

to show you just what he can do with his portable Nintendo system. It ranges from what ought to be the backing for the best racing game to some seriously dubby mixes. All from a video-game system. Makes me feel lazy for all those afternoons I spent trading crap and tormenting cuccos in “Link’s Awakening.” Local Nick Maynard brings a much more 16-bit sound to take you forth into that shiny future.

— BY SUZAN PERO

Society for Chamber Music SUNDAY, MARCH 17 MEMORIAL ART GALLERY, 500 UNIVERSITY AVE. 7:30 P.M. | $30 | 377-6770, CHAMBERMUSICROCHESTER.ORG [ CLASSICAL ] Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg

and his wife spent summers at their lakeside villa at Troldhaugen, where Grieg had a separate composer’s hut. He and his wife devised a system whereby she would hang out a colored cloth, visible to him at the hut, whenever visitors stopped by the villa, so that he could maintain the level of solitude he required to compose. Join the Society for Chamber Music in Rochester to experience the beauty of Scandinavia, including a performance of Grieg’s “Sonata in A Major for Cello and Piano, Op. 36.” — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. The Deftones played the Main Street Armory on Monday, March 4. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ BLUES ]

John McConnell. Dinosaur

Death of the soccer mom

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W

Opening with a seething version of “Be Quiet and Drive (Far Away)” Sacramento’s Deftones tore a hole into the Main Street Armory on Monday, March 4. I was rather surprised at the huge crowd wedged into the joint for the band’s stop on its Koi No Yokan Tour. But then it occurred to me: these guys don’t really tour that much. It wasn’t just a show, it was an event. I last saw the band at The State Theatre in Tampa in 1995, when the group was the toast of the nu-metal, post-hardcore, pre-rapcore world with the release of “Adrenaline.” It was like nothing anybody had heard and bands like Limp Bizkit quickly wrecked it. Deftones have persevered over the years and have lasted with a more substantive, hard rock, and even metal approach. What truly impressed me at the Armory show was guitarist Stephen Carpenter’s absolutely killer guitar tone. Typically with a band this loud — coupled with the Armory’s boomy acoustics — the guitar tends to get swallowed up in the stampede. Carpenter

had a classic thick and bright kerrang that shook the rafters and loosened fillings. Wednesday, March 6, I ventured back to my three-chord, loud-fast roots with The Queers at the Bug Jar. I rolled up as The Anderson Stingrays blazed through a set like a GTO with a death wish. The Masked Marauders kept it loud and wild with an ironic detour into the 80’s. Taking a showbiz note from Luchadors everywhere, and of course, Los Straitjackets, the band donned masks with a budgetary twist — they looked like ski masks from the dollar store. And then The Queers exploded in one giant 50-minute song at breakneck speed. Sunday afternoon at the Landing in Fairport I hung out with the kids from Fab Gear’s “It’s Only Rock ’n’ Roll” Summer Camp. They loudly played a

soundtrack that announced the beginning of the end to recitals as we know them, as well as the death of the soccer mom. The future sounds bright as these kids lean less and less on the masters and begin writing on their own. It brought a tear to my eye.

Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Margaret Explosion. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

The Michael Musillami Trio. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $10-$12. Ryan T. Carey. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Steve Green Trio w/Maggie Mullen. Pomodoro-University

Ave., 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 6 p.m. Call for info Pomodoro-University Ave., 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Music limit. We can write what we want, we can do what we want, we can expand. But Soviet Dolls isn’t purely an electronic entity. Cavallaro: When we recorded in the

studio we tried to use as many organic instruments as we possibly could. We did use our share of software, but we also used real piano. It sounds better. And recording electronic stuff and using the software was totally new to us. Before when we went into the studio we were mic’d up and played.

How do you maintain your organic quality in a non-analogue setting? Quinn: I think a lot of techno is

intentionally robotic sounding. For us it’s a blend of both. There are a lot of things in electronic music that I don’t hear and would like to hear — grittier drum sounds, stuff that went the way of the dinosaurs after the 90’s, that can really be wellintegrated with modern stuff and give it a kind of edge, give it more of an identity. If you play a track and you have a kit sound and you really like it, and you add some dirt to it, make it sound a little bit trashy, and you throw it over something really pretty. That contrast — often it seems it’s either all or nothing — it’s either rugged or really pristine sounding…

So it’s an unlimited palette? Quinn: That’s the attraction for me.

The Soviet Dolls is a new hybrid rock-electronic band featuring former members of Merlot and an up-and-coming vocalist who got her start doing YouTube videos. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Red rock Soviet Dolls W/JOYWAVE, THE 1975, AND THE BRANCH DAVIDIANS SATURDAY, MARCH 23 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | BUGJAR.COM SOVIETDOLLS.COM

[ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Soviet Dolls is a cool cocktail: two parts rocker, one part young lady who makes YouTube videos. It’s a delicious meld of synthetic pop served over organic rocks. But it’s not the aural wrestling match you’d expect. The synthetics are roughed up nicely by the analogue, and the rock is made more accessible by the synth-pop technology and know-how. The resulting sound is slick and 14 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

quick with a substantial, almost indie-rock kick and alternative darkness. Though this sound careens with a progressive texture and beauty, it’s nothing scary or new — except maybe to the band itself, as it leaves the comfort of previous rock endeavors for the unchartered territories of the digital realm. It rocks, comrade. The band has already released one self-produced, six-song CD and it continues to experiment in the studio and find its place on stage. The trio — Matt Cavallaro, synth and guitar; Stephen Quinn, bass and vocals (he and Cavallaro previously played in the rock outfit Merlot); and 18-year-old chanteuse Hannah Gouldrick, vocals; — sat down to talk about it. An edited transcript of the conversation appears below.

CITY: So you guys come from a rock ’n’ roll background. What gives? Stephen Quinn: It was totally different than

this. This is actually a new universe for us, which is cool, because when you get older and you’re doing music, you sometimes stick to your roots. We started this thing to get out of our comfort zone and it’s been a real cool experience.

Did it feel strange or alien? Matt Cavallaro: Not at all. Steve and I always

shared a love for electronic music.

What precipitated the plunge? Cavallaro: A big part is the simple advances

in technology, where you can have a midi or a computer and write a really legit-sounding song. Before it was two guitar players, a bass player, and a drummer and that’s what you were working with. With this, the sky’s the

It opens up all these doors instead of, “You’ve got five instruments, do it.” When you have a palette like this you start using things you never thought you’d use in a song. What’s your musical background? Hannah Gouldrick: I don’t really have a

musical background. My family isn’t that musically inclined, you could say. Quinn: We saw her on YouTube doing cover songs. I was amazed at the fact she knew Jeff Buckley. Cavallaro: There was an old soul in there. Quinn: When I was a teenager, I was a total fuck up, doing whatever I wanted. It was nice to be surprised and see someone that was really into it. What do you veterans have to offer? Gouldrick: The transition from the studio

to the stage, the live aspect, learning how to use my voice. I’m not shy. Cavallaro: She’s just a little green.


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free.

Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s,

3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

The Abilene Pro-Am Jam w/ Chris “Hollywood” English.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. Free 21+, $5 unders.

Thunder Body Medicine Wednesdays. Skylark Lounge,

40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ] Dan Keller. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.

Master w/Sacrificial Slaughter, Fisthammer, and Abdicate. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$10.

THURSDAY, MARCH 14 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jeff Slutsky. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

John Cole. Pane Vino

Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Lacey Lee. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7:30 p.m. Free.

DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe,

150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Saint Practice Day. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

AudioInflux w/Gang of Thieves. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke

Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Four80East w/Paradigm Shift. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8 p.m. $25-$42. Jazz Trane. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Steve West w/Steve Melcher & Drew Moore. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 6 p.m. Free.

Five Alarm Open Jam.

Holly Hunt w/Tuurd, Licker, Green Dreams, and Night Terror. Monty’s Krown, 875

[ OPEN MIC ] Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 5853193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic hosted by Jamm’in Charlie. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co. –

Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 6970235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 18+ Thursdays. ONE [ REGGAE/JAM ] Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. before 11, $3-$10 after. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 Dance Madness. Brickwood before 11 pm. Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. facebook. com/SidewalkJackson. 10 p.m. [POP/ROCK] Free for 21+. Blanket Fort Festival. The DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call 7:30 p.m. $3. for info. 16 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

Made Violent, Sexy Teenagers, Comedown.

Monroe Ave. 271-7050. Call for info.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. 21+. $5.

Speaker for the Dead w/ People With Teeth, Low Flying Planes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 8:30 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. The Fools. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free.

FRIDAY, MARCH 15 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Frankie & Jewels. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. The Reunion Inn, 4565 Culver Rd. 323-9899. 8 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration w/The Dady Brothers. Sticky

Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10.

St. Patrick’s Day Kick-Off w/ Barry’s Crossing. Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St. 545-4258. 7 p.m. Free.

Trace Wilkiins w/Carin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

5 Alarm Open Jam. The

GatorFace. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. Geech Brothers. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Happy Hour: Todd Bradley. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 5 p.m. 21+. Free.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Gang of Thieves. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 6 p.m. Free.

The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Rochester Oratorio Society: Mozart, Faure, and Beethoven.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $10-$25.

RPO: St. Patrick’s Day with John McDermott. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info.

Brent Persia - One Man Band and DJ. BLU Bar & Grill, 250

Pixley Road. 750-2980. 9 p.m. Free.

Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9:30 p.m. Call for info.

Matthew Corey and the SoulStars. Boulder Coffee Co.

MUSIC/COMEDY | BLANKET FORT FESTIVAL We love mash-ups. Whether it’s chocolate and peanut butter or Jay-Z and The Beatles, the end result is usually more wonderful than weird. Blanket Fort Festival is a mash-up of sorts. This event combines an evening of music and comedy under a massive blanket fort held indoors at The Yards collaborative art space on the grounds of the Rochester Public Market. Imagine a night out that actually feels like a night in, or maybe vice-versa. Blanket Fort Festival? Now can someone do the same thing for ship in a bottle? Featuring stand-up by Mikey Heller, Colin Burgess, Lucas Gardner, Jon Schuta and more. Music by Josh Netsky Band and Evan Van Kouwenberg. Blanket Fort Festival takes place Thursday, March 14, 7:30 p.m. at The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. $3. www.facebook.com/events/147628082063583. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St.

Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free. Flour City Beatz 2. Southwedge Colony, 503 South Ave. 585-727-0000. 10 p.m. 21+. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/ Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub &

Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free.

ROC_CHIP 28: Danimal Cannon w/DJ Nicky May May, Sparx & Yarms. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $5-$7. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7

Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.

Mark Cassara Band w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135

W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Midnight City. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Sunny Brown Band. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Todd East. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. 924-3232. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

5 Head w/The Fox Sisters, Boss Tweed. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $8-$12. 7 Sense. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 9 p.m. Free. Brass Taxi. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

The Dead Love Society, The Fevertones. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Friday in America. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info.

- Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Mitty & The Followers. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Son of the Sun w/My Plastic Sun. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

Paper Plans, Brian Lindsay Band. California Brew Haus,

402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. Call for info.

The Resonance w/Violet Mary. Richmond’s Tavern, 21

Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 8 p.m. $5. Teressa Wilcox Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. The Whigs. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 8 p.m. $13-$15.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] A.L.L. Acoustic. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Brian Coughlin’s Songwriters in the Round. Tango Cafe, 389

Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. Call for info. Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-2622090. 11 p.m. Free. Craig Taubman and Co. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd. 473-1770. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18.

Galtee Mountain Boys w/ McMahon School of Irish Dancers. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Irish Session. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 2 p.m. Call for info.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Barry’s Crossing. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free. Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info.

St. Patrick’s Day Party: Driftwood. Sticky Lips BBQ

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Call for info. True Blue. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Ezra & The Storm. The Beale

New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.


W S SX

The Industrial Blues Band. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Music fans! Want to get the scoop on the up-and-coming bands coming out of the South by Southwest festival in Austin? City Newspaper’s Willie Clark is there, bringing you daily dispatches from the mosh pits and panel discussions.

Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-

B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free.

NEW every morning at rochestercitynewspaper.com/blogs/MusicBlog

[ CLASSICAL ] Connie Deming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Bar & Lounge

RPO: St. Patrick’s Day with John McDermott. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82.

ROCHESTER’S BIGGEST POST PARADE BASH!!!

SKA/ROCK | 5HEAD [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bass Patrick’s Day. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. Free-$10.

DeeDee’s Wild College Party. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. Harlem Shake Party. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. 10 p.m. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. LA Union: Puerto Rico y Santo Domingo w/DJ Bonitillo, DJ Felix, DJ EJ. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 10 p.m. $10-$15.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Road. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

I grabbed 5Head bassist, Steve Pizutto by the collar. I got in his face. “I’m tired of the lies, man,” I snarled. “Admit it. The band is getting back together.” Pizutto relented. He saw the murder in my eyes. “OK, OK,” he said. “5HEAD is back.” Last year, this legendary Rochester ska band got together for a reunion show. During an interview leading up to it they tried to give me the old “just for one show” song and dance. I wasn’t buying it. This band was too much fun to ever go away in the first place. And now it’s back. For good. Sorry about the collar, Steve. I’ve only caught new rock-andsoul sensations the Fox Sisters once and already love them. Ex-Thundergods! Ex-Quitters! Horns! Yes! 5Head plays with The Fox Sisters Friday, March 15, 9:30 p.m. at Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $8-$12. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Garden Fresh, Chip’s Challenge. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Tru Starr w/KES, I$shy, Hassan Mackey, and The Patrick Jaouen Band. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $10$15.

