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HAVE TECH, WILL TRAVEL Page 6

Kenneth E. Seaton examines the marriage of technology and trucking and here’s what the happy couple have to look forward to…

Page 13

FROM MEMORIES TO REALITY – It’s hard to believe the Maritime Motorsports Hall of Fame only opened its doors in 2009. A lot has happened since then…

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NS BUTCHER BECOMES FINALIST in Major US-Based Driver Development Program – Where the legends of tomorrow are born.

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10TH ANNUAL NSTSA SAFETY EXCELLENCE AWARDS – Luncheon honours the “best of the safest” at annual event.

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NB CONVOY FOR HOPE – August 19th marks an important date in the fight against cancer. Find out why, here.

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VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED LABOUR MEASUREMENT – Professional development and business measurement mean new skill sets for the aftermarket.

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NB COLLEGE GRADUATES FIRST WOMAN FROM TRUCKING PROGRAM – A former resto worker gains traction in a new career.

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WORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS IN CANADA – Mental health and its benefits for the trucking industry.

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CLEAN ACROSS CANADA : CCA ENTERS ITS SIXTH DECADE – WELL, ALMOST. The face of the car wash industry is approaching a notable milestone.

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OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW – The 2017 Big Rigs Big Hearts Big Results Convoy is back and better than ever!

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ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT = Those dang moose! • More!

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DAN’S TRUCKER BLEND: THE PERFECT CUPPA FOR THE ROAD – A hobby turns into a passion turns into a thriving business.

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A REMARKABLE CAREER: NAPA’S VP RETIRES – John Buckley says adios after a long, distinguished run.

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Letter from the Editor

US AND CHINA IN RACE FOR BATTERY MARKET DOMINATION

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By Carter Hammett

ENTLE FOLK START YOUR ENGINES. THERE’S A RACE HAPPENING NOW THAT YOU MIGHT NOT BE AWARE OF AND IT COULD HAVE A PROFOUND IMPACT ON THE FUTURE OF DRIVING. As these words hit the screen, electrical vehicle icon Elon Musk, founder of green vehicle behemoth Tesla, is working on the globe’s biggest battery factory. Tesla produced 84,000 vehicles in 2016, with a goal of hitting the half million mark next year. However, China has thrown its hat into the ring with some heavy hitting commitments of its own. By 2021, China plans to produce more than 120 gigawatt hours a year. For the uninitiated, that’s enough to supply batteries for either oneand-a-half million Tesla Model S vehicles or…over 13 million Toyota Prius Plug-in hybrids for a year! Right now China controls over half

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the global lithium ion battery production while the US has about a ten percent share. By 2021 China’s market share is projected to climb to a whopping 65 percent, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. China’s aggressive stance recalls the approach it took with solar power over ten years ago. It virtually controlled the industry with lowered costs down by 70 percent. The same outcome might just happen with the battery market, creating a more competitive marketplace in this category. Batteries account for up to fifty percent of total vehicle cost. Pundits are projecting lithium ion to be a key technology during the upcoming decade and creating a market worth almost $40 billion by 2025. Lithium-ion had an immeasurable impact on the consumer electronics market during the 1980s, a part of everything including your iPhone. Now the transportation sector, hungry to move past its dependency on oil, is finally moving into an industry dominated by Japan and South Korea. In recent years China has caught up and surpassed Korea as the world’s largest lithium battery supplier for all electronic devices. By 2020 China pre-

dicts over 5 million electric vehicles will be making their way across the country, up from the current 1 million today. But the prevailing question remains: will there be enough lithium to go around? A year ago lithium prices went haywire because volume appeared to be lacking. Today with production relatively stable, supply is in line with projected demand. However, much of projected growth is also based on a series of assumptions that new supply can be not only produced but also integrated into current production methods over the next few years. Some pundits question whether there will simply be enough lithium to meet the demand by 2023. There’s no question the supply chain is complex and still finding its way. In the first half of this year, Tesla delivered about 47,000 vehicles, owing to a severe shortfall of battery packs. Meanwhile, Tesla has said it aims to produce 500,000 vehicles in 2018. Part of this will be achieved by opening four new factories by the end of this year. Meanwhile, China, lacking a major player has consolidated all of its smaller battery manufacturers as part of its strategy to help its industry to mature. Part of China’s motive for its aggressive stance on battery production is a response to international pressure to literally clean up its act as a major producer of smog pollution. But another perhaps more subtle reason, is to create a domestic market which can be expanded globally. That’s a sobering thought when you realize that vehicles are projected to bypass electronics as the biggest users of lithium ion batteries by the end of 2024. This is having massive repercussions at the global corporate level as key players scramble to bang out agreements in anticipation of chain deals, acquisitions and other business. With the recent “death” of the Trans-Pacific partnership earlier this year, it’s going to be interesting to see how key players will move forward next.


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HAVE TECH, WILL TRAVEL LIKE IT OR HATE IT, TECHNOLOGY IS EVOLVING AT A FAST AND FURIOUS PACE AND INVADING EVERY FACET OF OUR LIVES. THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY IS NO EXCEPTION. HERE’S A PEEK AT WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT THE FUTURE TO LOOK LIKE.

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By Kenneth E. Seaton

Y NOW I T ’ S FA I R LY C O M M O N KNOWLEDGE THAT THE CANADIAN TRUCKING INDUSTRY – AS WELL AS MANY OTHER COUNTRIES – IS FACING A MAJOR CHALLENGE. INDUSTRY EXPERTS ARE PREDICTING THAT THERE WILL BE A PROJECTED DRIVER SHORTAGE OF AROUND 34,000 DRIVERS BY 2024. As if those numbers aren’t serious enough, a 2016 study¹ – prepared for the Canadian Trucking Alliance by CPCS Transcom – stated that figure “could increase to 48,000 based on plausible combinations of different trends that can affect industry demand, occupational attractiveness and labour productivity.” Interestingly enough this report also stated that “based on forecasts by the Conference Board of Canada, for-hire trucking industry GDP is expected to grow from $19.2 billion in 2014 to $24.1 billion in 2024, for

a compound annual growth rate of 2.2%. Taking into consideration expected labour productivity growth, this industry growth implies the need for 25,000 additional truck drivers by 2024.” And just because many sources are predicting that autonomous trucks will replace drivers, doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s something that the industry needs to be concerned about…yet! The reality is that fully-autonomous driving is at least a decade or two down the road; and there will be many speed bumps and regulations that will have to be dealt with before it ought to become a driver or industry concern. So, on one hand we have a predicted driver shortage and on the other hand we have an expected annual growth rate! What to do, what to do? Pundits have differing opinions on how to best solve this dilemma. Some proposed potential solutions to dealing with the shortage include: Conducting more aggressive driver recruitment campaigns via social media, advertising, word of mouth, etc.; Ensuring that divers are better trained by increasing paid training funding for new drivers and healthier reimbursement enticements for upgrading existing driver skill sets; Making driving careers more ats e p t e m b e r 2 017

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Truckers Corner

tractive to females, millennials, ex-military drivers and heavy equipment operators, etc.; Identifying and addressing ways and means of improving the image of truck drivers and the trucking industry in general; Using new technologies to re-brand trucking as a “wannabe” career. While many of the suggested solutions are definitely do-able, in this article we’re going to explore how technology – and its impact – will help the trucking industry in attracting the best and brightest of a new generation of driver. Technology will also go a long way towards addressing many of the issues that drivers are currently facing and should aid in ensuring longer driver retention. Jean Marc Picard, executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association (APTA) believes that “new technology will have a positive impact on our industry. A lot of the new technology that is used today is having great benefits for carriers…..from a safety and efficiency standpoint.” There are a number of reasons for the looming shortage – far beyond a retiring workforce – but perhaps the secondary reason is that many believe that a truckers’ lifestyle just isn’t attractive enough to a younger generation. Combine that with safety and security concerns of its drivers, a 20-to-30 per cent driver turnover rate, no official government recognition as a

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skilled trade, and a need to improve the overall image of the trucking industry and its drivers.

USING TECHNOLOGY TO DISPROVE THE MYTH THAT TRUCKING IS NOT A SKILLED POSITON The outdated thinking that truckers are long on arms and short on brains is a sadly misguided perception. As anyone who has ever wheeled a big rig down a highway, navigated through city streets and/or backed into a tight loading dock will proudly tell you; being a trucker is a skilled profession and that not everyone is up to the challenge. Monetary wise, truck driving may not be a bad career choice, with the CPCS study noting that, “Truck driving, and particularly long-haul truck driving, is a reasonably well-paying occupation.” However, some drivers are sacrificing their health to bring home the bacon; as the study also determined that, “Long-haul truck drivers are required to work long hours, unpredictable hours and spend a lot of time away from home in order to earn their wages.” As the trucking industry marches boldly forward so does the necessity of having a fully trained and competent driver sitting behind the wheel. Driver training and apprentice programs will have to be upgraded and updated to include new technology and how to best get the most bang for its buck.

Having truck driving designated as an official ‘skilled trade’ by the government would go a long way to boasting drivers’ wages and benefits and would also be considered a positive move towards driver immigration purposes. Having an official designation, would make it more attractive and easier for employment consultants and international fleet owners to recruit and hire foreign drivers. Even with a retiring and male-dominated workforce, the utilization of both existing and new technology will support – with the proper driver enticements--the trucking industry to optimistically retrain and upgrade the skill sets of many of its current drivers; thereby working towards addressing the industries high turnover rate.

TECHNOLOGY CAN BE USED TO ATTRACT A NEWER WORKFORCE The trucking industry needs to tweak its image. This will go a long way to attracting a wider and more diverse range of vehicle operators. Targeting females, millennials, ex-military, some people with disabilities and new Canadian drivers would be a great place to start. Technology should be used, not only as an industry tool, but also as a ways and means of focusing attention on the trucking industry and its many career opportunities. For people who not only use it, but also view it as an enabler to a better quality of life, technology and all that it en-


Truckers Corner

compasses is the way of the future. By concentrating its attention towards a more tech-savvy operator – like millennials – the industry will be targeting a potential workforce that’s already driven to learn new technology and one that is eager to expand and apply its tech skills. The trucking industry will develop right along with them. For truck driving industry old-timers, jargon such as; Evel Knievel – translates to Motorcycle cop, Chicken Coop – Weigh station/port of entry, Alligator – big piece of tread from a truck tire in the road, Driving Award – Speeding ticket, Backstroke – Return trip, Anchor Clanker – Boat trailer, is familiar and easily understood. However, old-timers most likely wouldn’t understand what social media, gigabytes, IT, cryptic, etc. mean. Conversely, it’s probable that the new generation of truckers wouldn’t have a clue as to what the old-timers were talking about either.

LOWERING THE STRESS OF ON THE ROAD TIME WITH TECHNOLOGY There is no question that being a truck driver can be a very stressful occupation.

