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JOB DESCRIPTION . . . THE BOSS! (SEE PAGE 16)

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A SUSTAINABLE TIRE IS POSSIBLE (SEE PAGE 41)

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SOMEONE’S KNOCKING ON THE DOOR: LET ‘EM IN! With highway electrification currently being tested in Europe and Las Angeles, new directions in innovation stand poised to benefit the transportation industry and beyond.

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ROAD TEST: NEW CANADIANS MOVING FORWARD IN AUTOMOTIVE CAREERS – A unique collaboration between Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia and Nova Scotia Community College is helping new Canadians crack the barrier.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – A young driver who should know better coughs up some stiff fines for failing to pay his part of the toll….more!

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JOB DESCRIPTION…THE BOSS – whether it’s goal setting, planning the business or hiring talent, there’s one staffer whose job description can be rather elusive.

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 44 PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers rob@autoatlantic.com EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com SALES TEAM Meg Devries meg@autoatlantic.com

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ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – There’s moose on them thar highways…More!

Dan Hillier dan@autoatlantic.com

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OFFICE MANAGER James Somers james@autoatlantic.com

TRUCKING INDUSTRY CHANGES – Trucking and truckers are the backbone of the Canadian economy, and here is what’s propelling change in the sector.

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WOMEN IN CARWASH CONFERENCE EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS – Brenda Jane Johnstone’s first conference was a hit… Here’s what went down at the first event.

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IN MY BLOOD… BECOMING PART OF THE NAPA family was a natural fit for this Moncton-based operator.

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SETTING SIGHTS ON SYDNEY NS – After a two-year hiatus, stock car racing returns to Cape Breton, writes Tim Terry .

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BUMPER TO BUMPER TRADE SHOW is a hit and Susan Sangster would like to thank you, and you and you and you too!

Page 41

A SUSTAINABLE TIRE IS POSSIBLE – Genesis compound gets your tires rolling …

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NEW BUMPER TO BUMPER STORES ON THE ROCK – It would be hard to find a person more enthusiastic than Neil Browne of St. John’s, NL.

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FIX AUTO WELCOME’S BATHURST, NB TO THE NETWORK – With over 70 years in the business, Bathurst continues to drive forward and joins the Fix Auto network.

Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3S 1H6. Tel 902.423.6788 • Fax 902.423.3354. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada.

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WIN BIG! Rust Check Jacket, hat, touque and winter package, or a Stanley 123-Piece socket set from NAPA in our contests!! autoatlantic.com

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Letter from the Editor

SOMEONE’S KNOCKING ON THE DOOR: LET ‘EM IN

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By Carter Hammett

N GERMANY, SOMEWHERE BETWEEN FRANKFURT AND DARMSTADT ON THE FAMOUS AUTOBAHN, A THREE-MILE STRETCH OF THE FAMED HIGHWAY HAS RECEIVED A FACE LIFT. That’s because Germany is one of the next countries in line that is taking a chance on nurturing electric highways as the next big thing in green trucking. Testing began earlier this year with a hybrid electric-diesel truck merging into traffic while taking on power from cables overhead—similar to those used by streetcars and trolleys--which kept if from relying on its combustion engine. Germany follows Sweden’s lead after that country launched its first eHighway back in 2016—there’s also some eHighways currently being tested in Los Angeles as well—and both highways use pantographs which connect to overhead cables and draw electricity. Trucks can feed electricity into the grid when braking, which makes the system quite useful

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if there’s ever a jam. It’s the first time the experiment’s been performed on a public highway. Developed by German industrial giant Siemens and assisted with significant investment by the German government, trucks carrying the necessary apparatus attached to their roof use the cables to travel up to 90 kph without needing to burn any diesel fuel, converting back to diesel-powered internal combustion once leaving the electrified stretch. If all goes to plan, the system will demonstrate the feasibility of overhead contact systems on the Autobahn, along with how much energy they can save and pollution they can avoid. Siemens states that their system is good for places where railways aren’t available or practical and where existing road infrastructures can be electrified using their system. The testing stretch currently being used is part of an artery from the Frankfurt airport close to an industrial park that sees a lot of diesel-powered truck volume, which can assist in reducing carbon emissions than an average highway stretch. At present only five trucks will work the electrified portion daily, which means it’ll be a while before the system’s impact

can be felt, although two more systems are forecast to open soon. There’s over 13,500 heavy trucks that run that same stretch daily. In theory the smaller emissions footprint could inspire more trucking companies to move forward with eTrucks in the future. Siemens claims their system is doubly more efficient than internal combustion engines, using only half the energy. So, if 30 percent of Germany’s highway truck traffic were electrified and used renewable sources, it would negate 6,000,000 tons of C02 saving $22,400 US, Truck transportation is the fastest growing source of oil demand in the world, according to the International Transport Forum. Road transportation of goods is projected to account for an estimated 15 per cent increase in global CO2 emissions between now and 2050. This of course, threatens to undermine any progress made in reducing greenhouse gas emissions that are threatening climate change. A key part of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement is reducing carbon emissions caused by road transport and the continued innovation into eHighways could prove to be a major component in the ongoing search for innovative solutions. There can be no denying that innovative projects like this will be leading the way in the future. A pity Canada lags so far behind in this department, especially compared to other industrialized nations. New Canadians, like the ones profiled in this issue’s feature, bring a host of skills and fresh insights to the Canadian table. Unfortunately there’s a plethora of obstacles that prevent them from maximizing their contributions. Organizations like Halifax’s ISANS are making inroads into helping newcomers integrate into the Canadian marketplace and helping them get fresh starts, including those offered by the automotive sector. Diversity is essential for innovation and Canada is uniquely positioned to capitalize on this by opening the doors to the vital talent waiting to tackle a fickle marketplace. y.


ROAD TEST: NEW CA FORWARD IN AUTOM

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ANADIANS MOVING MOTIVE CAREERS A

By Carter Hammett

TLANTIC CANADA HAS JUST EXTENDED ITS ATLANTIC IMMIGRATION PILOT PROGRAM BY TWO YEARS, PLACING AN EMPHASIS ON THE SKILLS NEW CANADIANS BRING TO THE REGION. SUPPORTING THEM ALONG THE WAY ARE EDUCATION PROGRAMS LIKE NSCC’S AUTOMOTIVE INSTALLATION PROGRAM WHICH IS HELPING PEOPLE LAUNCH NEW CAREERS AND NEW BEGINNINGS. When he stepped up to the podium to accept his automotive installation certificate of completion from Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC), it’s doubtful Patrick Soumaro ever imagined himself finishing a college program, let alone one in Canada. That’s because Soumaro, 39, had spent the previous 26 years of his life living in an Ivory Coast refugee camp after fleeing for his life at the age of 13 when civil war broke out in his native Liberia. His father had been killed, he himself had been injured and separated from the rest of his family. On top of that the youngster never had any formal schooling due to the civil unrest that displaced him. While living in the refugee camp, however, he managed to acquire seven years’ informal training, observing at first, then gradually participating, in automotive work in a friend’s garage. “I tried to follow friends in the garage; it was really street training,” he says. “They used to do body work, rust work, wiring.” That experience proved invaluable when he was offered a spot in the automotive installation program through Immigrant Services Association of Nova Sco-

tia (ISANS). First introduced in 2016, the course includes fundamentals in safety standards, PPE, sector-specific terminology, car maintenance, hoist operation, tires and other things they’d see on a regular basis while working in a shop, says NCSS’s Transportation Department Facilitator Dave Giles. “A lot of emphasis is placed on tires,” says Giles. “That’s a big part of what they’ll be doing.” So students familiarize themselves with size, depth, torc among other variables.” After that students are split into two, where they actually get to experience driving the car into the shop. And working on hoists. “Some get it quick while others struggle. They have to do it right. We’re all about perfection,” says Giles. Auto installers aren’t part of the regulated trades. The course instructs them in tasks like oil and tire changes, accessories, exhaust and other variables that don’t require licensing. “Tire shops and places like Mr. Lube don’t require licensed personnel, so they can sell, repair, balance, install and other tasks so long as they’re not trade-regulated,” says Giles.

