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THE 3 R FUTURE OF OLD TRUCKS (SEE PAGE 28)

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DON’T CALL US JUNKYARD DOGS ANYMORE! A once-maligned profession populated by scrap yard workers in it only for the bottom line, automotive recycling is gaining new respect as an environmentally-conscious player in a world where values are shifting faster than car gears.

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REDUCING THE ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT OF THE AUTO INDUSTRY – Did you know that over 80% of your vehicle can be recycled? A plea for more awareness.

Page 16

EMPLOYER OF CHOICE LUNCHEON – The Trucking Human Resource Council honours its own in an annual tradition

Page 18

THE JONES BOYS OF NEW BRUNSWICK – These guys grab an idea and run with it. And wait ‘til you see the results…

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LABRADOR NAPA GARAGE SUBJECT OF NEW DISCOVERY CHANNEL REALITY PRODUCTION – Been feeling like something’s missing since Corner Gas went off the air? This vid might fill the void.

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RAISE YOUR LABOUR RATES – Contributor Bob Greenwood suggests firing a customer to improve the bottom line…And he’s got the figures to prove it!

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THE 3R FUTURE OF OLD TRUCKS – Kenneth E. Seaton opens his bag of tricks and finds there’s an afterlife for old trucks

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Letter from the Editor

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF THE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE?

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By Carter Hammett

T APPEARS CALIFORNIA REALLY IS THE PLACE TO BE SEEN, ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAPPEN TO BE TOODLING AROUND IN A VEHICLE POWERED BY AUTONOMOUS DRIVING SOFTWARE. That’s what happened with Apple’s three Lexus RX450h SUV’s as they were snapped while moving around the San Francisco Bay area back in April of this year. The vehicles come fully loaded with sensors and cameras to navigate. After receiving the DMV permit, Apple employees jumped wasting no time getting it on the road. It’s rumoured that Apple’s given a deadline of year’s end to determine the feasibility of its own driving system. If the idea comes to fruition the notoriously private company could conceivably partner with vehicle manufacturers to produce something like CarPlay or perhaps even its own vehicle when appropriate. There’s a number of factors that just

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might propel autonomous driving forward a little faster and disrupt driving as we know it. Among them is the EV platform. There’s a lot of money to be saved in maintenance alone. Oh, and there’s something about them being better for the environment too. Another aspect to consider is the sharing economy. With Uber all over the place these days and cost projections indicating that it’ll take at least a decade for riders to start coughing up bucks for a car of one’s own, the time is ripe for ride sharing. Not a new concept of course, but certainly a new methodology. And you barely need to mention that technology is now at a place where processor speeds are now suitable enough to handle operate a vehicle. Complement that with object detection, #D maps and the like, and the future might not be as far

away as you think. If you’re in Pittsburgh, you can already connect with a self- driving vehicle via Uber, but safety drivers sit up front because the cars simply aren’t fully dependable or realized just yet, so you can expect the drivers to be around for a while. I suspect that with, among other things, the patently outrageous cost of home ownership in many of our urban centres, that car ownership may become a thing of the past. It won’t happen overnight of course…cities are typically slow to pass their regulations and some are notoriously slower than others. However, things will start accelerating once a standard has been reached. (These vehicles will also help level the playing field for many people with disabilities as well). I used to be quite hesitant at considering the viability of autonomous vehicles. Now that I’ve resigned myself to the idea, the question becomes how? Some of the anticipated benefits are more obvious than others: accident reduction and associated costs; lots and lots of free space (think about it: parking becomes redundant) and free time, less driver stress….the list goes on and on. Another bonus will be start-ups. There will be tremendous business opportunities in research and development, policing, troubleshooting, monitoring, upgrades, maintenance and more. All of this has the ability to change the very face of the cities we live in and that’s rather incredible to think about. Will there be negatives? Absolutely. Here in Toronto, Uber has encountered massive howls of protest from the taxi industry and that’s because--even if the feeling’s purely instinctual—cabbies know they will one day become redundant. Never mind: fifty per cent of the jobs available in the next decade didn’t exist 10 years ago. That’s how fast things are changing. Will you be ready to shift gears when the lights of change turn green?


DON’T CALL U DOGS AN THE OLD SCHOOL LINEAR ECONOMY IS BECOMING A THING OF THE PAST. AT ONE TIME, EVERYTHING WAS MAKE, USE, DISPOSE. A NEW MODEL OF THINKING IS GROWING AND THAT’S THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY, IN WHICH WE KEEP RESOURCES ACTIVELY IN USE FOR AS LONG AS POSSIBLE, MAXIMIZING ITS VALUE IN THE PROCESS. SPOILER ALERT: IT ENDS WITH RECOVERING AND REGENERATING PRODUCTS AND MATERIALS AT THE END OF EACH SERVICE LIFE. FEW INDUSTRIAL SECTORS EXEMPLIFY THIS BETTER THAN AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLING. ONCE MALIGNED FOR SKETCHY PRACTICES, THE INDUSTRY IS TRANSITIONING INTO A MODEL OF RESPECTABILITY AND A LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT.

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US JUNKYARD NYMORE! W

By Carter Hammett

ITH THE RECENT LAUNCH OF THE NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION, END - OF-LIFE VEHICLE SECTOR COUNCIL (ELVSC) BACK IN NOVEMBER OF LAST YEAR, A TURNING POINT WAS REACHED IN AN INDUSTRY ATTEMPTING TO REDEFINE AND REPOSITION ITSELF IN A RAPIDLY CHANGING SECTOR THAT’S BRACING FOR THE FUTURE. The ELVSC will play a critical role as it supports the ELV management standard while providing training services to stakeholders in all aspects of ELV management. “It’s a standards-based solution to recycling end-of-life vehicles that we are seeking,” says Steve Fletcher, managing director of the Automotive Recyclers of Canada (ARC), an umbrella group of seven associations representing over 400 auto recyclers. He’s also the executive director of 180-member Ontario Automotive Recyclers Association (OARA). The ELVSC will also support provincial auto recyclers to meet regulated end-of-life recycling standards adopted by Ontario in March, 2016. Those standards form a critical part of ensuring that vehicles are dismantled with the proper management of hazardous wastes, and will require all Ontario ELV recyclers to prevent discharge of pollutants into the environment. The council is but one solution to a host of changes occurring in an industry that’s currently trying to shed an unfair image of a profession populated with lazy, unscrupulous, self-serving scrapy-

ard wheeler-dealers, hell-bent on chasing their bottom line. And with the introduction of quality control programs, new sophisticated technology, improved training and a host of standards, the industry is packing its bags and moving into the twenty first century. Every year in Canada, approximately 1.6 million vehicles reach the end of their useful lives. Some have crashed. Some have trashed. Put another way, some vehicles have been victimized through accidents; others are simply “done.” Once upon a time these cars were considered scrap and thus disposable. But values change over time and now these former junk heaps are perceived as major players in the circular economy. That’s due in part to the fact that automobiles are the most recycled consumer product in the world today. They offer enough steel to produce 13 million (!) cars. You may not realize that much recycling happens while your car is still in use, through a process called automotive aftermarket recycling. In fact, about 80 per cent of your car can actually be reused or recycled. In Canada the sector creates thousands of jobs and generates over $1 billion in revenues. In the good ol’ U-S-of-A, auto recycling is the 16th largest industry. It employs over 100,000 people and contributes about $25 billion to the local economy, annually. In Europe, nearly eight million vehicles are recycled every year. Oh, and the environmental benefits shouldn’t be left out of the discussion either. The North American recycling industry saves about 85 million barrels of oil from getting used in making new or replacement auto parts. Automotive recycling is also responsible for contributing about 40% of all ferrous metal to the scrap processing industry. These figures can’t be ignored and their economic and environmental ben-

efits have important ramifications that cut across international borders. Right now, however, the industry is in a state of flux. On the one hand, the industry appears to be populated partly by old school scrap heap operators in it for the bottom line, even as a new breed of recycler who takes his business and brand seriously enters the picture. Furthermore, the sector has been largely self-governed with some operators more business savvy and socially-andenvironmentally responsible than others. Hence, the influx of new standards and introduction of new regulations that are gradually turning the industry on its head.