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On a daily basis, drivers face the unrelenting pressure of needing to meet impossibly tight deadlines; having to comply with strict industry driver restrictions, dealing with demanding customers and battling through ever increasing traffic snags. For many fatigued drivers “the open road” has turned into more of a walled-in treadmill. Nowadays savvy trucking industry leaders are turning to technology as they try to make being on the road less stressful and hopefully more attractive to newer drivers. They are providing their new drivers with tablets and other devices that will automatically update their log books and can also download electronic dispatches, enabling them too quickly and easily receive, track load assignments and other details. The new tech will also permit drivers to hear voice-guided GPS-navigation that will direct them to follow customized and reliable truck-legal routes. It will also alert and direct them around unforeseen traffic glitches, and it will continually monitor and alert the driver, dispatcher and/or fleet mechanics of any problems or issues that the vehicle may be developing. Divers who spend a long time on the

road away from family and friends often find it lonely and the downtime can be more than demanding. Technology is working hard to improve things. Apps – i.e. Around Me or Near Me – assist truckers in finding out information on businesses, restaurants, etc. close to their current location. Communicating via Skype or listening to soothing melodies, nature sounds or ocean waves can prove to be very calming. Vehicles equipped to receive Wi-Fi will allow drivers to relax by reading or listening to a book or magazine on their mobile reader, watch TV or a movie, play video games, send and receive audio or text messages. Installing on-board fridges and microwaves will help promote healthier and more economical eating habits. These are just a few examples of how technology can put a little home in the cab.

TECHNOLOGY AND HOW IT CAN BOAST SAFETY, SECURITY AND WELLNESS Both industry experts and fleet owners agree that by putting technology to effective use, they will be taking positive


Truckers Corner

steps to improving the way that the industry addresses the safety, security and wellness of its drivers. APTA’s Jean Marc Picard agrees, saying that, “we do support new technology especially when it improves how we operate and makes us safer as an industry.” Fatigue management, long sedentary hours, sleep disruption and unhealthy eating habits, etc. are just a few of the ongoing industry and driver concerns. Installing and effectively monitoring onboard systems will allow for better tracking and will easily permit both drivers and dispatchers to make favourable changes to their schedules, loads and vehicles. Up-to-the-minute vehicle tracking and the ability to instantly communicate with drivers will help dispatchers in making driver changes – while the vehicle is still on the road – in the event of family emergency or other necessity. This can be accomplished with the minimal amount of effort or downtime. Similarly, if there is an onboard incident or accident, technology has the capability to automatically alert emergency services and dispatchers. Some prospective drivers may be intimidated by the size and sheer bulk of the industries vehicles and thereby may be put-off from choosing trucking as a career potential. Driver comfort and safety, both inside and outside the cab, is a real and viable industry concern. Vehicle manufacturers are now utilizing new technology in an effort to affectively address and

resolve many drivers’ concerns. Advances like stability control with automatic and antilock braking systems, blind spot warning devices, lane departure warning and collision avoidance systems make vehicles safer to drive. Cameras now aid drivers in not only backing up, but also allow them to scrutinize their vehicle’s perimeter before leaving a vehicle, all in the service of providing better driver safety and security.

TECHNOLOGY THAT WILL HAVE DRIVERS OOHING AND AAHING As if todays’ trucking tech isn’t enough to satisfy, just around the next corner is the Internet of Things  (IoT). Basically – IoT technology interconnects computing devices embedded in everyday objects or devices, thereby enabling them to send and receive data – very basically! With the advancement of IoT, fleet owners and drivers will be testing and trying out platooning. This is when two or more trucks travel close together – usually around 15.2 meters apart – thereby reducing drag and saving fuel by drafting. The vehicles travel in an electronic cloud of sorts and are in constant communication with each other as they coordinate speed and braking. Wearable devices that will greatly increase trucking safety by being able to continually monitor a driver’s health, fatigue factor, etc. Hats, clothing, headsets and wrist-worn devices will keep an eye

on a driver’s heart & breathing rate, body positioning including occurrences of microsleep or the dreaded “headbobs”. Drivers wearing smartwatch type technology that’s equipped with built-in GPS navigation will receive an alert vibration or “tap” on the wrist in the event that a notification is needed. Also known as haptic feedback, this type of alert can be for exceeding the speed limit, warning of a vehicle in the driver’s blind spots, etc. In the near future, it is probable that drone equipped trucks will allow delivery companies and their drivers to go that last-kilometre for their customers. Drones could be hand or vehicle launched right from the top of the truck, deliver its package and then return to the truck at the same or a different location. Currently, companies like UPS, the Postal Service are testing out utilizing drones as part of their delivery fleets. Today’s truckers are a far cry from those who wheeled around the big rigs during Convoy movie days. And, they will be a far cry from what will be behind the steering wheels in the future. Vehicle manufactures, owners, fleet and transport managers and of course drivers, will have to learn to not only adjust to, but also evolve with the advancement of new technology. Technology may very well prove to be not only a game saver but also a game changer! ¹ The Truck Driver Supply and Demand Gap - Final Report, Prepared by: CPCS, 6-May-16

Interstate Batteries • 593 St. George Blvd. • Moncton,N.B. • (506) 386-6777

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FROM MEMORIES TO REALITY . . .

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By Mike Kaplan - MMHOF N.S. Director

T ALL STARTED WITH OLD FRIENDS MEETING AND TALKING ABOUT OLD TIMES AND DO YOU REMEMBER THIS PERSON AND THAT PERSON, AND THAT SITUATION AND OTHER SITUATIONS. Yes as it was about 15 years ago. A book was suggested but then came the idea of going bigger for many people to get involved and to include not just stock car racers, from where most of us hung our hats, as a lot came through the ranks in drag racing as well. Guess the first way was to get in touch with a number of people to form a nucleus of those that had been around the industry for a while. A president was elected in Blaine Paige. The movement began forward to collecting memorablea. The items started to flow. Jim Hallihan, an inductee into the Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame, gave guid-

ance as he was part of the committee. We had no money to work on but the committee came up with an idea to throw a roast for the late Scott Fraser. It was an overwhelming success. I had the honor of emceeing the event. We were underway, with hurdles to be forthcominng. The Forbes car dealership made their big meeting room available to us for our meetings. We knew we had to go further than just Nova Scotia and reached out to New Brunswick and P.E.I. Again we had to spread our wings further and honour more than Stock Car racers so we included every sport connected to motorsports. The next big hurdle was to see if we

could get the Nova Scotia Government or Federal Government to give a helping hand‌ the mountain appeared before us. Time to go further. Blaine Paige along with Gordie MacCulloch had a meeting in New Brunswick with another Canadian Hall of Famer and a gentleman that knew the industry and how to build an empire with connections better than any of us, Ernie MacLean and his wife Winona. We met in New Brunswick and decided it was the way to go, a real leader at the helm. We elected a new slate of officers and registered the Maritime Motorsports Hall of Fame. Movement started happening in the right direction. Before we knew it many others got involved and the town of Petitcodiac loved the idea and made the land available to us. The New Brunswick Government came forth with some much needed financing and much needed help. It was evident that in 2003 a group of enthusiiasts that there was a strong need to perserve and promote the rich motorsport heritage that exists in New Bruns e p t e m b e r 2 017

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swick, Nova Scotia and P.E.I. in 2005 the Maritime Motorspoorts Hall Of Fame was incorporated and a non profit organization. Thanks to ACOA, the Province of New Brunswick’s large donations, the help from the village of Petitcodiac, many volunteers and lots of fundraising you now have “The Maritime Motorsports Hall Of Fame”...this is your Maritime Hall of Fame….we only run it for you. On October 16, 2009 the doors opened to this fine 10,000 sq ft facility complete with a motorsport museum , local tourism 14

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centre, office space, conference room for up to 140 people, a 15 person meeting room, and a large parking lot that has played host to car shows, and a full kitchen for in house catering. This first class multipurpose facility is located adjacent to highway No1 at exit 233 in the Village of Petitcodiac. Our next planned Induction ceremony is November 18 in Sumerside. This year’s inductees will include… New Brunswick: Stock Car – Donald Beers Drags – James Cowie Snowmobile - Trueman Copp Builder – Cyril Hall Tractor Pull – Kevin Taylor P.E.I. : Builder - Kevin Power & James Merrill, Wayne Gaudet Stock Car – Carl Livingston Nova Scotia : Stock Car – Cy Harvey Drags – Bill Clark & Gary Pozzebon These inductees will join the other 110 elite inductees to be remembered and find a special place on our honour roll on our wall in the Hall. If you know of a participant that is deserving of this distinguished honour, on our website are the forms for nomination which have to be in our hands by April1 of that particular year. There are so many that should be considered. The Web site is www.maritimemotorsporthalloffame.com.


Atlantic Racing News

NOVA SCOTIA’S BUTCHER BECOMES FINALIST IN MAJOR US BASED DRIVER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM By Tim Terry

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OR THOSE WITHIN THE ATLANTIC CANADIAN MOTORSPORTS COMMUNITY, THEY ALREADY KNEW THE TALENTS OF PORTER’S LAKE, NOVA SCOTIA’S COLE BUTCHER. Butcher was selected prior to the season as one of seven finalists for the United States based Kulwicki Driver Development Program. The program was created MIKE MCCARTHY/MCCARTHY PHOTOGRAPHIC

COLE BUTCHER HAS FOUR PODIUM FINISHES ON THE PARTS FOR TRUCKS PRO STOCK TOUR, INCLUDING A THIRD PLACE FINISH AT THE RON MACGILLIVRAY CHEVROLET BUICK GMC 150 AT RIVERSIDE SPEEDWAY IN JUNE.

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in memory of 1992 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Champion Alan Kulwicki and is aimed to help worthy grass roots racers realize their dreams. Those are dreams like Butcher has had since he slid into his first stock car in 2006. Butcher was one of the drivers who raced a Bandolero car when the division came to Canada and his home track of Scotia Speedworld in 2006. While Butcher saw success in the class, his breakout season was not until 2010, when he won nine feature races contested on the season to cruise to his first track championship. He dabbled in Bandolero racing the next year and won a few more feature races before the focus was set on moving up the ranks.

As has been the case with many young drivers recently working their way up through the short track ladder in Nova Scotia, Butcher’s team set their sights on a Legend car. In his rookie season in the car in 2012, he shot the lights out by winning not only the Scotia Speedworld Strictly Hydraulics Legend track championship but also the Maritime League of Legends championship, a touring series which visits a number of the top short tracks in the three Maritime Provinces. The 2013 season at Scotia Speedworld was much of the same. Butcher continued to rack up victories and battled with veterans Matt Moore and Maritime Motorsports Hall of Famer Cy Harvey to win his second consecutive championship.


