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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack

ATS Euromaster Ltd Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack

Registered Office, ATS Euromaster Ltd, Vantage Point, 20 Upper Portland Street, Aston, Birmingham, B6 5TW, UK Issue 10d, January 2008


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Health & Safety Information Organisation During 2002 ATS Euromaster Limited (“ATS”) took over the trading activities of Associated Tyre Specialists Limited and its 8 regional subsidiaries. The company operates around 488 service centres nationwide and employs in excess of 3500 employees.

Nature of Business ATS Euromaster is the UK’s only national comprehensive tyre service provider offering a complete tyre supply and servicing facility from its network of Service Centres with a truly comprehensive capability. ATS offers tyres and tyre services for all vehicle types from wheelbarrows to earthmovers, including car, van and truck. Fast fit and MOT services are also offered for cars, whilst a fleet of over 1300 fitting vehicles offer mobile and breakdown services.

Safety, Health, Environment and Quality (SHEQ) ATS Euromaster has a Health and Safety Policy which complies with the requirements of the Health & Safety at Work Act. A copy of the Health & Safety Policy Statement is on page number 4. A copy of ATS’ Environmental Policy and Quality Policy statements are on pages 5-7. The company is certified to ISO 9001:2000 and a copy of ATS’ certificate is on page 29.

Health and Safety Management The ATS Health and Safety policy and strategy is supported by a Health & Safety Team reporting directly into ATS Euromaster’s Board of Directors. The team is responsible for monitoring compliance with Health and Safety and accident investigation, as well as the ongoing review and improvement of internal procedures to ensure ATS Euromaster maintain the highest standards of health and safety.

Operational Management and Training The Centre Manager is responsible for all activities and personnel based in his/her Centre. He/she will assess the competency of all fitters and ensure Induction training is completed. Additional job specific training that has been identified is then provided through two approaches. On-the-job instruction and supervision will be provided by a competent experienced senior fitter. More detailed training will then be provided by the ATS Euromaster national training team. The national training team consists of in-house experienced, competent trainers, all with considerable experience in the Industry. They provide various training courses regionally, the majority of which lead to City and Guilds certification when successfully completed. The Area Operations Manager is responsible for several Centre Managers in a defined geographical area. All Centre Managers have received health and safety training, and after the recent full review of procedures, all Centre Managers received an additional one-day health and safety training course to ensure they were fully aware of their responsibilities. During 2004/5, all Assistant Centre Managers also benefited from the one-day health and safety training course, to ensure they are fully able to support the Centre Manager. ATS Euromaster Ltd has a clear definition of the responsibilities of all personnel within the organisation and it is the responsibility of the ATS Euromaster senior management to ensure that all managers receive relevant training.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Changes in Policy and Consultation Should there be any changes in operational policy or technical specifications then this is cascaded through the organisation by means of Safety or Technical Bulletins. These bulletins are discussed at the regular regional meeting that the Area Operations Managers have with their Centre Mangers. The Centre Managers will then communicate these matters to their technicians. These meetings are not seen as one-way communications but a method by which the staff can make suggestions for the improvement of Health and Safety within the Company. Monthly health & safety topics are discussed at every management meeting, starting with the Directors and ending in the centre, with the issue of a Monthly Safety Bulletin. The topics discussed will vary depending on recent incidents or new/revised procedures. Any significant changes to the Health and Safety Policy are briefed to all levels of management by the Health and Safety Team.

Accident Investigation and Reporting This is one of the procedures that was totally revised at the end of 2003. ATS Euromaster takes the investigation of all accidents and near misses very seriously so that remedial action can be taken to avoid recurrence. A new standard reporting form has been introduced, a copy of which is on page 8. This report will form the basis of the RIDDOR report to the enforcement authorities as well as the internal reporting procedure. The accident will be investigated by the relevant local management and the Health and Safety team, with any changes necessary as a result, implemented through the cascade procedure.