INTRODUCING ISANS And that provides a good entry point into the Canadian market place for many new Canadians says Mohja Alia, employment services manager with ISANS. The non-profit agency offers settlement services, including language training, form filling and bridging programs to dozens of new Canadians landing in Nova Scotia every year. In response to labour market demand, three courses were identified by ISANS and subcontracted out to NSCC: construction, food industry and automotive installer, says Alia. “They are very successful programs,” she says. “Many people get jobs very quickly.” She says some clients arrive in Canada with automotive experience in their home countries already under their belt. autoatlantic.com

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Human Resources

“That’s been very helpful in getting clients started with an apprenticeship.” Some of the more entrepreneurial clients simply move through the program and strike out on their own. “We had someone start their own tire changing business,” says Alia. “We try to support business start-up.”

CAN’T GO IT ALONE Immigration has long been sought out as a solution for a widening skills gap across multiple Canadian industry sectors—including transportation--and a new report by The Conference Board of Canada, published in May re-emphasizes this. Titled Can’t Go It Alone: Immigration is Key to Canada’s Growth Strategy, the study considers a variety of labour force scenarios over the years 2018 to 2040 before arriving at its conclusion. During this two-decade period, 9.2 million baby boomers are expected to reach retirement age in tandem with a parallel increase in demand on publiclyfunded social services. With a projected 11.8 million students graduating Canadian schools during that period, there will still be a shortfall left by

TRADES PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM Employers: Are you interested in hosting an experienced immigrant trades-person for 12 weeks at no cost? The Trades Practical Assessment Program connects employers across Nova Scotia with experienced tradespeople. As a host employer, you offer the chance to work in your organization for up to 12-weeks at no cost to you. There is no obligation to hire; you have the opportunity to assess their skills on the job and provide recommendations on apprenticeship and exam level readiness. Participants are keen to participate they gain valuable Canadian work experience, local references, experience towards their level or Red Seal and the opportunity to network and showcase their skills. All participants have a minimum of 2 years’ experience in their trades, are certified  in WHMIS, Fire Safety and First Aid, and are job ready and legally eligible to work in Canada. What are the benefits to you? Flexible: Participants are flexible and can start with entry level tasks Low Risk: Tradespersons are insured against injury at the workplace through ISANS 8

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the 13.4 million workers expected to retire or leave the labour force at that time. The study concluded that a combination of gradually rising immigration levels and increased labour force participation of women, Indigenous peoples and persons with disabilities was the “best path forward” for Canada and would produce a net labour force increase of 5.9 million workers. It’s worth noting that many of the 11.8 million Canadians who will be leaving school and entering the workforce between 2018 and 2040 will be the sons and daughters of immigrants. These individuals become important contributors to the Canadian labour market, which in turn helps the country’s economic performance. Indeed, while the future anticipates the value new Canadians bring to the table, Atlantic Canada still struggles with attracting and retaining new Canadians today. Case in point: according to an excellent series of articles, The Saltwater Deep Dives, in the Chronicle Herald earlier this year, there was a record 19,300 immigrants that entered the region’s workforce,

between 2012-2018. However, that wasn’t enough to offset a 2.4 per cent decline — 30,700 people — in the labour market, mostly because of retiring baby boomers. Adding further frustration to the situation is the region’s track record for keeping immigrants in the area. Stats range from a high of 72 percent in Nova Scotia to a mere 18 percent in PEI. The Atlantic Immigration Pilot In response, strategies are needed to address this issue. One of them, the three-year The Atlantic Immigration Pilot (AIP) program was launched in 2017 and recently extended to December 2021. According to a press release from the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, AIP “is an innovative partnership aimed at attracting and retaining skilled immigrants and international graduates to meet the unique workforce needs of the Atlantic region. The goal is to ensure the longterm retention and integration of newcomers in Atlantic Canada to help drive economic growth. AIP is employer-driven. Most immigration programs begin with someone applying

Targeted: Individual skills are matched with employer needs Career Focused: Tradespersons are connected to the Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency and eager to become certified in their trades No Strings Attached: No obligation to hire or pay – allowance covered by ISANS For more information please contact Mai Al Nabhan | 902-406-8846 |  malnabhan@isans.ca

NB E2K 3E2 Phone: 506-634-4860 - newcomerconnections@saintjohnY.com

COMMUNITY AGENCIES SUPPORTING NEW CANADIANS

Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia 6960 Mumford Road, Suite 2120 (2nd floor) Halifax, NS B3L 4P1 Phone: 902-423-3607 info@isans.ca PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada 49 Water Street, Charlottetown, PE C1A 1A3 Phone: 902-628-6009 Association for New Canadians 144 Military Road, St. John’s, NL Phone: 709-722-9680 - settlement@nfld.net YMCA of Greater Saint John 191 Churchill Boulevard, Saint John,

Multicultural Association of Fredericton 28 Saunders Street, Fredericton, NB E3B 1N1 Phone: 506-454-8292 - mmcaf@ mcaf.nb.ca Multicultural Association of the Greater Moncton Area 22 Church Street, Suite C170, Moncton, NB EIC 0P7 Phone: 506-858-9659 info@magma-amgm.org


Human Resources

to immigrate to Canada. Under AIP, Atlantic employers (such as businesses, not-forprofits, governments) apply to a province to become designated under the pilot. This means they can offer jobs to skilled foreign workers and recent international graduates. These jobs must be in the province where the employer is designated and for every job offer, employers have to demonstrate that local workers haven’t been able to fill the void. The province where the candidate will work must endorse the job offer. After the endorsement, the candidate can apply for permanent resident status. The candidate can live and work in Canada when the application is approved. AIP has three programs divided by skill levels, each of which have multiple steps that need to be completed in full: High-skilled, intermediate-skilled and an international graduate program. Candidates need to have accumulated at least 1,560 paid hours over the past three years. Internships, volunteering and self-employment aren’t considered valid, however those hours can be accumulated both inside and outside Canada. Furthermore, work experience can be used to qualify for the intermediate skilled work program in a two ways, including experience that matches National Occupation Classification skill level, C, which includes job-specific training like long-haul truck drivers. Language and education qualifications

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must also be assessed and applicants must have enough money to support themselves among other variables. A job offer must be received from a designated employer using a specific form. It has to be permanent, full-time (30+ hours weekly) and can’t be seasonal. Finally, the employer and employee submit the application form once all the steps have been completed. Through the pilot, more than 2,535 approved permanent residents are destined for or already in Atlantic Canada. As of May 2019, AIP is allowing immigrant spouses with intermediate skill level, such as food and beverage servers or long-haul truck drivers, an opportunity to apply for an open work permit. This change supports the Atlantic Immigration Pilot’s goal to ensure newcomers who arrive in Atlantic Canada, remain. AIP is part of The Atlantic Growth Strategy’s objective is to drive long-term economic growth in the Atlantic region by implementing targeted, evidence-based actions under the following priority areas, innovation, trade and investment, infrastructure and climate change.

FINAL THOUGHTS Patrick Soumaro is happy. He’s just achieved level 4 English the week of our interview. He’s made a conscious decision to put his job search on hold so he can focus on his English studies. It’s a short term achievement acquired as part

of a longer-term plan. During his automotive installation course studies, English was perhaps the most daunting part of his course. Learners are required to use a computer to research parts and costs. ISANS recognizes that language can be a barrier and supplies interpreters on an as-needed basis to help facilitate student learning. “For some work you need to have education and skills,” he says. “I want to be a mechanic or do auto body work…I want to be in the automotive sector.” To date 48 students have graduated the automotive installation progam, says Dave Giles. “The employment rate is pretty good. At the end of the day students are provided with an introduction to Canadian culture. They learn about what employers expect. Some students go on to other industries, some enroll in further automotive studies…some even open their own shops.” “Shop owners should know that there’s entry-level people out there willing to do the work. There’s wage subsidies and lots of support available if shop owners take on a student. “It’s a good program and allows the opportunity that might not have been available in students’ home countries, whereas here it’s seen as a profession. They’re privileged to have the chance to take this program.”


Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD

S

ELECTIONS FROM THE STRANGE, BIZARRE AND NEGLECTED COMPILED FROM AROUND THE INTERNET TO HOPEFULLY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR DAY STIFF PENALTIES INDEED! The Philadelphia Inquirer recently reported that the worst toll evader in Pennsylvania is being ordered to pay up. The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that Jarrett Stiff didn’t pay for trips on the Pennsylvania Turnpike 2,264 times from 2012 to 2017, more than anyone else in the state. The 36-year-old from suburban Philadelphia racked up nearly $128,000 in unpaid tolls and subsequent fines. In a deal with prosecutors, he pleaded guilty in April to theft of services, was ordered to pay over $11,500 and was sentenced to five years’ probation. No attorney to speak for him is listed in online court documents. Stiff’s case and two others resolved in suburban Philadelphia this week are the latest examples of the Turnpike Commission’s aggressive new approach to toll evaders. The commission began pursuing felony charges against toll scofflaws who owed $2,000 or more in an effort to recoup hefty losses from unpaid tolls.

MAN GETS DUI AFTER LAWNMOWER CRASHES INTO POLICE CAR

lawn mower with a trailer, according to the Bradenton Herald. The officer noticed minor damage to a rear plastic piece on the vehicle, and Anderson admitted hitting the cruiser but insisted there was no damage. Anderson told the officer that he was drunk, according to police. Officers said Anderson was unable to complete the field sobriety tests and said his demeanor “ranged from laughing to aggressive.” After Anderson was taken into custody, he reportedly accused the police of poisoning him and asked to be taken to a hospital, according to local media. Police said that Anderson’s blood-alcohol content registered .241 ― more than three times the legal limit ― and that he also had cocaine in his system. However, Anderson insisted the police put the cocaine in his system, making his point with profane language and racial slurs, local media reported. Along with the DUI, An-

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NO ALLIGATOR SHOES FOR THIS DRIVER… Here’s an odd one! The Associated Press reported a story about how sheriff’s officials said a Florida woman pulled a small alligator from her yoga pants during a traffic stop May 6. The Charlotte County sheriff’s deputy stopped a pickup truck after it ran a stop sign. Driver Michael Clemons, 22, told him he and his passenger Ariel MachanLe Quire, 25, were collecting frogs and snakes under an overpass. He gave the deputy permission to search bags in the truck. When the deputy found 41 3-stripe turtles in the woman’s backpack, he asked if she had anything else. She pulled the 1-foot (0.3-meter) gator from her yoga pants. Charlotte County Sheriff’s officials suggested an explanation on Twitter for the incident: “Not to be outdone by #FloridaMan, a #FloridaWoman pulled an alligator out of her pants.” The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission took over the investigation.

AND FINALLY….

derson was charged with refusing to submit to a DUI test after a license suspension. He has two prior DUI convictions and his license has been suspended since 1978, police said.

DRIVER CITED FOR USING MANNEQUIN TO DRIVE IN CARPOOL LANE

A Florida man is facing charges of driving under the influence after he crashed his riding lawnmower into a police car the Huffington Post reported in May. The Haines City Police Department said 68-year-old Gary Wayne Anderson crashed into the vehicle while an officer was away from the car, according to the Lakeland Ledger. The officer walked back to the car after hearing the crash and saw a man on a

HOV occupancy violations.

UPI.com reported May 7 about how police in New York state said a driver was cited after a sharp-eyed officer noticed he was using the carpool lane with a mannequin as his passenger. The Suffolk County Police Department said Highway Patrol Officer Andrew Spina was driving early in May on the Long Island Expressway when he noticed something seemed suspicious about the passenger in a 2002 Saturn that was using the high-occupancy vehicle lane. Spina pulled the vehicle over and discovered the passenger was indeed a dummy that had been disguised with clothes, sunglasses and a baseball cap. The driver, James Britt, was cited for

Back in April, Autoblog told the story of a 20-month-old boy who survived a six-story fall from suburban Seattle apartment window after he landed on the roof of a parked car that cushioned the impact of the plunge. The toddler “landed in a way where the car absorbed enough of the impact that he was awake and crying when paramedics arrived” Wednesday afternoon, Redmond police spokesman James Perry told local media. The boy was in serious but stable condition at a hospital. Just before the fall, the toddler was alone in a bedroom, while his mother and two siblings were in another room, Perry said. Investigators believe the boy propped himself on the edge of a window that was cracked open, pushed through a screen and tumbled about 60 feet. The owner of the Mazda sedan that the child fell on was amazed that the boy survived. Edward Lu told local media that the only reason the car was there was because he had decided at the last minute to ride his bike to work that day. Had the car been gone, the boy would have landed on pavement. “That’s a big dent,” Lu said. “I couldn’t believe it.”


If we knew, we’d have baked a cake! Don’t let your next anniversary pass by unnoticed. Call us, we can help. Do you have something Big to Celebrate? Your company’s Anniversary, or a Grand Opening, Newly Renovated Premises or Addition of a New Branch. We can help you promote this event! All we would require from you is a supplier list that you would like us to contact to support your feature. We would do all the work required to put together a professional informative feature with editorial stories, pictures etc. This is a very effective way to promote your latest important news with a minimal amount of effort on your part as we do all the work! We would also give you a couple of hundred copies of the feature to have on hand and use however you like. Call us in Halifax, NS toll free at 1-866-423-3939 or Email us anytime at info@autoatlantic.com for the details on what we can do for your business!

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Bob’s Business Development

JOB DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . THE BOSS

A

By Bob Greenwood

LOT OF TIME HAS BEEN SPENT BY M A N Y S HOP OWNERS WRITING OUT THE VARIOUS JOB DESCRIPTIONS REQUIRED THROUGHOUT THEIR BUSINESS. I find it interesting that they will never spend time writing out a full description for their own position. Yes “the Boss” is a position within the shop and it is the most critical position to understand when it comes to shop responsibilities and success. Let’s go through the Boss job description and then you take the time to compare to this list and evaluate how you are doing. Be honest with yourself. Set Goals – it is the owner/management’s responsibility to establish proper goals and objectives for the shop that must be met daily, weekly, monthly and quarterly. The math and the processes that require change must be proven. No “let’s try it and see if it works” program is acceptable in this day and age. Datelines must also be set for each goal to keep the “boss” accountable. Plan the Business – Once the goals and objectives are set then the owner/ manager must plan the strategy and processes required to achieve #1. Exactly “how” are we going to do this, in what time frame and who is involved? It is the detail required in this step that is so important. Hire Remarkable People – Owners/ Managers must take this responsibility seriously and get away from “entitlement” issues or how long a person has been in the shop. If an employee has been in the shop for 5, 10, 15 or more years BUT is not keeping up with the times and desire to be the very best, then they must be repositioned into a productive position they have the skill for or let go. Complacency in this business cannot be tolerated because we are in a safety and reliability business with our clients. Remember this also: “Good people leave a business because bad people stay”. Talented people want to work with a company that has an excellent culture and accountability in16

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stilled into the system. That’s how professionals think and that is the type of team you want to build into the business. Bring out the Best in People – It is the owner’s responsibility to build a positive and productive team. Micro managing and/or managing people by fear is so archaic today. Establish a daily routine of finding one positive thing each team member did each day and sincerely bring it to their attention. Don’t patronize. Talk to them and compliment them on what they did no matter how small it may seem to you, it could be important to the team member to actually hear something positive out of the boss’s mouth. Challenge everyone to always strive to be the very best that they can be and reach for new horizons they perhaps once only dreamed of. Support their ambitions through your behaviour and watch how loyalty becomes part of the business culture because everyone learns that everyone has

each other’s back. It’s just not about me, it is about us. Ensure the Success of the Company – This is the biggest responsibility of all. You the owner have asked people to join your team BUT it is just not the individual, it is also their family. If you do not do your job properly and the business fails, you have dramatically affected the lives of the people in the business. Remember that employee’s think differently than employers and that is why they are employees. Don’t take this Boss position lightly. Do your job properly and not only will the culture of your business flourish, you will find that great clients will want to deal with the business as they actually enjoy the experience considering the grudge purchase they must make with their vehicle. You are the owner. You are the Boss. Should you get a raise or should you be fired? Re-examine your position and responsibilities carefully.