AUTO RECYCLING 101 Let’s start with some basics and one of the most basic questions is, what is automobile recycling exactly? According to Steve Fletcher, auto recycling tends to fall into two activities. “First, it’s essentially about buying cars nobody else wants because of accidents or general use,” he says. “There’s lots of good parts and they’re valid. Older cars still run but the owner doesn’t want to put the money into them. One of the hardest aspects of what we do is buying and finding vehicles since much is based on the reuse of parts.” “The other half” of automotive recycling deals with selling parts, that is, components like engines, fenders, roofs, quarter panels and others that are more commonly wrecked. “Our members want to use as much of the car as they can,” says Fletcher. “If they can’t sell the parts about 75 per cent of the metal will be recycled.” The most commonly-recycled parts of a vehicle include tires, batteries, radiators, transmissions, rubber hoses, mats, oil filters, wheels, windshield glass and more. We’ve written about recycling tires before, and they have been transmogrified into everything from playground foundations to highways to fashion accessories. Old batteries can be made into new j u l y 2 017

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At the Recycler’s Yard

ones. Metals like steel and iron can almost be placed in a recycling category by themselves. But before any of that can take place, the car goes through a process, which includes conducting a substantial inspection to determine if the car can actually be repaired. If this is unlikely, the car moves into the dismantling phase. Most cars are dismantled and recycled. Fluids like antifreeze, transmission and brake lubricants, gas and oil are drained and the hazardous liquids are set aside for safe disposal. Gas and antifreeze can actually be filtered and reused. After this, the engine and transmission are removed from the chassis and the chosen parts are cleaned. Auto recyclers also remove and sell valuable metals in the car, such as copper from the radiator, or aluminum from the wheels or engine. Although some car parts can be used “as is” to repair other cars, still others are sold to remanufacturers to overhaul. The final remaining step in the process is crushing the remaining car body and then shredding into a fist-sized pieces of metal. About sixty percent of a passenger vehicle is composed of steel and iron. Interestingly, the steel used in a brand new vehicle contains at least 25 per cent recycled materials, and can include the hood, trunk, door, quarter panels or the shell itself. “It’s actually fascinating to watch,” says Fletcher. “It’s very labour-intensive on the dismantling and parts side. A lot of people think we’re reverse manufacturing!”

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“GAME-CHANGER” As fascinating as the process is, it’s also becoming governed by a series of policies and standards that have been long been percolating. That’s because it was virtually the “wild west” as Fletcher says, in terms of standardizing recycling practices. “There’s good recyclers and there’s bad recyclers. We need the government to help identify who’s good and who’s bad.” Some of the more unscrupulous recyclers caring only for their bottom line are built only for speed, and may not extract hazardous chemicals, like mercury, operating fluids or refrigerant, each of which can have devastating effects on the environment. For example, Fletcher says that a mere .85 grams of mercury is enough to pollute 20 hectares of land. Other liquids, like various operating fluids can have a devastating impact on groundwater. In March 2016, the province of Ontario introduced the Environmental Activity and Sector Registry (EASR), which creates a series of recycling standards that will put demands on all ELV recyclers to manage subject and hazardous wastes. ELV recyclers not meeting the standards will either have to invest in their business in order to meet the new regulations or leave the industry. The move has been applauded by many in the recycling world and described as a “game-changer” by others. Part of changing the game has been Canada’s rather late entry into the low carbon economy. While ELV recycling is

indeed an ongoing achievement with 85 per cent of the ELV being recycled back into the economy, the launch of a sector council seemed like the next logical step. Introduced in November 2016, the End-of-Life Vehicle Sector Council (ELVSC) is an initiative of ARC with support of the Global Automakers of Canada and the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers Association. The non-profit organization will perform a number of functions, including maintaining a uniform set of environmental performance standards for Canadian ELV recyclers that will serve as a foundation that have not developed regulated standards; facilitate the training of ELV recyclers with a view to assisting them in achieving regulatory compliance in Canadian jurisdictions with recycling standards like those currently operating in Ontario, BC and PEI. It will also play a major role in information dissemination about environmental data, while collaborating with stakeholders to research and support innovation in ELV-related resource recovery. Finally, the ELVSC will provide clearinghouse services to facilitate OEM-recycler technical data exchange. Fletcher says the NGO will provide standards-based solutions to recycling ELVs. “Ultimately as part of the solution, training is needed,” he says. “You need to show people here’s where materials need to be recovered. That training applies to both the processing side, including the all-important metal recovery as well as the dismantling side. The ELVSC will play


At the Recycler’s Yard

a vital role in enforcing and measuring those standards. “We need an operating standard that’s consistent and reliable so customers have faith in the product,” says Andrew MacDonald, owner of both Maritime Auto Parts in Glenholme, NS and Maritime Pick-A-Part, near Halifax. “It’s important to all have the same level of standard.” The agency also needs to collaborate with automotive manufacturers, with data sharing on the processing side forming an important part of an overall strategy. “It’s in the manufacturer’s best interest to ensure their models are handled at end-of-life,” says Fletcher. “It’s good corporate citizenship to be stewards of the vehicle.”

MOVING INTO THE FUTURE With the sector council establishing its footing, the industry as a whole continues to redefine itself on a number of fronts. One of those variables is image. Many people still view the industry through the dated lens of the junkyard dog scrounging in the salvage, trying to make a fast buck. “We’ve never really explained our role we play in the lifespan of a car,” says Fletcher. “We’re much more than just junkyard dogs and need to educate people.” Complementing that will be improvements in training for the latest crop of automotive recyclers, especially in sales of parts and the technological realm. For all

intents and purposes, tomorrow’s car is essentially a smart phone on wheels. “It’s about professionalizing the sale of auto parts,” says Fletcher. “That means improving the standard and getting better training and certifications. It’s helpful to understand how cars work, what can be repaired and understand why you’re pulling a specific part. “The parts counter personnel will also have to be trained.. These days you almost need to be a certified dismantler. We’re looking at developing core competencies for the big three areas: dismantling, sales and inventory.” “The Ford computer will be a Ford computer and will be unique,” says MacDonald. “That computer will need reprogramming. More often than not the car will become economic write offs because the components are more valuable than they used to be. “A great example is a mirror in the Mercedes. A mirror used to be just a mirror and was considered expensive at $100. Now, with blind spot cameras and LED a mirror will set you back anywhere from $500.00 to $1,000.00. That means you can fetch around $250.00-to-$500.00 for a used one. Parts are becoming more valuable and cost more money because of the complexity of it.” This means that automotive recyclers need to embrace technology and look at the “parts of the future”, like sensors and

radar and they need to determine how these will be offered to customers. A recent IHS automotive survey indicated that the average age of cars on the road is 11.5 years. This means that vehicles not only have improved reliability, but also that consumers are more aware of preventative maintenance and regular servicing to maximize the life span of their vehicles. While consumers continue to purchase new vehicles, older vehicles continue to last longer. In fact, a 2015 USA Today article stated that the number of vehicles on the road 25-years-old and older is about 14 million. While the number of vehicles 16-to-24 years old is about 44 million. The cumulative impact of these numbers means new growth opportunities and revenue streams for a range of automotive providers in the aftermarket sector and other areas as well. With an increased awareness of both the environmental and economic impact of their role on the (national) stage, automotive recyclers will be well positioned to leverage this knowledge and open new doors while improving their image. Professional auto recycling is changing to meet a higher quality of customer service,” says MacDonald. “We’re continuously growing as a whole and we’re getting better at quality and delivery of parts.”

THE CANADIAN AUTO RECYCLERS’ ENVIRONMENTAL CODE (CAREC)

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ORMED IN 1997 AS AN “ASSOCIATION OF ASSOCIATIONS”, THE AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLERS OF CANADA (ARC) IS THE NATIONAL VOICE OF THE AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLING INDUSTRY, REPRESENTING, THROUGH ITS PROVINCIAL AFFILIATES, OVER 400 ENDOF-LIFE VEHICLE (ELV) RECYCLERS AND DISMANTLERS THROUGHOUT CANADA.

by the Retire Your Ride program). CAREC provides recyclers with the most relevant information and tools to prevent hazardous materials contained in end-of-life vehicles from contaminating our water, land, and air during and after the vehicle recycling process. This guideline has been updated, in keeping with the latest regulations and policies. CAREC is an invaluable resource for automotive recyclers, outlining best practices for the environmentally sound management of end-of-life vehicles (ELV). We encourage all auto recyclers throughout Canada to adopt the Code into their business practice.

In addition to providing a forum for the channeling of information and addressing Canada wide concerns, ARC is actively involved in the leadership, promotion and betterment of the automotive recycling industry across the country. One output of this is The National Code of Practice for Automotive Recyclers (CoP) which was developed in 2008 for recyclers participating in the National Vehicle Recycling Program - Retire Your Ride. Given the popularity and success of the CoP, it was decided to ensure that it should remain in use after the Retire Your Ride program ended in March 2011. Accordingly the CoP was renamed the Canadian Auto Recyclers’ Environmental Code (CAREC) and its scope expanded to cover all end-of- life vehicles (and not only vehicles targeted

CAREC HAS THREE GOALS:

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1. To convey the legal and mandatory requirements before, during and after the recycling process and promote best management practices within the industry 2. To promote pollution prevention and the 3Rs (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) in the vehicle recovery industry to reduce the ecological impact of the automotive sector and 3. To ensure that there is a consistent set of practices that are aligned as much as possible, with federal, provincial and municipal laws and regulations, as well as with product and industry stewardship programs where applicable.