Accident Statistics Because of the short length of time that ATS Euromaster has been operating under one national management structure, there are as yet very few meaningful statistics that can be produced. RIDDOR figures are available for 2004:-

• •

Major Injuries: - 21 Over 3 day Injuries: - 116

Improvement/Prohibition Notices and Prosecutions Any notices are taken very seriously by the Company and are dealt with immediately at a senior level of management in conjunction with the Health and Safety Manager and his team. They are very rarely received due to the policies and procedures in place and the good working relationship ATS Euromaster has with the enforcement authorities. There have been no prosecutions taken against ATS Euromaster in the last three years.

Risk Assessments All ATS Euromaster work activities are covered by generic risk assessments and Safe Working Procedures with substantially more practical detail also contained in the Process Control Document. Together, these more than adequately cover all work premises, equipment and activities. The risk assessments have all been reviewed along with all other health and safety procedures and have been fully trained to all Centre Management. Where work is carried out at customers premises it may be necessary for new Risk Assessments to be carried out or existing ones amended in conjunction with the customer at that site, in order to produce a specific Safe Working Procedure. A sample copy of a selection of Safe Working Procedures and Process Control documents are attached for your information and can be found on pages 9-25. Page 2


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Equipment and PPE All work equipment is maintained in line with manufacturer’s recommendations and all relevant statutory inspections are carried out by a competent independent organisation. Technicians are provided with the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment where the risk assessments have identified a need. This may include safety shoes, safety glasses, bump cap, waterproof clothing, high visibility clothing, mobile ‘phone etc.

Subcontractors ATS Euromaster does not employ subcontractors in the Service Centres or on customer sites with all work being carried out by our own personnel.

Insurance Attached on pages 26, 27 & 28 are details of our Public and Employers Liability insurance policies currently in force.

Contacts The Group Health & Safety Manager can be contacted at Vantage Point, 20 Upper Portland Street, Aston, Birmingham B6 5TW. Telephone: 0121 325 7325. The Quality Manager can be contacted at Vantage Point, 20 Upper Portland Street, Aston, Birmingham B6 5TW on Telephone: 0121 325 7325.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack

Introduction Policy Statement It is the policy of ATS Euromaster to comply with the letter and spirit of the provisions of The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974,The Fire Precautions Act 1971,The Environmental Protection Act 1990 and other relevant legislation, and to regard these provisions as minimum requirements. Our employees have the right to work in safe and healthy conditions. It is through the correct application of the Health & Safety Policy that these conditions are properly maintained. We recognise fully that health & safety matters are a management responsibility ranking equally alongside our responsibilities for generating profit, caring for and developing our people and managing successful business operations. The details of these responsibilities are contained in the Health & Safety Guide for Centre Managers. We undertake to provide adequate resources for health & safety training and adequate information for all employees to improve their knowledge and awareness, and to enable them to discharge their individual responsibilities. We also undertake to ensure that there are satisfactory arrangements for the health and safety of members of the public, visitors and contractors at all of our premises. A team of Health & Safety Advisors is employed to provide advice and assistance in health & safety matters. It is essential that everyone accepts their personal responsibilities as set out in the Health & Safety Policy, and there is active cooperation and consultation between management and employees in promoting and maintaining safe and healthy working conditions. We undertake to revise this Policy as often as necessary, to take account of health & safety developments. All changes will be brought to the attention of employees.

Ian Stuart Group Managing Director June 2006

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack

Quality Policy ATS Euromaster aims to be the UK Leader in tyre services and light vehicle maintenance. We continuously strive to deliver an exceptional quality of service by anticipating, acknowledging and satisfying Customers’ expectations in partnership with our suppliers whilst always respecting the environment. The organisation, with the participation of its employee, strives for a culture of continuous improvement in the services provided to its Customers and continually reviews its progress towards delivering this. Ian Stuart Group Managing Director June 2006


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Environment Policy Statement 1. It is the commitment of all Companies in the ATS Euromaster Group to ensure, that during the conduct of their business, environmental issues are progressed and that as far as possible the environment is not adversely affected as the result of the Group’s business activities. 2. The Group will ensure that all Management and Supervisory staff are aware of this responsibility to have proper regard to environmental matters and to ensure that their subordinate staff are fully aware of and adhere to Group policy and Company environmental control procedures. 3. Environmental issues will be addressed at all times as follows:3.1 TYRES