East Coast Road Report

ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT: LATE SPRING - EARLY SUMMER EDITION

B

ITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO! NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

Motorists Reminded of Increased Moose and Caribou Presence on Highways The Departments of Fisheries and Land Resources and Transportation and Works reminded drivers in a press release April 25 to watch out for moose and caribou on the highways, particularly in the St. Anthony and Howley areas where increased caribou activity can be anticipated as they migrate from their wintering areas. “We are also approaching the period where adult female moose are preparing for spring calving and calves from the previous year are being abandoned. These young animals may pose an increased risk to motorists on highways since they tend to be very active and may move long distances. “Motorists should be vigilant of moose and caribou at all times, particularly before and during the calving season and

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throughout the summer. Due caution should be exercised during these periods. Motorists are also reminded to be cognizant of speed when visibility is reduced, particularly when driving at night.

NEW BRUNSWICK

Provincial purchase of salt from local mine will create new jobs

The provincial government announced May 6 an agreement to buy its supply of road salt from the Nutrien mine in Sussex, a decision that will support 50 mining jobs and generate economic spinoffs in the region. “This agreement will put local companies first, grow our economy and support

New Brunswick workers,” said SussexFundy-St. Martins MLA Bruce Northrup. “I am very proud that this fall, the salt applied to provincially-managed roads will once again be sourced right here in New Brunswick.” By entering into this agreement, the provincial government has ensured the continued operation of the mine in Sussex. The mine currently employs 34 workers to maintain the facility and undertake decommission tasks. The workforce will increase to 50 to support the two-year supply agreement. Decommissioning of Nutrien’s potash operations will continue as planned. “This agreement demonstrates how serious we are about supporting regional resource development,” said Energy and Resource Minister Mike Holland. “It is important to the economy of New Brunswick that we put our own resources to good use by accessing an operation that is already in place.” On average, the province purchases about 180,000 tonnes of road salt per year. For the past two years, the road salt used


by the province has been outsourced from Nova Scotia and Quebec. The agreement is not expected to result in a change to the price of salt. “We are happy to have found a way to keep employment within this community, and we thank the provincial government for their hard work to help us make this happen,” said Doug Doney, general manager of Nutrien’s operations in New Brunswick. Other salt users including municipalities, schools, hospitals, and private operators of Route 1 and Route 2 may purchase salt through the government’s contract. The average annual salary in New Brunswick for non-metallic mineral mining and quarrying is just over $80,000. It is estimated the increased payroll will generate around $685,000 in personal income taxes and other taxes payable to the province. Local and provincial businesses will benefit from the injection of purchasing power from an incremental payroll of close to $3 million.

NOVA SCOTIA

Paqtnkek Mi’kmaw First Nation launches $10 million hwy showcase Back in March of this year, Paqtnkek

Mi’kmaw Nation announced a partnership with Wilsons Fuels and Calgary-based Husky, who will supply an Esso-branded outlet in the community’s new commercial development 20 kilometres east of Antigonish. Husky will supply diesel fuel to the station’s Cardlock operation as a convenience for long-haul truckers on the TransCanada Highway to and from Cape Breton and Newfoundland and Labrador. “This is a historic time for our community,” Chief PJ ‘Paul’ Prosper said. “We are creating a better economic future for ourselves and future generations. We are thrilled to have such credible business partners as we launch the Bayside Travel Centre; phase one of our commercial development. Adjacent to the Bayside Travel Centre will be an entertainment centre containing video lottery terminals under the Band’s gaming agreement with the Nova

Scotia Gaming Corporation. This is a relocation and expansion of the existing Band-owned business. The travel centre is expected to open in the summer of 2019. The Band will consult with community members about phase two of the development, which will be located just to the east of the travel centre. “We are thrilled to be a part of this commercial development along the TransCanada Highway near Antigonish,” Steve Perry, Maritime account manager, Wilsons Fuels, said. “We are very proud of our relationship with the Paqtnkek community and look forward to our bright future together.”

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Look twice for motorcycles As warmer days arrive, more Islanders are enjoying PEI roads on their motorcycles. A reminder that law enforcement officers will be conducting special traffic checks throughout May to ensure motorcycle riders and drivers are driving safe. Scott Lundrigan, PEI Crimestoppers coordinator and a retired police officer who rode a motorcycle on patrol, has seen too many motorcycle collisions and has some safety advice for motorcycle autoatlantic.com

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operators. “From personal experience, I know that proper safety gear can make the difference between a collision you walk away from and one that lands you in the hospital or worse,” said Lundrigan. “Eye protection prevents momentary blinding, protective clothing protects you from serious scrapes if your bike slides and everyone knows that a helmet can save your life.” Safety tips for motorcycle riders Make sure your motorcycle is in good working condition, including rubber, brakes and lights that are working properly. Being seen, and the ability to stop or maneuver out of a dangerous situation is often your best defense. Motorcycle riders should have an up-to-date motorcycle inspection to ensure good tire condition and braking/steering/suspension components. Always ride closer to the center line, rather than the middle of the road and shoulder, so you can see oncoming traffic more easily and they can see you. Pay attention to the road and never drive while impaired or distracted. Ride according to your skills and ability. Avoid riding in bad weather; wet roads are dangerous on two wheels. Consider taking a motorcycle safety course to learn more about 20

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safe riding. “While it is crucial that riders drive defensively, other drivers have an equal responsibility for the safety of everyone on the road,” said Lundrigan. “Making a complete stop at intersections or when entering the road is a crucial safety practice. Motorcycles are small and can be easily missed in a car’s blind spots so it’s important to check twice for motorcycles.” Safety tips for drivers Many collisions occur when left turns are made suddenly in front of an oncoming motorcycle. When making a left turn, be patient. Make sure there is not a motor-

cycle behind a string of cars. Don’t crowd a motorcycle from the rear, as most motorcycles can brake faster than a car. Even a small collision with a motorcycle could result in life changing injuries or death for the rider. “Whether on a motorcycle or in a car, the biggest safety tips are always the same – follow the rules of the road, never drive distracted or while impaired by drugs or alcohol and slow down.” said Lundrigan. “Motorcycle riders – and all drivers - are reminded they are required to have valid driver licences, registration and insurance before enjoying Island roads.”


Truckers Corner

TRUCKING INDUSTRY CHANGES . . .

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By Kenneth E. Seaton

RAGEDIES OFTEN BRING OUT THE WORST AND SOMETIMES, THE VERY BEST IN PEOPLE. AND, SOMETIMES THE CIRCUMSTANCES THAT LEAD UP TO THE TRAGEDY, FORCE PEOPLE TO ADDRESS ISSUES THAT COULD HAVE GONE UNADDRESSED FOR A LONG TIME. The Humboldt crash has directed high beams squarely on trucking and the trucking industry. It has focused keen interest – on what has been and what’s currently going on – on Canadian hi-ways and byways across the country. The initial responses to the tragic accident were to tar and feather the truck driver; however, as time progressed and as realities came to light, its clear that there are some serious issues festering within the trucking industry. There once was a time when being a trucker was considered a good profession! Where drivers could make a pretty decent living as they made a career out of sitting behind the wheel of a big rig. However, nowadays many things have changed. The industry is faced with a severe driver shortage and is often running less experienced drivers in ever more complex rigs. Trucking companies, fleet owners and by extension – usually drivers with inferior training – are becoming solely fixated on a need for maximizing profits by; going faster for longer periods of time and on doing end runs around government rules and regulations. Sometimes, Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) on trucks were not installed, or were improperly installed or, even ignored or disconnected by someone. Problematic combinations lacking regulatory rules and laws have conceivably driven the industry towards where it is today. A stumbling government that has often neglected its industry infrastructures and insufficient auditing by Transportation Ministry inspectors has resulted in some in the trucking industry taking over the running of the roads.