At the Recycler’s Yard

REDUCING THE ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT OF THE AUTO INDUSTRY

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By Kory Harrington

OUR VEHICLE MAY BE MORE ENVIRONMENTALLYF R I E N D LY T H A N YOU THOUGHT . . .

Recent changes in automobile production have improved the total percentage of what can be recycled in an average vehicle. Over 80% of a vehicle can be recycled. The changes in recyclable materials and non-recyclable materials have greatly improved, leaving recyclers with very little waste. Nova Scotia is home to many automotive recyclers. With the exception of 2016, vehicle sales and registrations have been on the rise in the province over the last number of years, leading to more vehicles being recycled annually. According to Statistics Canada, Nova Scotia has seen a small decrease in total vehicle sales in the province between 2015 and 2016. Statistics Canada reported 54,451 new vehicle sales in Nova Scotia in 2016, just shy of the

55,057 units reported in 2015. This small decrease was preceded by four years of constant growth. Nova Scotia offers many sustainable long -term careers throughout the automotive industry including recycling, and presents many opportunities for the province. The automotive industry plays an important part in the economy across Canada and the changes to automobiles are directly affecting sales. Consumers have become more aware of both their own and corporate footprints and they are requesting more sustainable products which also focus on reducing production pollutions. Many automotive manufactures have made drastic changes to the production process while creating new ways of using existing recycled material. For example, the sheet metal in new automobiles is composed of a blend of both recycled and new metal. Automotive manufacturers have invested in developing new and improved materials to help reduce the environmental impact of the industry. In the case of Ford Motor Company, Ford has reduced manufacturing energy use by 25% between 2010 and 2015. The reduction in energy consumption could be directly

related to the use of bio-based plastics. Auto manufactures are switching to soybean or other agricultural-based products to produce plastics. This plastic is found in most manufacturers’ vehicles due to the fact that these materials are biodegradable. This development has led to automotive manufacturers producing vehicles which are almost completely recyclable. The process of producing a soy bio-based plastic also requires less energy, so a reduction in energy use also accommodates the change in products. Also, Ford has heavily reduced their water consumption across different vehicle plants. Your vehicle may be more environmentally friendly than you previously thought. Most automotive manufacturers have become aware of the environment impact of vehicle production and have or are developing ways to improve old processes. Toyo Tires has changed the materials they use to produce tires and they have incorporated walnut shells and bamboo fiber in the production process to reduce their environmental footprint. Toyo sources these materials through local vendors, which results in reduced costs due to the recycling process. Walnut shells are

Interstate Batteries • 593 St. George Blvd. • Moncton,N.B. • (506) 386-6777

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collected from walnut farmers and have little to no costs other than collection and processing. Incorporating an existing abundance of natural materials has helped set these companies apart from competitors. Walnut shells are used in the rubber compound to gain traction during slippery conditions. Toyo has incorporated bamboo fiber in their tires due to the abundance of the resource and the added strength over traditional compounds. Automotive recyclers across Atlantic Canada are for the most part small businesses. Most recyclers employ less than 15 employees and are locally owned and operated. Automotive recyclers collect, disassemble, and sort through the recyclable materials found in automobiles and dispose of the non-recyclable material in the safest manner. Automotive fluids are removed and disposed of in accordance with local laws. Consumers depend on the recyclers for replacement parts as well as providing a safe environment for years to come through safe disposal processes. The environment has become a major area of focus due to the environmental impacts of the automotive industry. Automobiles are now the most recycled con-

sumer product in the world. The recycled materials make their way into new automotive parts production and other applications. For example, tires are often recycled into many different applications such as asphalt for roads. The Nova Scotia Automotive Sector Council (NSASC) works on behalf of auto recyclers, both new and used automobile dealers, retail gasoline dealers, collision repair shops, Canadian Tire and independent repair shops across the province. NSASC is collaborating with the automotive industry and the Nova Scotia Appren-

ticeship Agency to develop strategies for improving current conditions in the province. The youth initiative, TestDrive has been created for youth 16-17 years old in provincial high schools to have the opportunity to explore a career in the auto industry while earning a wage and high school credits. Start your succession planning today by hiring a local youth! Why not become a part of the solution and be a TestDrive employer today? Contact Kory Harrington at testdrive@automotivesectorcouncil.ca.

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Industry News

AXALTA CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE CENTER OPENS

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XALTA COATING SYSTEMS (NYSE: AXTA), A LEADING GLOBAL SUPPLIER OF LIQUID AND POWDER COATINGS, HELD THE GRAND OPENING OF ITS CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE CENTER ON MAY 16, 2017 IN CONCORD, N. CAROLINA.

Charlie Shaver, Axalta Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and Michael Carr, Axalta President-North America officiated the opening program with special guests Jeff Gordon, four-time NASCAR® Cup Series champion, and Rick Hendrick, owner of 12-time Cup champion Hendrick Motorsports. The Customer Experience Center is a 36,000 square feet training and conference complex designed to serve Axalta’s refinish, transportation OEM, and industrial customers. The Customer Experience Center boasts two world-class paint application centers, a collaborative mixing lab, and an exhibit lobby where visitors can witness the breadth and depth of Axalta’s coating systems and technology. The facility is located on the Hendrick Motorsports campus adjacent to some of the finest automotive technology and expertise in the world. “Axalta’s Customer Experience Center

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is part of our global commitment to put customers first and to revolutionize the coatings landscape,” said Shaver. “The facility combines cutting edge technology and Axalta expertise. I’m confident that the combination will be an asset for customers and help drive their productivity, growth and profitability.” Federal, state, and local officials participated in the event, honoring Axalta with certificates of recognition and welcome letters. United States Senator from North Carolina, Thom Tillis had an American flag flown over the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., which was presented to Shaver. “Axalta Coating Systems designs and mass-produces transportation coatings all around the world and having your new facility in Concord is not only exciting but will be a boon for our economy,” stated Congressman Richard Hudson, in a letter presented at the event. “The center will bring people from all over the country to train with state-of-the-art paint booths and a collaborative mixing lab.” In his remarks, Concord City Mayor, Scott Padget welcomed attendees to the Customer Experience Center and presented Shaver with a welcome letter from the city government that stated, “The City of Concord is honored to welcome Axalta Coating Systems and allowing us to be a part of the grand celebration on this day

of May 16, 2017. On behalf of the Concord City Council, our management team, and the citizens of Concord, we welcome the opportunity for Axalta Coating Systems to make Concord home.” In the evening program, Axalta honored Rick Hendrick for his contributions to the sport of racing and for his recent induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Shaver revealed that the boardroom in the Customer Experience Center will be officially named and dedicated as the Rick Hendrick Hall of Fame Boardroom.

ABOUT AXALTA COATING SYSTEMS Axalta is a leading global company focused solely on coatings and providing customers with innovative, colorful, beautiful and sustainable solutions. From light OEM vehicles, commercial vehicles and refinish applications to electric motors, buildings and pipelines, our coatings are designed to prevent corrosion, increase productivity and enable the materials we coat to last longer. With more than 150 years of experience in the coatings industry, the approximately 13,000 people of Axalta continue to find ways to serve our more than 100,000 customers in 130 countries better every day with the finest coatings, application systems and technology. For more information visit axalta.com  and follow us @Axalta on  Twitter and on LinkedIn.


Truckers Corner

EMPLOYER OF CHOICE LUNCHEON

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MPLOYER OF CHOICE” IS A PROGRAM DEVELOPED BY INDUSTRY FOR THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY AND IS OFFERED THROUGH THE TRUCKING HUMAN RESOURCE SECTOR COUNCIL ATLANTIC.

Eighteen (18) employers were recognized at the Employer of Choice event hosted in Truro, Nova Scotia April 18, 2017. This luncheon recognized organizations leading in the areas of recruitment, retention and human resource practices, which is building a stronger workforce within their organization. To earn designation employers are relying on employee endorsement for 70% of their total score. What does this mean to employees? One quote from an employee who participated in the survey component “The fact that

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my company is going through this process shows me they care more about their employees than the bottom dollar.” In the years ahead, workforce stability will be a company’s competitive edge. In these challenging and ever changing times, which are enhanced by a tight labour market, employers will be continually challenged to locate, attract, optimize and retain the talent they need to serve their customers. The most successful employers will be those who legitimately inspire talented workers to join them and to stay with them. The Trucking Human Resource Sector Council Atlantic is very proud to

congratulate the 18 employers currently recognized with their Employer of Choice designation: Eassons Transportation Group; Clarke Road Transport; Atlantica; Atlantic Pacific; Tom MacDonald Trucking; Keltic Transportation; J&C Ventures; Morley Annears; Armour Transportation Systems; Salvatore Insurance; Nova Truck Centres; Midland; Classic Freight; OSCO; Connors Transfer, SLH Transport, Seafood Express and Auction Transport Services. Companies are using this tool to benchmark where they are today and to help inform strategic planning for employment retention for years to come. If you are interested in learning more or want to start your application, visit our website www.thrsc. com. Applications are accepted throughout the year – designations are awarded throughout the year … start your application today!