Chandler Travis Three-o. The

Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. Limited seating, contact Rick at ricmon31@aol. com. $20. Connie Demming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Cousin Vinny. Corner Sports Bar, 122 Main St. East Rochester. 585-2482040. 8 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 Goodman Street North. 266-3570. 10 p.m.

[ POP/ROCK ]

Absolution Project. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Endangered Youth w/ Backbiter, J.O.B. Squad, Night Terror, Perserverance, and Waves Crashing Piano Chords.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Fat City. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Front. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. 21+. $4. Loud & Proud. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Mitty & The Followers. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. Call for info.

SAT. MARCH 16: DOORS OPEN AT NOON LIVE CELTIC ROCK

C E L E B R AT E

S T. PAT R I C K ’S D AY !

SISTERS OF MURPHY NO COVER CHARGE

$3 IRISH WHISKEY SHOTS CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE SERVED ALL DAY • SPECIAL EVENT •

5TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY THURS. MARCH 21 LIVE MUSIC BY NORTH CAROLINAS

“WOODY PINES”

VIPER JAZZ • RAGTIME • COUNTRY BLUES NO COVER CHARGE

S T. J O S E P H ’ S B R E A D & IRISH SODA BREAD

WIN A FREE YEARLONG ADMISSION PASS TO ALL ABILENE SHOWS !

745 Park Avenue 241-3120 • Open 7 days

153 LIBERTY POLE WAY•232-3230

(EXCLUDING JAZZ FEST)

www.abilenebarandlounge.com

Roger Kuhn & Cammy Enaharo.

Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Ruby Shooz Rock & Roll Dinner Dance. Whittier Party

House, 88 Whittier Rd. 2708856. 6 p.m. $30.

Shakin Bones w/Catch & Release, Jumbo Shrimp.

Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 2 p.m. Free. ShotGunn Wedding. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. Sisters of Murphy. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 2 p.m. Free. Springer. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info. St. Patrick’s Day Party. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 6 a.m. Call for info.

St. Patrick’s Day Party w/ Up2Something. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.

St. Patty’s Bash w/Mochester, Last Minute, Right Turn Racer.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. continues on page 18

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


SEE

ALL

THE MARCH MADNESS GAMES HERE

A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD BAR!

[ POP/ROCK ] Anberlin. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 7 p.m. $17-$20. Sisters Of Murphy. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 1 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

FEBRUARY BEER GENESEE BOCK BROOKLYN DRY IRISH STOUT CAPTAIN LAWRENCE IMPERIAL IPA PYRAMID WEISS CREAM

Sisters of Murphy w/Everhart Band, John Akers. Shamrock

Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 3239310. noon. Call for info.

L&M Lanes Gift Cards Now Available!

L&MES LAN

St. Patrick’s Day w/Friends Unplugged. Captain Jack’s

Any denomination - Great gift idea!

OPEN BOWLING DAILY!

Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 3 p.m. Call for info.

873 Mercha Merchants Rd. • 288-1210 www.L www.LMlanes.com Find us on

JAZZ | JIMMIE HIGHSMITH JR.

MONDAY, MARCH 18 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Did your grocery store close? Feeling lost and confused? Don’t know where to turn to? Turn to:

Highsmith plays Wednesday, March 20, 8 p.m. at Tala Vera, 155 State St. $10. 546-3845, tala-vera.com. — BY RON NETSKY

Proudly since 1964 Join us for a sampling event

ROGERS BEER

The Irish don’t need luck, they need R’s Market!

Fri, March 15 4pm-6pm

If you like your jazz smooth, with an extra helping of funk on the side, Jimmie Highsmith Jr. is the sax player for you. After studying at the Hochstein School of Music and School of the Arts, Highsmith joined the United States Air Force and formed a jazz band to play USO events. Since returning to Rochester in the early 1990’s, he’s recorded four albums as a leader. In recent years Highsmith has shared the stage with Wynton Marsalis, Wes Anderson, Wycliffe Gordon, and many other jazz luminaries.

CORNED BEEF, CABBAGE, BEER & POTATOES

Hand-trimmed meat, Cut to Order OPEN EVERY DAY! Mon-Sat 9am-8pm, Sun 9am-6pm 2294 MONROE AVE. BRIGHTON | 271-8270 | FIND US ON

SEX TRAFFICKING How are we involved?

A screening of highlights of the documentary

followed by Q&A with Laura Lederer, J.D., Former Senior Advisor on Trafficking in Persons for U.S. Department of State.

The Little Theatre

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20TH • 6:15pm Tickets: $5.00, $4.00 Advance Information line: 585-627-4134 Feminists Choosing Life of NY, co-sponsor of

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 St. Patty’s Day Metal Matinee: Tyranitar w/Cuthulu, To The Deep.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 2 p.m. 21+. $3.

That Party Band w/Wingin’ It, The Mighty Quinn.

Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. 3 p.m. Call for info. Walt O’Brien. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free.

SUNDAY MARCH 17 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays: Brian Clancy. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free.

The Dady Brothers w/Galtee Mountain Boys. Johnny’s Irish

Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. noon. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [BLUES]

The Nightstalkers. Smokin’

Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

18 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

Day by Day: 20 Years Singing Gods Praise: A Musical Revue.

Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. 10:45 a.m., 7 p.m. Free, offering accepted.

Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. The King’s Swingers. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Argyle Grill at Eagle Vale Golf Club, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. 223-9066. 7 p.m. Reservations required. gvoc. org. $15-$40.

Lovin’ Cup Idol: The Final Three: Duets and Tributes.

Rochester Chamber Orchestra: Ravel and More.

TUESDAY, MARCH 19

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 3 p.m. $10-$25.

Rochester Theater Organ Society: Ken Double.

Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 2:30 p.m. $15.

Society for Chamber Music in Rochester: A Scandinavian Sampler. Memorial Art Gallery,

500 University Ave. 276-8900. 7:30 p.m. $10-$30. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

St. Patty’s Day Dance Party w/ DJ Richie Salvaggio. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 21+. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Michael Vadala Trio. Prosecco

Compline. Christ Church, 141

AS PART OF A 4-DAY SERIES OF EVENTS IN COMMEMERATION OF WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH HOW DO WE ENABLE THE EXPLOITERS OF WOMEN AND GIRLS? Event contact: Hannah Murphy, 585-478-6134, hannahmariamurphy@gmail.com www.fclny.org

Genesee Valley Orchestra and Chorus: Look to the Rainbow.

Manic Monday Retro Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info. Todd East and Hot Sweets. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Kozy Soul, Upward Groove, thurlow. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK]

Artisan Craft and Music Night ft. Jeff Sherner. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251

Exchange Boulevard. 2328470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free.

Turnt Up Tuesday Dance Party ft. DJ Alykhan, Vampyre Eyes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Free.


[ JAZZ ]

Bob Henley. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.

An Expeditionary Learning School

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W.

Serving children in grades k-6

Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free.

Our program features: • Community-based investigations • Hands-on, minds-on projects • Exploration and discovery • learning through fieldwork • Opportunities for service to others

[ OPEN MIC ]

Golden Link Singaround.

Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Roc City Pro Jam. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Beginner Bluegrass Jam.

Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Samantha Fish. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Hope College Chapel Choir.

Trinity Reformed Church, 909 Landing Rd North. 381-5330. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. third Wednesday of every month. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian

Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Jimmie Highsmith, Jr.. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. 21+. $10. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ryan T. Carey. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free.

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With any luck o’ the Irish, you’ll find yourself at a classical celebration of the Emerald Isles this weekend. On Friday and Saturday join the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra POPS, Jeff Tyzik, conductor, and Josh McDermott, tenor, and dancers from the Boland School of Irish Dance. There’ll be lovely Irish ballads, tunes, and music from Riverdance. Oe’r in Fairport, ye can have a pint, some dinner, and some folk and popular music with a dash of Broadway hits via the Genesee Valley Orchestra & Chorus. And out in the yon of Geneva at the Belhurst Castle, join the Finger Lakes Chamber Music Festival for brunch and a concert, featuring string quartet with Michael Slattery, tenor, playing Irish airs and dances. The fare is sure to include corned beef and cabbage, alongside Irish soda bread. What’s more to do but whistle, “When Irish eyes are smilin’?”

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Learn more about our school by attending one of our parent information sessions Wednesday, March 20, 2013 Saturday, March 23, 2013 Thursday, March 28, 2013 9-11am; 1-3 pm 7-9 pm Eisenhart Auditorium at RMSC Eisenhart Auditorium at RMSC

The RPO concerts start Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Gibbs Street; tickets cost $15-$82 (454-2100, RPO.org). The Genesee Valley Orchestra & Chorus takes place Sunday at 7 p.m. (dinner preceding) at Eagle Vale Country Club; tickets cost $40 (223-9006, GVOC.org). The Finger Lakes Chamber Music Festival concert takes place Sunday at noon at Belhurst Castle in Geneva; tickets cost $25-$55, which includes brunch (315-536-4145, Fingerlakes-Music.org). — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Thunder Body Medicine Wednesdays. Skylark Lounge,

40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Arrows Over Athens w/There I Say is Lightning, Scholar, Hideout. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Rexx. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N.

Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Theater people sitting behind me were getting anxious by the end of the show, audibly wondering when it would end. But still they exploded into a standing ovation at the curtain call.

Clockwise from left: Kerry Young, Stephanie Sheak, Allison Roberts, and Denise Bartalo in “August: Osage County,” now at JCC Centerstage. PHOTO BY STEVEN LEVINSON

The situation is fraught “August: Osage County” THROUGH MARCH 24 JCC CENTERSTAGE, 1200 EDGEWOOD AVE. $18-$26 | 461-2000 X235, JCCROCHESTER.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

After it debuted in 2007, Tracy Letts’ drama “August: Osage County” won just about every theater award that matters — Tony, Drama Desk, Pulitzer, New York Drama Critics’ Circle, etc. The play itself is extraordinary, even though the subject matter is about as ordinary as you can get. A far-flung extended family is brought back together, and once the members are all contained in close quarters, long-simmering tensions reach a boil and long-buried truths explode. I don’t know about you, but that describes basically every one of my family gatherings. What makes “August: Osage County” so special is the complicated, very human characters; the intricate Jenga-like layering of plots and subplots; and expertly crafted dialogue with lines so vicious they make “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” look like “Hello Kitty.” At three-plus hours, it’s a hell of a challenge. But the cast and crew at the JCC 20 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

Centerstage are up to the task, and this show features some of the finest acting I’ve ever seen on a Rochester stage. The play concerns the Weston clan of Pawhuska, Oklahoma. It opens with patriarch Beverly Weston (David Munnell) hiring young Native American Johnna (Sara Michelle Bickweat) to be a live-in aid, helping with cooking and cleaning and chores around the house. The Westons could use the assistance, as Beverly’s wife, Violet (Denise Bartalo), is dealing with a diagnosis of mouth cancer, as well as a long-standing prescription-drug habit. Things quickly become tense when Beverly disappears after the opening scene. Eventually Violet calls in the rest of the family, including nearby daughter Ivy (Allison Roberts); Violet’s sister and brother-in-law, Mattie Fae and Charlie (McKenzie Keenan and Peter Doyle); and Colorado-based daughter Barbara (Kerry Young) and her husband and teenage daughter. As the family waits for word on Beverly, they start to hash out their own individual dramas, of which there are many. On opening night Act I was a mixed bag. There were pacing issues, mostly due to Beverly’s long, languorous monologue that opens the show. But even after that the

first section felt as though the gears were jammed; the action didn’t shift smoothly. There were also at least two instances on opening night where it seemed that the actors were stumbling over lines early in the play, and they had to do a bit of verbal tap dancing to get around it. Any issues disappeared instantly with Act II, and from there on, the show and the cast caught fire. The second act in particular is so tightly directed that you can’t look away for even a second. Director Brian Coughlin makes several interesting staging decisions that add to the emotionally voyeuristic feeling of the show. Following an incredibly brutal family dinner, there is a chase sequence that could have easily been played solely for laughs (the show is a dark comedy, but a very dark comedy), but instead became a potent mix of the ridiculous and the desperate. The tension lets up a bit in the third act, even though the play delivers several more dramatic nuclear blasts. The realism of the characters and the difficult truths of their relationships really shine as the story reaches its conclusion, and by the end of the show it feels like everyone has run an emotional marathon. That was true for both the cast and the audience; several

Every actor in the 13-member cast delivers a good-or-better performance. But two in particular produce remarkable, career-defining work. Denise Bartalo looked completely exhausted by the end of the opening-night performance, and with good reason. Her take on battleaxe matriarch Violet is astonishing to behold. Violet is such a difficult character, and requires an actor to believably play looped-out-of-her-mind on pain pills, sharp-eyed and sharper-tongued harpy, and finally oddly sympathetic but still irredeemable survivor. There’s not a single off-pitch note in Bartalo’s portrayal of this complicated woman, and she is so believably, casually ruthless in the second act that I found my pulse racing just listening to her berate and cajole. Matching her blow for emotional blow is Kerry Young as eldest daughter Barbara. Barbara doesn’t come in until late in Act I but quickly becomes the ostensible heroine of the play. Young has played a variety of dramatic roles on local stags, and is also the founder of Unleashed! Improv. That blend of pathos and crack comedic timing makes her ideally suited for this show; her wry delivery of even some of Barbara’s most caustic lines helps to cut through the almost palpable bitterness. As impressive as Bartalo’s Violet is — and she really is wonderful — she needs an equally strong Barbara to play off of, and Young never lets her down. There isn’t sufficient space to go over all of the cast’s contributions, but other stand-outs include Matt Ames, who reads “sleazeball” as soon as he saunters onto the stage; Allison Roberts as Ivy, who lives up to her character’s namesake as unassuming but hiding something destructive underneath; McKenzie Keenan as the forever-exasperated Mattie Fae; Peter Doyle as arguably the lone voice of sanity in the entire family; Steven Marsocci as the nice guy who maybe isn’t so nice; and Sara Michelle Bickweat as the unassuming Johnna, the outsider who allows us to see just how monstrous these people are by comparison.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. A Photographer’s Path 16. Reception Mar 20 3-6 p.m. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Adult Student Show. Admission free during workshop hours. 276-8959. mag.rochester. edu.; “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again: Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. Reception Mar 15 5-8 p.m. ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts/. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Mis en Scène. Featuring the work of Richard Jenks and Daniel Mosner. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Mar 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. Reception Mar 13 7 p.m. 585-473-0503. tapandmallet.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Sproutkeepers” Justyn Iannucci & Margot Hughes. 1975ish.com. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 244-9892. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Precious Metals: New Paintings on Gold, Silver, and Copper” by Beverly Rafferty. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. 2013 High School Student Art Exhibition. artswyco.org. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. A Celebration of Youth Art Month. Irondequoit, Penfield, Webster High Schools. Closing reception Mar 23 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Eccentrics” by Judd Williams. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appt. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Within the Wallpaper,” new work by Jolene Beckman. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m, Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings and Woodcuts. Through Mar 31. lobbydigital@ gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225. Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Through Mar 31. 4145643. catclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “LIFE and TIMES” by Cheryl Amati Martin American Way Collection. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery, 6475 Gulick Rd. Nature in Art: Selections from the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-