• • • • • • • • • • •

To operate a waste management policy to minimise the environmental impact of operations as follows. Reduction of waste; ATS will endeavour to provide professional advice and services to ensure that customers achieve the maximum operational design life for each tyre supplied. Re-use; at the end of design life, every waste tyre will be inspected for suitability for re-use by retreading. Recovery; where re-use is not viable, ATS endeavour to ensure that the material and/or energy content of the tyre is recovered economically. In the event that re-use or recovery is not practicable ATS will ensure the waste casing is disposed of using the Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO). To ensure the policy is implemented across the Company ATS will only use suppliers for recycling and disposal:Who share ATS’s own commitment to the responsible and sustainable management of postconsumer tyres. Who are licensed in all respects for the collection, transfer and treatment of waste tyres. Who operate fully traceable and auditable management procedures with respect to the duty of care. Who operate appropriately licensed treatment sites. Who ensure that final disposal methods and operations are appropriately licensed.

3.1. BATTERIES To arrange for all scrap batteries to be collected by the battery manufacturers for recycling. 3.2. OTHER SCRAP & WASTE PRODUCTS To ensure that all other scrap and waste products are disposed of through the local authority Waste Management Service or by a properly licensed contractor(s). To ensure that all waste or surplus chemical substances used during the course of the business are disposed of in accordance with the Environmental Protection Act.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Environment Policy Statement 3.3. USE OF COMPANY VEHICLES To ensure that all vehicles are serviced and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer recommendations and to ensure, as far as possible, that engine emissions comply with the Government guidelines. All new vehicles will, wherever possible, be fitted with catalytic converters. 3.4 NOISE To ensure that any noise generated in the course of the Group’s business is kept to the minimum that is practicably possible within legal decibel factors. 4. It is the duty of all Directors, Managers and Supervisors:4.1. To ensure that instruction and training on the Group environment policy is provided to all new employees. 4.2. To insist that all employees comply with the Group environment policy and company environmental control procedures. 4.3. To check regularly that statutory regulation and the Group environment policy is being followed by all employees for whom they are responsible. 4.4. To investigate any breach of statutory regulations or the Group Environment Policy that may occur within their field of responsibility and produce for senior management a report of their findings together with recommendations for avoiding a similar occurrence. 5. The Group environment policy will be reviewed regularly in order to comply with changes in statutory provisions and the best industrial practice. Environmental matters within the ATS Euromaster Group is the joint responsibility of all the ATS Euromaster Board Members.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Accident Book/Reporting Form 1.

WHERE & WHEN did the accident occur? Name & Address of Accident Site?

Centre

Form No: Roadside

Customer Site

Exact Location of Accident: Date of Accident:

Time of accident 24 hr: Employee

2. WHO was injured?

Public

Contractor

Name: Home Address:

D.O.B Job Title:

Employed By: Description of Injury: Treatment:

None

Still Working: Witness: If yes write full name and address and other details

Yes Yes

First Aid

Hospital

Hospital 24 hrs

No No

(continue on separate sheet if necessary)

3. TYPE of

Fatality

Injury:

Major Injury

Over 3 Day Injury

Public Direct to Hospital

Dangerous Occurrence

Minor Injury

Property Damage

(Tick one box only)

4. WHAT HAPPENED AND WHY? (Description and Cause of Accident)

Manager Report Injured Person

Making

Signature

Date

Signature

Date

Now fax this form to 0121 567 8495, then post it to – ATS Euromaster Ltd, Risk Management, Metropolitan House, 1 Hagley Road, Five Ways, Birmingham, B16 8AA

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Process Control – Truck Jacking of a Commercial Vehicle METHOD

REMARKS

Lifting 1. The vehicle should be positioned on a suitable level hard-standing. 2.

3.