Atlantic Racing News

But that wasn’t the biggest thing to happen to Butcher in 2013. While the youngster was busy making laps and defending his championship at his home track, he was sliding into the window of a “big car” for the first time as he made his debut on the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour. The Rookie of the Year chase was one of the deepest in Tour history. What began as a battle between four rookies came down to a shootout of two of the Maritimes best in Butcher and Dylan Blenkhorn. Blenkhorn’s rise to the top was similar to what Butcher’s was. Both of their paths had been littered with both wins and championships in the Bandolero and Legend ranks and the pair found themselves together at the top as they began their Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour careers. The battle between the two and Albertan Denver Foran would end up being a back and forth affair. Butcher would race to top rookie honors in four of the series 12 events but when the points were tallied it was Butcher falling 36 points short in the rookie chase to Blenkhorn. As history would soon play out, it was not the last time the two would fight it out for one of the Maritimes most prestigious honors. The new season would be the last time we would see Butcher in a Legend car full time while trying to juggle the rigorous Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour schedule. He would go out in fine style though, cruising to a third consecutive championship in Legends by topping rookie Nicho-

las Naugle by 44 points in 2014 at Scotia Speedworld. At the time, the mark was a record at the track as no other driver had previously won three consecutive championships in the same class until Dan Smith would sail to five Truck championships. The 2015 and 2016 seasons would see Cole’s younger brother Jarrett win the Strictly Hydraulics Legends championship at Scotia Speedworld. Shelby Baker now runs the red #53 Atlantic Tiltload Legend car on Friday nights as he tries to record his first Legend championship and sixth straight for Butcher Racing. His Legend car prowess also took him to Atlantic Motorsports Park. The famed road course outside of Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia hosted a handful of Maritime League of Legends Tour stops to close out the year and Cole was able to tame the road course for three wins. It showed not only could Butcher get it done on the ovals, but he could make some right turns better than the field as well. Butcher moved from a rookie to championship contender in 2014 as his sophomore season vaulted him to fourth in the standings from his tenth place effort in 2013. While he may not have won any races, he let folks know he was there to contend. He led the most laps at Riverside Speedway in September of that year before a spin with less than 50 laps to go took him out of winning contention. He also set fast time at the same race track earlier that season. The 2015 season was a big one for the Butcher Racing team. In the fourth race of

the season and Butcher’s 28th career Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour start, the team ended up in victory lane celebrating a win in the Nova Truck Centres 150 at Scotia Speedworld. As big as the home track win was, two weeks later the team once again found themselves in victory lane at one of the circuit’s toughest race tracks in Speedway 660. The championship was fought in another back and forth battle with up to four names being thrown around heading into the waning races. Butcher was in the thick of it but would ultimately wind up second place after all the dust settled following 12 events. Butcher also found himself racing with Blenkhorn in one of the best displays of racing ever seen at Scotia Speedworld during the 2015 season finale, the Dartmouth Dodge 200 at Scotia Speedworld. The two ran side by side for a majority of the 180 laps completed on the afternoon, exchanging the lead an impressive 26 times at the finish line. While Butcher led the most laps, 105 of them, it was Blenkhorn taking the win at the finish as the two came sliding across the line at the finish. Many fans to this date still believe it was the best racing they have seen at the track and from the series. While Butcher may not have won the battle that day, he would come out the winner of the war the next year when he took home the 2016 Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour championship. Consistency put Butcher in the championship discussion with the #53 finally

MIKE MCCARTHY/MCCARTHY PHOTOGRAPHIC

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COLE BUTCHER, ALONG WITH THE BUTCHER RACING TEAM INCLUDING HIS BROTHER JARRETT, ARE SUPPORTERS OF MAKE A WISH ATLANTIC PROVINCES, RAISING AWARENESS THROUGH THEIR RACING PROGRAM FOR THE CAUSE. autoatlantic.com

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popping the top to victory lane in July at Petty International Raceway during the Irving Blending & Packaging 150. Two races later, Butcher would score the biggest win of his racing career with a dominating victory in the Atlantic Cat 250 at Scotia Speedworld. Butcher inherited the championship point lead with two races to go and while reigning champion Donald Chisholm tried to close the gap, Butcher shut the lid on 2016 with a win in the season finale Dartmouth Dodge 200 to seal his first Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour championship. It is Butcher’s racing south of the border that caught eyes and turned heads, especially during the off-season between the 2016 and 2017 seasons. Butcher and his team are no strangers to racing in the United States. Butcher has seen success at various INEX events for

Legend cars in his career, including a win in Las Vegas Motor Speedway during the Pro division Race of Champions at the INEX Asphalt Nationals. Like most Pro Stock teams in Atlantic Canada, it is common to see the Butcher Racing team head to Maine and take part in racing at Oxford Plains Speedway. Oxford Plains Speedway has been a point of success for Butcher as he has raced numerous Pro All Stars Series races

at the famed oval. Butcher was 17th in his first Oxford 250 in August 2015 and began his Maritime championship off-season there with a seventh place finish in the PASS North finale in October 2016. Butcher teamed up with Southern Super Series champion Donnie Wilson and his team for a run at the Snowflake 100 at the Snowball Derby in Pensacola, Florida, which is where Butcher put his name on the map. Butcher led three practices on

MARITIME TRACTION CHANGES

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S PART OF TR ACTION’S CONTINUING GROWTH IN THE MARITIMES, CR AIG BLAKNEY HAS ACCEPTED THE POSITION OF OPERATION MANAGER FOR THE TRACTION STORES IN THE MARITIME PROVINCES.

Craig’s experience within the Traction group and his knowledge of the trucking industry will play an important role on the operations division. Craig has spent the past 10 years with the Traction Moncton location beginning in late 2007 as the Outside Sales Representative and moving up to Branch Manager in March of 2012. Craig will be hand in hand with Stephen Henman (GM Sales Manager UAPHVPD) to develop the business in the Maritimes for Traction and as well to continue the growth plans for UAP overall. Craig will report to the Montreal UAP head office as will Stephen, and as well, will retain the position of Branch Manager for Moncton until further notice. s e p t e m b e r 2 017

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Atlantic Racing News

the week for the Pro Late Model division and would eventually finish a strong sixth, charging from outside the top ten late in the race. The relationship came together again for the Easter Bunny 150 at Hickory Motor Speedway and Butcher once again got up on the wheel. Butcher led the first practice for the iconic Pro All Stars Series race, time trialed fourth and would ultimately charge to the fourth place spot at the end of the race. Butcher ended off his 2016-17 offseason with a second place performance in a 40-car field at Oxford Plains Speedway in April. What makes the finish most impressive for his family owned team is that the 20 year old started 26th in the 150-lap race and had to run his way through traffic up to the runner-up position. Since beginning his title defense of the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour championship, he has seen his share of ups and downs. Butcher opened the 2017 season at home with a second place finish to Shawn Turple at the Lucas Oil 150 at Scotia Speedworld. A crash during the second race of the season saw Butcher storm from the back with 50 laps to go to a eighth place finish at Petty International Raceway is the only

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“blemish” on the record so far in 2017. Butcher was third during the Ron MacGillivray Chevrolet 150 at Riverside, fourth at both Scotia Speedworld and Speedway 660 and second in both the IWK 250 at Riverside Speedway and the Irving Blending & Packaging 150 at Petty International Raceway. Fans have seen the newest chapters written in the rivalry between Butcher and Blenkhorn as the 2017 season has wore on. Some of those have been kinder than others while both parties have taken verbal shots over the season. As of press time, the last battle between the two was a more friendlier one as the two swapped the lead eight times at Petty International Raceway in July with Butcher leading the most laps in the Irving Blending & Packaging 150 while Blenkhorn took the win. Butcher’s season has been consistent with six top fives and seven top tens but is currently only fourth best as of press time. Butcher is 55 points out of Blenkhorn for the top spot with two-time series champion Turple and Prince Edward Island’s Dylan Gosbee between them. The series heads to Prince Edward Island’s Oyster Bed Speedway before heading back to Scotia Speedworld for the Atlantic Cat 250. Butcher is the reigning champion of

the prestigious race. The honor of being selected as one of seven finalists in the Kulwicki Driver Development Program is huge for Butcher’s racing career. The program’s first year was 2015 and Butcher is the first Canadian to be selected for the program. Georgia’s Cody Haskins, Minnesota’s Michael Ostdiek, John Peters of Maine, Brett Yackey of Colorado and Justin Mondeik and Braison Bennett from Kulwicki’s home state of Wisconsin are Butcher’s competition in the program. Finalists receive a one time stipend of $7,777 (in honor of Alan’s NASCAR Championship winning number, #7), and the winner of the competition receives seven times that amount, or $54,439, along with the championship trophy. Finalists have access to assistance in such areas as sponsorship development, marketing and industry networking throughout the year. Points are awarded for not only on track performance, but also community engagement, social media activities and program representation. Butcher is involved with various community initiatives and charities. It is not uncommon to see his car displayed around the Halifax region and to see Butcher interacting with fans, new and old, chatting about his racing efforts.


The Butcher Racing team is a major supporter of Make-A-Wish Atlantic Provinces. Their biggest night, A Night of 3 Wishes, raised $100,000 in April, $4,100 of which came from auctioning off a driving experience at Scotia Speedworld with Cole. “It is such an honor to be a part of the KDDP program,” said Butcher of being selected as a finalist. “I would love to be the first Canadian to win it all. The program is

full of great people and excellent competition. Our racing season has gone pretty good so far. It has had its ups and down, but that’s how the sport goes.” Wisconsin drivers Ty Majeski and Alex Prunty have won the first two Kulwicki Cups. Majeski has gone on to race in the NASCAR Xfinity Series for Roush Racing in a part time role. Judging in the Kulwicki Driver Development Program runs until October 31st.

The Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour wraps up Saturday, September 16th at Scotia Speedworld. Butcher’s schedule also includes many open races, leading up to the Snowball Derby at 5 Flags Speedway during the first weekend of December. Fans can follow along with Cole Butcher’s racing endeavors online by visiting the team’s Facebook page (@ButcherRacing) or on Cole’s Twitter account (@ ColeButcher1).

BILL TESKEY, CANBUILT PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER HAS PASSED AWAY

From humble beginnings in 1969 as the Canadian distribution point for Pennzoil products, the manufacturing division was created to offer a superior line of Canadian made shop equipment geared to industrial, fleet, and the automotive industries. With unparalleled national growth in sales and distribution over the years, the company has prided itself in its ability to maintain inventory and supply a competitive product. Beginning with a very short product line, the vision he had for the company included a wide variety of shop equipment for which he had an eye for quality and sales potential. Our offering was expanded by working with suppliers from all over the world to include a comprehensive range of equipment such as floor jacks, vehicle hoists, Italian designed and made tire changers, wheel balancers as well as advanced equipment for de-carbonization, transmission diagnostics, and a complete line of technologically advanced European lubrication equipment. As an innovator, Bill created a number of new products to include the Canbuilt Lifting System, the RoboStrut, and the Canbuilt Tint meter as well as many special fixtures and jig projects for some of the transit and fleet companies across the country. Bill, with a personality larger than life, will always be remembered as a proud Canadian and a man with a big heart. Many of his customers and suppliers have come to think of him as much as a friend as a business colleague. With the Teskey family behind us and an experienced management team in place, we embrace what he has left us as we hold onto the memories, and continue to push the company forward with his spirit in mind, all of his enthusiasm, dedication and passion. s e p t e m b e r 2 017

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Around the Atlantic

10TH ANNUAL NSTSA SAFETY EXCELLENCE AWARDS

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HE NOVA SCOTIA TRUCKING SAFETY ASSOCIATION (NSTSA) PRESENTED SAFETY EXCELLENCE AWARDS TO THIS YEAR’S INDUSTRY SAFETY CHAMPIONS AT ITS 10TH ANNUAL SAFETY EXCELLENCE AWARDS LUNCHEON IN DARTMOUTH RECENTLY.