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The art that you see on the walls and pedestals at museums and galleries tends to only be a percentage of the work in venue’s total collection. As part of the Memorial Art Gallery’s centennial celebration, the art house will present “It Came from the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection.” This exhibition will feature more than 200 works of art from the 4th millennium BCE to the 21st century that, for a variety of reasons, aren’t frequently placed in public view. The objects were collected under six directors during the gallery’s first 100 years, and include famous names such as Hopper, Hockney, and Klee, as well as many local artists who played key roles at MAG and in the region’s rich art history. The members-only opening party for “It Came from the Vault” will take place Saturday, March 16, 8-11 p.m., and is free for members to attend, but is closed to the general public. The exhibit is open to the public Sunday, March 17, through Sunday, June 9, and is included in gallery admission ($5-$12). Guided exhibition tours, lectures, and other events surrounding this exhibition are listed online at mag.rochester.edu. For more information, call 376-8900. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “It’s Black It’s White” New Drawings by Tim Mack. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Camera Obscura” Through Apr 7. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org.; “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Janice Jakielski “Being Here” Installation. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. Closed Mar 9-16 for UR Spring Break. 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “What Shape is White” Featuring David Kerstetter, Monteiro Prestes, Peggy Corthouts, Edward Loedding. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Operation P.H.O.T.O. (People Helping Others Overcome). TueThu & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., MonFri by appt. First Fridays 6-9 p.m. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Livingston Art Center, 4 Murray Hill Drive. Apartment One. A show featuring the photographic art and graphic design created for the 2013 “official” Visitors Guide Livingston County. 243-6785. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “It Came From the

Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Art Reflected: 1913-2013. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.; “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG” Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. Open school break hours Tue Feb 19 and Apr 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu. Creative Workshop Adult Student Show. Admission free during workshop hours. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Jack Wolsky. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021. kfarrell@monroecc.edu. monroecc.edu/go/mercer. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Rochester Area Fiber Artists (RAFA) presents: “Winter’s End” millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Art Therapy.” A display of wooden sculptures by Cheryl and Don Olney. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. “Contrasts & Contours” Hamilton Aguiar. Introducing regional sculptor Lucien Casartelli’s sophisticated, contemporary, mixed media sculptures. 2921430. nanmillergallery.com. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again: Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. Reception Mar 15 5-8 p.m. ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts/. Our House Gallery of Veterans Outreach Center, 783 South Ave.

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continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


KIDS | SESAME STREET LIVE: “ELMO MAKES MUSIC”

“C” is for cookie, and that’s good enough for the Cookie Monster. But Elmo cares about the entire alphabet, which is why he gets to sing “The Alphabet Song,” and also why he gets his own musical. That would be “Elmo Makes Music,” which will run for six performances this weekend at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.). The whole family can rock out to the sweet sounds of rubber duckies and trash can lids with this musical featuring Elmo, Abby Cadabby, Big Bird, and the rest of their Sesame Street neighbors. And for the adults who already know the whole alphabet or whose diets can’t abide being tempted by cookies, there are still plenty of treats to be enjoyed here. The set list, which features nearly two dozen songs, mixes classic pop singles like “You Should Be Dancing” and “Rockin’ Robin” with the usual “Sesame Street” repertoire. “Elmo Makes Music” plays on Friday, March 15, at 7 p.m.; Saturday, March 16, at 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m., and 5:30 p.m.; and Sunday, March 17, at 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. The matinee on March 17 will have a sign interpreter for the deaf and hard of hearing. Tickets cost $15.50-$27.50 and can be purchased through rbtl.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Art Exhibits Faces of Veterans. Tue 5-7 p.m., Fri 1-3 p.m. or by appt. 295-7836. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Mis en Scène. Featuring the work of Richard Jenks and Daniel Mosner. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Mar 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Heroes and Villains. recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Makers & Mentors. Through Mar 17. WedSun 1-5 p.m. New paintings, prints, and mixed media works by Kurt Feuerherm, Peter Monacelli, Patricia Dreher, and Kristine Bouyoucos. In Lab Space: Heather Swenson. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Art Shows. Jan 22-Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt. 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@ genesee.edu. genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2754477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu.

Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. “Brighton Country Homes and Architects.” 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. “Modern Love A collection of Paintings” by Sam Snyder. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake! Portraits of Pastries.” 732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tue-Thu noon-6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-8731. assisiinstitute.org. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. “As ready as I’ll ever be,” new work by Andrew Cho. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Salvador Dalí: Dante’s Divine Comedy.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Closed from March 16–24 for academic break. 395-2805. brockport.edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Reception Mar 21 5-7 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@ rit.edu. rit.edu/fa/gallery. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Winners. 275-3361. urmc.edu/libraries/miner/. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. PhotoBook Awards 2012. 442-8676. vsw.org.

22 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. 2013 Annual Wayne County High School Art Exhibit. Reception Mar 10 2-4 p.m. 315-331-4593. waynearts.wordpress.com. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Realms of Goddesses Divine. Emma Brooks BFA solo exhibition. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. brockport.edu/finearts. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “From Thought to Image: Art Quilts of Nancy P. Hicks.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thu 4:30-7:30 p.m. Reception Mar 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. nancyphicks.com. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “Totems and Other Tributes to the Earth: Ceramic Works by Peter Gerbic.” Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 7851369. flccconnects.com.

Art Events [ SUN., MARCH 17 ] Exhibition Tour: It Came from the Vault. March 17, 1, 2 & 3 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. [ TUE., MARCH 19 ] Artisan Craft and Music Night. March 19, 6-10 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way Local artists will be displaying and selling their works in both our intimate Upstairs Lounge and Downstairs in the barroom.Enjoy great art, great drink specials. And live tunes downstairs provided by the Singer-Songwriter Jeff Sherner. Also…Enjoy Fantastic, Mouth-Watering BBQ served up by our friends at Fett Svin BBQ No cover. 232-3230. info@abilenebarandlounge.com. abilenebarandlounge.com.

Comedy [ THU., MARCH 14 ] Blanket Fort Festival. March 14, 7:30 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market BYOB. Comedy and music show inside a giant blanket fort. goohouse.tumblr. com $3 suggested donation. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com. Joe Bruno/Theo Von. March 1416. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] Laughs For Lifebox. March 15, 8 p.m. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. Some of Rochester’s best comedic talent are coming together to put on a benefit show for Lifebox. Laugh Riot, Goo House and 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar are all putting their heads together to come up with the best show possible. Doors open at 7 p.m $10. 442-6880. lifebox.org.

Dance Events [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] LivingDance-LivingMusic. March 15, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Kinections, 718 University Ave. Fri Fundamentals $20-$35, Sat Working in Depth $20-$40. Register. 473-5050. kinections. com.

Neutral Ground Singles Dance. March 15, 8 p.m.-midnight. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. Music by DJ Joetta $7 requested donation. 3817603. neutralground1.com. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Ruby Shooz “Rock & Roll” Dinner Dance. March 16, 6 p.m. Whittier Party House, 88 Whittier Rd. $30, register. 270-8856. kris@WhittierPartyHouse.com. GalaxyCateringGroup.com. [ SUN., MARCH 17 ] Irish Dance Performance. March 17, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Boland School of Irish Dance Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Rochester Singleton’s “Irish Dancers Program.” March 17, 2 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. Tap Dance Jam Sessions. third Sunday of every month, 2 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. $5. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com.

Festivals [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Maple Sugar Festival. March 16, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Pancake breakfast served 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $6-$8, free to ages 3 and under $6.50$8.50 admission, free ages 3 and under. 538-6822. gcv.org. Maple Sugar Open House. March 16, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Free. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. Maple Sugar Weekends. Sundays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Pancake breakfast (includes admission) $7-$10, 9 a.m.-1 p.m Admission $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Maple Weekend at Packard Valley Farms. March 16 and Sundays 438 Macedon Ctr Rd, Macedon. All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast. Horse-drawn and tractor wagon rides. Tour of the sap house. Petting zoo. Bird’s eye view of the sugar bush. Craft sale. Kid’s activity zone. Maple products and baked goods for sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m mapleweekend.com. Maple Weekends. Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m Wohlschlegel’s Naples Maple Farm, 8064 Coates Rd., Naples. Pancake breakfast 8 a.m.-1 p.m Free admission, $3-$7 breakfast. 775-7770. wohlschlegelsnaplesmaplefarm.com.

Kids Events [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Cool Kids: The Magic Guy. March 16, 10 a.m. The Forum, Genesee Community College, One College Rd., Batavia. Free. 637-3984. generationcool.biz. Science Saturday: Make a Fast Friend. March 16, 11 a.m.3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Learn about greyhounds Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Zoo Challenge and Birthday. March 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Critter challenge 10 a.m.-4 p.m., birthday party 1-3 p.m. for olive baboon babies

RECREATION | EVENING WATERFALLS WALK

I can think of few more romantically titled or just plain refreshing recreational events than “Evening Waterfalls Walk,” which is a hike to be held at Letchworth State Park in Castile on Friday, March 15. Meet at Inspiration Point at 6 p.m., and enjoy a three-hour guided hike among the park’s waterfalls. Forget the burdens of human society for a while and just revel in the glory of vernally awakening nature. The park has an $8 parking free, and it is recommended that you bring a flashlight. Also this week, Letchworth will host a “Bit of Green, Signs of Spring” walk on Sunday, March 17, at 10 a.m. Meet at the Mount Morris Entrance Gate for a carpool. Later that day, an “Indoor Ed-venture” will take place at the Visitor’s Center, focusing on overwintering mushrooms. This event takes place at 2:30 p.m. For more information, call 493-3625. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Included in zoo admission. senecaparkzoo.org. [ SUN., MARCH 17 ] Bebop to Bach Concert Series. March 17, 2 p.m. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St $5$10, register. 442-1770 x3049. tsmith@harleyschool.org. harleyschool.org.

Lectures [ WED., MARCH 13 ] Bringing Nature to Your Garden. March 13, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Ellen Folts, owner of Amanda’s Garden in Springwater Free, register. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. Social Media 101: Lessons from Lady Gaga. March 13, 10 a.m.noon. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St Presenter: Deborah Mourey - Principal, Mourey Consulting $10-$50, register. 473-4000 x206. artsrochester.org. “Story-Line Acting” with Stephen McKinley Henderson. March 13, 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road Free, register. 345-6868. [ THU., MARCH 14 ] Chiapas: Problems in Paradise. March 14, 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 359-7092. Focus 45 Lunchtime Lecture: Daguerreian Studios of Rochester. March 14, 12:15-1 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. With Joe Struble. Bring lunch or purchase one $3-$6. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Local Historic Happenings in the 1600s. March 14, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Includes both days, Feb 14 & Mar 14 $5. 3408655. penfieldrec.org. The Naked Truth: Advertising’s Image of Women with Jean Kilbourne. March 14,

7:30 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St $25, register. 315-253-6669. auburnpublictheater.org. Neighbors Next Door: Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease, Part 2. March 14, 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] Kern Symposium on Liberal Arts and Business. March 15, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Student Innovation Hall Free, register. rit.edu/cla/ kern/program.php. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Geneva Bee Conference. March 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva. Speakers: Dr. Deborah Delaney“Managing Risk in Honey Production: From the Hive to the Pantry” and Dr. Tammy Horn“Beeconomy: What Women and Bees Can Teach Us About Local Economy and Global Markets.” Free, $20 donation accepted. 855-324-6639. genevabeeconference.org. “Healing Ourselves, Our Families and Our Communities with Whole Food Nutrition.” March 16, 1-4 p.m. Quality Inn, 125 N. Main St., Newark. Speakers will be Laura Villanti of the Weston Price Foundation on whole food and traditional diets. Adama Davis of Western NY Nutritional Services and Standard Process/Medi Herb on whole food supplements and herbs, Elizabeth Henderson, a long time organic farmer, author and educator on healthy, fair and sustainable communities Free. 315-331-0810. jrleff_dc@yahoo. com. [ SUN., MARCH 17 ] “The Inner Lives of Animals: Lessons from a Vegan Biologist” with Jonathan Balcombe, Ph.D..