Around the Atlantic

THE JONES BOYS OF NEW BRUNSWICK AUTOMOTIVE ARTISTS, INNOVATORS, SCULPTORS AND ENTREPRENEURS

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By Andrew Skaling

HE JONES BOYS OF NEW BRUNSWICK HAVE RAISED THE BAR IN THE CUSTOM AUTO COLLECTIBLES MARKET TO HIGH ART FORM STATUS.

Since forming their part-time business, Jones Boys Automotive Innovations, about five years ago, the two Salisbury brothers have built a reputation in the gearhead community for custom automotive sculptural pieces that are second to none. Becoming automotive artists/entrepreneurs was really only a matter of time if not genetics for the Jones brothers. Their adored dad and best pal, Don Jones, from their earliest childhood memories, had them around and enthused about

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all things cars and in the garage working with him on all sorts of projects. As a tribute to their deeply missed father, all their products have a logo with his initials “DMJ” applied. Given their upbringing it’s no surprise that in adulthood they’ve pursued related careers: Les has had a long career as a sales rep for Milwaukee Tools and Ed has had a long-haul driving rigs for a large trucking company. The “innovations” in the company name all started when Les picked up some molds at a flea market in Connecticut to make front and half model antique gas pumps. The reasoning for this chance purchase was pretty simple: The real deal aka a mint condition gas pump is in the thousands of dollars and even to restore one takes the enthusiast into the triple digits. Les was in the process of just such a

restoration but was getting discouraged because of the costs. So, Ed, the initially skeptical younger brother, said: “Alright, we’ll give it a go” and so began the Jones Brothers business odyssey that started with the making of custom gas pump models. Refinements in the process and the use of new recycled polymer materials soon followed. They use a local graphics company to do the custom visual work and the possibilities are limited only by the imaginations of the customers. One customer on the Island wanted a New Jersey devils themed wall mount pump for his “man cave” and that’s exactly what he got. “Taste is individual…anything goes. What a client wants, The Jones Boys will do.” Ed pointed out the “any request is doable” ethos of the business. He’s also quick to point out that they’re not fo-


cussed on any one auto brand or product but that the only limit is the client’s imagination and, in some cases, marketing or advertising goals. The pumps are gaining in popularity with businesses of all kinds, not just automotive, as a great and unique advertising vehicle but the core is still the auto enthusiast decking out his man cave or workspace. The scope and abilities of the brothers doesn’t stop with the original gas pump design. As they’ve grown and developed over the last few years they’re increasingly getting commissions to do unique and much larger custom pieces. Everything from taking the back-end of a 50’s Olds and turning it into a couch for a customer’s garage to match his pride and joy of the same restored Oldsmobile model to a wall mounted rear end of a ’77 Trans Am for a fan of Smoky and the Bandit have come out of the Brothers’ backyard shop. The Boys’ attention to detail is so thorough that in these projects LED lighting has been installed that can be set to everything from “normal” car lights to, essentially, a light show including strobes - perfect for a lively party in the garage! Admiring some of the Boys craftsmanship and attention to detail they’re quick to stress how important the obsessive effort they put into each product is. “Good enough, while, isn’t good enough for us” Les points out. “Every project has to be absolutely perfect.” And each one is. In today’s age of environmental responsibility, one might not think that a small business operating out of a backyard garage would be a leader in the green business practices space but the Brothers are in every way. For instance, their primary suppliers are all local small businesses within a ten mile radius. The shop that does the molding of the gas pumps only uses recycled PVC; the graphics folks are just down the road; and all the parts and actual cars used in their furniture and art pieces are truly recycled as they’re well beyond repair or restoration. Oftentimes the car bodies are tracked down, in a not unusual Maritime scene, as rusting skeletons in a rural field. Ed points out that they do not and will not take the saws or torches to a road worthy or restorable car. Seeing how the Brothers can bring an old pile of long discarded metal and repurpose it in better than new condition and finishes is truly a feast for the senses. The Jones Brothers have been experiencing a growing following of admirers in the auto enthusiast world, largely through car shows and social media. Global News has even produced a little piece on the

“Auto Artists” from New Brunswick. They’ve started producing some new product lines such as tables and stools which are made of various old parts and the latest, a new series of tailgate benches which are built out of old truck beds. The latter are gaining attention in the retail auto sector – garages and dealers = as the perfect customer waiting area seating option. Like all their products, each one is a unique piece because, of course, the

source vehicle is unique. What’s the future look like for the Jones Brothers? Both Les and Ed are approaching retirement from their respective careers and the plan is to focus full-time on the business. One of the first goals will be to set up a workspace and retail showroom/gallery that people can visit and check out the gas pumps and some of the auto parts art and furniture pieces and, of course, to ogle a big project in production – like the old

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Around the Atlantic

Corvette that has a 50” flat screen TV that rises out of the back. Words and pictures don’t do justice to their work so chances are the shop/showroom will quickly become a destination, if not pilgrimage site, for the gearheads crowd. For the time being, check out Jones Brothers Automotive Innovations at their website: jonesboysautomotiveinnovations.com or their Facebook page where they’re constantly posting new pics of their one-of-a-kind creations which can only be described as true works of art.

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Future Technologies

WORLD’S FIRST ELECTRIC VEHICLE DISCOVERY CENTRE IN TORONTO

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HE PLUG’N DRIVE ELECTRIC VEHICLE DISCOVERY CENTRE IN NORTHERN TORONTO. IT’S THE WORLD’S FIRST EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING FACILITY DEDICATED TO ELECTRIC VEHICLE (EV) EDUCATION AND AWARENESS – AND IT’S COMPLETELY FREE FOR CONSUMERS.

Union (PWU), Toronto Hydro and Bruce Power. Located at 1126 Finch Avenue West in North York, the centre features:

Indoor showcase of the latest EV models and charging stations from leading manufacturers.

“The EV Discovery Centre will serve as an EV hub for consumers throughout Ontario and for visitors from around the world,” Cara Clairman, President and CEO of Plug’n Drive said. “We are providing a one-stop-shop where consumers can explore and test-drive the latest EV models – alongside charging solutions at home and on the road.” Ontario’s Climate Change Action Plan aims to expand EV sales to 5 per cent of all new vehicles sold by 2020. The EV Discovery Centre is a key component in accomplishing this goal. “We are investing proceeds from Ontario’s carbon market into Plug’n Drive’s Electric Vehicle Discovery Centre to encourage more Ontarians to make the switch to low-carbon transportation and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions,” Minister Glen Murray added. “As part of Ontario’s Climate Change Action, we are helping to tackle emissions from the transportation sector, which is the single-largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the province.” The EVDC is a learning centre that provides visitors with the knowledge they need to consider an EV for their next vehicle purchase. After visitors have expressed interest, the EVDC will refer them to an EV-certified dealership in their area. “Our research shows that Ontario needs effective EV education and awareness raising initiatives, such as Plug’n Drive’s EV Discovery Centre, to speed up EV sales,” Clairman concluded. “EVs are fast, dependable and affordable – and they are a key part of a low carbon future for the region and beyond.”

ABOUT THE EV DISCOVERY CENTRE The centre is a public-private partnership between Plug’n Drive, the Province of Ontario, TD Bank Group, Ontario Power Generation (OPG), Power Workers’ j u l y 2 017

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Around the Atlantic

LABRADOR NAPA GARAGE SUBJECT OF NEW DISCOVERY CHANNEL REALITY TV PRODUCTION

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called “Last Stop Garage.” The show will be premiering in Canada on the Discovery Channel in this Fall’s primetime lineup and on Discovery sister properties in the United States, Latin America and Europe. The Baikie family garage business started nine years ago and, as well as the garage, includes two gas bars and a corner store. “Our community has had garages over the years and they all successfully failed. When this garage became available we jumped on it in 2008. We’re also 100% Inuit-owned and two thirds of our staff are Innu” Leander explained. The store is also, interestingly, now the only Yamaha Music dealer in Labrador. Only makes sense as Leander is part of the ECMA award-winning band “The Flummies” and

By Andrew Skaling

ABRADOR GARAGE SUBJECT OF NEW DISCOVERY CHANNEL REALITY TV PRODUCTION - NEW SHOW STANDS POISED TO BECOME A REALITY “CORNER GAS” OF THE EAST COAST. “Boldly going where no NAPA Autopro has gone before.” That’s the understated way that Leander Baikie describes the remarkable twist of fate that has come his way. The owner of CRB Automotive in North West River Labrador and his son Colin, along with their employees, will be the stars of a new unscripted reality show