AWARD: MEDIUM BUSINESS: ALL OUTDOORS LANDSCAPING LTD. L-R: DEBBIE BOND, JESSE DEMONT, AMANDA AND CHRIS GWYNNE-TIMOTHY

NOVA SCOTIA TRUCKING SAFETY ASSOCIATION

Work Safe, Truck Safe, Live Safe, NSTSA Delivers!

Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association safety@nstsa.ca 380 Bedford Highway, Suite 205 Halifax, NS, B3M 2L4 Phone: (902) 493-3051 | Toll Free: (888) 329-9660 Fax: (902) 405-3115 | Email: safety@nstsa.ca 22

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Our Safety Excellence Award recipients have demonstrated how they have positively influenced their company’s team (CEO, supervisors, managers and workers). Their company is committed to doing whatever is necessary to ensure that everyone works safe including sub-contractors. All Safety Excellence Award recipients are employed by companies who are “Safety Certified” by the Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association and the Workers’ Compensation Board of Nova Scotia. Our membership has seen a 36% decrease in time lost from work due to a workplace injury in the past 6 years. The Prevention Incentive Pilot Project where companies participating in the “safety certified accreditation program” are eligible for a rebate has returned over $1,000,000 to the industry in rebates between 2013 and 2016.


Congratulations to this year’s Safety Excellence Award Recipients! For more information: Tel: (902) 405-3350; Toll Free: (888) 329-9660; Visit our website: www. nstsa.ca your complete trucking industry safety resource centre. NSTSA is ISO9001 Certified.

AWARD: WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE: ARMOUR TRANSPORT INC., KENTVILLE L-R: JOHN EAKIN, SANDY STARK, DAN CROSSLEY

AWARD: SAFETY CHAMPION: S&M TRUCKING, JOHN MAXNER

AWARD: WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE: ARMOUR TRANSPORT INC., NEW GLASGOW ARNOLD CHARRON s e p t e m b e r 2 017

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Around the Atlantic

AWARD: PROGRESS ACHIEVEMENT: KING FREIGHT LINES L-R: JACK THOMPSON, SHERRI MCDOWELL, DOUG HILTZ AND DARRYL WOOD

AWARD: SMALL BUSINESS: BRIAN HATCH TRUCKING - HEATHER AND BRIAN HATCH

WASTE OIL FURNACES THAT BURN HOT & SAVE MONEY!

S NLES STAI EL!! STE

Tel: (506) 458-9322

Fax: (506) 459-6110

360 Route 10, Fredericton, NB E3A 7E1 idealequipment@outlook.com www.idealequipmentltd.com Still have Cleanburn parts and service for our customers! 24

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AWARD: PROFESSIONAL DRIVER OF THE YEAR: HUGH MACDONALD, DAY & ROSS TRANSPORTATION GROUP


Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN’T USE COLLECTED FROM ALL

OVER THE AUTOMOTIVE GLOBE. WE CARE ABOUT THESE THINGS SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO! HERE’S HOW PAVING CREW SOLVED THE PROBLEM OF A PARKED CAR Autoblog recently reported about a situation that might have ended better if for once the car HAD been towed. St. Louis taxpayers are astounded over a road crew’s hasty solution: literally painting a car into a corner - with asphalt, no less. The crew was racing to complete its work in time for the weekend opening of the Kings highway bridge, which had been closed for 22 months. They were still applying asphalt on Shaw Avenue near the north end of the bridge on Saturday morning, reported local media, but were in such a hurry they apparently neglected to post “no parking” signs. And there, parked legally but inconveniently, sat a blue Kia. Their solution has been lighting up

social media ever since Pulitzer-winning St. Louis Post-Dispatch photog Robert Cohen spotted the workaround and tweeted about it. So far, the RFT says, the pavers have not circled back to fix the spot they missed Closer to home the CBC reported May 27, a similar incident in Montreal. But this incident was close to a potential construction strike that week. So the workers repaving a stretch of Rene Levesque Blvd found themselves in the process of making some hard decisions. They chose to pave around the car. That’s left an unsightly splotch of bare concrete near the corner of Montcalm, the site of which has now become a running joke online, with photos being shared on social media. Projet Montreal opposition leader

Francois Limoges said the patch of unpaved road was a metaphor for the administration of Mayor Denis Coderre. “It’s botched, it’s mismanaged and it’s improvised,” he said. “It reflects the whole administration for the whole four years. This is what happens when you don’t manage well your work.” The strike began the next morning, and one week later the National Assembly passed a special law that ordered the province’s construction workers back to work on Wednesday.

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL This ain’t the little old lady from Pasadena! An 83-year-old British lady from Worcester, England found herself in a bit of a pickle after travelling 483 kilometres to her doctor’s appointment, instead of


Carter’s Corner

the usual 10 km. What started as a regular hospital visit turned into a serious trip to Scotland for Valerie Johnson. The Independent reports roadworks close to her house confused and diverted her, and she drove for eight hours before ending up in Larkhall, Scotland, with no fuel left in the tank. Meanwhile, daughter Karen Maskell called police and booked a flight to Scotland to pick her up. According to the Scotish Daily Record, Johnson missed a turn-off and continued on a major highway in the country until she crossed the border. A couple reportedly looked after her while waiting for her daughter to pick her up from Scotland. “Mum’s next-door neighbor called me to say she hadn’t come back and he was worried. I thought she must have had an accident,” her daughter explained. “We called the police and by the time I got to her house, they said they had spotted her car on a traffic camera at Preston at 11 P.M. I said it couldn’t be my mum because she hates driving, she doesn’t usually drive more than three miles. But it was her and she was still heading north and we had to get the Scottish police involved.” Bottom of Form When Johnson’s car stopped with no fuel on the middle of the road, she told a couple from a nearby house she’s lost and needs help. They phoned the local police, who coordinated with England’s police to inform Maskell her mother is fine. An ambulance was also called to check her condition.

machine.” It’s actually the new home of local dealer Autobahn Motors, who sells luxury, sports, exotic, and supercars. “We needed to meet our requirement of storing a lot of cars. At the same time, we wanted to be creative and innovative,” said general manager Gary Hong. And the thing is, it actually operates like a real vending machine. Customers use a touchscreen display located on the ground to select a car and it appears in front of them in one to two minutes. Yes, it’s that easy to buy a used Bentley these days. The official site of the used cars dealer shows it has many different vehicles currently on sale and displayed in Singapore. The selection varies from a 2013 Volkswagen Golf Cabriolet, through tens of Porsches and BMWs, to a couple of Lamborghinis, Ferraris, and Bentleys. Interestingly, there’s even 1977 Ferrari Dino, as well as a brand new Land Rover Discovery 90. There’s also a nice office space for rent.

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And continuing our eco-theme for this issue, Rinspeed has promoted the

Bentley is making gains towards more eco-friendly cars. That doesn’t actually mean hybrid powertrains, although

This Is The World’s Largest Luxury Car Vending Machine product 2017-0516 11:08:30 . . . and it dispenses Bentleys,

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THIS CONCEPT CAR IS A GARDEN ON WHEELS

BAMBOO, PROTEIN LEATHER, MUSHROOM LEATHER, JELLYFISH MATERIAL... WHAT’S NEXT?

INTRODUCING THE WORLD’S LARGEST LUXURY CAR VENDING MACHINE

Ferraris, Porsches, and Lamborghinis. We’ve seen many impressive car dealerships around the world, but this one totally blew our minds – meet the luxury car vending machine from Singapore. The futuristic 15-floor, 60-slot showroom just opened its doors and is billed as the “world’s largest luxury car vending

the new vegan-friendly interior, apparently, the company is already researching the topic and the design team is exploring different materials. “We will shortly present a Bentley with a vegan interior, it’ll give you a luxury sensation but with a different way - protein leather, mushroom leather, jellyfish material. This is something the design and colour and trim guys are interrogating.”

PHEVs are part of the brand’s future plans, but incorporating different materials as an alternative to the traditional methods. Bentley’s Director of Design Stefan Sielaff, speaking at the Financial Times Future of the Car Summit, revealed the marque is exploring different veganfriendly options for upholsteries and trims. “You can’t sell an animal-containing product like a Bentley, with 20 leather hides, to someone with a vegan lifestyle,” Sielaff is quoted by AutoExpress. “We’ve been talking to these customers, in California especially, and they’re asking us what can we give them. We do a lot of custom-made and coach-built solutions, in conjunction with our colleagues at Mulliner, and therefore we want to satisfy these customers because they are the peak of a trend.” While there are no specific details regarding the estimated date of arrival for

“mobile office” notion in previous concept designs, and the Swiss think tank even transformed a Tesla Model S into a self-driving office on wheels. But with the debut of Oasis concept last year, the innovation stakes have certainly been upped.That’s the whole point of the Oasis concept, according to the company’s press release, which acknowledges some critics might be scratching their heads at the notion of growing plants inside a car. “Urban gardening on wheels as a new trend? A little bit out there? Maybe. But as always, the creation of Swiss mobility innovator Frank M. Rinderknecht is an oasis for inspiration in the otherwise rather expansive automotive wasteland,” the company said. The Oasis also features an onboard “personal assistant” that puts artificial intelligence to work for the car owner by linking personal data (via digital calendar and social media accounts, for instance) with the vehicle’s navigation system and traffic information. As a result, the vehicle can not only let you know whether you’ll make it to your destination on time, but can also give you a heads up if you’re about to miss an appointment.


Around the Atlantic

NB CONVOY FOR HOPE - ATLANTIC

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HE 8TH ANNUAL CONVOY FOR HOPE – ATLANTIC IS BRINGING TOGETHER ATLANTIC CANADIANS TO CELEBRATE THE GREAT SERVICE OF THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY AND SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITIES IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER.

Detailing, East Coast International Trucks, Jeramand Trucking, Action Car & Truck, The Caisse Populaire, The Gear Centre, Irving 24 & Elite Fleet. Our team has raised just over a quarter of a million dollars to

date. Please join us in the fight on August 19th 2017, It’s a great day to celebrate the survivors! Jo-Anne Phillips, Tracey Sherwood, Carol Mason, Dan Boudreau www. ConvoyForHope-Atlantic.com.