March 17. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd 5:30 p.m. vegan potluck, 7 p.m. program $3, free to members. 234-8750. rochesterveg.org. [ MON., MARCH 18 ] “Dr. Ward’s Most Remarkable Survey of Rail Transportation in Ontario County, New York,” a lecture by Robert Ward Jr., Ph.D.. March 18, 7:30 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com. “From War to Peace: The Life of George Lennon.” March 18, 7 p.m. Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Rd. North Film and discussion with Ivan Lennon Free. 428-8204. “How Can the Humanities Play an Important Role in Today’s Digital World? with David Lester. March 18, 7 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Free. sjfc.edu. Monday Lecture Series: “Snakes in Muddy Waters: Perspectives on the Separation of Church and State” with Deborah Hughes. March 18. Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, 17 Madison St Noon lunch lecture $25, 2 p.m. tea lecture $15 susanbanthonyhouse.org. [ TUE., MARCH 19 ] Geva Theatre Center’s “Bob” Cast Members. March 19, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Perinton Historical Society Program: An Evening with President Lincoln. March 19, 7:30 p.m. Fairport Historical Museum, 18 Perrin St President Lincoln, as portrayed by Terry Darrow, will give his famous Gettysburg Address which will be followed by a question and answer period Free. 223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. “To The Arctic” Multimedia Presentation with Photographer Florian Schulz.. March 19, 7 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave School of Nursing room 100 Free. welcometothearctic.org. [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Neilly Lecture: Author and Playwright Anthony Giardina. March 20, 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson room 275-4461. Seabreeze Park When You were a Kid with Matthew Caulfield. March 20, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. Skalny Center Lecture: Krakow’s Metamorphoses. March 20, 7:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Sloan Auditorium, Goergen Hall 275-9898. rochester.edu/college/psc/cpces. Telling Tales: External Narratives in Opera. March 20, noon. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8145. libraryweb.org.

Literary Events [ WED., MARCH 13 ] All of Rochester Book Discussion: “Into the Beautiful North” by Luis Alberto Urrea. March 13, 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com.

Exotic ingredients infuse beef, lamb, and vegetarian dishes for lunch or dinner every day of the week. VEGETARIAN • COMBINATION DISHES BEEF • LAMB • CHICKEN DISHES

SPECIAL EVENT | ST. PATRICK’S DAY EVENTS

Some people don’t need need any help figuring out how to spend St. Patrick’s Day. It’s a two-step process: get with your friends, then head to a bar. The rest is blacked-out history. The only dilemma is how to handle the morning after. Should you call in sick for work in advance, or try to rough out your Monday with a hangover? But for others, St. Patrick’s is more than an excuse for an all-day binge. They want to celebrate the day and actually remain sober. They want to find activities that the whole family can enjoy. Or maybe they just have something really important to do on Monday morning. Fortunately, there are several safe, sober ways to enjoy the ostensibly Irish holiday, with special events spread across the whole weekend. Call it the luck of the Irish, if you will. On Friday, March 15, the Catholic Family Center will hold its annual St. Patrick’s Day Gala at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center (123 E. Main St.), from 6:30 p.m. to midnight. This year’s gala will honor the refugee-aid organization Saint’s Place, and its executive director, Colleen Knauf, with the Catholic Family Center Award. The evening will also include cocktails, dinner, dancing, entertainment, and a live auction. Tickets for the gala are $200 per person, $250 for patrons, and can be purchased through cfcrochester.org or by calling 262-7020. There’s no bigger celebration locally than the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, which regularly draws more than 200,000 visitors. This year’s parade will be held on Saturday, March 16, starting at 12:30 p.m. The parade kicks off at the corner of East Avenue and Alexander Street, and then continues down East Avenue and Main Street, ending at Plymouth Avenue. The free parade will be preceded by other festivities, including the Running on the Green five-mile race, which starts at the Blue Cross Arena (1 War Memorial Square) at 9:30 a.m., and a Celtic Fair at the Radisson Riverside Hotel (120 E. Main St.) from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more info and the full schedule of parade events, visit rochesterparade.com. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “The Madonnas of Leningrad” by Debra Dean. March 13, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free. 336-6060. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., MARCH 14 ] Authors Talk. March 14, 7 p.m. School Without Walls, 480 Broadway Authors Thomas DeWolf, descendant of slave traders, and Sharon Morgan, descendant of enslaved Africans, will talk about their journey of healing and the writing of their new book, Gather

at the Table Free. 288-8644. gatheratthetable.net. Book Discussion: “The Holocaust, the Church, and the Law of Unintended Consequences: How Christian Anti-Judaism Spawned Nazi Anti-Semitism” by Roman Catholic Deacon Anthony Sciolino. March 14, 7 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Free. 385-8325. tjewell@sjfc.edu. Book Signing: “Whispers to my heart: Emerging from the depths with God” with Cindy Van Ostrand Blair. March 14, 6:30-8 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade. March 14, 12:12-1 p.m. Central continues on page 24

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Literary Events Library, 115 South Ave. Book talk by authors Thomas De Wolf and Sharon Leslie Morgan 4288350. libraryweb.org. The Greater Rochester Russell Set. March 14, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Tim Madigan on Paul Kurtz and the secular humanist movement $3, free to members. 473-2590. wab.org. Huge Used Book Sale. March 1417. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. preview for members, public welcome with $5 donation. Open days: Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. (fill a bar for $3) 428-8350. libraryweb.org.

Just Poets Open Mic: David White. March 14, 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza 248 3248. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Book Reading: Tina Nellucci. March 16, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. “The Multi-million Dollar Poetry Industry” with Laughing Larry Berger. March 16, 3 p.m. Gallery One Fine Arts, 2575 E. Henrietta Rd $25, register. 334-6388. laughingl@yahoo.com. [ SUN., MARCH 17 ] Book Discussion: “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” by Maryanne Shaffer and Annie Burrows.. March 17, 4 p.m.

Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ MON., MARCH 18 ] The Sun Magazine Discussion Group. third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., MARCH 19 ] Book Discussion: “Into the Beautiful North” by Alberto Urrea. March 19-20. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Readers Theater: “Romeo and Juliet.” March 19, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com.

[ WED., MARCH 20 ] Book Discussion: American War. March 20, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. “Kearney’s March” by Winston Groom bn.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., MARCH 13 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside!. Tuesdays-Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org.

“Race: Are We So Different?” Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. “To My Valentine.” Through March 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 31. Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] Rides of March. March 15, 5 p.m. Full Moon Vista Bike & Sport Shop, 661 South Ave. The Rides of March on the Ides of March

provide a chance to get in shape and sign up for the MS Bike tour which is 7/20-7/21 from Keuka College. Full Moon Vista staff will offer a tire changing clinic at 5 p.m. and lead a 15 mile ride starting promptly at 5:30 p.m. MS Bike Tour staff and volunteers will be present to answer questions and help you sign up for the tour Free. 546-4030. info@ fullmoonvista.com. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] GVHC Hike. March 16, 9:30 a.m. Mendon Ponds (beach lot, Douglas Rd.), strenuous 5+ mile hike, east Esker trail free. 750-8937. gvhchikes.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Hamlin State Beach Park. March 16, 8:30 a.m. Meet at parking lot 1.

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Dress warmly Free. 425-7849. rochesterbirding.com. Winter Tours of Moutn Hope Cemetery. third Saturday of every month, 1 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $5, members and children under 16 free with adult. 461-3494. fomh.org. [ SUN., MARCH 17 ] GVHC Hike. March 17, 8:30 a.m. 390 exit 11, moderate/ hilly 8 mile hike, Finger Lakes Trail. Stop at Mapletree inn for pancakes after hike $5 carpool. 265-9221. gvhchikes.org. [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Spring Equinox Walk. March 20, 7 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd

Free. 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter.

Special Events [ WED., MARCH 13 ] February Meeting: Love as a Revolutionary Force. ongoing, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Green Party of Monroe County gpomc. org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County,

249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Village of Pittsford Candidates Forum. March 13, 7-8:30 p.m. Pittsford Sutherland High School, 55 Sutherland Dr. Moderator: Katherine Smith, Advocacy Chair, LWV-RMA, 2 Mayoral Candidates and 4 Village Board Candidates lwv-rma.org. [ THU., MARCH 14 ] The 2013 RAF ADDY Awards. March 14, 6:30 p.m.-midnight. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St $25-$90, register. rafconnect.org. Film: The Magnificent Seven (1960). March 14, 6:15 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org.

Garden Artisans Expo. March 1417. Southtown Plaza. 455-4562. sarah@gardenartisansrochester. com. Lincoln Tours. Saturdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] 8th Annual Spring 2013 Batavia Antique Show and Sale. March 15-16. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.4 p.m. Clarion Hotel & Plam Island Indoor Water Park, 8250 Park Rd., Batavia. Saturday special: free with paid Friday night Admission $4, children under 12 free. hollandlandoffice.com. Catholic Family Center’s Annual St. Patrick’s Day Charity Gala. March 15, 6:30 p.m. Rochester

Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Please join Catholic Family Center and its generous supporters in celebrating Saint’s Place and Colleen Knauf for their outstanding work with the Refugee Resettlement Program. The Irish-themed evening will include great food, live music and an auction, chances to win a dream vacation, and a leprechaun sighting (or two!) $200 and $250 (Patron). 262-7172. Flim: “Ethnic Notions.” March 15, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, register. thebaobab.org. National MS Society’s On the Move Luncheon. March 15, 11:30 a.m. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Road The On the Move Luncheon honors people in

the Greater Rochester area who are On the Move creating a world free of MS through their activism, volunteerism and philanthropy. The luncheon also helps to increase public awareness of MS and the National MS Society. The goal of the On the Move Luncheon is simple – to raise funds and empower each other to create a better future for those living with MS Tickets start at $60. 271-0805 March 15, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Road msupstateny.org. The Pipes and Drums of the Black Watch 3rd Battalion the Royal Regiments of Scotland and the Band of the Scots Guards. March 15, 8 p.m. Nazareth College Arts continues on page 26

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Special Events

St. Joseph School Annual Gala. March 16, 6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. Live auction, horse racing $80, register. 586-6968. sjspenfield. com/gala. St. Patrick’s Day Parade. March 16, 12:30 p.m. Downtown East Avenue to Main Street, stopping at Plymouth 234-5167. rochesterparade.com. Thread Six Year Anniversary Party. March 16, 7-9 p.m. Thread, 654 South Ave. Special announcement 232-7110.

Center, 4245 East Ave $55-$70. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. St. Patrick’s Day Gala 2013. March 15, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Cocktail hour, auction, dinner. This is a Black Tie optional event $200, RSVP. cfcrochester.org. A Taste of Cameron fundraiser. March 15, 6:30 p.m. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Rd. $35. 585-288-7170. cameronministires.org. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] 2nd Annual Women’s Health Fair. March 16, 9 a.m. Pieters Family Life Center, 1025 Commons Way Join us at the Pieters Family Life Center for a day of wellness speakers, demonstrations, and vendors just for women. Speaker topics include: Yoga for chronic pain, family budgeting, homesteading, spiritual health, nutrition, menopause, health screening, stress management and financial health Free. 4873500. pietersfamilylifecenter.org. Antiques on Campus. March 16 and March 16-17, 10 a.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. More than 50 dealers and a silent auction with many great items & the winning bids will be named on Sunday (you don’t need to be present to win) $6. 415-9269. antiquesrochesterny.com. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Casa Larga Celebrates St. Patrick’s Day. March 16-17, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $5. 223-4210. casalarga.com. Cobblestone Farm Winery’s St Patrick’s Irish Weekend. March 16-17, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Cobblestone Farm Winery & Vineyard, 5102 State Route 89, Cayuga Lake Wine Trail, Romulus $3 tasting fee. 315-549-8797. cobblestonefarmwinery.com. Community Donation Drive. March 16-17, 9 a.m. Savers Thrift Store, 1175 Marketplace Dr. We are accepting clothing, shoes, accessories, housewares, books, and furniture items. All donated items benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters 424-4487. 1170@savers.com. savers.com. Film: “Hughes’ Dream Harlem.” March 16, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, register. thebaobab. org. Highland Hospital Gala. March 16, 6 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St This event is Black Tie optional. Highland’s largest fundraising event benefiting the Radiation Oncology Clinic $200, RSVP. urmc.rochester.edu. “Making Vegan Chocolate” with Terry Keheller. March 16, 3:30 p.m. The Cocoa Bean Shoppe, 20 S Main St. $4. 203-1618. cocoabeanshoppe.com. March Madness at JD Wine Cellars. March 16-17, noon. JD Wine Cellars, 1339 Eddy Rd $10. 315-986-4202. winery@longacrefarms.com. JDWineCellars.com. Roc City Health Project. March 16, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave Herbal spa, massage,

SPECIAL EVENT | MAPLE SUGARING WEEKENDS

Though we’re still freezing our fingers and snow is lingering on the ground, the song birds have returned and spring flowers are stirring in their beds. Another sure sign that warmer times are ahead is that it’s maple-sugaring season, and the sweetly beloved tree sap is beginning to flow. Take part in local tradition at one or more of these events that showcase how all of our favorite tree-sap products — from maple syrup to maple cream, to maple jelly — are created. Here are just a few of the regional events being held this week. For more, visit rochestercitynewspaper.com and search “maple” on calendar of events. Genesee Country Village and Museum (1410 Flint Road, Mumford) hosts two weekends that feature the centuries-old process of collecting sap from maple trees and processing it into syrup and sugar. The Maple Sugar Festival takes place 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, March 16-17 and 23-24, and includes 19th-century-style tree tapping, demonstrations on candle making and maple beer brewing, hands-on games and crafts, tastings and treats for purchase, displays, and more. Admission is $8.50 for adults and $6.50 for youth. Members and children ages 3 and younger are admitted for free. There will also be an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast each day of the festival, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., which costs $8 for adults, $6 for youth, and is free to ages 3 and under. For more information, call 538-6822 or visit gcv.org. The Rochester Museum and Science Center’s Cumming Nature Center (6472 Gulick Road, Naples) will host the 35th Annual Maple Sugaring Weekends, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, March 16-17 and 23-24. The program provides information to visitors on the science and lore of maple sugaring, and includes demos, tastings, and a pancake meal served 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Each pancake meal is $10 for adults ($9 for adult members) and $8 for children ($7 for member kids), and includes one admission to CNC. Admission without the pancake meal is $3 per person, $10 for a family, and free to members. For more information, call 374-6160 or visit rmsc.org Also in Naples, visit Wohlschlegel’s Naples Maple Farm (8064 Coates Road), which participates in the New York State Naples Maple Weekends, March 16-17 and 23-24. The farm offers an open house sugarhouse tour and woods walk 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast 8 a.m.-1 p.m. ($3 for children ages 3-7, $5 for kids 8-12 years, and $7 for ages 12 and over). For more information, call 775-7770 or visit wohlschlegelsnaplesmaplefarm.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY chiropractic, and acupuncture services. Bring mat for yoga $15-$35 for services, $5 yoga. roccityhealthproject@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ roccityhealthproject. Rochester Amateur Radio Association: FCC exams for ham radio licenses. third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m RIT

26 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

campus, Building GLE Room 3139 [Park in lot J]. Bring a pen and pencil, two forms of ID including one with a picture. If you are upgrading: Bring your original, and a copy, of your current amateur radio license; or unexpired Certificates of Completion Free. 289-3801. ken@w2krh.com.