TRUCKERS AND THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY ARE THE BACKBONE OF THE CANADIAN ECONOMY In 2014 the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) released its Canada Transportation Act Review¹. The report concluded

that over 90% of all consumer products and foodstuffs are shipped by truck in Canada. Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the for-hire trucking industry was valued at $17 billion, but its impact on the Canadian economy was estimated


Truckers Corner

at $65-billion overall, based on benefits to the economy through sales, jobs and taxes generated by firms and sole proprietors operating in the trucking sector. At the time of last year’s crash, inexperienced drivers – often with little or no training – could climb behind the wheel of a big rig and head out onto the highways. All that was required, was that they could pass a class drivers exam, and to find a company willing to bend the rules to accommodate their lack of experienced driving skills. In addition, some unregulated and unscrupulous truck driving schools were taking advantage of loopholes that allowed the schools to circumvent provincial oversights and churn out inadequately trained graduates. Numerous owners and trucking industry experts have been pushing for government recognition that truck driving is a ‘skilled trade’. Official designation status would prove a very progressive step towards promoting driver immigration – permitting the hiring of trained and experienced drivers – as a way of helping to address the looming driver shortage. A change in status would make it more appealing and less complicated for employ-

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ment consultants and global fleet owners to recruit and hire foreign drivers. Jean Marc Picard, executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association (APTA) thinks that commercial truck drivers should have the designation of a ‘skilled trade’ and the sooner the better. He maintains that, “This country is dependent on commercial trucking for the transportation of all goods and keeping the economy moving and our most important position is the truck driver.”

TRUCKING INDUSTRY CHANGES ARE COMING In 2018 Ontario was the only province that required drivers to take a Mandatory Entry-Level Truck driver training (MELT). However, more governments are now getting on-board, as Alberta and Saskatchewan have recently released the initial framework for their own programs. Manitoba plans to follow their lead and has announced that its own program will begin later this year in September. MELT programs will be required nationwide by the beginning of 2020. The remaining provincial and territorial jurisdictions are currently conducting, or have

conducted, reviews of training standards for commercial entry level training. As of March 2019, Alberta had introduced and implemented new training and operating requirements for trucking companies and their employees. The training requirements were to include: Standardized curriculum in all driver training schools. Specified hours of training required for in-class, in-yard and in-vehicle. Enhanced knowledge and training on professional driving habits, vehicle inspections and airbrakes.

INCREASED NUMBER OF YARD AND ROAD TESTS TO BE CONDUCTED The Saskatchewan government announced that as of March 15 of this year, transit drivers would need to complete 121.5 hours of training before they’d be eligible for testing on a Class 1 trucking license. Presently, there’s little regulation in Saskatchewan regarding the training of transport truck drivers. On Jan 21, 2019 the CBC News reported that Transport Minister Marc Garneau made an announcement while attending a transport ministers meeting in Montreal.


Truckers Corner

He declared that, “new regulations for semi-truck driver training will take effect across Canada about a year from now.” Garneau also stated that minimum entrylevel semi-truck driver training standards will be developed for next January. Driver training schools will have to follow and closely adhere to the new standardized curriculum. Local governments will be tasked with ensuring that those who deliver the training will be held to higher standards. Previously, some unregulated truck driving schools were found to have exploited loopholes that allowed them to skirt around some provincial oversights. In February, several western news agencies reported that numerous agricultural groups had complained to the Albertian government about the newly imposed training requirements. They maintain that training requirements would have unintended consequences for those farmers who were dependent on seasonal labour. Many farmers have also voiced their concerns that the new rules would interfere with spring seeding. Subsequently, the Alberta government announced that – while it was not granting an exemption to the agriculture industry for the new rules – it would be extending its deadline for farm workers. Those farm workers, who wanted to obtain a Class 1 licence would now have until March 1, 2020 to complete the new mandatory trucker training programs.

STANDARDIZING ELD RULES As technology rolls along, it is forcing many things to go the way of the Dodo, and truck drivers old fashioned logbooks can be counted amongst them. Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) will soon be re-

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quired usage for all drivers. As a driver’s tool it is used to document a driver’s Record of Duty Status (RODS). RODS are used by drivers to prove their compliance of all driver regulator standards i.e. hours behind the wheel, time spent resting between driving shifts and other important information. Drivers must present their up-to-date logbooks for roadside inspection and enforcement officers, fleet mangers, etc. Many companies and individual drivers are switching over to ELD’s as a more organized and efficient means of tracking, managing and sharing RODS information. Devices can connect with the trucks’ engine and driving time data is transferred directly to the ELD, thus making for an easier and much more accurate method for drivers to keep and record their hours of service requirements. The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) released The Impact of Canada’s Regulatory Structure on Small Business² in 2019. In it they reported that, “Based on cost benefits performed in the United States the estimated benefit to Canadian governments and business from switching from paper logbooks to electronic logging devices is 80 million dollars. This efficiency gain is related to reduction of paperwork time/effort leading to more logistical efficiencies for drivers/ small businesses --an increase in $2000 in revenue per driver in Canada.” A ruling finalizing the requirements for Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) on trucks which drivers must comply with hours-of service rules will be coming soon to the Untied States. Transport Canada has published a first draft of its ELD rules; however, it has not indicated on just when the final regulations would be

announced. The regulations would only apply to federally regulated carriers and individual provinces and territories would need to adopt the rules before they are applied to other carriers.

MORE TWEAKS AND REVISIONS ARE ON THE ROAD The CTA, along with various other groups, are remaining steadfast in their effort to direct attention towards the need for a trucking-focused immigration program to aid in offsetting the current/ looming truck driver shortage. Trucking industry experts are also continuing to urge further government assistance, greater government support and cooperation as it moves towards modernizing the industry. One of its goals is to make the industry more appealing to women and millennial drivers. Commercial truck drivers are supposed to adhere strictly to hours of service regulations. They must log personal conveyance’s odometer readings and to make the appropriate adjustments, when necessary, from their daily total distance traveled mileage records. Electronic recording devices – like ELDs – should remove some of the wiggle room that is currently being exploited. With the signing of the new CanadaUnited States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA), Canadian truckers and the industry can expect further changes to come when the agreement reaches the ratification stage. With the current forceful promoting of American interests, new regulations changes are sure to have an impact on Canadian drivers, owners and the industry.

¹ Canada Transportation Act Review, Prepared by: CTA. PDF file. Fall 2014 ² The Impact of Canada’s Regulatory Structure on Small Business, Prepared by: CTA. PDF file. Feb 2019


At The Car Wash

WOMEN IN CARWASH CONFERENCE EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS!

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HE FIRST INTERNATIONAL WOMEN IN CARWASH CONFERENCE WAS HELD IN BEAUTIFUL NIAGARA FALLS, ONTARIO. It was a unique event that exceeded

expectations and left its’ guests enriched and inspired – so inspired that organizers are planning a second and third edition for 2020. What a wonderful experience of learning, networking, and growing ideas through meaningful interaction with insightful and informative speakers. The

very first conference has already begun to change the culture of the industry to promote greater collaboration across all areas of the business. All of this along with the professionalism on display throughout this event offers a definite value-add for anyone attending. – Amy Cantin from,

Help us celebrate 20 years of safety in Nova Scotia! Save the Date!! As the NSTSA enters into its 20th year of operation. We are planning a very special evening to celebrate safety in the truck transportation industry.