Ensure that the vehicle brakes are “on” (if in doubt, get the Driver/Mechanic or other person familiar with the vehicle braking systems to do this for you. Chock the wheels to remain on the ground.

If there is any possibility of the jack sinking into the ground or causing damage to the ground surface – use a Loading Plate/Block. The vehicle may move during jacking, causing it to slip off the jack saddle. This will reduce the risk of vehicle moving during the lifting and lowering process.

3a. Determine the load being carried on the axle required to be lifted.

Obtain this information from: 1. The Vehicle Manufacturers Plate 2. The MOT Plating Certificate 3. The Vehicle Loading Sheet

4. Select a jack sufficient Load Carrying Capacity to lift the axle. • Check the condition of the jack. • Check the action of the jack ensuring it is serviceable.

The capacity of the jack should be visibly marked on it. Look for signs of oil leaks or damage. Check jack oil level if in doubt.

5. Select a suitable jacking point. 6. Place jack in position with Loading Plate/Block if necessary. 7. A good working practice at this point is to do a de-torque/loosen the wheel nuts using a Wheel Brace/L Bar (and its extension if applicable). 8. Jack the vehicle to working height and lower onto Axle Stands/Chassis Stands/Vehicle supports. Lowering 9. Check that there are no obstructions under the vehicle or tyres. Raise the vehicle and remove the axle stands/chassis stands/vehicle supports.

Ensure that Axle stands/Chassis Stands/Vehicle supports are of the correct carrying capacity.

When wheels are again secured to the vehicle.

10. Ensure that during the lowering you are not in a hazardous position. 11. Lower the vehicle slowly.

Sudden movement may cause the jack to be forced out of position.

12. When the vehicle is fully lowered, remove Jack. 13. Return all equipment to storage. Section: Issue:

Truck 4

Date: November 2002

Replaces: April 1997 Page 14 Page 13

Issued/Approved By: P.Y.C/D.A.B/M.E


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack Process Control – Truck Jacking of Vehicles Fitted With Air Suspension METHOD

REMARKS

1. Ask driver to make sure engine is not running and the ignition is turned off.

Most manufacturers stipulate the engine must not be running, as this may cause the air suspension to “self-level” and cause the vehicle to come off the jack and/or vehicle support.

2. Allow air bags to fully deflate across the axle being worked on.

If in doubt how to exhaust the air from the suspension units you must obtain assistance from the vehicle operator/driver.

3. Chock wheels remaining on the ground. 4. Damp down any contaminated areas of the wheel or hub.

Brake dust may be present on the wheel or hub, which is hazardous to health if inhaled.

5. De-torque wheel nuts.

Using a wheel brace/bar.

6. Place jack under suitable jacking point.

Make sure jack is not positioned under the airbag or suspension link.

7. Make sure the jack is positioned on a firm, flat surface (ie the axle). 8. Raise jack to a suitable height so the axle stand, chassis stand or timbers can be located in order to support the vehicle.

Make sure axle stand, chassis stand or timbers are not located under the airbag or suspension link.

Removal and refinement of Wheel(s) Note – notify the vehicle driver should the vehicle’s engine be safe to.

As per process control Truck that under no circumstances start the engine until you instruct the driver it is safe to do so.

Section: Issue:

Replaces: July 1997

Truck 2

Date: January 2000

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Issued/Approved By: K.J.T/D.A.B


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Working on Customer Premises Risk Assessment An element of tyre fitting work may be carried out at the customer’s premises in car or truck parks, transport yards or workshops. The locations visited may include office car parks, construction sites, quarries, waste/landfill sites and haulage loading areas. Whilst these environments may not carry the same risks as working on vehicles at the roadside or on motorways, all safe-working procedures must be followed in conjunction with any customer site rules. The main hazards include: Working in close proximity to other vehicles Accidental movement of the vehicle/trailer when being worked on Collapse of the jack or support system Explosion of the tyre Manual Handling problems Other risks associated with the customers own activities