This year’s event will raise awareness and funds to combat Breast, Colon, Lung, and Prostate Cancer. Our event is unique in so many ways; - It is rare that a single event supports more than one cancer. Our team has chosen the top four that most affect Atlantic Canadians, and unfortunately those numbers of incidence and mortality are the highest of all the provinces in Canada. - All of our events are organized and run solely by volunteers. We guarantee that less than 10% of funds received will be used for essential expenses; insurance, licensing, web domains, etc. This provides more than $0.90 on the dollar to be directed straight to the cause. - Of the 4 cancers we represent Colon & lung receive the last funding in Canada. In-fact we are the largest event east of Toronto that contributes to the awareness and fight against lung Cancer. This year’s Convoy is gaining incredible momentum. We are maintaining the new route selected last year (previously from Salisbury Irving Big Stop to the Aulac, Irving Big Stop) for the Convoy to travel from the Salisbury Irving Big Stop through the city of Moncton, and coming together at the Moncton Coliseum for awards and to celebrate the survivors. A bar-B-Q hosted by Scotiabank – matching proceeds, Live Music from 18 again, a live & silent auction, 50/50 draws, a $6000 Travel voucher raffle, Face painting, Special guests Lightning McQueen & Tow Mater (courtesy of Georges Deck & Recovery, PEI), and a live demonstration from the Moncton Fire Department. We are anticipating a fantastic turn out from the community and are looking forward to sharing the hope of a cancer free future. We are changing the conversation, raising awareness, contributing funds to the research, early detection and prevention, and supporting those affected. A Special Thank You to our Long & short Haul Sponsors: Element Financial, Midland Transport, Never Enuf Chrome & s e p t e m b e r 2 017

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Bob’s Business Development

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED LABOUR MEASUREMENT

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By Bob Greenwood

HE PROGRESSION OF VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY HAS MADE A DRAMATIC DIFFERENCE IN MEASURING A TYPICAL SERVICE SHOP BUSINESS. THE AFTERMARKET MUST CLEARLY UNDERSTAND THIS PORTION OF THE BUSINESS ALL OVER AGAIN. You may recall where I have stated in past articles that a typical shop owner is going to require 6 to 8 days of management training per year moving forward. This labour measurement is one of the key changes that will have to be relearned in a management class as the old way of measurement will leave too much money on the table. As commodity margins decline and vehicle software grows, everyone must understand where their management attention must be directed. A totally redefined labour measurement will take place within the next year to maximum 2 year period. Maintenance labour category will be just that, pure maintenance work based on the manufacturers recommended service intervals and repairs of worn out or broken parts. Diagnostic labour will be the ana-

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lyzation of a situation or interpretation of information. (What is the problem, what caused it and what is the solution?) Inspection labour will be all completed paid inspections. Re-Flash will be strictly updating the vehicle from the OEM website. Calibration labour will be a new category as the lining up of sensors after a repair has taken place will become an additional specialty skill within the shop. Special tools must be purchased to restart the calibration process and vehicle software platforms will have to be understood. The key information that also will need to be understood is “what will the mix of each labour category be within the shop?” This brings back the importance of key efficiency measurement for each category as specific training will have to be required and making sure the shop has the right skill set within the team to ensure professional execution of the services on behalf of the client. The efficiency measurement of each category will also help establish the billed hours per R/O and the required “car count” that will be needed for the shop. Measuring the “effective” rate will be critical in the labour mix measurement. How much labour should we be getting from each labour category to justify the staffing level? All that being said another big change coming to the industry will be the setting of labour rates for each category. Labour rate mathematical multiples will change from what they are now which is based around the technicians hourly wage times

the multiple to working with the individual shops actual cost per billed hour. This is a unique calculation that must be clearly understood as to what it means and how to use it properly by all shop owners / managers. Better “job quoting” and “estimating” skills will have to be embraced because the knowledge for “how” a job must be done and “what kind of labour” is involved to complete the job to total client satisfaction must be learned. As you can see, personnel development and business measurement will become more intertwined than ever before. All of these things combined will dramatically affect the net profit of the business. Our industry is changing so rapidly and dynamically and the reason for this is due to vehicle technology and the technician competency that will be required to fix and maintain a vehicle properly. Imagine also the additional education that will have to take place to the consumer who has one of these vehicles. That also is going to be a skill all on its own. I see this as just the beginning of so many changes coming to the aftermarket within the next 1 to 3 years maximum. What will happen to the shops that don’t have a learning culture in their business or won’t want to re-learn and move in the direction they must? Time will not be on their side. It is this kind of change that will dramatically separate the shops in a given marketplace. Hold on for the ride over the next 3 years, it will be a great one for the shops that get it.


AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!


Truckers Corner

COLLÈGE COMMUNAUTAIRE DU NB GRADUATES FIRST WOMAN FROM TRUCKING PROGRAM

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By Andrew Skaling

FTER MORE THAN A DECADE WORKING AT VARIOUS JOBS IN THE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY, CARAQUET, NEW BRUNSWICK RESIDENT CAROLE LANDRY-POWER DECIDED SHE WANTED A CAREER.

A lifelong interest in machinery and some research around employment vacancies that indicated a high demand for truckers led her to the Collège Communautaire du Nouveau Brunswick (the francophone community college network) in Bathurst where she enrolled in their Class 1 Trucking program and began her training in April. Not incidentally, she also happens to be the first female graduate of the program! Trucking is without question a historically male dominated profession. Like every other industry that is changing, for the better, into an inclusive sphere of occupation. When asked about the trailblaz-

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ing aspect of her enrolment and graduation she responded astutely: “It’s never too late to do something you want to do. I just grabbed the reins and went with it. If you wait around for others to lead the way you’ll likely end up with nothing more than regret. I didn’t think too much about that aspect. The time was right for me and I just followed my passion and went for it.” After completing the twelve week, full-time program, Carole is now waiting to begin her apprenticeship with Armour Transport. Her apprenticeship will last four weeks and involve working with a professional driver at her side at all times while she’s behind the wheel. After that, she’ll be hitting the road as a bona fide long-haul trucker for the company. As she said: “I wanted a career not just a job. Work should be your passion and I’ve found mine.” The community College program, which is offered in both the New Brunswick Community College systems (French and English) is offered at sites around the province. The program is di-

vided into approximately 40% classroom time and theory and 60% practical workshops which includes time on the college’s state-of-the-art portable simulator and time behind the wheel of the real deal modern cab and trailer. As Carole mentioned, there has been a high demand for truckers in recent years in the province – as many as a thousand vacancies last year alone – so the NBCC and CCNB are upping their outreach to all corners of the province to promote trucking as a solid career choice. A big component of this outreach effort is the ability to visit any community with their simulator system and give, high school students in particular, a true sense of how a tractor trailer operates and the level of skill required and to outline all the myriad components of the training course. The NBCC and CCNB offer a helpful overview or checklist for those exploring the trucking career path. They describe the ideal candidate as: someone who loves the road and travel; is into heavy equipment; likes new and varied challenges; is a self-starter and autonomous worker; makes quick but informed decisions and is determined, patient and in good health. The program, which results in the granting of a widely recognized certificate, is offered at various campuses around the province with different start dates throughout the calendar year. More information is available at: www.nbcc.ca for English language programs and www. ccnb.ca for French programs. Since deadline time there have been some changes in the class 1 trucking program so check the relevant website for the most up-todate information and contacts. Back to Carole in Caraquet and she’s eager to finish her training and hit the open roads and “get trucking.” Her final thought on the subject was one of encouragement to anyone with an interest in trucking and mechanical things in general to consider a good solid career in transportation. As she said “I have no regrets about this choice, only pride and anticipation for the road ahead.”


Truckers Corner

WORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS IN CANADA

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ORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH IS FAST BECOMING ONE OF THE HIGHEST PRIORITY CONCERNS AMONG CANADIAN EMPLOYERS. Quick facts provided by the Mental Health Commission of Canada and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety tell us that: 1 in 5 people experiences a psychological health problem or issue in any given year. Psychological health problems and illnesses are the #1 cause of disability in Canada. Psychological health problems cost the Canadian economy over $51 billion per year ($20 billion results from workrelated causes). 47% of working Canadians consider their work to be the most stressful part of daily life. Only 23% of Canadian workers would feel comfortable talking to their employer about a psychological health issue. Psychological health problems affect mid-career workers the most, lowering the productivity of the Canadian workforce. In Nova Scotia, there are over 20,000 workers in the trucking industry. Linda Corkum, Executive Director, Nova Sco-

tia Trucking Safety Association (NSTSA) reports that an increasing number of inquiries received at the NSTSA office over the past six months are related to mental health and wellness in the workplace. Trucking companies have called the NSTSA asking where to seek help with mental health issues for their workers, coworkers and themselves. The biggest hurdle to overcome associated with mental health in the workplace is stigma. To address this, the NSTSA recently hosted The Working Mind Train the Trainer program delivered by the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Ten individuals representing the trucking industry participated in the five-day facilitator certificate training program including the NSTSA office team! NSTSA is the first industry association to provide this program that has been proven to be effective with proven positive results. NSTSA is now equipped to provide this training available for our industry based on the Mental Health Continuum Model on which The Working Mind program is centered. As a matter of fact, several trainers who completed the course have used some of the techniques taught in the course and they called to tell us “they really work”! We offer The Working Mind program for supervisors (full day workshop) and

for workers (half day workshop). It is an evidence-based program designed to: • • • • • • •

Reduce the stigma of mental illness Increase awareness of mental health Offer resources to maintain positive mental health and Increase resiliency The overarching goals of the program are to: support the mental health and wellbeing of employees enable the full productivity of employees ensure the workplace is respectful and inclusive of all employees including those with mental health problems and mental illnesses encourage employees to seek help for mental health problems and mental illnesses.

Information on workplace mental health and wellness, including the full report on The Working Mind program is available by visiting: mentalhealthcommission.ca. To learn more about this program or to schedule The Working Mind training for your workplace, please contact Linda Corkum, Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association: www.nstsa.ca or call 902-405-3350. THE WORKING MIND TRAIN THE TRAINER GRADUATING CLASS

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At The Car Wash

CLEAN ACROSS CANADA: CCA ENTERS ITS SIXTH DECADE

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By Carter Hammett

OR INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS IN THE AUTOMOBILE CLEANING BIZ, THERE’S NO BETTER PLACE TO TURN FOR GUIDANCE AND DATA THAN THE CANADIAN CAR WASH ASSOCIATION. For almost six decades, The Canadian Car Wash Association (CCA) has been the face of the carwash industry in our fair nation. Whether it’s providing guidance, expertise, advocacy, networking or professional development for its members across the country the association has grown from a fledging Ontario-based

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grassroots group to a strategic go-to information source for small business owners. The agency monitors trends, analyzes emerging technologies, business applications, customer attitudes and other variables that impact business and communicates this pivotal information to its members in rapid turnaround time. This has been one of the keys to its success over the years. With a mission that states, “Dedicated to Sharing Knowledge and Best Practices”, the association reaches its members through a multi-pronged approach that includes newsletters, the highly respected annual CARWACS seminars and networking events like the members’ Golf Tournament. The Association has consistently provided its members with information on how to run a successful carwash and cre-

ated opportunities to meet with industry professionals. Furthermore it’s developed some key documents, including The Getting Started Toolkit (2012) that’s helped car wash operators get their business off the ground. Another landmark study occurred in 2011 when CCA partnered with Leger Marketing to assess Canadian awareness of driveway car washing on the environment. In 2006, the Association partnered with Kent Group Ltd to collect and report market data for the car wash industry. The Wash Volume Reports provide members with the opportunity to participate in unique and confidential market research that provides information on industry performance, trends and market share. There are now 11 years of comparative data that’s accessible to all members.