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has been performing for over 40 years as a musician with the “longest running band in Newfoundland and Labrador.” It takes but a quick introduction to Leander and his lifelong friend and general manager, Stanley Oliver, to realize the Baikies and their 18 employees are going to have a big impact on the small screen and their small community. In a recent hour-long conversation with Leander and Stanley, this scribe got an unforgettable introduction to the guys, their garage business and their impending catapult to fame. Before delving into the subject of reality TV, the guys gave me a history of CRB and a sense of the community they serve. Both Leander and Stanley were quick to stress that theirs is a life that still starts at 6:30 AM,


runs into the evenings, six days a week and that’s “just” operating a business that two neighbouring communities depend on. Despite the filming, they’re still “a fully operational garage.” In remote Labrador, tight-knit communities depend on their neighbours and keeping the primary means of transportation and connection to larger centers, the automobile, working and fueled is critical. The local Zamboni also needs some TLC from time-to-time. It wouldn’t be unusual to see an old GMC being brought back from breakdown in the bay next to the Zamboni getting tuned up nor would it be unusual to look out through the bay doors from that unusual scene to watch a moose stroll by. So how does a major Toronto production company, Proper Television, wind up developing a series around a family-run garage in Labrador? Short answer is social media. Longer one is a senior producer with Proper was flying home from Europe and, when the plane began passing over the first North American landfall, Labrador, he wondered “who lives there, what do they do.” Stanley said they “thought it was a hoax” but a 24hr posting on Facebook looking for interesting stories and people in the North caught Colin’s attention, he responded, met the producers in Montreal and two weeks later they showed up in North West River with cameras and shot the pilot. That was in March 2016. Once the show concept was picked-up by Discovery Canada (rare for the industry off the first pilot) in November, regular filming began in February. We discussed at some length, and with no shortage of light-hearted comedy, the sudden change that all this has brought to CRB Automotive and the community of North West River. “Some of us didn’t want to be discovered” quipped Leander. “but we’re pretty excited about it all. There hasn’t been this much excitement in North West River since Dr. Grenville built the hospital in 1905.” Leander describes “Last Stop Garage” as a “Machine rebuilding show with a lot of natural northern humour.” As one of the crew relayed during early filming, the ease and natural comfort the cast has in front of the camera made their job that much easier. He also, quite correctly, pointed out that “getting natural comedy in TV is tough. Drama is easy. Comedy, not so much.” The show is largely character-driven and Stanley explains, in part, their unique appeal. “We’ve got a professional mixed martial arts fighter (Colin); Leander whose got several music CD’s and has been in that for a long time and me, a former politician (deputy mayor of

Goose Bay), who has five prosthetics by the way, one of which isn’t my tongue, plus the rest of the characters and we’re all running a garage that is literally at the end of the road.” The scenic beauty of Labrador is as much a star in the production as the CRB gang. Based on viewing an early episode cut both Leander and Stanley are pleased with the way the crew captured the local wild and spectacular landscape. That

alone will probably ignite interest in Newfoundland and Labrador from viewers around the globe. With typical Atlantic Canadian modesty the guys heads aren’t swelling under the pending fame of being the stars of a primetime TV show. As Leander put it: “Whether it works out or not, at least we can say we did it. We got an experience that few will ever get and learned a ton about the TV business in the process.”

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Around the Atlantic

Stanley added, in reference to the younger cast: “To them, reality TV means authenticity and they want this to be as real as possible and it is. Everything on the show, all the work, is done by our guys.

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There’s no behind-the-scenes pros or any other help doing the work.” The date for the premiere of the half hour show hasn’t been firmed up yet nor the regular timeslot announced but it will be going to air

in the Fall season on Discovery Canada and on Discovery Velocity in the United States. Keep an eye out in the local listing for “Last Stop Garage” – it’s sure to be a hit.


Bob’s Business Development

RAISE YOUR LABOUR RATES FIRE A CUSTOMER, AND GROW YOUR BOTTOM LINE

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By Bob Greenwood

VERYONE, WHO KNOWS THIS INDUSTRY, UNDERSTANDS THAT THINGS ARE CHANGING VERY RAPIDLY. EVERYONE ALSO UNDERSTANDS THAT THERE IS A SHORTAGE OF COMPETENT TECHNICIANS. The problem with this is that the issues in our industry are creating increased costs, and these costs must be dealt with. Let’s assume the shop owner goes through the processes and has examined the operation very carefully and eliminated any waste to keep costs down. Management has also examined the level of productivity per person to ensure

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that this issue is addressed. Everything has been approached with thoroughness, but management comes to the only conclusion that increased costs are higher than expected and they must be passed on through an increase in the shop’s labour rates. Now management’s mind starts to play games. Management doesn’t sleep too well at night. Management starts to think, “If I increase my labour rates, I will lose my customers and suffer financially”. The things we dwell on sometimes are amazing. Consider this; if you are competent and your clients trust you, and you never let them down, why would they leave you over a labour rate increase? Consider that it is time to slow down and do the math in your business. How many customers could you let go (or even fire) and send them over to the competition? There is a formula, follow the example at right:

SHOP ASSUMPTIONS: • The shop labour dollars sold last year was $350,292 • The shop labour rate is $90 • The shop is averaging 1.48 labour hours billed per workorder • The shops gross profit earned from labour is 94.5% (labour dollar sales minus sublet labour equals labour dollar gross profit. Labour dollar gross profit divided by labour dollar sales equals labour gross profit percentage) • The shop needs a 15% labour rate increase taking it up to $103.50 ($90 X 15%= $13.50) 1. The first step is to take the labour dollars sold and divide it by the labour rate. $350,292 divided by $90 = 3,892.1 hours billed for the year 2. Take the hours billed for the year


and divide it by twelve which gives you the average billed hours per month. 3,892.1 divided by 12 = 324.3 average billed hours per month 3. Calculate the following mathematical formula: Gross Profit Margin percent on labour divided by gross profit margin percent on labour plus 15% minus 1 = the percentage reduction allowed in billed hours. 94.5% divided by 94.5% + 15% = 94.5% divided by 109.5% = .8630 .8630 - 1.0 = .1369% (expressed as 13.69%)

the old labour rate revenue. All costs are now covered, and revenue growth begins, coupled with bottom line growth. With satisfied clients, the shop most likely gets “client” referrals, not “customer” referrals. Many shop owners fear a labour rate increases, and yet if they would do the math, it could mean the difference from going to a financially stable shop providing good salaries for all, versus trying to run a stressed out cash strapped shop.

Shop owners (management), too many times, can be the real enemy to a successful enterprise, not the technicians, not the client, just the person in the mirror who writes the cheque. Work out your numbers to ensure you are not the one holding your shop back from moving to the next level that it must get to if it is going to succeed over the next five years.

4. Average labour hours billed per month times percentage reduction alllowed 324.3 X 13.69% = 44.40 hours 5. Average labour hours per month minus actual number of reduced labour hours allowed equals new average labour hours to be billed at new labour rate 324.3 – 44.4 = 279.9 average monthly hours PROOF: 324.3 X $90 = $29,187.00 279.9 X $103.50 = $28,969.65 (the rounding up of all numbers makes for a slight difference) In other words we can bill out less hours at the new labour rate and still retain the same labour dollars in the shop as we had at the old rate. 6. Now the interesting part occurs. It is certainly not the intent to lose any clients, but there are some customers management would probably prefer if they went somewhere else (the real world here), therefore, how many customers could the business afford to lose (or fire) after management raises the labour rates, without affecting the total labour dollars brought into the shop? Actual number of reduced labour hours allowed divided by average labour hours billed per workorder equals number of customers that can be “fired” 44.4 divided by 1.48 = 30 customers It is most unlikely that the shop will lose 30 customers in a month over a $13.50 labour rate increase, however, if some are lost, or fired, that can be good too because it frees up valuable time. Time that can be spent with “clients”, not “customers”. Time that allows you to “slow down” and get focused on the client’s needs, which in turn, allows the shop to service them very well, and increase total revenue substantially beyond j u l y 2 017

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Truckers Corner

THE 3 R FUTURE OF OLD TRUCKS TODAY’S TRUCKS FACE A FUTURE OF THE 3RS: RECYCLE, REUSE & REPURPOSE

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By Kenneth E. Seaton

T WASN’T THAT LONG AGO THAT WHE N YOUR LOYAL TRUCK DECIDED TO TURN ITSELF INTO A CLUNKER AND QUIT RUNNING, YOU HAD SEVERAL RELATIVELY EASY THINGS THAT YOU COULD DO ABOUT IT. You could; give it to your teenager and say “It’s yours if you can get it up and running”, take it to the local auto junkyard and walk away with a cool 25 or 50 bucks, or you could drive it, push/pull it into the field behind the house and leave it. However, that was a while ago; these days when your vehicle dies it becomes officially classified as an “End of Life Vehicle” (ELV). ELV vehicles are defined as: “stripped, wrecked or otherwise inoperable

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due to mechanical failure.” Leaving your vehicle in the back forty in the dead of night is no longer considered a viable option. In Canada, it’s estimated that annually about 1.6 million vehicles become ELV and are taken off the road. Canadians – and most first world nations – are now faceing stringent new rules and regulations on just how they can rid themselves of their old friends and workhorses. The controlled disposal of ELVs is because it’s been discovered that they pose a threat to the environment. The main reason is the hazardous materials that the vehicles carry inside them. For most people, who are trying to live greener, being a conscientious recycler is now part of their daily routines. Protecting the earth and its environment is a great way of trying to ensure that our children’s future will be bright, clean and is an obligation that everyone should take seriously.

