Issuu on Google+

A closer look at the life of a child growing up in Britain during World War 2...

Created by: Jesse Donn, Julia Picco, Manuela Peyer, Julen Rojo– Roos


Most teachers took the children and transported them to reception areas. The trips could be as long as 12 hours. This caused many children to come out of the journey exhausted, upset by leaving their parents and fearful of the war to come. Children of different cultures and different degrees of money were sent to different places. In the first weeks of war almost four million people were evacuated to reception areas. Reception areas were usually in or near the countryside. Children of school age were not evacuated with their parents. They were required to report to their school with only a change of a clothes, basic toilet essentials, a packed lunched and of course a gas mask. While host families were quite frightened, they were very understanding and accepting.


With many parents away or at work, children were often left to look after themselves. They played in fields or in the street. Street games were safer than they would be today, because there were so few cars. Almost every home had a radio or 'wireless'. Most radios came in a case made of Bakelite, a kind of plastic. In Britain, all the programmes came from the BBC. People listened to the radio news, and read newspapers, to find out what was happening in the war. Not every home had a phone (and there were no mobile phones). Pay-phones in red 'telephone boxes' did not always work after air raids, because of bombs. To keep in touch, people wrote letters.


Most teachers took the children and transported them to reception areas. The trips could be as long as 12 hours. This caused many children to come out of the journey exhausted, upset of leaving their parents and fearful of the war to come. Children of different cultures and different degrees of money were sent to different places. Children were torn between two feelings, being devastated because of the war, and happy because their summer holiday had been extended by 2 weeks because of the evacuation. A lot of schools had been squeezed into one for safety purposes. Most of the male teachers had been sent into the Armed forces. Some of the things that they learnt during the war was how to put on a gas mask and how to plant vegetables.


During the World War it was important for house wives to use the few supplies and resources that they had. Diet was largely laid upon the wives to take care of as husbands were at the war. To assist wives in keeping children healthy, the ministry of food issued a leaflet about healthy food. It showed them how to make food for their muscles, food to give energy and food for general upkeep. Sugar was hard to find and people had their own vegetable gardens



A Wartime Childhood