LOOKING BACK It seems hard to believe now, but way back in 1959 Ted Snyders rounded up a small group of operators and held the first meeting of the Automatic Car Wash Association of Ontario on May 19 of that year. Snyders drafted a constitution for the agency and became its charter president. The following year, the association became incorporated. Although Snyder relinquished his presidency after five years, he became executive secretary, a position he held for the next three decades until 1996. During his tenure, Snyder was a central witness to the growth and development of the CCA and observed some key milestones, including the first Canadian Automatic Car Wash Trade Seminar, sponsored by ACWA Ontario, and held in 1963 at the Muskoka Sands Inn. The three-day affair included sessions on car cleaning, labour, cost accounting, equipment and general maintenance, extra income sales, complete car reconditioning, discounting, gas tie-ins and special promotions. The event was a success and the next year it moved to Niagara Falls and included the ACWA International Board meeting. Over the years seminars have expanded to include an annual golf tournament and outdoor barbeques, which have become staples members look forward to. The following decade ushered in a name change when the association formally changed its handle to The Canadian Carwash Association to reflect the geographic scope of its members in 1975. The CCA continued to add layers of recognition and service to its members, such as the inclusion of a trade fair, which premiered in 1980 in conjunction with its AGM. The following year the Ted Snyders Achievement Award made its debut and has since recognized the outstanding contributions of its volunteers who have worked with the association over the years. And whether it’s volunteers, owner-operators, suppliers or employees, there have been scores of people who have contributed to making the car wash industry what it is today.

like economic factors which impact all businesses we have shown direct correlation in cycle counts dependent on or impacted by several factors. • Precipitation amounts • Temperature • Snow on the ground • Gas prices “That said it is difficult to measure growth unless you do so in comparative

slices. You would look at market share and competition in your trade area and rate your performance against whatever industry trend information is available. We are fortunate in Canada to have a well-developed history of performance which is managed and distributed by the CCA. This along with the many trade surveys published annually provide enough data to accurately measure performance.”

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY “I would say that the state of the industry in Canada is quite healthy given that it is an industry whose performance is so reliant on external factors that make week-to-week, month-to-month and even year-over-year analysis and forecasting very difficult,” says Al Macdonald, past director & VP of CCA “Aside from things s e p t e m b e r 2 017

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At The Car Wash

A key part of that performance is the rapid and fickle evolution of technology on the industry, and whether your business is a corporate enterprise or a familyrun business, the challenge to keep up remains steadfast. Some of the emerging technologies we are seeing include:

MOBILE PAYMENTS: “Due to the increasing cost of hardware and entry payment systems there is a need to explore other solutions that reduce their dependence on such technologies. The objective is to make it easier and faster for people to wash - eliminating the friction of selecting a wash, paying for the wash, waiting for the card to activate on site etc.,” says Kirsten Potvin, Business Development, Carwash Finder Inc. and director, CCA “Mobile payment solutions eliminate the need for expensive hardware upgrades and have loyalty programs already built into the solution. These innovations are designed to make the customer experience as easy as possible, while also allowing the operator to provide incentives to the customer in order to promote a return to the car wash. As an added bonus, there is no need for the customer to have their wallet on them- as the credit card is already uploaded in the phone app – which therefore increases efficiencies and throughput onsite. “We anticipate that a large number of operators will switch from conventional

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payment methods to mobile-based payment systems in the coming years.

EMV TECHNOLOGY “Another emerging focus in payment systems is EMV technology. EMV cards are smart cards (also called chip cards) that store their data on an integrated circuit. These cards must be physically inserted into the chip reader. Certain pay station manufacturers in the car wash industry will also be adding Interac debit to their future product lines. This EMV technology increases security for the customer and reduces transactional fraud resulting from the use of counterfeit, lost or stolen cards. This should then lessen or eliminate the margin of operating losses for the site.

EPOS SYSTEMS These electronic point-of-sale systems (ePOS) allow car wash operators to sell washes, gift cards and memberships directly from their websites. It is an ecommerce stream for operators to expand their offering and provide the convenience of purchasing products while at the home or office (prior to arriving onsite)”. These and other key technologies, including touch screen payment systems which walks customers through the purchasing process and radio frequency identification which can process wash subscriptions We believe that the future of the car wash market will see many operators con-

verting to a completely cashless solution in order to save labour costs and reduce the risk of human error. The modernization of the industry has begun – but it is far from over!” says Potvin.

LEAN, MEAN, GREEN Another key element in that modernization process is juggling profit and productivity with environmental responsibility. Today’s consumer is far more informed about issues like climate change and the car wash industry is doing its bit to respond to those concerns. “With the environment being top of mind for most consumers it’s important they understand that professional commercial car washes are far superior for the environment then washing one’s vehicle in the driveway. Professional car washes use up to 80 percent less water than a driveway wash and what most people don’t realize is where that dirty contaminated driveway water is going once it leaves their driveway. It’s going directly into the storm sewer which drains untreated right into local rivers and lakes. Whereas commercial car washes have to separate the sands and oils in large separators that licensed haulers have to remove, and the remaining water goes to the local sanitary systems where it gets cleaned and then discharged into the local water ways,” says Mike Black, owner, Valet Auto Wash & past president ICA “Many local municipalities and cities around the world are now making drive-


At The Car Wash

way washing illegal due to the pollution and amount of water used. A good source of reference is the International Carwash Association’s program called www.washwithwatersavers.com    Car washes in an effort to reduce cost due to the extremely high cost of water in some parts of the country are putting in reclaim systems which can reduce fresh water consumption upwards of 50% for most car washes. The reclaim systems have advanced in recent years and the quality of the water is very good and the only fresh water needed is for some detergent mixing and for the final vehicle rinse.” It would be easy to fill an entire issue of Auto and Trucking Atlantic with just the history of the CCA. In its nearly six decades, the association has grown to mirror the trends making an impact on the industry and in turn, shared that knowledge with its members. It’s safe to say that transparency and willingness to distribute information contribute to the agency’s success. Another is mentoring the owneroperators of the future. “For individuals looking to get into

the industry a, significant self-evaluation is a good place to start. For example, if you are a hands on, mechanically inclined individual there are obvious advantages to the selfserve industry in that you closely manage all aspects of your operation and direct customer service is less critical than in a full serve operation where you must rely on a dedicated and professional staff to sell your product and complete the transaction. However, there are risks in an unattended self-serve operation that are not as relevant in a full serve tunnel wash. Vandalism and coin theft are a good example,” says Al Macdonald. “All in all, the best ways to understand the pros and cons are to take the time and visit industry events and trade shows. Take advantage of the educational sessions and new investor workshops to

CAR WASH 101, FOR THE UNINITIATED

If you thought car washes were all alike you’re sadly mistaken. Here’s a quick primer. There’s currently three car wash models being used in the Canadian marketplace: self-serve or coin-operated washes, roll-over or in-bay automatic wash system, and tunnel washes featuring a conveyor system.

THE SELF-SERVE COIN-OPERATED WASH The self-serve or coin-operated car wash generally features several bays usually 15’ wide by 27’ in length that are designed and engineered for the customer to wash the cars themselves. The customer drives into the bay, inserts payment and washes their vehicle. These bays usually include products like high pressure soap, foam brush, high pressure wax, spot-free rinse, presoak, tire cleaner, and high pressure rinse. Designated areas for vacuuming car interiors are usually also offered. In the Ontario market, self-serve coin-operated washes are generally drive in and back out facilities whereas those in Western Canada are usually indoor “ barn-style”. Most self-serve coin-operated car wash facilities also feature an in-bay automatic wash, oil change centre, or other complimentary business.

THE ROLL-OVER (IN-BAY AUTOMATIC) WASH

The most popular car wash system for gas stations in Canada, The Roll-Over allows the customer to drive into the wash bay until they reach the optimal position for washing. The vehicle remains stationary while the wash equipment moves over the car’s

CARWACS

Does anyone know what the acronym CARWACS stands for? 38

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help understand all the balancing factors and perhaps most importantly, use the resources that nonprofit industry trade associations offer and if necessary speak to an industry consultant to get even more detailed information.” Sound advice from a pro. It’s a sentiment that would have made Ted Snyders proud.

surface. Once the vehicle has been thoroughly washed, it slowly moves through the dryer and proceeds out of the wash bay. These types of washes are generally either touchless or friction (brushes). The Roll-Over system usually takes between 4-6 minutes per vehicle with maximum throughput of 15 cars per hour.

THE TUNNEL CONVEYOR WASH SYSTEM While certainly the most expensive car wash model, tunnel conveyor systems also have the ability to generate substantial revenue while washing high volumes of vehicles on an hourly-anddaily basis. This system utilizes a conveyor to move the vehicle through the stationary vehicle washing components in the wash bay. These tunnels vary from 60-to-120 feet in length. Most Canadian tunnel washes use rotating brushes with a “foam” medium to wash the car’s exterior. High-pressure water is commonly used to assist in the cleaning process. Some tunnel car wash facilities provide extra services for cleaning the vehicles inside and comprehensive detailing services. Many tunnel wash systems feature a variety of “upsell” products, including tire dressing, Clear Coat Wax, rust inhibitor or underspray, and triple foam polish to increase revenue. Tunnel wash prices vary from typically $6.00- to-$ 15.00 depending upon the wash package purchased.” – Brad Goetz, Vice President- Equipment, Mondo Products Company Limited & VP CCA

Send your ideas to Karen Dalton at kdalton@canadiancarwash.ca and we’ll send a gift card to all those who

submit the right answer. We’ll publish the results in the next issue.


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Around the Atlantic

OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE NEW!