YOU CAN RECYCLE YOUR VEHICLE If your vehicle is now ready to be put

down, there are several practical options open to you. If you just want to scrap your ELV, you should be aware that the majority of the weight in your vehicle is composed of steel. At your local recycling yards scrap steel should run for around $150 per ton and on average a vehicle is usually worth around $300 to a scrapyard. Some auto recycling statistics that you didn’t perhaps know: • Every year, over 25 million tons of materials are recycled from old vehicles; * That with current technology around 75 to 80 % of a vehicle can be recycled; • Each year, the automobile recycling industry in USA and Canada provides sufficient steel to produce roughly 13 million new vehicles; • According to reports, the gross annual revenue in 1997 in the USA was $7.05 billion and in Canada was $1.15 billion. In the same year, auto recyclers in the USA and Canada acquired approximately 4.7 million vehicles for recycling; • Ninety-eight percent of every car battery


Truckers Corner

can be recycled. From 2009 till 2011 the Canadian National Vehicle Scrappage Program (NVSP) ¹ – known as Retire Your Ride / Adieu Bazou – was one of a range of clean transportation initiatives undertaken by our government that partnered with various federal departments as part of its Clean Air Agenda. The program encouraged owners of 1995 and older model-year cars to retire their vehicles in exchange for an offered incentive. The NVSP’s primary goal was to reduce air pollutants by removing these older vehicles from the road; its secondary goals were to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs) by promoting sustainable transportation alternatives and to prevent the release of toxic substances through responsible vehicle recycling. Across Canada the program offered cash incentives of $300. Non-cash incentives varied depending on where the program recipient resided. These incentives ranged from rebates on newer vehicles, transit passes, discounts on bicycles and e-bikes, and memberships in car-sharing programs. The NVSP report documented that, “Most of the participants (93%) preferred the cash incentive. More than 75% of participants replaced or indicated they would replace their vehicles with another one. The auto manufacturer rebates had a direct impact on the type of replacement

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vehicle purchased, as most program users opted for larger vehicles due to their coming with the biggest incentives and discounts.” Over the life of the program, approximately 138,600 vehicles were retired. The NVSP final report quantified that “As the full national program was implemented 21 months after program inception, it was unable to reach its initial target. Some regions had difficulties reaching their targets due to the lack of recycling infrastructure and other logistical issues.”

YOU CAN REUSE YOUR VEHICLE So Old Betsy is officially an ELV parked in the back yard and you can’t bring yourself to junk her. And you can’t face chopping her up and turning her into some form of Yuppie art. You’re wondering what to do – that’s until you see a customized classic vehicle with a gleaming set of wheels role by – and a star is born. Of-course not all old vehicles are considered classics, but she will always be a lady in your eyes. Customizing or “tricking” trucks is a genuine pastime and many vehicle owners are putting new outfits on old dolls. With some cost and lots of loving work, once what was ELV can be uniquely retooled to roll again. She can go from a broken down eyesore to eye candy as you restore her to more than her former glory.

From pick up to big rig numerous owners are going this route and having lots of fun doing it. In-fact, there are many trade and vehicle shows held across the country that are strictly devoted to The Look! Being practical and serviceable are notions that these tricked out rides just leave in their dust. There is way more to it than just putting on some new rims, wheels and/or a flashy new paint job. From the front grille to the rear bumper, pretty much the only things limiting owners is their imagination and having the funds to devote to their ride. Costing from hundreds to many thousands of the dollars, the amount spent seems to only depend on just how deep an owner’s pockets are. Some customizing schemes may run old school. Doing something like; painting and pin stripping, mounting new rims/wheels & mud flaps, custom leather seats – including installing seat heaters to kick it up a notch – with matching embroidered trim, tinted windows with graphics on the rear window, flipping the tailgate handle to accommodate cool paintwork or artwork, doing grille work that makes people see you coming, lighting it up with new high-intensity (HID) headlights & stylish fog lights, running lights that travel down your truck and end with the new taillights that say Whoa! You can also go real new agey by


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Truckers Corner

installing; an in-dash or in-vehicle gaming system complete with Wi-Fi and fully functional tablet PC that comes complete with matching trim & carpeting. Airbrushing your vehicle’s interior, including the door/dash panels and even the engine cover. Toss in some in-car LEDs that highlight your vehicles stylish new interior. Also, you can swap out your door & tailgate handles for electrically activated

ones; add power steps & running bars to both sides and back of your vehicle. The rear steps will allow easier access to your weatherproofed custom enclosed truck bed that comes complete with its own giant audio speaker box. Or, perhaps you are feeling a little retro; you can tune it up and convert your truck into a funky RV or Motorhome. Back in the 70s everyone wanted a VW

campervan. With a little ingenuity and out of the box thinking you can change your pickup, work truck, step van and even transport truck into a rolling home away from home. A little electricity here and plumbing there and you’re ready to hit the road. If you are thinking of converting your vehicle but are mechanically challenged, you may want to consider visiting your local high or trade school. You could ask them if they might be interested in doing the conversion work as part of a school project. Hiring professionals to do the work for you might also be another way to go. Design the interior to fit your wants and needs and for around $200,000 or so, you could have a fully equipped and fun RV to spend your vacation and down time in. Installing solar panels on the roof will also make your RV not only a money saver, but you would also be doing your bit to help save the environment.

OR YOU CAN REPRUPOSE YOUR VEHICLE So what can you do if your ELV is really not salvageable and there is really nothing that can be done to resurrect it. But, with all the emotional baggage that you have been toting around in the truck bed, there’s just no way that you are ready to part with her. Maybe there is another way to go. You could always put a piece of your beloved vehicle into your man cave, basement, kids’ bedroom, etc. That’s right – with a little creativity, cash and elbow grease – owners just like you are turning their old clunkers into innovative, imaginative & functional pieces of furniture, etc.! Recycling turns into upcycling and your memoirs can “Keep on Truckin”. This way, not only can you keep your vehicle near you – or parts thereof – but, there’s also a good chance that you can make your spouse and kids happy too. Some savvy entrepreneurs have even taken to parking their old junker outside of their businesses with the expectations that they’ll be enticing car buffs to stop by and take a look. One company in the UK – whose business is converting retro vehicles into motorhomes – have even turned an old Volkswagen van into a three person work area, complete with fully functioning headlights. From inside to outside, from modest too large, there are many ways to repurpose your vehicle: In the Office – Make office furniture utilising vehicle front & rear ends, coil spring rings can become funky desk top paper holders, bench seats can become 32

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sofas, your old bucket seat is now your comfy desk chair, old headlights can become new retro looking desk lamps, your old licence plate transforms into a timely clock, engine blocks can be transformed into coffee makers that will drive the conversation; In the House – Old vehicle seats become cool couches and armchairs, old truck beds turn into one of a kind beds, convert old vehicle hoods into functional bed headboards, four springs and a glass top equals coffee table, engine & vehicle parts can be shaped into lamps or chess sets, coat hooks, toilet paper holders, the front end of your pick up becomes a basement bar complete with upholstered wheel rim stools & engine block wine rack, or even a fireplace; In the Yard – Your old vehicle’s front end is now a yummy BBQ, the rear end stores all your tools in one spot, tailgates become bench seats and fold down workbenches, engine & vehicle parts transform into piston candle holders, wind chimes, bird feeders, old headlights can easily light up your yard at night, tire rims turn into fire pits, old tires are easily converted into swings, seats and if all else fails, the whole vehicle can be transformed into an awesome flower or plant holder.