[ SUN., MARCH 17 ] Opera in European Opera Houses. March 17, noon. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $18-$20. 2580400. thelittle.org. Toy Show and Collectible Sale. March 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. 442-5700. [ MON., MARCH 18 ] CPS-3 Community Champion Kickoff Event. March 18, 6 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. The American Cancer Society’s Rochester office is currently recruiting volunteers who are willing to serve as a Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS3) Community Champion. Registration will begin at 5:30 PM. The one hour program will begin at 6:00 PM. At this event, you will be presented with all the information you need to help educate the community about CPS-3 Free. 224-4933. cps3rochester.org. Film: “180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School.” March 18, 7 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue Free. 258-0200. wxxi.org/events. Finger Lakes Foodie Awards. March 18, 6-9 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr 877-3864669. aj@visitfingerlakes.com. fingerlakesfoodrevolution.com. RIT Faculty Speaker Film Series: “Quartet.” March 18, 6:40 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $5. 258-0400. thelittle.org. TAO (Transplant Awareness Organization) Pizza Party. March 18, 6-8 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 S Main St Join us for fellowship, great pizza and the sharing of transplant experiences Free. 377-6028. TAO-Rochester.org. Worldly Approach to Wine: The Wines of Northwestern Italy. March 18, 6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $45, $55 non members. 2234210. casalarga.com. [ TUE., MARCH 19 ] Color Brighton Green: Let’s Move.Sustainably.. March 19, 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Rochester Academy of Science, Mineral Section. March 19, 7-9 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave The tentative lecture / workshop will be on, “Photostacking of Mineral Samples to Increase the Depth of Focus,” by Van King. Door prizes and refreshments. To verify this topic visit our Mineral Section website before the meeting. Visitors welcome 288-5683. mineralvp@rasny.org. rasny.org.

XRX Pioneer Club. March 19, 12:30 p.m. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. Bring Ontario Food Pantry donations. Speaker: Betty PerkinsCarpenter $18 members, $20 guests. 381-7603. xeroxpioneerclub.org. [ WED., MARCH 20 ] “Faith on Campus: The Abrahamic Initiative at Work.” March 20, 11 a.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave 52nd Annual Interfaith Event Free, RSVP. 2447060. wrj@tbk.org. tbk.org. Screening: “Not My Life.” March 20, 6:15 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Followed by Q&A with Laure Lederer, J.D., former senior adviser on trafficking in persons for U.S. Department of State $4$5. 478-6134. fclny.org.

Sports [ WED., MARCH 13 ] Rochester Americans v. Binghamton Senators. March 13, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] Rochester Americans v Albany Devils. March 15, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Roc CityThunder Home Game. March 16, 7:15 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Gordon Field House $8-$11, season tickets for $30$40. 475-4121. rittickets.com.

Theater August: Osage County. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Mar 24. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Bob.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Mar 24. Wed Mar 13-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Mar 20 7 p.m Tickets start at $30. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “The Book Club Play.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through March 23. Wed Mar 13 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m. (sign-interpreted), Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) and 7 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “City Lights.” Through March 20. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Through Apr 14. Previews Fri 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Wed Mar 20 7 p.m $20. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com “Day by Day: 20 Years Singing God’s Praise!” A Musical Revue.. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St Free. Mar 17 10:45 a.m. & 7 p.m. 271-6513. thirdpresbyterian.org. “An Exception to the Rule.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Lunch Hour Play Reading Series $8 play only, $15 includes lunch box, register. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Flanagan’s Wake. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 7 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Informed Consent.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Plays in Progress 2013

series . Mon 7 p.m. Free, RSVP. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Is Life Worth Living?” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave RCP/ Irish Community Players. Through Mar 30. Fri Mar 15-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $9-$19. 244-0960. info@ muccc.org. muccc.org. “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$15. 9357173. mjtstages.com. “Little Shop of Horrors.” RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St Fri-Sat March 5-16 at 7:30 p.m., Sat Mar 16 at 2 p.m $15$20. 325-3366. rapatheatre.org. “Murder Me, Murder Me Not.” Golden Ponds, 500 Long Pond Rd Through Mar 24. Fri-Sat 6:30 p.m., Sun Mar 17 3 p.m. $27 includes dinner. 225-2419. goldenpondspartyhouse.com. Sesame Street Live: Elmo Makes Music. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Fri 7 p.m., Sat 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Sun 11:30 a.m., 3 p.m $15.50-$27.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., MARCH 13 ] “The Bald Soprano.” Through March 13. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Seeking three males aged 25-40. Rehearsal begins April 15th and performances are the last two week-ends in June at MuCCC. The female roles have been cast. Audition by appt 2712087. michaelarve@yahoo.com. “Comedy of Errors.” March 1314, 7 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Prepare 1-2 min. Shakespearean monologue. Make alternate appt. if unable to attend 243-6785. chris@ livingstonarts.org. Seeking Musicians for Theater Productions. Through March 13. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre is seeking musicians for upcoming productions. Learning / rehearsal fee and performance fee provided. Long-term work with many performances possible throughout the year (theatre operates year-round, and many shows are scheduled on open-ended runs). Also looking for subs for occasional dates 325-4370. dennis@ downstairscabaret.com. Shakespeare in the Park: “Comedy of Errors.” March 13-14 & 7 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Familiarize a 1-2 minute monologue. Additional audition appointments can be arranged Free. 243-6785. chris@ livingstonarts.org. livingstonarts.org. Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Through April 24. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ THU., MARCH 14 ] BVT Summer Season. March 14, 7 p.m. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St Children only Thursday, all ages Saturday bvtnaples.org. [ MON., MARCH 18 ] “9 to 5 the Musical.” March 1819, 7:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. Everyone’s Theatre


[ WED., MARCH 13 ] The Dady Brothers Celtic Music Worksho. March 13, 5 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Stage 14. followed by concert with Irish foods ($2 admission, free with FLCC ID) Free. 7851335. flcc.edu. [ THU., MARCH 14 ] Abundance Theory. March 14, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Paul and Deborah Rees PsychicMedium Workshops. March 14-20. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S Various times and fees. Visit web for info 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. [ FRI., MARCH 15 ] Fiddle Classes Info Session with Kit Fallon. March 15, 7 p.m. Geneva Community Center, 160 Carter Rd., Geneva Free, register. ckfallon@hotmail.com. Gluten-Free Vegetarian Cooking Class. March 15, 6-8 p.m. Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods, 349 W Commercial St $55, register. 267-7405. rosariopinos.com. [ SAT., MARCH 16 ] Borosilicate Glass: Couples Date Night. March 16, 7-11 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $150, register. 349-7110. rocafc.com March 16, 7-11 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $150, register. 349-7110. RocAFC.com. Having a Healthy Home Workshop. March 16, 2 p.m. Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. Free. beechwoodtransition.org. Healthy Eating For a Better Life. third Saturday of every month, 12:30 p.m Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard. Free. 428-8214. Make your own Rain Barrel Workshop. March 16, 1 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd $25 for materials, no cost to watch, register. 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter.

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THEATER | “IS LIFE WORTH LIVING?”

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Shakespeare posed the ultimate question of all theater — indeed, of all literature and life itself — when he had Hamlet ponder, “To be or not to be?” But Irish playwright Lennox Robinson came close with the decidedly less eloquent “Is Life Worth Living?,” the title of his classic 1933 play, which will be revived by the RCP Irish Players starting on Friday, March 15, at the MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.). But don’t worry: Robinson’s play isn’t exactly heavy lifting. This comic farce, directed by Jean Gordon Ryon, is set on a small seaside town in Ireland, where the locals decide to forego their annual circus celebration in favor of attempts at serious theater. But once these typically chipper Irishmen and women must contemplate the gloomy works of Strindberg, Tolstoy, and Chekhov, it’s enough to make them question, for the first time, whether life really does have a purpose.

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“Is Life Worth Living?” continues through March 30 with evening performances, and one matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 17. Tickets are $19 general admission, $14 for seniors over 65, and $9 for anyone under 25. For tickets, full performance schedule, and other events, visit muccc.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Pisanki (Polish Easter egg decorating). March 16, 1-4 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. For adults and ages 12+ $20, register. 340-8664. polishheritagerochester.org. Rochester Orienteering Club Workshop. March 16, 8:30 a.m.-noon. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave This “hands-on” workshop will build map reading skills and enhance navigation skills and strategies for this exciting out-of-doors activity. All fees are fully redeemable towards ROC membership on the day of the workshop $10, $15 per family. roc.us.orienteering.org. Soft Glass Sampler Class. March 16, 9 a.m.-noon. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $75, register. 349-7110. rocafc.com. [ MON., MARCH 18 ] Family Development Class: “Improving Parent-Child Relationships.” March 18, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Orchid Class. March 18, 6:30 p.m. Gallea’s Tropica Greenhouse and Florist, 2832 Clover St $25 supplies fee, $15 additional for orchids. 586-3017. galleas.com. Wondrous Winter Cooking: “Eggs for All Occasions.” March 18, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave $30, register. 4611000. mycce.org/monroe. [ TUE., MARCH 19 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural

Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Cake Scuplting for Easter with Jane Casey of Grand Finales. March 19, 6-8 p.m. Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods, 349 W Commercial St $45, register. 267-7405. rosariopinos.com. Family Development Class: “Will My Child Still Love Me?” March 19, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester. org. [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Borosilicate Glass Weekday Sampler. March 20, 1-4 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $75, register. 3497110. rocafc.com. DSLRs with Peter Blackwood. March 20, 6-9 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. $15, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary. org. Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” March 20, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children 5 to 12 years old Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org.

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[ TUE., MARCH 19 ] A Night of Cabaret: An Evening of Entertainment. March 19, 7 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way Bring sheet music and be prepared to sing 32 bars of a song of your choice. Accompanist provided 8892290. gatescommunitytheater. org.

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Company, Inc. Preparation: Appropriately dressed and prepared to dance, sing and read a short selection. Callbacks: Thurs. 3/21/13 at 7:30pm. 4543367. everyonestheatre.com/ index.php/Shows/9to5. Best Foot Forward Children’s Theater Auditions. March 1819, 4:30-7 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Young actors come prepared with a short song and monologue or poem 398-0220. bestfootforwardkids.com. “Twelfth Night.” March 18-19, 7 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave The production will be presented at the Highland Park Bowl July 5-20 748-9948. craddock@ frontiernet.net.