Exposed persons are most likely to be fitting technicians. Customers should be asked to leave the vehicle and keep away from the immediate working environment. Controls Always sign in at reception and familiarise yourself with any site rules. Certain customers may require attendance at an induction before being allowed on site. Customer rules may specify permit to work systems, no-go areas, VOR areas, no smoking, fire instructions, traffic routes, speed limits etc. All of these rules must be followed. Assess the situation depending upon the location of the trailer, tractor unit or combined outfit, and then take one of the following actions in this order of preference: 1. The customer vehicle/trailer should be removed to the designated ATS working area with the keys removed and held by the technician. The ATS service vehicle should be parked in such a position as to disable access to the customer vehicle/trailer. The STOP A-board should be displayed in a prominent position, with the ‘work in progress’ sign also displayed on the vehicle/trailer. OR

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Working on Customer Premises Controls 2. If there is no designated ATS working area, the ATS service vehicle should be parked in such a position as to disable access to the vehicle/trailer. The keys should be obtained for the customer vehicle where applicable, and held by the technician. The STOP A-board should be displayed in a prominent position, with the ‘work in progress’ sign also displayed on the vehicle/trailer. Traffic cones should be used to create a safe working area. OR 3. If customer site access restrictions prevent the use of the ATS service vehicle to disable the vehicle/trailer, the keys should be obtained for the customer vehicle where applicable, and held by the technician. Traffic cones should be used to create a safe working area. The STOP A-board should be displayed in a prominent position, with the ‘work in progress’ sign also displayed on the vehicle/trailer. OR IF IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO FOLLOW ONE OF THE ABOVE CONTROLS, WORK SHOULD NOT START. WORK CAN ONLY START WHEN IT IS POSSIBLE TO FOLLOW ONE OF THE THREE CONTROLS LISTED ABOVE, HAVING CONFIRMED THIS WITH THE CUSTOMER. Request any help that is necessary from the site owner and customer driver and ensure both know what work is being carried out where. Always wear reflective hi-visibility clothing and safety shoes, along with bump cap and safety glasses when necessary, and any other PPE specified by the customer. Always use the warning sign ‘work in progress’ inside the vehicle or hanging on the uncoupled trailer or vehicle door, in addition to the ‘STOP’ A-board. The ‘work in progress’ sign is available from Service Desk in rigid plastic, in two sizes – 300mm x 100mm and 600mm x 200mm. Two holes should be punched in the plastic and string threaded through to enable the sign to be fixed to the handle, wheel or hitch point. ‘STOP’ A-boards are also available through Service Desk.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Working on Customer Premises Customer Site Health & Safety Checklist Follow all ATS Euromaster safe working procedures for jacking, supporting and chocking of vehicles. Follow all ATS Euromaster safe working procedures for wheel and tyre removal and tyre inflation. The Centre Manager will liaise with the customer to ensure there is a safe working environment on the site and that any specific customer requirements can be met. Likewise, ATS procedures and requirements can be discussed to ensure full cooperation at all times. The ATS Customer Site Health & Safety Checklist should be completed for all new customer sites where ATS provide regular scheduled tyre services. This checklist should also be completed on any site where technicians report problems with operating safely, or alternatively, where customers raise queries about ATS operating standards. A copy of the Checklist is on the following two pages, and is available electronically from the AOM or Health & Safety Advisor. The first page is intended for the customer to confirm exactly what they expect from ATS when technicians are working on their site. Both parties should discuss and agree the standards, with any unresolved issues referred to the AOM. The second page is intended for the Centre Manager to confirm exactly what standards ATS will work to and what the operating requirements are in terms of working area, vehicle isolation etc. Again, both parties should discuss and agree the standards, with any unresolved issues referred to the AOM. Finally, the Centre Manager and customer contact should sign both pages with a copy given to the customer. Once this has been finalised, the Centre Manager should ensure that all agreed working arrangements are discussed and agreed with the technicians responsible for working on that site. The situation should then be reviewed at regular intervals to ensure the agreed procedures are still working satisfactorily.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Tyre Inflation Risk Assessment Inflation of tyres is a process that is carried out thousands of time per day by ATS fitting staff. Generally the process is completed without anything untoward happening. However, there is potential for things to go wrong. The highest risk is from tyres, which have been repaired or may have been damaged whilst undergoing a puncture, eg run flat. The following lists the main hazards and control measures which must be followed to ensure safe working. The main hazards include: Air blast from tyre if it explodes during inflation. Being hit with shards of debris if tyre explodes. Uncontrolled movement of wheel if tyre explodes Being hit with debris if a multipiece wheel explodes. Exposed persons are fitters. Any bystanders must be asked to move to a safe position away from the tyre. It is safer to stand at the side of the tyre adjacent to the tread, rather than in front of the sidewall, but always use the minimum 2 metres of air hose where provided. Controls When inflating a tyre to check for punctures, never inflate to more than 15 psi. If no leaks are found straight away, the tyre should be removed and checked visually. When the tyre has been removed, examine the inside of the tyre very carefully to look for damage to the structure, especially on the sidewalls. If any damage is found, a new tyre should be fitted. If the puncture is repairable, follow the company repair procedures. When refitting the tyre to the wheel, inflate to no more than 15 psi to ensure the beads are correctly seated. Always insert the valve core before inflation. All truck or heavy/industrial tyres should be inflated to operating pressure with the wheel inside for safety cage/device, utilising the full 2 metres of air hose to stand well away from the cage/device. If a safety cage/device is not available or the wheel will not fit inside a cage, the wheel should be refitted to the vehicle or held in the jaws of the tyre changer before fully inflating, again using the full 2 metres of air hose to stand as far as possible to the side of the wheel. Never repair a tyre that has damage or internal or external casing. Stop inflating the tyre if you hear creaking or squeaking noises. Never stand directly over or in front of the tyre when inflating it always use the full 2 metres air hose to stand away from it.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Wheel & Tyre Removal & Refitting – Cars & Vans Risk Assessment Where there are no two-post ramps in centres, it will be necessary to jack a vehicle up and remove the wheels from a floor position. This can be done safely if the following procedure is adhered to. Not following this procedure increases the risk of injury to all employees and damage to equipment. The main hazards include: Movement of the vehicle whilst jacked up Explosion of the tyre Misuse of the fitting machinery Manual handling problems (see Section 1.2) Entrapment in tyre fitting and balancing machine Ejection of material on balancing machine Exposed persons are most likely to be fitting technicians. Customers should be asked to keep away from the immediate working environment.