Suite 205 - 380 Bedford Highway Halifax, NS B3M 2L4 Phone: (902) 493-3051 Toll Free: (888) 329-9660 Fax: (902) 405-3115 | nstsa.ca 28

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Zep Vehicle Care The educational, productivity-focused workshops included topics geared towards helping attendees build their businesses and better engage with colleagues, family members, and industry peers. The sessions were focused on stress management, personality profiling, branding, conflict resolution, and negotiation skills and all were delivered in a uniquely congenial setting. It was much more intimate and personable than other conferences and seminars I have been to. I am used to a large convention-center type event. I liked this conference because I felt like I got to actually meet and talk to almost everyone in attendance. – Emily Gertenbach, KleenRite Corp The presenters and the open format as far as conversations and the intimacy of the program were extremely valuable. – Joanne Gambert, Auto Laundry News The idea for this ground-breaking conference emerged just one year ago as Brenda Johnstone and Andrew Klukas – co-creators and organizers of the event – shared a meal at a small restaurant in Vancouver, BC. After a few phone conversations and emails with others in the industry it became clear that the time was ripe for the kind of event they were planning. The positive response was simply overwhelming! P.D. McLaren signed up as the title sponsor during the very first conversation, and the rest soon followed. Women in Carwash #1 offered insight into the new business environment that women in the car washing industry are creating. “We wanted our guests to be inspired, motivated, and energized by the presentations, discussions, networking opportunities and after-hours fun, and to leave with practical tools to strengthen their business” says Johnstone. The feedback received from attendees indicates that they undoubtedly were. I enjoyed the fact that, though the speakers were obviously experts in their field, they were available at different times during the conference for follow up discussions and questions. My company paid for me to be at the conference. It would have been well worth spending my own money to attend” – Kevin Thompson, Zips Car Wash When first organizing the conference, it was asked if participation should be limited to women. The answer was an emphatic “No!” As Johnstone put it, “The fact that this is the first ever Women in Carwash conference is proof that the many women who have built their suc-

cess in the industry didn’t need any special help to get there, so they certainly don’t need it now.” In its own unique way, Women in Carwash recognizes and celebrates the best of what is already happening in the industry and further promotes it. “We knew we were on the right track when we found men asking if they are allowed to participate, but Women in Carwash #1

merely tested these waters,” says Klukas. “We now know how we can take things to a whole new level at the next event.” “It was altogether enjoyable. It was fun. It was informative. In these three ways, it was similar to other conferences, but the difference was the feel that somehow it was also groundbreaking.” – Kevin Thompson, Zips Car Wash The next conference will delve more

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At The Car Wash

deeply into how men and women do business together and to strengthen their ability to thrive and to promote greater productivity in the car washing industry. Women in Carwash #2 will take place from January 20 – 22, 2020 in Arlington Texas. As they say, everything is bigger in Texas! However, the goal is to continue to deliver the conference in relatively intimate, smaller group settings. Additional conferences and venues may be added and, if so, early registrants will be able to transfer their registrations to alternative Women in Carwash events. Registration will open soon. Be among the first to join Women in Carwash #2 by visiting www.womenincarwash.com and registering early. “It was my distinct pleasure to be a guest speaker at the Women in Carwash conference held in Niagara Falls on April 30 through May 1, 2019 and I found this event to be first class all the way. From the amazing organizational skills and attention to detail displayed by the organizers, to the venue, to the quality of the presentations. I can’t say enough about the way this was organized and executed and I would jump at the chance to be involved in any future events put on by this group. Thank you for allowing me to be a part of it.” – Gary McDougall, Presenter. 30

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Around the Atlantic

‘IN MY BLOOD’ . . . BEING PART OF THE NAPA FAMILY CAME

NATURALLY TO THIS MONCTON CORPORATE STORE MANAGER

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By Susan Bradley

IKE MANY OTHER NAPA DEALERS IN THE ATLANTIC REGION, CHAD MURRAY OF MONCTON CAN TRACE HIS INTEREST IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR TO FAMILY ROOTS.

Murray says. “Basically if any store or any customer, whatever they need during the day, they order right through me, and I

can provide that to them.” It takes only minutes to process the order for the customer, who can either ac-

“I have been in the automotive industry for my entire career, right out of high school,” says Murray, who is a NAPA corporate store manager. “It’s been my whole life, my father is a techician, my grandfather was in sales, so it’s just in my blood - the automotive market - from a very early age.” The Moncton corporate store, at 335 Edinburgh Dr., is connected directly to the automotive supply chain’s regional distribution centre. It makes for a busy workplace. “We’re a retail and wholesale company. We provide delivery service to our wholesale clients around the Moncton area,” says Murray. “My store is hooked right to the distribution centre. It’s the main counter store here in Moncton.” The 3,500 square foot facility has 14 employees. The distribution centre has its own staff that process the orders, packing and sending them out for delivery. Murray, 40, has headed up the Moncton operation for the past five years. He grew up in nearby Sackville, N.B., The store provides a wide range of top quality NAPA products and equipment to businesses which serve the region’s construction, industrial, logging, fishing and mining sectors. Hydraulic fluid, gear fluid, all different types of greases, heavy duty cleaner, brake cleaner, electrical cleaner, brake pads and rotors are some of the NAPA products supplied by the store, Murray says. The streamlined access to the NAPA line provides quick and efficient service to corporate and retail customers as well as other NAPA stores in the region. “The distribution inventory is my inventory. I have access to all the inventory at any point in time during any day,” autoatlantic.com

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Around the Atlantic

cess it right at the Moncton store, or it is shipped to the site where the order was placed. Specialized training sessions are another unique feature of the Moncton operation. “We host six clinics a year. They are held at NBCC [New Brunswick Community College] here in Moncton. They are put on by specialized trainers ... for technicians as well as owners on different products that we sell and any new and upcoming vehicles that are coming out on the market,” he says. “We bring technicians up to speed on any new equipment they may need to properly service any new vehicles that may be coming into their base. This training we provide is exclusive to NAPA.” NBCC , with its automotive programs and close proximity, also makes it a resource for supplying trained workers. “We do reach out time to time to the automotive sector of the community college and once in awhile, we are able to get people to come to fill in gaps at the

store and different stores, Murray says. “What we are also able to do, by doing that, is to help our customers. To help automotive service providers out in the area get new tecnhicians hired from the community college. We are able to place some of these young people into the market through our network. “So all of these owners who are going to these training programs, they are getting to see some of these young kids in there, too. So we are able to get some of these young kids place into jobs a little easier. All around it helps bring us together. “ The store also supplies an extensive line of NAPA products, equipment and expertise to its retail customers. NAPA has a flyer program six times per year, Murray says. “We also do two retail sales events throughout the year, one in the springsummer, one in the fall-winter, which is a

CHAD MURRAY IS CORPORATE STORE MANAGER AT THE NAPA FACIITY AT 335 EDINBURGH DR. IN MONCTON, NB 32

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customer appreciation day. There’s a barbecue and discounted items throughout the store with giveaways and that kind of stuff. It’s to draw in customers and to let them know we appreciate them coming by.” Murray envisions purchasing NAPA stores in the future, venturing out into a larger operation. He said the NAPA group is like family. “It is a very welcoming family. If someone is looking for a career path, this is a great family to work for.”


Atlantic Racing News

SETTING SIGHTS ON SYDNEY, NS NEXT CHAPTER IN SYDNEY’S STOCK CAR RACING BEGINS IN JULY By Tim Terry

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FTER A TWO YEAR HIATUS, STOCK CAR RACING WILL RETURN TO NOVA S C O T I A’ S C A P E BRETON ISLAND IN 2019. As was the case about five years before, social media was ablaze in January with the rumor mill churning that the quarter mile oval track on Grand Lake Road in Sydney had been sold once again. Since opening in 1976, the facility has gone through several reincarnations and ownership groups. This time, it was announced that Greg Dowe, a local Nova Scotian businessman and race fan, would be trying his hand at track ownership. Dowe purchased the oval from Bill