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Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com Film Previews on page 31

Off to see the wizard [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

course, attains the excellence of the great 1939 movie, “The Wizard of Oz.” “Oz the Great and Powerful” That picture, appearing in what may rank as the greatest single year in the greatest single decade (PG), DIRECTED BY SAM RAIMI of Hollywood film, overwhelms any sequel, NOW PLAYING remake, or imitation. Possibly to deal with the challenge of its predecessor, the producers of As the new movie “Oz the Great and “Oz the Great and Powerful,” decided to solve Powerful” demonstrates, L. Frank Baum’s the problem by making a prequel, an invented fantasies about the magical land of Oz remain back story showing the origins of the famous a source of enchantment for filmmakers wizard and his own adventures in that dream and audiences. Dramatic and cinematic country over the rainbow. adaptations of the stories date back to the Like the original, the movie begins in black early years of the 20th century and continue and white in some arid little spot in Kansas, through the present day, with such works as long before Dorothy’s dream, where a small“The Wiz,” “Oz,” and the current Broadway time magician named Oscar, nicknamed Oz hit, “Wicked.” None of those versions, of (James Franco), works in a shabby carnival, dazzling the locals with sleight of hand and cheap illusions. Something of a lowrent lothario who romances a number of comely young women, he must escape the pursuit of the enraged strong man, whose wife succumbed to his charms. Oz jumps James Franco and China Girl in “Oz the Great and Powerful.” PHOTO COURTESY

into the carny’s hot-air balloon, enters the vortex of a tornado, and of course crashes in Oz itself, a land of pastel colors occupied by an odd assortment of characters. From that moment Oz encounters a series of fantastic adventures, complete with weird creatures and supernatural effects. He rescues a flying monkey named Finley (Zach Braff, who also plays his assistant in the carnival) from a monster, and meets Theodora (Mila Kunis), a witch who believes he is the great wizard foretold as the savior of the land that bears his name. They journey to the Emerald City, where Theodora’s sister Evanora (Rachel Weisz), also a witch, harbors her own ambitions for the throne of Oz and plots against him. The magician meets yet a third witch, Glinda (Michelle Williams), who helps him in his attempts to protect the citizens (Oztralians perhaps?) from Evanora’s evil plans. Instead of such remarkable characters as the Tin Woodsman, the Scarecrow, and the Cowardly Lion, Oz must depend on the comical Finley and a doll named China Girl (Joey King), and all too briefly, the Munchkins. One of the movie’s major problems involves its adherence to the conventions of contemporary blockbusters rather than the sense of wonder in the Baum fantasy and the film it inspired. Instead of attempting something resembling the charm of the original performers, the delightful songs and

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Trying to break free [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Dead Man Down” (R), DIRECTED BY NIELS ARDEN OPLEV NOW PLAYING

dances, the director, Sam Raimi, substitutes the special effects (in 3D) of any expensive, overproduced spectacular currently shaking the walls of any megaplex. The Munchkins don’t sing, nobody dances on the Yellow Brick Road, no horses change color, and even the Emerald City doesn’t really look green enough. In keeping with current fashion, the picture includes a climactic battle much like any of the tiresome titanic struggles of the X-Men or Spider-Man, in which Oz employs his carny magician’s tricks to fight against the magic of the evil witches. Although it very nicely foreshadows the wizard’s methods in the original film and cleverly employs the technology that he knows from his own time and place, it also serves as the usual vehicle for the same old pyrotechnics and stunts that so many contemporary viewers mistake for filmmaking. James Franco’s one-note performance grows as dull as the whole movie, while the other principals match him with offensively excessive overacting. For all its special effects, its explosiveness, and of course the necessary computer-generated imagery, “Oz the Great and Powerful” lacks the wit, the liveliness, and the imagination of the original. The whole enterprise demonstrates the brilliance of those films of what now seems the ancient past of American cinema at is best, and will surely make anyone long for a sadly lost world, and the presence of Judy Garland, Bert Lahr, Ray Bolger, and even Toto.

In “Dead Man Down,” the new thriller that marks the American feature debut of Danish director Niels Arden Oplev (he directed the original “Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”), the filmmaker reteams with his former leading lady, Noomi Rapace, who plays another damaged young woman with a yen for revenge. The film, an odd mishmash of love story and violent action flick, is as inauspicious a debut as you can imagine. It seems likely that Oplev was handed this film only because it’s in a similar vein to “Dragon Tattoo.” It’s another dark, gritty crime thriller all about the healing power of vengeance. But the director is able to inject enough stylistic flourishes to keep things sporadically interesting, even as the plot becomes increasingly nonsensical. Colin Farrell stars as the strong and silent Victor, a low-level thug under the employ of New York City crime boss Alphonse (Terrence Howard). For some time now, Alphonse’s men have

Colin Farrell and Noomi Rapace in “Dead Man Down.” PHOTO COURTESY IM GLOBAL

been getting picked off one by one, and he’s been receiving threatening letters making it clear that he’s the ultimate target. Increasingly desperate to save his own skin, Alphonse tasks his remaining men with rooting out the identity of whoever is gunning for him. Simultaneously, Victor makes the acquaintance of Beatrice (Rapace), the shy woman with a scarred face who lives in the apartment in the building across from his, and with whom he’s been sharing flirtatious glances. Once they get to know each other, Beatrice drops a bombshell: it seems that she witnessed Victor murder a man in his apartment and took video of the crime as it took place. Using this video, she hopes to blackmail Victor into performing a murder on her behalf. She wants revenge on the drunk driver who caused her accident and ruined her life. That leads to my biggest problem with this movie (setting aside the fact that it’s, in the end, a very silly film that asks its audience to take it completely seriously): the make-up that’s supposed to indicate Beatrice’s horrifying disfigurement. Someone involved with the production was clearly afraid to make their lead actress look at all ugly, which is clearly called for in the part. The half dozen or so red lines that mark the left side of her face just don’t cut it. To be fair, she says that her current state is the result of extensive facial reconstruction surgery, but still, her doctors did a damn fine job: she’s beautiful. In fact, she looks exactly like Noomi Rapace. Normally, I’d let this slide. I understand that this is Hollywood, after all. What passes for “disfigured” in the movies is considered supermodelgorgeous in the real world. But here the psychological effect Beatrice’s injuries have had on her is of crucial

importance to her motivation. Without the visual representation, she just comes across as a psychopath. The decision to keep Rapace pretty throws her entire storyline off kilter, and also adds some unintentional humor to scenes where the neighborhood children harass her, call her “monster” when she’s out walking, and graffiti her door. It’s difficult to sympathize with her thirst for revenge when the scars that supposedly cause her such torment appear as though they could be covered up with just a tiny bit a foundation. The script even bothers to make her character a beautician, for goodness sake. Despite this major flaw, it’s the relationship between Victor and Beatrice that works the best out of anything in “Dead Man Down”. The two wounded souls who find themselves falling for one another despite the less-than-ideal circumstances under which they meet isn’t exactly a novel idea, but the always reliable Farrell and Rapace completely sell it. Rapace has a magnetic screen presence and Farrell admirably chooses to underplay his part. A film that focused on these two characters would have been much more interesting, but the script, by J.H. Wyman, is more interested in following the convoluted revenge plot between Victor and Alphonse, which goes bananas, complete with cryptic notes and jigsaw-puzzle clues. As over-the-top and ridiculous as this plot gets, the film is dead set on maintaining its dour, grim tone. The film looks great, however; director of photography Paul Cameron’s cinematography is always lovely to look at, and the occasional nifty camera move adds some spice to the proceedings. Somewhere inside the film is a more interesting movie trying to break free, but sadly it never quite happens.

EAST OF EDEN

Friday, Mar. 15, 8 p.m. John Steinbeck’s classic novel comes to life in this vivid adaptation by influential filmmaker Elia Kazan. An incredible achievement of cinematic style, powerful acting, and gripping storytelling, the film was shot with sweeping widescreen photography on the California coast and introduced American audiences to heartthrob James Dean. (Elia Kazan, US 1955, 115 min.)

THE SOUND OF MUSIC Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week.

Saturday, Mar. 16, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Mar. 17, 2 p.m. With sweeping helicopter shots of the Austrian countryside, songs by Rodgers and Hammerstein, and Julie Andrews’ soaring voice, this widescreen classic remains one of the defining works in American film. It’s the story of a novice turned nanny who wins the hearts of her charges—and their father—while outrunning the burgeoning Nazi threat. (Robert Wise, US 1965, 174 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—Stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


continues from page 11

Local musician Jesse Sprinkle has already made several humanitarian trips to Africa, but this spring will be his first time going as part of his Paradise, Uganda music project. PHOTOS PROVIDED

with you and try to, not only encourage your music, but hopefully encourage your life overall,’ that’s something.” “We’re working musicians and want to show them this is a way you can approach your life,” says Johnson. The curious part in the meeting of these two cultures is who exactly is bringing what to the table. Poverty dictates a lot of technology and its availability, but that’s countered by Sprinkle and Johnson’s reverence and reference to tradition. “Ironically,” Sprinkle says, “a lot of their music is processed because of budgetary issues. If you go into a studio there, they just throw up a computer beat and you sing over it. You think of African music as organic. So we want to bring that into it as much as we can.” So in some instances, Sprinkle and Johnson are actually the traditionalists in the equation. “We’re very interested in their music and they’re very interested in American music,” says Johnson. “I think we’re going to probably meet in the middle. If it transforms and evolves a little bit, I’m happy. We’re doing an album together not so much mimicking their music. It’s our take on their music blended with their take on their music.” The two Rochester musicians are currently in cyber pre-production, e-mailing riffs, arrangements, and concepts back and forth to the musicians they’re working with in Uganda — members of the community who are in charge of the children, or have their respect — along with the children, who are collectively known as The Kampala Street Singers. “We want to have as much done as possible before we get there,” Sprinkle says. “But there will be a spontaneous factor. We’ve got people in Uganda listening to 30 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

the concepts we’ve come up with to see if they want to write with that or send us their own concepts. Also there are about 100 kids in the community. We have to pare it down to those who can and will do the work. It could narrow down to, like, 10 kids. Three of the kids have died since I started this. Some get arrested, some get the chance to go to school.” Part of the pre-production is the task of raising cash to cover expenses. Through the fundraising website Indiegogo.com, Paradise, Uganda initially raised about $14,000 of its $20,000 budget. “That’s everything from travel and recording through printing and distributing,” says Johnson, who also points out Paradise, Uganda has no outside help from big organizations. “A lot of people just assume we’re going through an organization,” says Johnson. “Or we’re going to meet up with an organization, but we’re literally just going and meeting up with kids on the street. We’re not typically fundraisers. We’re musicians.” “The business details can really suck,” Sprinkle says. “I’ve been to Africa six times and this is the most involved trip. Usually it’s raise some funds, go out there, enjoy it. This time it’s all this stuff.” This trip is designed to yield an album, due to drop sometime in June, with its proceeds going back into wherever it is most needed in the Kampala community at that time. “While we’re over there we will be researching specific needs,” Sprinkle says. “And what’s most urgent at the moment.” The plan is to return and do a concert, getting the kids to perform. “And who knows what that will lead to,” Sprinkle says.


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BARBARA (Not Rated): Director Chrisitan Petzold’s Cold War thriller about a young doctor trying to leave East Germany who is transferred to a rural hospital in retaliation, while her West German lover plots her escape. Pittsford THE CALL (R): Halle Berry plays a 911 operator who must use her wits to help an abducted girl escape the clutches of a violent serial killer from her past. Also starring Abigail Breslin. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA & PAGLIACCI: World famous tenor José Cura stars in “Pagliacci” in this opera double bill production from La Scala, Milan. Little (Sun, Mar 17, noon & Tue, Mar 19, 6:30 p.m.) EAST OF EDEN (1955): James Dean stars in Elia Kazan’s adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novel about two brothers competing for the love of their deeply religious father. Dryden (Fri, Mar 15, 8 p.m.) IL POSTO (1961): A young man forgoes his education to look for work in the big city, and experience the dehumanizing world of bureaucratic life, in this Italian Neorealist film that’s part satire, part coming-of-age tale. Dryden (Thu, Mar 19, 8 p.m.) THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE (PG-13): Steve Carell and Steve Buscemi play past-their-peak magicians looking to revitalize their careers. Also starring Jim Carrey, Olivia Wilde, Alan Arkin, and James Gandolfini. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE LAST TIME I SAW MACAO (2012): A unique hybrid of noir detective story, sci-fi film, and documentary, this is the latest from Portuguese directors João Pedro Rodrigues and João Rui Guerra da Mata. Dryden (Wed, Mar 13, 8 p.m.) LORE (NR): A young girl must lead her siblings across war torn Germany after their Nazi parents are arrested by Allied Forces in this war thriller from acclaimed director Cate Shortland. Little MISERY (1990): Dirty bird Rob Reiner adapts the Stephen King novel about a famous novelist who is rescued (sort of) by his No. 1 fan after a car crash. Starring an Oscarwinning Kathy Bates, James Caan, Richard Farnsworth, and Lauren Bacall. Dryden (Thu, Mar 14, 8 p.m.) THE SOUND OF MUSIC (1965): Singing nuns, Nazism, whiskers on kittens, and brown paper packages tied up with string. You know the drill. Dryden (Sat Mar 16, 8 p.m.) SPEAK (NR): The widespread fear of public speaking is examined in this documentary

set against the backdrop of the World Championship of Public Speaking competition. Little (Wed, Mar 13, 6:30 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 21 & OVER (R): Straight-arrow college student Jeff Chang decides to cut loose for the first time when his best friends plan a debaucherous night of celebrating in honor of his 21st birthday, putting his academic future in jeopardy. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Pittsford DEAD MAN DOWN (R): The American debut of Niels Arden Oplev, director of the original “Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” films, stars Colin Farrell and Noomi Rapace as two strangers who team up to exact some violent revenge. Also starring Terrence Howard and Dominic Cooper. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Cinema EMPEROR (PG-13): In this historical drama, Tommy Lee Jones plays General Douglas MacArthur during his postWorld War II investigation into the activities of emperor of Japan. Little, Pittsford ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH (PG): Interplanetary space adventure abounds in this kidfriendly animated feature about a geeky blue-skinned alien who must travel to Earth to rescue his more heroic brother. Featuring the voice talents of Brendan Fraser, Jessica Alba, Rob Corddry, William Shatner, and Sarah Jessica Parker. Canandaigua, Tinseltown A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD (R): John McLane is back in the fifth installment of the “Die Hard” franchise, this time teaming up with his CIA agent son to take down a group of Russian terrorists. Starring Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch, and Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Tinseltown IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mildmannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown

JACK THE GIANT SLAYER (PG13): Bryan Singer directs this epic, action-adventure retelling of “Jack and the Beanstalk” starring Nicholas Hoult, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Ian McShane, and Bill Nighy. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE LAST EXORCISM PART II (PG-13): Immediately following the events of the first film, the sequel follows poor Nell Sweetzer (Ashley Bell) tries to start a new life for herself, only to find that the evil force that possessed her isn’t quite finished yet. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Tinseltown LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Little, Pittsford LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Part of a double feature with the John Wayne classic “The Quiet Man.” Cinema OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG): Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a cast stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Little, Pittsford SAFE HAVEN (PG-13): Attractive widower falls for equally attractive young woman on the run from her past. Adapted from a novel by Nicholas Sparks, so you pretty much know what to expect. Starring Josh Duhamel, Julianne Hough, and Cobie Smulders. Canandaigua, Greece Ridge SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown SNITCH (PG-13): Dwayne Johnson infiltrates a drug ring as an undercover informant in order to clear the name of his wrongly convicted son. Also starring Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper. Culver Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown

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Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com.