Controls It is preferable for the fitting technician to drive the vehicle into the Centre and customers should be politely asked to wait in the reception area. The ignition should be switched off with Neutral or Park (Automatics) selected and the handbrake on. Damp down the wheel or hub and slacken the wheel nuts prior to lifting the vehicle. Ensure that the jack selected for the job is a suitable rating and is in good condition with no hydraulic fluid leakage. When placing the jack it should only be positioned against a firm flat surface eg the axle or other manufacturer specified jacking point. Ensure the base of the jack is placed on sound even ground and always use additional supports to hold the vehicle. Once the vehicle is lifted, axle stands should be located to support the vehicle, and the vehicle should be lowered gently onto the supports. The jack should be holding the vehicle weight and should be locked in position slightly lower than the supports. Replace the handle in an upright position. If access is difficult or suitable support areas are not available (eg with a Ford Mondeo) the place supports in the area that will prevent the vehicle falling to the floor if the jack(s) where to fail, but do not lower the vehicle down onto the supports. This method should only be used in exceptional circumstances since the vehicle will not be totally stable when held up only by the jack, and the vehicle may be damaged if it was to fall onto the supports. Loosen wheel nuts, but do not fully loosen or remove them until the vehicle is jacked and supported (see safe working procedure for jacking vehicles, section 1). Page 20