Vasil, who operated the track for three seasons from 2014 to 2016. Vasil also operates the NAPA Sportsman Series, which promotes Late Model Sportsman division racing at Riverside Speedway outside of Antigonish, Nova Scotia. The two had began talks in early 2018 before the deal finally closed in the opening month of this year. When it comes to stock car racing, Dowe has done about everything except for steering the ship at a race track. Dowe has driven race cars, he owns Bandolero and Legend cars for his daughter Brooke and son Dylan and has sponsored the sport through his company, PPM Inc. His business keeps him on his toes, but his love for racing and the opportunity to revive racing in Cape Breton was strong enough to pull the trigger on purchasing the oval. Since the announcement of the acquisition on January 16th of this year, Dowe has seen a steady stream of messages

from those wanting to congratulate him on purchasing the facility, to those willing to help out at the speedway, those who wanted to enter cars, advertisers wanting to put themselves in front of the dedicated motorsports community to individuals wanting to give advice and suggestions on what they want to see. Liken it to a driver getting introduced to a crowd before a race, if the fans are making noise, it is a positive because they are reacting to what was announced. With the purchase of a speedway that has set silent since the end of October 2016, there is plenty to do to get the facility up to racing condition. Most of the buildings and structures were still solid, except for the officials tower that needed some new boards and the grandstands that will need new lumber. The grass needed cut and some of the trees that had overgrown needed to be trimmed, as would be the case with any property that hadn’t been maintained in over two

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years. The pit area, which was known for soaking up the water when it rains heavy, is also being looked at to receive a little bit of love. With the turn of the winter season to spring, the racing surface is set to get some attention. At the end of the Vasil ownership, the pavement was getting a bit rough in places. “Character” as some would call it, while some would call for it to get attention. The straightaways showed a lot of that so called “character,” while the transition heading into the third turn was rough to pass over with a street car, let alone a race car. At press time, Dowe and his team were awaiting the asphalt plants to open so some new blacktop could be laid down on the oval. The team is not planning a complete repave, as a repave would take away the current top lane preferred groove for the bigger cars, but concentrate on the places that need some love after neglect over the past Cape Breton winters. Once the paving and patching are completed comes the “trim.” The final tending to the landscape, painting, signage and finishing touches. Like any outdoor facility when the Summer rolls around, a new coat of paint to give the

place some life and color is always a great touch. Scheduling racing is always a tall task regardless of what geographical location you are in. Whether you are in the Carolinas or within small several communities in Canada, racing venues that work together typically create happy race teams, drivers and fans at the end of the day. With an area that had seen a lot of cars sold when Vasil announced the track was for sale, combined with the car count that was there at the time, it was deemed that the area likely couldn’t support a weekly racing program. In fact, only four race tracks in the region run on a weekly or biweekly basis, with the closest of those to Sydney being Prince Edward Island’s Oyster Bed Speedway or Scotia Speedworld. You also do not want to put multiple events on against other race tracks. When those events compete against each other, they split up car count and will sometimes split up fans. This is also where the love for racing crosses over into the business side of owning a race track. As much as we all love racing, this is also a business for many individuals. Simply put, if the dol-

lars and cents don’t add up, then a business doesn’t survive. If a race track doesn’t have enough cars to produce a show on a weekly basis, the fans will not come and the revenue does not come in to pay insurance, staff and additional operation costs. Typically, less events typically give a track a concentrated car count on those nights and it makes those limited events special and a “must see attraction” for fans. Everyone has the right answer to what makes a race track, or any enterprise for that matter, work. If you ask ten different people, you’ll get ten different opinions on what will be the secret to success. Is every race track perfect? Not even close. You better believe Sydney Speedway will have its own path to their success, much like every other entertainment venue in this region. But, we’re getting a bit off track - no pun intended! Sydney Speedway is slated to open July 6th and 7th with a double header weekend. They’ll have another late July event on July 27th before taking almost two months off before a Thanksgiving Day Weekend Double Header on October 12th and 13th. The schedule has major

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Atlantic Racing News

events and series in mind, along with the local contingent who wants to see racing back in Sydney. Most teams will not want to travel a long distance during their point championship season but with two strategically placed double headers, management is hoping it will spark the interest for some teams to get on the move to Cape Breton. The next hurtle to clear was what divisions to run and what building rules would be set for said classes. Dowe has a soft spot for Legend and Bandolero racing with his children racing Bandoleros and himself racing a Legend car from time to time. With both cars coming from the US Legend Cars International shop as turnkey racecars and several used for sale around the region, including a couple from the PPM Inc Motorsports shop, the divisions are easy to enter at the track. The Bandolero cars are designed for youngsters and drivers from aged eight to 16 will be able to compete in these cars at Sydney Speedway while drivers as young as 14 years will be able to compete in Legend competition. Before the speedway sat idle, the three major divisions at the track included Late Model Sportsman, Street Stock and Four Cylinder Mini Stocks. All three will return to the race track in 2019, with the four cylinder cars represented on all cards with the Sportsman and Street Stock cars racing on both double header weekends. One of the headlining races on the

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Opening Weekend will be the Passione Flooring & Interiors East Coast Mini Stock Tour. The series, who has several competitors race on the Tour from Cape Breton, will compete in two 75-lap races, one on July 6th and one on July 7th. The races will be Rounds Three and Four on the nine race schedule. A number of current East Coast Mini Stock Tour drivers competed, and won, at Sydney Speedway when Vasil owned the race track and are excited to be headlining the first weekend of competition at the track since 2016. When it comes to racing operations, two major hires were made in April to help the racing program succeed in 2019. Tony Leonard and Frankie Fraser Jr. were formerly introduced to the crowd at the Information Meeting held on the Easter weekend at the Hearthstone Inn. Both are racers who have been around race tracks all their lives and will bring their experience and expertise to the track to help grow the facility. Fraser is one of the big names when it comes to stock car racing in the Maritimes. Not only has Frankie Jr grown up building race cars and traveling to race tracks with his family, he has also driven race cars around the region. Fraser will serve as the Race Director and oversee the track on the three weekends at Sydney Speedway in 2019. Leonard will serve as Technical Director at the track this upcoming season.

Leonard currently serves as the Technical Director for both the NAPA Sportsman Series and the Atlantic Modified Tour and has helped out in technical inspections at both Speedway Miramichi and the CENTRE For Speed in New Brunswick. Dowe has also set out to purchase and acquire the essentials some might not think of prior to operating a speedway. In addition to technical inspection tools like scales and gauges, Dowe has shopped around for an electronic timing and scoring system for the track. The track had access to a timing and scoring system up to 2016 but was previously borrowed from another facility. Other things such as racing flags, tickets, bracelets and signage are also being acquired in advance of the first race on July 6th and 7th. That just scratches the surface of what has been put into motion for the Grand Lake Road oval in 2019. Most of the preparation for the new chapter of this story will be completed by the time you get your hands on this issue of Auto and Trucking Atlantic. The remaining staff members will have been put in place, the finishing touches will have been completed and the green flag will be set to fly if it hasn’t already. A new era in motorsports in Cape Breton has begun with the vision of Greg Dowe and his staff at Sydney Speedway! For up to date information, be sure to give them a follow or a like on your favorite social media channels at @SydneySpeedCA.


Around the Atlantic

BUMPER TO BUMPER / SANGSTER’S THIRD ANNUAL TRADE SHOW Susan Sangster (Owner of Bumper to Bumper Elmsdale & Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia) would like to thank every-

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one for coming out to her 3rd Annual Mini Trade Show. The event was very successful with multiple supplier venues and

many customers came to check out great deals and have a chance to talk one-onone with suppliers.


Tires and Treads

A SUSTAINABLE TIRE IS POSSIBLE

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By Rubber & Plastics News

USTAINABILITY AND THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY. THESE TWO IDEAS ARE THE FOCUS OF BOTH GLOBAL CORPORATIONS AND THE MEDIA.

cially formulated nano polymers, Genesis evolution expects impressive growth levels in the next three to five years. The proposal that follows describes

more specifically this innovative company. Also included are goals and objectives, a needs assessment, budget forms and a management plan.