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By Shannon Gallagher

HE BIG RIGS. BIG HEARTS. BIG RESULTS. TRUCK CONVOY FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS NOVA SCOTIA PRESENTED BY IRVING OIL IS SOON TO BE RETURNING – AND ALONG WITH IT COMES EXCITING NEW CHANGES AND SURPRISES. Nova Scotia trucking pride will be back on full display as 200 mouth-dropping #BigRig trucks make their way through 50 km of convoy route in Dartmouth, NS. Witness the true spectacle as community cheer stations are set up along route and front lawns are turned into movie theaters where people are waving their street signs and children are frantically acting out the ‘toot your horn’ motion. It is truly a oneof-a-kind experience. On September 23rd, 2017, we are set to welcome the 6th run of this event, and you know what they say-everything is better with age. Learning from experience has allowed us to come back with bigger

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and better ideas. Thanks to our partners – Irving Oil, East Coast International, Work Authority, Clearwater, Parts for Trucks, Wolseley Canada, Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association, Salvatore Insurance, Nova Truck Centre, Fisher Transport Limited, Hull Transport, Leading Edge, Diesel Spec and Macleod Lorway Insurance Group, Oregan’s, Lassonde, THRSC Atlantic, Truckers Association of Nova Scotia and Subway for making it happen. The 2017 Big Rigs. Big Hearts. Big Results convoy is also honoured to announce an awesome new addition to the convoy family, East Coast International, as the new #BigRigs sponsor. Our partnership with East Coast International has come a long way and we couldn’t be more excited with what this means for our convoy and for our athletes. “Dave loves being part of his community, it’s important to him. It’s a great way to keep the staff engaged, and it boosts morale.” said Tania Arsenault, Marketing Manager at East Coast International. As part of our partnership, East Coast International will be hosting a ‘Big Rigs Honorary Truck Convoy Marshal’ contest. “One lucky driver will be given

the celebrity treatment on convoy day. The lucky winner will be placed at the front of the convoy in a brand new International truck with their name decaled to the side of the truck and will be included in all the “celebrity” fan-fare as our special guests.” For more details, head over to our website and watch our Facebook space for more information. Our theme of this year’s truck convoy is ‘driver appreciation’ because none of this would be possible without them, which is why we want to make our drivers feel extra special. In partnership with Clearwater, 5 lucky convoy drivers who have previously poured their hearts into raising a substantial amount of money in pledges, will be surprised with a popup party. We will be showing up to their home or workplace randomly with nothing short of a celebration – balloons, party poppers, and cake. You can bet we’re pulling out all of the stops! And just when you thought one convoy was enough, we’re adding another. We have teamed up with our presenting sponsor, Irving, for a mini truck convoy that will be happening in Enfield on Sep-


tember 22nd, the day before the truck convoy. Times and details will be announced soon, so stay tuned on our Facebook page and website. But wait, there’s more. The true focus of our event is the drivers and our athletes, and pledging is the key fundraising aspect of the convoy. Donations mean that we can provide our athletes, coaches, and volunteers with the best equipment, opportunities, and experiences. In hopes of exceeding last year’s fundraising total, Parts for Trucks has come on board as our incentives sponsor to create an exciting driver incentive’s package with an awesome grand prize hamper. You can expect to see prizes like a Parts for Trucks backpack cooler, Cobra CB radio, Truck Convoy belt buckle, lobster dinner, and more! Visit our website to see how you can get in on this. To top it off, our beloved celebrities will be making their way back to Nova Scotia for the truck convoy. Come out and meet Shipping Wars cast member Marc Springer, Todd and Tamara Sturgis from Trucking is Glamorous, Chrome & Steel radio owner Bruce Lacasse, and Reno Ward from Ice Road Truckers. And finally, music lovers will be pleased to hear that Charlie A’Court will be returning again this year to play some live music during the BBQ. Charlie is a

5-time East Coast Music Award winner, Multiple Nova Scotia Music Award winner, Maple Blues Award nominee, and International recording/touring performer. As you can see, this year’s Truck Convoy for Special Olympics Nova Scotia is set to be better than ever! To keep up to date with all of the exciting things happening, make sure you are following our Facebook page @ TruckConvoyNS.

HOW TO REGISTER Truckers’ can register through our website http://truckconvoyns.ca/drive/ register/ . Cost is $125.00 per truck and includes a special driver’s bag that includes a hat, t-shirt, BBQ tickets and gifts from

our Sponsors. Lead Truck is chosen by the driver who collects the most pledges, and lead team is two or more drivers working together to collect pledges as a team. For more information, please call Anne Marie at 902-429-2266 x 2.

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Around the Atlantic

UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC 2017 PEI MEET

U

NI-SELECT ATLANTIC HAD ONCE AGAIN ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL MEMBERS CONVENTION, FROM JUNE 20TH TO JUNE 23RD 2017, AT THE CHARLOTTETOWN INN & CONFERENCE CENTER IN CHARLOTTETOWN, PEI. ERIC ALLEN AND SCOTT STONE AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

JOHN COYLE AND STEVE STOCKDALE LARGEST SALES INCREASE FOR APPLICATION PARTS

THE WINNING HORSE!

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During the Convention, we had many supplier presentations (Spectra Premium, Gates, Dorman, Exide, Mevotech, and Raybestos), Jobber meetings, Mini Trade Show, and a Special Guest Speaker Caroline Ouellette- 4 time Olympic Gold Medalist, for the National Women’s Hockey Team. Evening Events were a great success,

On Wednesday evening; we were at the beautiful “Lobster on the Wharf” with our awards banquet. Thursday evening we had a great time at the Red Shores Race Track with a beautiful meal in centerfield and a Bumper to Bumper /Auto Parts Plus sponsored Horse Race. We were pleased to present: 30 years of Service Award to Capital Auto Supplies


Around the Atlantic

presented to Rand Cook. We gave an “Award of Excellence”, in recognition of the highest level of product support, fill rate, lead times, and inventory management. This award was presented to Mevotech received by Eric Allen & Scott Stone. We also Awarded Largest Sales Increase for:

·      Non- Application Parts Category: Awarded to JET accepted by the Jet Rep: Rick Hanna ·                Application Parts Category: Awarded to DNS accepted by the DNS Reps: John Coyle & Steve Stockdale. Followed by the Recognition Awards, which are voted by the Uni-Select Atlantic Membership.

30 YEAR SERVICE AWARD RAND COOK

JOHN ROBICHAUD MEMBERS CHOICE AWARD RICK HANNA LARGEST SALES INCREASE NON-APP

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These Awards were presented for their dedicated service to the Uni-Select Membership in 2016, presented to: ·      Mark Woodburn – Brake Parts Inc. / Raybestos ·      John Robichaud- WIX We would like to thank all our Members and Suppliers for all their support and dedication throughout the years.

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MARK WOODBURN MEMBERS CHOICE AWARD


East Coast Road Report

ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION NEW BRUNSWICK

Province invests in bridges over Tobique River

The provincial government is investing in two major bridges over the Tobique River this year as part of its capital budget.

Phase II of the project on the bridge over the Tobique power dam will continue, and a multi-year repair of the Tobique River Bridge connecting the Village of Plaster Rock with Route 108 will get underway. “Strategic investments in transportation infrastructure are a key element in job creation and economic growth,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Fraser. “By making the right investments at the right time, we are improving and maintaining our roads and bridges while moving the economy forward.” Extensive repairs of the Tobique River Bridge No. 1, which crosses the Tobique River dam, has been ongoing since 2016. Phase II of the project is expected to be completed this year, with a third phase planned for the future. A tender will be awarded this month for a two-year repair of the Tobique River Bridge No. 4 in Plaster Rock. This year’s work will include repairs to pier caps and beam ends and replacement of the bearing. Next year, partial depth replacement of the bridge deck, replacement of the expansion joints and upgrades to the traffic barrier system will occur. “Both of these bridges are important components of our regional transportation network,” said Carleton-Victoria MLA Andrew Harvey. “These projects will ensure that our businesses can continue to get their goods to market and our residents can get where they need to go.” The province’s $775.6-million capital budget, which includes the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure’s capital budget of $638.5 million, reflects the government’s priority to invest strategically in its buildings, highways and bridges. Strategic investments in infrastructure are a key component of the New Brunswick Economic Growth Plan, the province’s framework for growing the economy and creating jobs.

NEWFOUNDLAND

Motorists Advised to Be Vigilant in Watching for Moose on Roadways The Departments of Transportation and Works, and Fisheries and Land Resources are warning all motorists to slow down and be vigilant in watching for 46

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moose, especially over the next several days as many people will be travelling throughout the province during the Victoria Day weekend. Motorists are encouraged to report moose sightings and accidents by calling 1-855-896-6673 (1-855-89-MOOSE). In 2016, there were 580 mooseve h i c l e collisions in Newfound land and Labrador. While moose-vehicle collisions can happen year-round, most occur between May and October, and though moose are more likely to be seen along highways and roadways at dusk and dawn, collisions often take place during other times of the day, especially at night when moose are more difficult to see. The Provincial Government partners with the Save Our People Action Committee (SOPAC) each year to increase moosevehicle collision awareness and distribute information at tourist information chalets and other public venues throughout the province. This information provides advice on how to avoid collisions. Some of those tips include: Scanning both sides of the highway when you travel; Paying close attention to warning signs; Avoiding driving at dusk and dawn when moose are more common alongside highways; Having passengers also watch for moose; and Not travelling at night when moose are more difficult to see. “At this time of year, moose are very active throughout the province and can often be found in close proximity to roads and highways. I encourage all motorists to reduce the risk of moose-vehicle collisions as they travel throughout the province this year by observing moose warning signage, obeying posted speed limits and slowing down when weather conditions warrant, ” said Steve Crocker, Minister of Fisheries and Land Resources

NOVA SCOTIA

$390M will be rolled out over seven years to twin sections of 100 series highways, other projects Nova Scotia’s Liberal government plans to spend $390 million over seven years to improve highways in the province, and won’t be using tolls to pay for the work.

The province will be seeking federal money to assist with covering the cost of the projects. On April 28, the government said the money will be used to twin three different sections of 100 series highways, improve safety and construct a four-lane  divided highway from Burnside to Bedford. This includes: Highway 101 from Three Mile Plains to Falmouth, including the Windsor Causeway. A total of 9½ kilometres. Highway 103 from Tantallon to Hubbards. A total of 22 kilometres.  Highway 104 from Sutherlands River to Antigonish, including Barneys River. A total of 38 kilometres. In a news release, the Department of Transportation states that the sections of highway will remain open while they are worked on. The push to twin those stretches has come after a series of fatal and serious accidents over the years A section of Highway 104 will also be twinned under a plan announced in April. The money also includes $30 million for safety improvements on un-twinned portions of highway. Those improvements could include new passing and turning lanes, and alterations to interchanges. A safety study on Highway 107 from Burnside to Musquodoboit  Harbour will also be completed.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Sharing the road important to bike commuter Jenny Melanson does a one-hour bicycle commute to work each weekday. She is happy to see government legislation in place to make cycling safer for all. Improvements in bike infrastructure and laws will make Jenny Melanson’s bicycle commute easier and safer. It’s been three years since she and her partner decided to use pedal power instead of gasoline to get to work. It takes her about a half-hour to travel the 10 kilometres between her Cornwall home and her downtown office. “The ride wakes me up, and it’s a gorgeous route,” she said. “Plus, it helps us get ready for bigger bike trips we have planned for summer vacation.” In the three years that she’s been cycling to work daily, she’s seen improvements both in bike infrastructure and laws. A bike lane was added to the route she frequents last summer, and recent amendments to the Highway Traffic Act will help ensure drivers keep a safe distance from cyclists. Under the new law, drivers must allow

at least one metre from a bicycle when passing. Prince Edward Island adopted the new law following the death of competitive cyclist Ellen Watters of Sussex, New Brunswick as a result of a collision with a car. New Brunswick adopted the law earlier this month. Two of the most dangerous driving habits Jenny says she’s seen are passing on a double yellow line and on a blind hill. Drivers can also be fined if they open their door and hit a cyclist. The fines will range from $200 to $500. Since Melanson wants to help raise driver awareness of cyclists, she’s a big supporter of the province’s new share the road initiative. The Province is partnering with Cycling PEI and the Insurance Bureau of Canada in an educational campaign to make sure drivers and cyclists know about the new law. “Cyclists can do their part for safety by wearing reflective clothing and putting lights on their bikes to stay visible,” she added. “And, motorists who take the time and watch out for cyclists will probably only get to their destination 10 seconds later.” With new law and warmer weather, Melanson expects her early morning commute will get even more enjoyable. “If we are all aware of the rules of the road, everyone will get along better.”


AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!


Around the Atlantic

DAN’S TRUCKERS BLEND: THE PERFECT CUPPA FOR THE ROAD

D

By Andrew Skaling

AN LESLIE’S PASSION FOR COFFEE GREW INTO A HOBBY ABOUT FIVE YEARS AGO WHEN HE BEGAN ROASTING BEANS FROM AROUND THE WORLD AT HOME IN A SMALL ROASTER.

That hobby has now grown into a new business venture that the Cape Breton resident hopes will achieve the “holy grail” for the career trucker – the perfect coffee for the long haul. With forty plus years behind him as a trucker and currently as the owner of Leslie Truck Lines Ltd Dan knows a thing or two about life on the road and the omnipresent mug of coffee that is the, at least unofficial, beverage of the industry. Dan’s journey to producer of coffee blends began a couple of years ago on a trip to Costa Rica with his wife Dawn. Some small chatter with the owner of the villa they were renting led to talk about Dan’s three self professed passions in life: Coffee, Truckers and the Country they were visiting. The following day, Jorge, the owner of the accommodations, informed the Leslies that, due to Dan’s great interest and passion for coffee, he had arranged for them to meet with and tour the area’s largest plantation cooperative. “Not being an established coffee expert or anything remotely close to that I wasn’t sure what to speak about when we met with the cooperative manager.” Dan recalled in describing that first meeting. “My first thought was to try and supply small specialty cafes with fresh Costa Rican coffee.” That first visit and tour of the coffee mill and a few farms and Dan’s business brain was churning with ideas. “After a night of tossing and turning I woke up around four in the morning with a thought. I love coffee and I love trucking and truckers. Why not a coffee blend and brand for that world!” That was it – full perk ahead to develop the idea. 50

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Later that same week Dan was regaling Jorge with his new plans and they started musing about what to call the yet to be developed coffee blend. As any visionary entrepreneur will tell you this is the fun part. They bandied around names like “Keep on Truckin’” among other names in the same vein. Then Jorge opined that because this was such a passion and in Dan’s lifelong career orbit that something more personal would be appropriate. Hence “Dan’s Truckers Blend” was born. So much for a relaxing holiday in the sun as Dan set immediately about trying different blends in a small roaster in the quest for the perfect blend. After lots of

trial and error he finally came up with what he felt was the right mix: “Finally I had a blend that I really enjoyed. Because I’m an average guy and a past trucker I knew if I really enjoyed it then most truckers probably would too.” Next order of business, whilst still in Costa Rica, Dan set his mind to the packaging and visual identity and logo of his new product. To him it was a no brainer that the branding had to have a big rig truck in it. “One afternoon I spent three hours sitting on a steep hill overlooking a highway which ran through a coffee plantation. It took that whole three hours because I waited for just the right moment for a truck to pass through with no other vehicles in the frame. The pic for our brand was taken and, funnily enough, it was with my old BlackBerry.” Fair trade suppliers lined up in Costa Rica and the business plan all sorted, the

Leslies returned home to Cape Breton. Not one to take a break, Dan formed The Cape Breton Trading Co. and purchased a small commercial coffee roaster to get to it. He began packaging samples with the plan to hand those out at truck stops on a road trip from Nova Scotia to Ontario. He literally surveyed hundreds of truckers and, of course, conducted taste tests. “The best part of all that survey effort was seeing the reaction of the truckers when they read the Dan’s Truckers Blend label. To see the word “trucker” in the name brought a smile and a glint to most eyes. The product has a small but definite morale boost aspect to it. Back when I was trucking being a trucker brought a certain respect from the motoring public. These days it seems the only thing a truck represents is something in the way. Hopefully, my coffee will help even just a little bit to boost morale.” Dan can’t stress his “building morale” mission strongly enough. It really is at the core of his newly integrated passions. Since forming his coffee company he’s been travelling extensively through the Maritimes to various trucking related events and, where possible, offering up samples and taking orders. The response has been overwhelmingly positive to the taste and quality of his blend but also the clear pride he’s projecting for the industry through his coffee beans. Slowly but surely the business is growing. Most orders are currently placed through his website (www.danscoffee.ca) with some local distribution around the Cape Breton market. The next phase of growing his labour of love business is to explore distribution through some of the larger food chains and truck stops in the Maritimes and also to target various auto and trucking related businesses. One last thing Dan nearly forgot to mention in our interview. He’s not only a trucker, businessman, entrepreneur, world traveler and coffee aficionado, he’s also a poet. He posts an ode to trucking and truckers every Sunday on his Facebook page (danstruckersblendcoffee).


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca

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Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

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Atlantic Cat

1-902-468-0581

atlcat.ca

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Atlantic Chemex

1-800-565-5144

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1-905-821-3300

axaltacs.com

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Bastarache

1-888-288-6621

bastaracheauto.com

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Blenkhorn’s

1-800-677-5807

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Bradford Exchange

1-847-581-8124

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IN

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1-800-565-0606

cabotss.com

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CARQUEST

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Dominion Sure Seal

1-800-265-0790

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Dynamic Trucks

1-888-366-2999

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

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Interstate Batteries

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Krown Rust Control

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MJS Holdings

1-866-461-1045

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Axalta

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

INTERNET

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

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4

maritimecarwash.ca

35

Maritime Pro Stock Tour 1-902-873-2277

maritimeprostocktour.com

51

Marktech Auto Equip. 1-902-527-1693

marktechauto.com

22

Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

2

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

15

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

29

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

48

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

49

NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

IN

NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

13

NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

14

NSTSA

1-902-493-3051

nstsa.ca

22

Parts For Trucks

1-800-565-4700

partsfortrucks.com

Uni-Select (BtoB)

1-506-857-8150

uni-selectcanada.com

39

Reliable Equipment

1-902-410-5877

reliablereg.ca

25

Rotary Lifts

1-866-461-1045

rotarylift.com

56

Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

33

SEMA

1-909-978-6720

semashow.com

43

Shell

1-800-661-1600

shell.ca

34

Traction Truck Parts

1-506-857-8840

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

52

autoatlantic.com

n

traction.com

worldpac.com

s e p t e m b e r 2 017

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19 55

A REMARKABLE CAREER: NAPA’S VP RETIRES

A

By Andrew Skaling

FTER A CAREER SPANNING FORTY-FIVE YEARS, JOHN BUCKLEY, MOST RECENTLY NAPA’S EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT, RETIRED IN EARLY MAY FROM A LONG AND REMARKABLE CLIMB UP THE CORPORATE LADDER, LITERALLY FROM THE WAREHOUSE, WITH THE AFTER-MARKET AUTO PARTS GIANT.

From building the bricks and mortar infrastructure of regional expansion decades ago to the adoption of advanced technology, Buckley has been a key player and witness to NAPA’s Canadian business success story and history. Mr. Buckley began working with the company in 1972 at the age of 18. His early jobs included working in the warehouse, handling inventory and doing parts delivery. A few years later, the company’s growth westward gave him the opportunity to contribute to the development of western associate stores and to help build the distribution model for the region. Over the course of his rise up the ranks he served variously as a store manager, general manager for southern Alberta, regional vice-president for Western Canada and senior vicepresident. Notably, he served on the Automobile Institute of Canada (AIA) board of directors. He also worked with government on a program to introduce at-risk youth to the automotive industry and worked with the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) on a counselling program to help women return to the workplace. In a statement on Buckley’s long career and contributions to the company’s success, UAP President, Alain Masse said: “We would like to thank John for his many years of dedicated service to the organization. He truly has played an instrumental role in building a strong leadership team across the country and strengthening the NAPA brand in all of our regions. His natural sense of leadership, combined with his great personality, inspired his colleagues for more than four decades. He will be missed by the team but we’re excited for him and wish him all the best for this new chapter in his life.” Mr. Buckley has indicated that his plans for the retired life don’t include slowing down. He wants to contribute his time and energy to his community of Calgary by working with at-risk teens and the civilian police commission.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

JULY 2017 WINNER!

Craig Davey of New Glasgow, NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is September 15th, 2017

IT’S SO EASY TO WIN!

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME: ADDRESS:

PHONE:

ACROSS

DOWN

1. With 3-Across, your favourite

1. ‘62-’71 Canada-only GM brand

read, briefly

2. “Hot” wheels driver, usually

3. See 1-Across clue

4. ‘’80s and ‘90s Toyota model

9. Flyboy’s defunct Lincoln

5. Greeting yelled from a ship

10. Nova Scotia licence plates word

6. Nickname, TV’s “Happy Days”

11. Added air to tire

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

biker (3,4)

12. Take-out food description (2,2)

7. Town in Nova Scotia

14. Showroom vehicle, often (3,3)

8. Resident of Canada’s capital

16. Crossword or sudoku

13. Mack truck mascot

19. New driver, usually

15. Really written off

20. Exhaust system’s end

17. “Goldfinger” car feature, ____ seat

23. Outlaw motorcyclist

18. Item in courier truck

24. Radiator liquid

19. Car tire inserts, once

25. Info-laden tire section

21. “Famous Potatoes” plates home

26. Bricklin gullwing component

22. Word before cab and after pit

8

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A

H E B

X

O K E

P L A

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N

17

L

25

A

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15

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13

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

A

utomotive history fans, we think you’ll like this photo of this (somewhat) well known historical car! Maybe you can name what this vehicle is, or anything more about it. Details please, and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better!

Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is September 15th, 2017.

Congratulations to Nora Valentino of Fredericton, New Brunswick who identified the racer as Jimmie Johnson, an American professional stock car driver and seven time champion in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series He drives number 48 Chevrolet SS for Hendrick Motorsports. Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

54

autoatlantic.com

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s e p t e m b e r 2 017


September 2017 Auto & Trucking Atlantic  

September 2017 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

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