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Wheel & Tyre Removal & Refitting – Cars & Vans Controls (Continued …) Once removed from the vehicle, the valve core should be removed to deflate the tyre in a controlled fashion. The bead must not be broken until the tyre is deflated. Using bead lubricant and the tyre changing equipment, remove the old tyre from the wheel taking care to avoid entrapments with moving machinery. Once removed, tyres should be transferred to waste area as soon as possible. Using bead lubricant and tyre changing equipment, replace the new tyre on the wheel again taking care to avoid entrapments with the moving machinery. Inflate the tyre to a pressure not exceeding 15 psi, ensuring the beads are seated correctly or are beginning to seat centrally across the rim. Continue inflation to operating pressure, maintaining a safe distance. When balancing the wheel, guard on the balancing machine should be used whilst wheel is rotating. Any faults on this guard should be reported. The rotation of the wheel on the balancing machine should only be stopped by the brake, never by hand. The wheel should then be replaced on the car or van, tightening the wheel nuts manually with a wheel brace. Final tightening of the wheel-nuts, using a torque wrench, should be carried out wherever possible, with the vehicle in the “raised” position. Where this is not possible the vehicle should be partially lowered to enable the correct torque to be applied before lowering the vehicle fully to the ground. A torque wrench should be used with bent knees and a straight back. Wear sturdy gloves whilst carrying out this operation. Safety glasses should also be worn if wire brushing is necessary to remove road dirt, loose paint or rust.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Jacking a Commercial Vehicle Risk Assessment Heavy-duty bottle jacks are used for lifting heavy commercial vehicles, and the jack selected should be of a rating to suit the vehicle weight. Problems may be encountered when attempting to jack vehicles that are very low to the ground or do not have readily accessible jacking or supporting points. Some vehicles are also fitted with air suspension across the axles and specific precautions are necessary when jacking up these vehicles. The main hazards include: Working in close proximity to other vehicles Collapse of the jack Vehicle falling off the jack Manual handling problems (see Section 1.2) Exposed persons are most likely to be fitters. The customer should be asked to keep away from the immediate working environment. Controls The technician must assess the situation and the vehicle to ensure he has the correct equipment and it is safe to jack the vehicle. When working at the roadside, the safe working procedures for Motorway and A-roads should be followed. Particular attention should be paid to the possible effects of turbulence and offside replacements must always be reported through to the Police or Highways Agency Traffic Officers for assistance. The driver must make sure the engine is not running, the ignition is switched off and the handbrake is on. The technician should take possession of the key wherever possible. Under normal circumstances, no-one should be left sitting in the vehicle. Use the warning sign “Work In Progress� inside the vehicle, on the door or on the coupling of a trailer, and when working on customer sites, follow the safe working procedure for work on customer premises. If air suspension needs to be deflated or inflated (depending on the vehicle), this should be completed by the vehicle driver/operator. Ensure there is a safe area to work in and use traffic cones to warn other people of your presence. Chock a relevant wheel that will remain on the ground (at the front and rear of the wheel), and damp down any areas of the wheel or hub, if there is excessive brake dust present.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Jacking a Commercial Vehicle Controls Ensure that the jack selected for the job is of a suitable rating and is in good condition with no hydraulic fluid leakage. Bump cap and safety glasses should be worn when underneath any vehicle. When jacking a vehicle that has the air suspension raised, the axle must first be supported with an axle stand or suitable hardwood or resin blocks. This is essential for personal safety, even before the jack is placed to lift the vehicle. If the air suspension was to fail, the vehicle will drop instantly. When placing the jack it should be positioned against a firm flat surface eg. axles, and should not be placed under airbag or suspension links. Ensure the base of the jack is placed on sound even ground and use jacking plates or suitable blocks under the jack to stop it sinking or slipping if necessary. Start to raise the vehicle, making sure you have suitable secondary supports available to support it once lifted. In certain scenarios, such as when there is a flat tyre, it may be necessary to lift the vehicle in two stages. The first jack to raise the axle off the ground and the second jack to raise the vehicle high enough to remove the wheel. In such instances, the vehicle should always be supported at each step of the process. This may mean supporting the raised air suspension setting prior to placing the jack. Increasing the height of the secondary supports once it has been lifted with the first jack, and finally, raising the secondary supports again, when the vehicle has been jacked to its working height. At all times, the vehicle should be lowered gently onto the secondary supports. A jack is for lifting the vehicle. It is not designed to support it. The jack should not be holding the vehicle weight and should be locked in position slightly lower than the supports. Never put yourself in a position where you could be hurt if the vehicle was to slip. In exceptional circumstances, if access is difficult, or suitable support areas (away from airbags or suspension links) are not available, place supports in an area that will prevent the vehicle falling to the floor if the jack(s) was to fail, but do not lower the vehicle down onto the supports. This method should only be used when absolutely necessary, since the vehicle will not be totally stable when held up only by the jack, and the vehicle may be damaged if it was to fall onto the supports. Wear sturdy gloves whilst carrying out this operation. If the wheel is to be removed then slacken the wheel nuts prior to lifting. Notify the driver that under no circumstances should the vehicle's engine be started until you state that it is safe to do so. Page 23