Consumption of resources and the one-time use of tires pose a huge environmental challenge. Millions of tires are cast off in landfills, and this global issue continues to grow daily. Compounding issues, tire companies today are forced to use only virgin rubber to create new tires. The tire industry also faces other problems. Cost increases in energy, product and production result in revenue reductions. A suitable, practical solution

is needed to produce sustainable tires. Michelin, for example, has announced its “Butterfly” program. The goal of this program is to create a tire with 30 percent recycled content by 2048. Michelin’s challenge of producing the “Impossible Tire” seems to be just that. New rubber compounding technology is required to achieve this goal. Suppose in the future a compound became available that, when added to old tires, would make that rubber sustainable, to be used over and over. Genesis evolution now has the technology to offer a unique solution to these problems. The compound, Genesis, when added to the rubber of used tires, creates new sustainable tires. These tires have a significantly high recycled rubber content in their tread formation. This compound has been tested repeatedly with positive results. Worldwide sites for testing include the United Kingdom, Canada, Oregon and Florida for a period of years. A circular economy, which aims to reduce waste and make the most of resources, opposes a traditional, linear economy, which has had a “taking, making, disposing” cycle. A systemic shift away from being satisfied with the status quo is required. Genesis evolution offers a new opportunity for tire companies. With this compounding tool and a set of speautoatlantic.com

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Around the Atlantic

PLENTY OF CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THESE BUMPER-TO-BUMPER STORES IN NL By Susan Bradley

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T WOULD BE HARD TO FIND A PERSON MORE ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT THE AUTO PARTS INDUSTRY, AND PARTICULARLY BEING PART OF THE UNI-SELECT GROUP, THAN NEIL BROWNE OF ST. JOHN’S, N.L. Browne, who heads up the Browne Group of Companies, has five automotive supply stores and one off-road division in the province, with more locations planned for down the road. All will soon be operating under the Bumper-To-Bumper flag. “I am in the process of switching all my stores over. I’ve been a member of Uni-Select for over 30 years,” Browne said in a recent interview. Bumper to Bumper, owned by Uni-Select, is Canada’s homegrown automotive distribution network. Browne has deep roots in the sector. “I’ve grown up around it - literally. The business is as old as me. It’s all I’ve ever known, since I could walk. “ His 14-yearold son has already started working in the company’s warehouse, he added. The Browne Group of Companies began 41 years ago, under founder John

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Browne, the father of Neil, who passed away last year. The group is diverse, with real estate and investment holdings as well a graphic design business. Today Browne’s Auto Supplies is a leading automotive company in Newfoundland and Labrador, and maintains a $3.5 million inventory at its 12,000 squarefoot warehouse in St. John’s. That location and main store, at 1075 Topsail Rd., is about 75 per cent wholesale, while the branches are about 50-50. Among the customers are tire shops such as Goodyear dealers, car dealerships and large repair shops with up to 10 bays, Browne said. “Our primary business is ‘under car.’ Being with Uni-Select makes life a little easier.” He said he orders everything directly from the manufacturers because of the longer turnaround time due to distance and reliance on ferries. “I am a week-to-10 days away from everything. We really have to keep an eye on our inventory,” Browne said. “In the winter, in Newfoundland, with the weather and the ice, the ferry could be shut down for five or six days. There could be storms on the other side of the island. I’ve waited three to four weeks on freight before.” Those types of circumstances are challenging, he says. “You get used to it though. It becomes the new normal.” The company also has about 20 ve-

hicles making deliveries to its customers. Brakes and brake parts are one of the company’s highest volume items, “in excess of $1 million [annually], just in brake friction,” Browne said. That type of product and service -” the under-car portion, which is 85 per cent of our business” - will remain constant, he said, even with electric and driveless cars. One of the attractions of being part of the Uni-Select family is the flexibility and brand name choices it provides, Browne said. “I have many, many options to choose from. I have the ability to get whatever my customer needs within the program.” Browne, a native of Newfoundland and Labrador, who grew up in Mount Pearl, says he wishes more people had his passion for the automotive supply industry. Another one of his challenges is finding young people who want to work in the sector and making them aware that there are good jobs to be had. “I have been actively trying to get more people involved in the industry,” Browne said, attending job fairs and speaking to students. “This is a trade. These are well paid positions. But this isn’t looked upon as a prestigious industry. I just want to get the word out that there’s a lot of opportunity for growth.” With average age of Uni-Select members being over 60 years old, it’s crucial to attract young blood, he said.


Industry News

FIX AUTO WELCOMES THE BATHURST, NB TEAM TO THE NETWORK that a reality.” Having been in business for over 70 years, the Hatheway team has made numerous shop improvements to keep up with the rapidly evolving collision repair industry including a new semi downdraft booth, frame rack and all new

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I T H OV E R 70 Y E A R S IN THE BUSINESS, BATHURST TEAM CONTINUES TO DRIVE FORWARD AND JOINS THE FIX AUTO NETWORK. BATHURST (New Brunswick), May 6, 2019 – Mark Weeks, Regional Vice President for Fix Auto Atlantic, is pleased to welcome Fix Auto Bathurst to the family. The collision centre is a part of the Hatheway organization, which also includes Ford, Nissan and Toyota dealerships. “Providing our customers with the best possible service has always been our number one priority,” said David Hatheway, President of Hatheway Nissan. “Joining the Fix Auto network made sense for our collision centre as we wanted to align ourselves with a solid partner to help us grow the business.” Fix Auto has worked diligently to build trusting relationships with insurance and supplier partners. These partnerships help both franchise strategic partners and customers by easing the claims process for all parties involved. “Making the claims experience a good one for our customers is key; partnering with Fix Auto helps us make

Call Pierre Legere in Halifax, NS at 902-455-7878 1-888-545-7878 krownhalifax.com

lighting; plus they are aluminum repair certified. These upgrades in addition to the innovative operational, management and marketing tools provided by Fix Auto to all franchise strategic partners across the network will help to drive the Bathurst


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NSTSA

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Parts For Trucks

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Uni-Select (BtoB)

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Rust Check

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location forward. Fix Auto Bathurst is proud of the standing they have built over the years. “Our team has worked very hard to build a solid reputation as the preferred body shop in our area,” commented Hatheway. “We have a team of highly skilled technicians and support staff that stand behind all our work and do everything necessary to ensure the customer is happy.” Mark Weeks concludes, “We are very pleased to welcome David and his entire team to our network. Having such a longstanding business with a solid reputation in their community join the Fix Auto team is a great win for our entire network. We’re really looking forward to working with Fix Auto Bathurst as they continue to grow their business.”

ABOUT FIX AUTO Fix Auto is part of Canada’s largest automotive aftermarket services network with over 270 locations across the country. Celebrating 25 years of excellence, each Fix Auto centre is owned and operated locally offering hassle-free care and services that return vehicles to their pre-collision luster and performance. Our company and our network continue to grow nationally and globally, thanks to a solid foundation based on entrepreneurship and innovation. With 680 locations around the world, Fix Auto is the global body shop network.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

MAY 2019 WINNER!

Marc Gagnon, of Summerside, PEI is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is July 15th, 2019

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

15 Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME:

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1. Interior-lever activated component (4,5) 6. Trucker’s workplace 8. Ford pony car, informally 9. “If I Had a Million Dollars” K-car 10. Rotate a VW 360 degrees (4,3,6) 11. Dysart truck stop’s Maine home 13. Flamboyant fiddler MacIsaac 16. Chassis-cushioning component (5,8) 20. ’10-debut GMC crossover 21. Gearshift knob’s “1” 22. Disc brake repair item 23. HMCS Algonquin, for example

1. Radiator attachments 2. Standing, extended applause 3. Sidewall LT means ____ truck 4. ’80s and ‘90s Toyota model 5. Motorcycle skid lids 6. Roll in neutral 7. Vital electrical-system component 11. City transit pickup point (3,4) 12. Brand renamed Pontiac 14. ‘02-’12 Jeep compact SUV 15. Side-impact crashes, slangily (1,5) 17. Rowing blades equipped, boat-wise 18. Or best ____, car ad’s OBO 19. Palindromic disc brake part

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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istory fans, time to dig online or in your books and maybe you can name what this famous vehicle is, or anything more about its history. Details please and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is July 15th, 2019.

Congratulations to Gar y Donovan of Upper Nine Mile River, NS who correctly answered that the car in the photo is a NASCAR team racer and that the driver is Kyle Busch. Kyle is the younger brother to NASCAR driver Kurt Busch. Kyle was born in 1985. Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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Profile for Auto & Trucking Atlantic

July 2019 Auto & Trucking Atlantic