Or, perhaps while looking at your old truck you thought “I should at-least do something with the cargo box.” Apparently U-Haul had that same thought and has rehabilitated more than 5,200 of their old rental truck boxes into sustainable modular self-storage units. By repurposing their old trucks they are now delivering more than 640,000 square feet of practical selfstorage. And finally, let’s not forget going the charitable route If your truck is ELV and you still can’t figure out what to do with it. You might consider donating it to a worthy charity. If you are not sure how to go about it, there are organizations like Donate a Car who you can contact and they will handle all the details for you. Individual charities are usually not set up to directly receive vehicles as a form of donation. Whoever you choose to handle your vehicle donation, make sure that they won’t charge you any handling or processing fees. Ask them if they guarantee that 100% percent of the vehicle proceeds will go directly to the charity of your choice. Additionally, make sure to request a tax donation receipt. Normally, most vehicle charity organizations will provide free towing in

many areas across Canada. Or they may increase the amount of the donation paid to you if you deliver the vehicle to them. Depending on where you live, most donated vehicles – conditional on its age and condition – will either be recycled or sold for scrap metal. Some people have also donated their ELVs to their old alma maters. Again, look around your neighbourhood for any local high, trade school or college auto program that might be interested in acquiring your vehicle for its aspiring mechanics to practice on. Also, query the school to ensure that they can issue you a receipt for tax purposes. If you have found a little-known charity that you are interested in donating your vehicle to – but are unsure if they are a scam – you can always investigate them online or through your local Better Business Bureau offices. Be wise and be aware that the Canada Revenue Agency maintains a pretty simple rule relating to charitable donations; the receipt amount that you claim on your taxes can’t be for more than the actual value of your gift! ¹ Evaluation of the National Vehicle Scrappage Program Final Report July 12, 2011 j u l y 2 017

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CHINESE ARTIST CREATES FIRST DIGITAL BMW ART CAR

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AO FEI (B. 1978) IS THE YOUNGEST AND FIRST CHINESE ARTIST TO CREATE A BMW ART CAR. BY EMPLOYING AUGMENTED AND VIRTUAL REALITY, THE INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED ARTIST ADDRESSES THE FUTURE OF MOBILITY SUCH AS AUTONOMOUS DRIVING AND DIGITALIZATION.

In the presence of Dr Ian Robertson, Member of the Board of Management of BMW AG, and hundreds of invited guests, the world premiere of BMW Art Car #18 was celebrated at the Minsheng Art Museum in Beijing on May 31. Cao Fei’s BMW Art Car is a reflection on the speed of change in China, on its tradition and its future. Her art car project consists of three components: a video of a time traveling spiritual practitioner, augmented reality features picturing colorful streams of light, accessible via a dedicated app (App Store: keyword “BMW Art Car #18”), and the BMW M6 GT3 racecar in its original carbon black. Paying tribute to the carbon fiber structure of the racecar chassis, her use of a non-reflective black incorporates the car into the possibilities of the digital world. In her video, the practitioner executes spiritual movements, which become immersive colorful streams of light. When the app is used within the premises of the car, these swishes become an AR installation floating above and around the M6 GT3. Her BMW M6 GT3 will race at the FIA FT World Cup in Macau on November 17-19, 2017. A virtual experience of Cao Fei’s BMW Art Car will be on display at the UBS Forum during Art Basel in Basel in June 2017. 34

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Around the Atlantic

GRAND RE-OPENING OF HENRY’S SERVICE CENTRE IN ANTIGONISH.

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HEY WERE LOCATED AT 4823 TRANS-CANADA HIGHWAY, ANTIGONISH, NS B2G 2L4 BUT HAVE MOVED TO 60 ST ANDREWS ST., ANTIGONISH, NOVA SCOTIA, B2G 2H1

They have been a NAPA Autopro member since 1983 and operated as an Esso Service Station since April 1977. They started with two service bays and a full service gas bar. Over the years they added 2 more service bays, convenience store and full towing service with a staff of 18. It is a family business with husband and wife, Henry and Barb, along with their son Matthew. A number of years ago the Province of Nova Scotia started the planning stages of twinning the Trans-Canada Highway. In that plan included an interchange for the new section of highway which would eventually by-pass Henry’s existing location. Understanding this meant Henry and

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his team would need to consider their options for the future and a decision was made to exit the Esso Program and leave the Retail Petroleum business altogether. They decided to put their energy and focus on the Automotive Service side of their business and opened a 6 bay NAPA AUTOPRO next door to our NAPA Auto Parts store on St. Andrews St in Antigonish. They held a Grand Opening on April 29th where the Community came out to

celebrate their achievement with them. You can visit them at www.henrysservice. ca or www.napaautopro.com/auto-repair/ nova-scotia/antigonish-henrys-servicecentre-limited/ or contact them directly at (902) 863-2819.  Our Team with NAPA AUTOPRO and NAPA Auto Parts would like to congratulate Henry, Barb, Matthew and their entire team on the Grand Opening of their new location and wish them years of success!


Around the Atlantic

CELEBRATE #BIGHEARTS CONVOY 2017

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HEN YOU ARE GIVEN LEMONS, YOU MAKE LEMONADE. LITTLE DID WE KNOW JUST HOW MANY PEOPLE WOULD COME TOGETHER TO HELP US TURN LEMONS INTO LEMONADE IN SEPTEMBER 2016. The power of the trucking community is immeasurable when it comes to rallying together to support one common goal, cause, or specifically, one of their own. Combine all three elements and you have something so incredibly powerful that it is hard to describe. In 2016 the trucking community did just this to honor a fellow driver, Darryl Ward from Ice Road Truckers, even though many did not know him. What they knew was that he was passionate about trucking, his family, his friends and Special Olympics. Together, this community stood together in solidarity at the 2016 convoy as each truck displayed a memorial bumper sticker and gave a small moment of silence at the display of a giant banner featuring his image that led the convoy for almost 50 Km through the streets of Dartmouth. What did this mean for the charity that Darryl felt connected to? It helped

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to raise $114,000 to help supplement the cost of many programs that are benefiting our athletes, coaches and volunteers. This year our Play Unified Program grew from two schools to ten in just one year helping to remove barriers to inclusion through sport. We are continuing to see growth in our Active Start and Fundamentals programs (ages 2-12) and we are offering more competitions, training and resources across the province. The 2017 Big Rigs. Big Hearts. Big Results truck convoy presented by Irving Oil will look to give back to the community that has given so much to them for the past five years. “ The 2017 Convoy planning is still underway but the focus will be on the drivers – thanking them for the years of support that they have given to our event and our athletes,” says Anne Marie Shannon, event organizer. “We are going to be looking for ways to help celebrate everything they have done to help make this event possible. Keep your eye out on our Social Media and Website for some great information surrounding this year’s theme. One great new addition to the 2017 event is the addition of East Coast International (ECI) as the Big Rig Sponsor. “Over the past four years, as a company we have recognized the value in supporting our community and our customers in this event. The Truck Convoy for Special

Olympics holds a “special” place in our hearts and we see the value that this event has on the athletes and their families. This year we are proud to help further their efforts by increasing our sponsorship to the Big Rigs level.” says David Lockheart, President of East Coast International. As part of this partnership, watch for some exciting features just for our drivers on behalf of our #BIGRIG sponsor. One concept that is in the works is making one Driver a “Honourary Convoy Marshall” for the day. East Coast International will provide the truck and Special Olympics will help to make this driver feel like the King of the Road! Watch for more details to be released soon.

HOW TO REGISTER Truckers’ can register through our website http://truckconvoyns.ca/drive/ register/. Cost is $125.00 per truck and includes a special driver’s bag that includes a hat, t-shirt, BBQ tickets and gifts from our Sponsors. Lead Truck is chosen by the driver who collects the most pledges, and lead team is two or more drivers working together to collect pledges as a team. Registration is open and lots of exciting things are happening on our Facebook group. For more information, please call Anne Marie at 902-429-2266 x 2.


Around the Atlantic

NAPA HOSTS ANOTHER GREAT SHOW!

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XCELLENT DEALS, NEW PRODUCTS AND A SWEET GIVEAWAY WERE ALL ON THE TABLE FOR THOSE IN ATTENDANCE.