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Wheel Removal & Fitting – Commercial Vehicles Risk Assessment The following procedure covers the significant precautions necessary to ensure safe working when removing and refitting wheels on commercial vehicles (BS, DIN and Spigot). The main hazards include: Working with penetrating fluids & Oils. Use of compressed air and associated tools. Failure of the vehicle jacking and support systems (see this section). Manual handling problems (see Section 1.2). Exposed persons are most likely to be fitters. Customers and people who do not need to be in the area should be asked to keep away from the immediate working environment.

Controls When removing Commercial Vehicle wheels: When cleaning exposed threads on wheel studs with a wire brush wear sturdy gloves and safety glasses. If light oil or penetrating fluids splashes onto the skin, wash it off immediately. Loosen wheel nuts using wheel brace/L-bar but do not fully loosen or remove them until the vehicle is jacked and supported (see safe working procedure for jacking vehicles). Once supported, fully remove the wheel nuts using either: • •

A wheel brace/L-bar or An air gun (impact wrench).

Ensure the correct size of socket is selected and that it is in good condition. When using an air gun, check its condition along with the airline, and select the correct direction of rotation prior to fitting onto the wheel nuts. Ensure the compressor is operating at the correct working pressure. Use the correct levers/wheel handling equipment to lift and pull the wheel squarely off the hub. Additional precautions are necessary when removing spigot mounted wheels. • • •

Clean exposed spigot and centre bore, stud and stud holes with a wire brush, scraper or probe, wearing sturdy gloves and safety glasses. Use penetrating oil in the stud holes and centre bore. Apply it sparingly and allow time for it to work. “Shock” the wheel free with a suitable hammer, hitting the front face of the tyre in a controlled manner whilst standing well to the side. This should not be done from the rear or from underneath the vehicle, and if not successful, a wheel puller should be used.

The wheel should be rolled to a safe position and returned to storage. Page 24


Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack 1.1 Risk Assessment & Safe Working Procedures Wheel Removal & Fitting – Commercial Vehicles Controls When refitting commercial vehicle wheels, the following precautions should be observed: All wheel studs locating and mating surfaces should be checked for damage, security and cleanliness. Wear sturdy gloves whilst carrying out the above. Safety glasses should also be worn if wire brushing is necessary to remove road dirt, loose paint or rust. When applying lubricating oil to wheel studs or the centre bore of spigot wheels, keep oil away from other surfaces and wash skin immediately if it splashes. Replace the wheel squarely on hub using tyre levers or wheel handling equipment. Replace the wheel-nuts carefully by hand at first. When using an air gun ensure the correct size of socket is selected and select the correct direction of rotation prior to fitting onto the wheel nuts. Adjust the airflow to the minimum setting and tighten the wheel-nuts gradually in the approved sequence (i.e. diametrically opposite). Final tightening of the wheel-nuts, using a torque wrench, should be carried out wherever possible, with the vehicle in the “raised” position. Where this is not possible the vehicle should be partially lowered to enable the correct torque to be applied before lowering the vehicle fully to the ground. A torque wrench should be used with bent knees and a straight back. After completion, return all tools to their storage area.

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Safety, Health, Environment, Quality & Insurance Information Pack

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Security Test