Apartments for Rent

NORTH WINTON AREA Upper two bedroom, washer, dryer, off-street parking. Deck, fenced yard, no pets. $750+ 585-586-0999

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps.

LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet surrounding. Utilities, Cable, off-street-parking included. On bus line, near bus stop. West Rochester. Call 585-328-2771. House has security.

Real Estate Auctions AUCTION CHEMUNG COUNTY REAL PROPERTY

TAX FORECLOSURES- 150+ Properties March 27 @11AM. Holiday Inn, Elmira, NY. 800243-0061 HAR, Inc. & AAR, Inc. Free brochure: www. NYSAUCTIONS.com

Land for Sale AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acres-only $99/month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) LENDER SAYS SELL NOW!! 8 acres- $19,900.30 acres$49,900. Woods, fields, views, stream! Just off New York Thruway! Terms available. Call (888)905-8847. newyorklandandlakes.com

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Retirement Property SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 772581-0080, www.beach-cove. com. Limited seasonal rentals

CHECK OUT

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Adoption

Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

ADOPT - Happily married couple wishes to adopt! We promise unconditional love, learning, laughter, wonderful neighborhood, extended family. Expenses paid. (Se habla español.) www. DonaldAndEsther.com. 1-800965-5617

FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

ADOPT - Our adopted son dreams of being a big brother! Loving family seeking baby; promises lifetime of happiness, security. Expenses paid. Angie/ Mike: www. angieandmikeadopt.com or call: 855-524-2542 ADOPT: Abundance of love awaits your precious newborn. Happily married couple promises to love and protect your baby. Expenses paid. Donna & Paul 1-877-ADOPT-41 www. DonnaandPauladopt.info ADOPT: Casting for ‘film’ of our lives! Needed: baby to complete family.  Loving, married, educated couple, wishing to adopt the star.  Natalie/David 1-877-FOR BABY. www.davidandnatalie.info PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant

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32 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

I AM LOOKING FOR NEW CLIENTS. After more than 25 years I still enjoy doing taxes and helping my clients pay the minimum possible. Unlike H&R and other tax services I work year round and I answer my own phone. Call me LEW JONES, JONES TAX SERVICE 585-381-5820 x27 1250 PITTSFORD-VICTOR PITTSFORD RD. Pittsford, NY 14534

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $25 585-880-2903 BRONZE COLOR vintage metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $35 585-8802903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827. GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $15.00 585-880-2903

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PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 RIVAL-SEAL-A-MEAL used food processor for $35 cash. Vacuum bags meals in freezer/cooking bags. Stretch your budget! Attractive white appliance, with built-in compressor. Ph: 585413-0827 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585225-5526 WALKER OPR HANDICAPPED use. Next to New condition. Red. $50 585-383-0405

Garage and Yard Sales GARAGE SALE, PITTSFORD Fri, Sat & Sun March 15th, 16th & 17th 10-4pm HUGE Multi-Family SALE! Furniture, tools, garden, collectibles & MUCH MORE! 2832 Clover St, Pittsford No early birds please. Huge selection, housewares, clothing, furniture, toys,etc. Friday & Saturday March 15rd & 16th 10am- 5pm Church of the Epiphany 3285 Buffalo Rd Gates.

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. (proudly, progressively, conservative flavor]. Why great divider Obama the Marxist reelected? Answer: “Liberalism is a mental disorder!” Elections have consequences- prices for gas/food/ commodities rising significantly beginning 2013. PREPARE!!! Obama Sucks. 585-747-2699

Jam Section BLUES/ROCK BAND Needs bass player. Experienced musicians, we have all the pieces but you! Call Mike 424-4122 or 738-1151. CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585458-9722


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Lost and Found

volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

LOST CAT! Orange, Fluffy Female, 8 lbs., 10 years old. Please Call 585-747-5074 or 585-748-7146 PLEASE! We Miss Her

Music Services

Notices NEW YORK NEEDS TO KNOW about NOEP! MCLAC’s Nutrition Outreach & Education

continues on page 34

Jim Speedy

Rochester’s Own Glass House

ReMax Plus 585.746.9875

Park Ave 23 Somerton St

839 Genesee Park Boulevard

Only $10 per sq. ft.!

Modern Commercial building for lease 3000+ sq ft 8 car parking, May divide

It’s all about the windows at this charming little home in the 19th Ward. Having recently been exposed to the wonderful documentary by Aziz Benmansour, Maison de Verre (French for House of Glass), on YouTube, I couldn’t help thinking about that innovative structure in Paris while walking around this “Glass House” with the current owner. He told me that the original owner had worked for a leaded glass company in Rochester during the 1920s when the house was built and that every window in the house has leaded glass—including the garage—and that no two windows are alike.

PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800-467-0295 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

RochesterSells.com

27 W Boulevard Pkwy, Charlotte:

WONDERFUL HOME WITH ALL THE BEAUTY & CHARM! GREAT BIG BEDROOMS! GREAT KITCHEN WITH APPLIANCES INCLUDED, GREAT CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION! MANY MAJOR UPGRADES. $99,900.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

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HomeWork

And there are plenty of them, which give this intimate house quite an open feeling. It seems like it was the perfect home for that gentleman bachelor who had it built and the single schoolmarm who became the next resident. There are leaded glass French doors that lead out to a three-season porch with more beautiful windows. The main entrance even has a winter enclosure with leaded glass removable windows and doors. The kitchen was recently remodeled to bring back the original marble floor and has new appliances, additional cabinets and tile granite countertops. Not to worry, the original cabinets with leaded glass are still intact. The original ambience of the home is still present with brass hardware, solid oak floors, and push button light toggles throughout. Although there is a new furnace, even the nickel plated central heating vents survive.

The second floor has two nice sized bedrooms with a walk-in closet in the master and a remodeled bathroom. Needless to say, more original windows abound at the top of the stairway and in the bathroom to keep the space bright and airy. Storage space is plentiful with a full attic and basement. The home sits on Genesee Park Boulevard, which is a beautiful tree lined street, and has very easy access to the restaurants, shops and service businesses along Brooks Avenue and Thurston Road. The wonderful assortment of new businesses and old is a testament to the community pride in the neighborhood. The 19th Ward Community Association is very active, so community involvement and opportunities to connect with neighborhood leaders hold great promise for anyone who moves here. This 1,166 square foot, unique and well cared for little gem has a two-car detached garage and a backyard. It is chock-full of surprising details and is listed at $79,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R196356 or contact Mary Rittersbach of Nothnagle Realtors at 585.329.7393. by Larry Francer Larry is the Associate Director of Preservation at The Landmark Society. As a new resident, he is currently house hunting and uses rochestercityliving.com as his primary reference tool.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Home and Garden Professionals

DRYWALL

SPECIALIST

> page 33 Program assists individuals, couples and families in Monroe County to apply for SNAP (food stamps). Monroe County residents should call MCLAC at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 2955626 to find out more. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS, and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

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34 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

BUYING/SELLING: Gold, gold coins, sterling silver, silver coins, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek), paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-

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Employment

Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

Volunteers

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DELIVERY - DRIVERS/ Independent Contractors. Need reliable vehicles for same day delivery, call 1-800-818-7958 DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com FOREMAN to lead utility field crews. Outdoor physical work, many positions, paid training, $17/hr. plus weekly performance bonuses after promotion, living allowance when traveling, company truck and benefits. Must have strong leadership skills, good driving history, and be able to travel in New York and NE States. Email resume to Recruiter 4@ osmose.com or apply online at www.OsmoseUtilities.com EOE M/F/D/V HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 2876377 or email jpowers@lifespanroch.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org

like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a

small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities RIVERSIDE HOTEL AND BOWLING CENTER For SaleLocated in the Olympic Region of the Adirondacks, 8- Lane Brunswick center, cosmic bowling and sound system, Qubica auto scoring & AMF SPC synthetic lanes installed 6 years ago, established leagues with 37 year annual tournament, turn key operation with many improvements - $300,000– www. riversidebowlinglanes.com – (800) 982-3747

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com TRACTOR TRAILER TRAINING TRACTOR TRAILER TRAINING - Financial aid, Pell Grants, POST-911 GI Bill and housing, if qualified! National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool, NY 1-800-243-9300 www.ntts.edu Consumer Information: www. ntts.edu/programs/disclosures

START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would

ANIMAL SCIENCE TEACHER (Anticipated Position)

Anticipated fulltime position beginning 2013-14 school year. Cattargus-Allegany BOCES

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-7772091 (AAN CAN) MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST NEEDED For a doctor’s office in Brighton. Person must be goal oriented, professional, with good interpersonal skills. Two years experience preferred. Competitive salary with benefits including paid time off, 401K and FLEX. Background check, references required. For further details email resume and contact info to: this_project@rocketmail.com (no attachments) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start

PRN TO PART TIME ULTRASOUND TECH A Progressive mobile imaging company is looking for a Registered Ultrasound Tech for PRN to Part Time work. Hours are flexible. The majority of work is paid on call and per study. Candidates should be ARDMS registered with experience in Abdomen and Vascular highly preferred. If you are interested please forward your resume to:

Teresa Moore 200 Buell Rd. Rochester, NY 14624 Fax (585) 436-5340 • Email: tmoore@rochestermobilexray.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


Legal Ads [ ARVINE-ELMWOOD LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 1/30/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ HAN’S BEAUTY SUPPLY, LLC ] A Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company Han’s Beauty Supply, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on January 10, 2013. As specified in the Certificate of Change filed with the Secretary of State on February 1, 2013, its office is located at 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620, Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process will be mailed to 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ACCOUNTABLE HEALTH PARTNERS, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Accountable Health Partners, LLC was filed with SSNY on January 31, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: Attn: Robert McCann, M.D., FACP, c/o Highland Hospital, 1000 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE SALON STYLETTO LLC ] Notice of Organization: Salon Styletto, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 1, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 43 Timberwood Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ACTION HERO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on

1/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 106 Arvine Hts., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ARCONTRACTORS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 74 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Davidandjill.net LLC Arts. of Org filed NYSS 1/22/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SS is designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SS shall mail a copy of process to 20 Buckingham St., #5, Rochester, NY 14607 which is also the principal business location. General purpose. [ NOTICE ] EQUITABLE ASSET MANAGEMENT (BLOCK 1-2013), LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] HONALEE CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 2/7/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 56 North Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JC JONES PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/25/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. [ NOTICE ] MARY CORCORAN PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC

36 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

(LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Corporation Service Company is its registered agent located at 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207 upon whom process against the LLC may be served. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Welcome Home Cinema LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 1/30/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Dunleavy Irish Dance, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/12/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 101 Lincoln Pkwy, Suite D, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Hare House Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 2/21/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 301 Willowbrooke Dr, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Obsidian Group, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 11/14/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 15 Alger Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Roc Alternative, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 89 S Union St, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. Of Form. Of Scrapbook Creations Retreats, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 01/23/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, P.O. Box 1171, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of A Healthy Bite, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y State (SSNY) on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 110 Culver Pkwy, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of South Ave Wine & Liquor, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 313 Pearson Lane, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by BP DOC, INC dba Captain’s Attic,37 Charlotte St., Rochester NY 14607, County of Monroe, for a Restaurant - Club. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ICSH PROPERTIES, LLC.. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 20 Hinsdale St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 109 STRONG STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 30, Penfield NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 624 PITTSFORD VICTOR ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ABBOTT TRENTO ONLINE MEDIA LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 46 Rahway Lane, Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of American Homestead Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aquarian Partners, L.P. Certificate filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LP, 825 Allens Creek, Rochester, NY 14618. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2063. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BURKWIT LAW FIRM, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: Charles F. Burkwit, 16 E. Main St., Ste. 450, Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CandyBearLand, LLC.

Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 3340 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CARRETTA LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 145G Gibbs St., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DAVID PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DeCiantis Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of F. Zhang, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/5/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greystone Vending LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 1133 Webster Rd. Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the principal office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jeremiahs Penfield LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: BLACKCOMB PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 10 Cambric Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mason-Bauman Agency LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MUNSON AND SULLY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: Adam C. Smith, 8 Reginald Circle, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of OPEN BOOKINGS LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY

(SSNY) on 12/13/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 78 Rossmore St. Rochester, NY 14606 Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROYCO SO NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 02/04/13, the name of LLC is: ROYCO NY, LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Spectrum Creative Arts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1/23/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 46 Durand Drive, Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stream D, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) on 01/18/13. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 31 Bracknell Circle, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpos:e Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Strong Will Development, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 280 Marne St., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE GENESEE EWE-ERY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 Beckerman Pl., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Joanne Albano-Vaugh at the princ. office of the


Legal Ads LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Fish, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADVISORS CAPITAL PLANNING LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 03/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to NJ addr. of the LLC: 777 Terrace Ave., Ste. 608, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604. Arts. of Org. filed with NJ Dept. of Treasury, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 02/13/13, office location is Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ATIS Elevator Inspections, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MO on 11/21/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MO and principal business address: 8531 Page Ave., Ste. 140, St. Louis, MO 63114. Cert. of Org. filed with MO Sec. of State, 600 W. Main St., Jefferson City, MO 65101. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Force-520 Metro LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/20/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Michael B. Kaplan, 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal address. Address to be maintained in DE: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 South DuPont Hwy, Dover, DE

19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Forward Development, LLC. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in North Carolina (NC) on 12/29/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the NC address of LLC: 128 S. Tryon St., Ste. 900, Charlotte, NC 28202. Arts. of Org. filed NC Secy. of State, 2 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of M&N Group Holdings, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/30/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PIPELINE EQUIPMENT RESOURCES COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 07/02/12. Princ. office of LLC: 3900 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NJ addr. of LLC: 9 Mars Ct., Unit C-4A, Boonton, NJ 07005. Arts. of Org. filed with State Treasurer, Dept. of Treasury, Div. of Revenue and Enterprise Services, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of qualification of RIVERSIDE INVESTING, LLC. Authority filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/13. Office in MONROE County. Formed in UT on 11/07/12. SSNY has been designated as agent of the

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 157 Moul Road Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Real Estate [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rosswood Villa Apartments, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in California (CA) on 1/22/1999. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260. Address to be maintained in CA: 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal office. Arts of Org. filed with the CA Secretary of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Six Month Smiles, LLC. Fictitious name: Six Month Smiles, LLC (Delaware). Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Principal office: 35 Main St., Scottsville, NY 14546. Address to be maintained in DE: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Sweden SPE LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Paracorp Incorporated, 2804 Gateway Oaks Dr., Ste. 200, Sacramento, CA 92533. Address to be maintained in DE: 2140 S. Dupont Hwy, Camden, DE 19934. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE MidFirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Ronnie J. Davis; Laura Davis, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 12/17/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the County Office Bldg, at 39 W. Main St., Rochester, in the County of Monroe, State of New York on 03/26/2013 at 10:30AM, premises known as 132 West Filbert Street, East Rochester, NY 14445 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town/Village of East Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 152.21, BLOCK: 2, LOT: 6. Approximate amount of judgment $35,009.28 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 8066/2011. Paul A. Guerrieri, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: January 28, 2013 1017169 2/20, 2/27, 3/6, 03/13/2013 [ NOTICE ] PATRIOT LAWN AND LANDSCAPE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 38 Summertime Trl., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] PAULA J. MARTIN CPA, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/8/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1344 University Ave., Ste. 235, Rochester , NY 14607. Purpose: To Practice the profession of Public Accountancy. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY DOME LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY LAND LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of

Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] TROUTSNOBS GUIDE SERVICE AND OUTFITTERS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 3/4/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 57 Meadow Cove Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] WEBSTER PARTNERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stephen Webster, 1595 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WINDLASS PROPERTIES & HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leah M. Buttery, 8344 Ridge Rd W., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: BRU-BAG, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O BRU-BAG, LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Daniele SPC, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Modern Sales, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 4 Niagara Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advanced Custodial Equipment and Supply, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York 14610. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Earlando Thomas, Physician, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on February 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580 The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PRIVATE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is TGS KITCHENS, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed 2-22-2013 with the New York State Secretary of State, (SSNY) who is designated as Agent for Service of Process against the LLC. The SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 4391 Lake Avenue, Rochester, N.Y. 14612. Purpose - any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WESTMINSTER ST ROCHESTER-SODUS LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company

is Westminster St Rochester-Sodus Lake Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 12/23/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 1 Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, New York 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, , Esq.. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-192 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christine J. Butkowsky; Jean Butkowsky; Andrew Butkowsky Defendants. February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 662 Moul Road, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 015.02-3-48.4, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8970 of Deeds, page 301; 1.79 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $137,460.41 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Adrian J. Burke, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-5976 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE

ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs, Katherine I. Maggi, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 1:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 7 Rodenbeck Place, Rochester, NY 14620, Tax Account No. 121.742-37.001, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8372 of Deeds, page 424; lot size 70 x 80.62. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $85,352.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Gilbert Perez, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-5977 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs Gerard R. Pinkerton; Nancy A. Pinkerton Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated March 1, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 10, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 4450 Sweden Walker

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


Legal Ads > page 37 Road, Brockport, NY; Tax Account No. 085.011-2 described in Deed recorded in Liber 7369 of Deeds, page 180. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $136,484.37 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: March 2013 Laurie A. Giordano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs

Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 9, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.532-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set

forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 26, 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-11232 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook, Melinda Ellis, individually and as Co-Executor of the Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook; Lisa Brunette, Individually and as CoExecutor of the Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook; Stephen Ellis; Thomas Ellis; Jerome John Pembrook, Deceased; and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Jerome John Pembrook, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs,

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38 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; Strong Memorial Hospital; Videos Plus; Account Management Services LLC; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, New York State Tax Commissioner; Fairlane Credit LLC; Workers Compensation Board of the State of New York; Georgia McCabe and Scott Brownstein; RAB Performance Recoveries, LLC; People of the State of New York; United States of America; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Location of property to be foreclosed: 153 Kings Lane, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, NY TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: October 9, 2012 MATTHEW

RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION: The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date the 26th day of November 1999, executed by Jerome John Pembrook to ESL Federal Credit Union to secure the sum of $30,000.00, and recorded in Liber 14740 of Mortgages at page 363 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on the 21st day of December 1999, and a further mortgage bearing date the 13th day of March 2000, executed by Jerome John Pembrook to ESL Federal Credit Union to secure the sum of $39,700.00, and recorded in Liber 14839 of Mortgages at page 582 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on the 3rd day of April 2000, which mortgages were consolidated by the Consolidation, Modification and Extension Agreement dated the 13th day of March 2000 and recorded April 3, 2000 in Liber 14839 of Mortgages at page 593 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on April 3, 2000 forming a single lien in the amount of $69,700.00. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, The plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named Defendants: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. J. Scott Odorisi, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated February 8, 2013 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot 19 Kings Lane, as shown on a map of Kings Lane Subdivision filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s office in Liber 136 of Maps, Page 73. Tax Account No. 076.16-2-74 Property Address: 153 Kings Lane, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, New York [ SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION ] Index No. 2012-5294 Filing Date: May 14, 2012 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE RBS Citizens, N.A. f/k/a Citizens Bank, N.A. Plaintiff vs. Robert Werner Citizens Bank, N.A. Fleet Real Estate

Funding Corp. and “John Doe”, said name being fictitious and intended to include any and all parties having an interest in the mortgaged premises and not otherwise identified above, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq.HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of Honorable Justice Richard A. Dollinger, J.S.C. (Acting), dated February 5, 2013, and filed with the Complaint in the office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. The nature of this action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date June 25, 2007, executed by Robert Werner to Citizens Bank, N.A., to secure the sum of NINETYTHREE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND NO CENTS ($93,000.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 21328, at Page 0001, in the County of Monroe, on July 23, 2007. The premises hereinbefore referred to are described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, and being a part of Lot 4, Section 2, Township 4 of the triangular tract (so-called) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the northerly boundary of Ridge Road, also known as Route 104 and being 99 feet wide, at a distance of 100 feet westerly, measured along the said boundary, from

its intersection with the division line between Lot 10 on the East and Lot 4 on the west, said division line being also the easterly line of a parcel of land described in a deed to Carl H. and Bessie A. Nellis recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2142 of Deeds, page 537; running thence northerly parallel to the division line between said Lot 10 on the east and said Lot 4 on the west a distance of 200 feet to a point; running thence westerly parallel to the northerly boundary of the Ridge Road, a distance of 100 feet to a point; running thence southerly parallel to the first described boundary a distance of 200 feet to the northerly boundary of Ridge Road; running thence easterly along the northerly boundary of Ridge Road a distance of 100 feet to the point or place of beginning; containing 0.46 acres be the same more or less. Subject to all covenants, conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements and rights of way of record. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq. HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: That it appears from the public records that Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., holds a lien which is adverse to Plaintiff’s interest and which remains open of public record as follows: a mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989; That upon information and belief, the lien of the Fleet Mortgage has been paid in full, and is therefore, subordinate to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, and should be discharged of record. That the lien of the Fleet Mortgage should be declared invalid and extinguished pursuant to Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law Article 15. That Plaintiff requests that the Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale

state the following: ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the lien which appears to be prior and adverse to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, namely the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is hereby declared invalid and extinguished pursuant to RPAPL Article 15; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., and all persons or entities claiming by, through or under them, be and are hereby forever barred and foreclosed of and from all right, claim, lien, interest or equity of redemption in and to said Mortgage Premises; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the record be reformed to reflect that the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is invalid and extinguished, and upon granting and entering of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale, a certified copy of same be presented to the Monroe County Clerk so the clerk may mark the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, discharged of record. In the case of default, judgment shall be taken against you and ordering the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, invalid and extinguished and discharged of record.


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD A Verizon risk team, looking for data breaches on a client’s computers, discovered that one company software developer was basically idle for many months, yet remained productive -- because he had outsourced his projects to a Chinese software developer who would do all the work and send it back. The employee earned several hundred thousand dollars a year, according to a January Los Angeles Times report, but paid the Chinese worker only about $50,000. The risk team eventually learned that sensitive company information was flowing to and from Chinese terminals, leading the company to suspect hackers, but that traffic was merely the U.S. employee (obviously, “ex-employee” now) sending and receiving his workload. The U.S. man showed up for work every day, but spent his time leisurely web-surfing.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit

— One of Britain’s most famous “madams” announced in January that she was coming out of retirement to set up a brothel exclusively catering to disabled people and the terminally ill. An ordinary brothel would be illegal in the town of Milton Keynes (45 miles from London), but Becky Adams insists that the government could not shut hers down without illegally discriminating against the disabled. — Advances in the Service Sector: (1) In January, the Japanese marketing firm Wit Inc. began hiring “popular” young women (judged by the extent of their “social network” contacts), at the equivalent of $121 a day, to walk around with advertising stickers on their thighs. (The stickers would be placed on the erotic “zettai ryouiki” -- the Japanese mystical area between the

hem of a short skirt and the top of long socks.) The women must be prepared to endure men hovering closely to read the ads. (2) According to news reports in November, New York City physician Jack Berdy was doing a brisk business administering Botox injections (at up to $800) to poker players who were hoping to prevent facial expressions that might tip their hands. — Ingenious: (1) London’s The Independent reported in January that Dean Kamen (who famously invented the Segway, a standing, battery-powered scooter) had developed, along with a Pennsylvania medical team, what appears to work as a “reverse feeding tube” that will vacuum out up to 30 percent of any food in the stomach before it is digested and converted into calories. After installation of the stomach “port,” the diner could operate the device without daily medical help. (2) The Polish cosmetics company Inglot announced in January a nail polish ideal for Muslim women, in that it can withstand the five-timesdaily hand-washing required for prayers. (Normally, devout women wear nail polish only during their menstrual periods, when the hand-washing is not required, but polish thus signals menstruation and therefore embarrasses modest women.)

Job Prospects Dim

Willie Merriweather, 53, was detained in February by police in Aiken, S.C., after an employment agency reported that, when he was sitting for an interview, he exposed himself (allegedly telling the interviewer that “it fell out,” that he “must have forgotten” to zip his pants). Police said Merriweather had been accused of a similar incident at a different employment agency a few days earlier.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 34 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll have trouble making up your mind when it comes to love and romance. The slightest thing you dislike about someone you meet will cause you to leave whomever you are with in your dust. The most important factor in a relationship right now is equality. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll be intent on finding someone reliable when it comes to love. Taking the slow route to romance and discovering how much you have in common with someone will be first and foremost. Forming a close friendship will likely lead

to a long relationship. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What you see and what you get will not be close to what you want in a one-on-one relationship. Fibs and deception will lead to disillusionment and heartache. Avoid anyone who brags and promises you the impossible. Be realistic and say no to intimate pressure. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll attract the cream of the crop when it comes to love and romance. Honesty and integrity will bring you in touch with someone totally into what you have to offer. Don’t move too

fast, even if it is a great connection. Savor the moment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll attract a lot of attention, but before you jump into what appears to be a fascinating relationship, observe whether your new found love is being attentive or possessive. You may want to keep your distance until you are sure you aren’t with someone controlling. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ll be drawn to the most unusual partner. Unlike the type of person you usually pursue, this time intrigue and fantasy will lead to a whirlwind romance that has the potential to take you on a roller coaster ride that is worth

every emotion you experience. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): One minute you’ll feel one way and the next another. Don’t make promises you cannot keep or lead someone on if you aren’t positive that you can go the distance. Uncertainty is your curse, but also your saving grace. If you aren’t sure, don’t commit. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Live life to the fullest. Dream a little dream and share your fantasies with someone you discover is just as unique and adventuresome as you. Love and romance are highlighted, and getting involved in interesting pastimes will lead to someone special.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Stick to the people you already know. Someone with no connection to your past will fill your head full of temptation built on lies and deception. Focus on home, close friends and meeting people -- but only those you know have a track record for being honest and upfront. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Revisit a relationship with someone you still think about. Poor timing or circumstances that stood in the way in the past will give way to a new, more mature encounter that has the potential to lead to a long-lasting and meaningful union.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You do best with partners as innovative and unique as you. Open your heart to the obscure partner willing to try new things and who has experience and knowledge to offer in return. Experimental living arrangements will pull you closer together. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ll attract serious partners, but before jumping in to a relationship, remember to maintain your own personality. Being a chameleon works only short term. Don’t be afraid to show your true colors. Be who you are, not who your partner wants you to be.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


40 CITY MARCH 13-19, 2013

Profile for Rochester City Newspaper

March 13-19, 2013 - City Newspaper  

Cover story: Finding Paradise in Uganda | News: Cutting out cars | Dining: Get Caked, Lettuce B. Frank Bistro | Music: Soviet Dolls | Theate...

March 13-19, 2013 - City Newspaper  

Cover story: Finding Paradise in Uganda | News: Cutting out cars | Dining: Get Caked, Lettuce B. Frank Bistro | Music: Soviet Dolls | Theate...

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