While not open to the general public, all of NAPA’s customers were invited to join in on the 2 day event. NAPA staff and sales personnel from Ontario to Newfoundland were on hand to greet and assist customers from the 84 Atlantic Canadian NAPA stores. The event featured several seminars and workshops and closed off with a giveaway of a Honda Pioneer SXS! Over 70 of NAPA’s suppliers were there to give hands-on demonstrations and talk shop. Here are a list of some who were there! SHELL CANADA BOSCH AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE ROBERT BOSCH INC. NLS PRODUCTS KLEEN FLO DOMINION SURE SEAL LTD. GATES CANADA ARSLAN AUTOMOTIVE

BBB INDUSTRIES DORMAN PRODUCTS CARDONE INDUSTRIES PRIMELINE TOOLS SKF SHORELINE FUELS TENNECO INNOVA JOHN BEAN CTP DISTRIBUTORS HENNESY BE PRESSURE SUPPLY NGK SPARKPLUGS CANADA LTD. LOCTITE CRC CANADA HITACHI AXALTA COATING SOLUTIONS IDEMITSU MITCHELL 1 SIDEM WINHERE CRP DV SYSTEMS ENEOS EAST PENN SPRAYMAX H. PAULIN BANDO/KYB SPECTRA PREMIUM AKEBONO CASTROL

ZF SERVICES VALVOLINE CANADA VALEO JB WELD SCA FRAM GROUP 3M OSRAM SYLVANIA BALKAMP PRESTONE GLASS SHEILD WD 40 APRIL SUPER FLOW KIMBERLY CLARK MATTHEW SCOTT DATA MARKETING SOLUTIONS INC. MEVOTECH AUTOVITALS NAPA ECHLIN ALLIANCE INSURANCE ABSORBPUR-QUALISORB ENERGY LOGIC GUNK BARTEC USA LINCOLN INDUSTRIAL / JDCOYLE MANN +HUMMEL/NAPA FILTERS LUCAS OIL PRODUCTS / JDCOYLE SEASTAR SOLUTIONS ITW PERMATEX / JDCOYLE AUTOTECH


East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC NEWFOUNDLAND

Maintenance Crews Making Annual Road Repairs Throughout Province With the arrival of warmer temperatures, crews from maintenance depots across the province are now refocusing on summer road maintenance issues. Repair work has been taking place on numerous routes throughout Newfoundland and Labrador. Crews are addressing potholes, caused by recurring freezing and thawing throughout the winter and spring, as quickly as possible. Other work taking place includes gravel road grading, shoulder repair, catch basin cleaning, guide rail and post maintenance, culvert repair and bridge inspections.  Garbage removal from the side of roads is done as frequently as possible as part of the summer maintenance program. The department appreciates the patience of motorists as crews daily monitor close to 10,000 kilometres of highways and community access roads and more than 1,300 bridges and large culverts. For the safety of all travellers and maintenance crews, motorists are reminded to follow safe driving practices. Motorists can also report driving conditions to the department’s regional dispatch offices 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at the following contact information: Avalon Region: 729-7669 Eastern Region: 466-4160 Central Region: 292-4444 Western Region: 635-4144 Labrador Region: 896-7888 Terra Nova, c/o Parks CDA: 533-2801

NEW BRUNSWICK

More than $3.5 million for road

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projects in Grand Lake region The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure will invest more than $3.5 million in road projects in the Grand Lake region this summer. “Like all New Brunswickers, the people of this region rely on our infrastructure every day to go to work, to school, or to access services,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Fraser. “That is why we are committed to making infrastructure investments that are necessary to support our economy and our quality of life.” A $1.2-million tender was recently awarded for paving 2.8 kilometres of Route 10, from an area near the SunburyQueens county line to an area near Route 116. Another tender will be issued for the replacement of a culvert on Route 123 at Redbank. The government is also providing funding through the Municipal Designated Highway Program for projects in Minto and Chipman: In Minto, the government will pay about 95 per cent of eligible costs for the paving of a 2.3-kilometre section of Route 10, from civic number 380 to Post Road. In Chipman, the government will pay for work on 2.5 kilometres of King Street, from the railway crossing to the village limits, including a level and reseal on a 1.9-kilometre section and paving on the remaining 0.6-kilometre section. “I am proud to be part of a government that is making the decision to invest in our communities; a government that is listening to people and getting the right things done,” said Fraser. The province’s $775.6-million capital budget, which includes the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure’s capi-

tal budget of $638.5 million, reflects the government’s priority to support its public buildings, highways and bridges. Funding for the Municipal Designated Highway Program increased to $25 million in 2015. It has remained at that level as part of a government commitment to sustain increased funding for municipalities.

NOVA SCOTIA

Province Investing $390 Million to Twin and Improve Safety After hearing from Nova Scotians during province-wide twinning consultations, government is investing an additional $390 million in capital funding over seven years to improve highways without the use of tolls. “We did not hear overwhelming support from Nova Scotians about paying a toll for twinned highways, but they were clear we should act now to improve our roads,” said Geoff MacLellan, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. “We will do that with an emphasis on safety and, at the same time, we will create economic opportunities for Nova Scotians.” The additional $390 million will allow the province to add three sections of twinned 100-series highways to the existing highway plan. Government will also build the Burnside Connector. All four projects will be complete within seven years. The four projects are: Highway 101, Three Mile Plains to Falmouth, including the Windsor Causeway, 9.5 kilometres Highway 103, Tantallon to Hubbards, 22 kilometres Highway 104, Sutherlands River to


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca

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Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

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Atlantic Cat

1-902-468-0581

atlcat.ca

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Atlantic Chemex

1-800-565-5144

atlanticchemex.ca

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1-905-821-3300

axaltacs.com

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Bastarache

1-888-288-6621

bastaracheauto.com

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Blenkhorn’s

1-800-677-5807

blenkhorn.com

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Bradford Exchange

1-847-581-8124

bradfordexchange.ca

IN

Cabot Shipping

1-800-565-0606

cabotss.com

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CARQUEST

1-506-631-3807

carquest.ca

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Dominion Sure Seal

1-800-265-0790

dominionsureseal.com

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

1-506-458-9322

idealequipment@outlook.com

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Interstate Batteries

1-506-386-6777

interstatebatteries.com

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Krown Rust Control

1-888-545-7878

krownhalifax.com

MJS Holdings

1-866-461-1045

mjsholdings@ns.aliantzinc.ca

Axalta

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278 Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

Maritime Pro Stock Tour 1-902-873-2277

INTERNET

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

IN

NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

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NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

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Parts For Trucks

1-800-565-4700

partsfortrucks.com

Uni-Select (BtoB)

1-506-857-8150

uni-selectcanada.com

31

Reliable Equipment

1-902-410-5877

reliablereg.ca

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Rotary Lifts

1-866-461-1045

rotarylift.com

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Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

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SEMA

1-909-978-6720

semashow.com

35

Shell

1-800-661-1600

shell.ca

13

Traction Truck Parts

1-506-857-8840

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

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Antigonish, including Barneys River, 38 kilometres construction of the four-lane, divided Burnside Connector (Highway 107) between Burnside to Bedford, 8.7 kilometres. Sections of the highways will open as they are completed. “I’m overjoyed that twinning is in the foreseeable future,” said Joe MacDonald, chief of Barneys River Volunteer Fire Department. “It’ll mean a lot to have a safe road through Sutherlands River. I believe many lives will be saved.” The funding also includes $30 million for safety improvements on un-twinned sections of highway. Those measures could include interchange improvements, passing lanes and turning lanes. A safety study on Highway 107 from Burnside to Musquodoboit will also be conducted. The provincial contribution will be used to access federal cost shared infrastructure programs. Nova Scotia has submitted business cases to the federal government for consideration. The province will continue to work with them to formalize agreements. The province will also be removing tolls from the Cobequid Pass for Nova Scotia motorists once the bonds are paid off (expected to be in 2019). A decision on commercial trucks and nonNova Scotia residents will be made as we move closer to this date and have fully assessed the long-term maintenance and operating costs. “We want to give Nova Scotia motorists a break. As we move closer to 2019, we’ll look at how we’ll maintain this crucial piece of infrastructure,” said Mr. MacLellan. Nearly 2,000 Nova Scotians took part in 14 public sessions between January 30 and March 9. Feedback was also received from close to 5,400 people through online submissions. The feedback, along with consultation presentations and materials, can be viewed at novascotia.ca/twinning.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Canada and Prince Edward Island support the next phase of the Trans-Canada Highway Extension From visiting friends and relatives to getting goods to market, we rely on our roads, bridges and highways to support a vibrant economy and a great quality of life. The governments of Canada and Prince Edward Island are investing in transportation infrastructure that will help create jobs and grow the middle class now while building a strong foundation for a sustainable economic future. Wayne Easter, Member of Parliament for Malpeque, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Paula Biggar, Minister of Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy and Minister Responsible for the Status of Women for Prince Edward Island, today announced funding for the second phase of the Trans-Canada Highway Extension. The support announced today will be used to remove the signalized intersection where the Trans-Canada Highway, Warren Grove and York Point roads meet, and replace it with a roundabout. The project also includes the reconstruction of one kilometer of the existing Trans-Canada Highway from the roundabout to Poplar Island. The newly repaved section will feature median curbing to prohibit left turn movement on the highway, and lighting. Once completed, this project will improve the safety and efficiency of the highway. It will also promote economic growth and residential development in the Town of Cornwall by removing commercial through-traffic from the town’s core, making room for businesses and residents to grow and live. The Government of Canada will contribute up to $2,139,926 of the total eligible project costs, while the Government of Prince Edward Island will provide $3,025,974.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

MAY 2017 WINNER!

Bill Brown of Sydney, NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is July 15th, 2017

IT’S SO EASY TO WIN!

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

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14 Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com

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1 New Brunswick city 6 Canadian capital, for short 8 Ford SUV 9 Before 10 Seat ___ 11 Extra tire 14 Alternative word 15 Measurement of the air in a tire 18 Sister, abbr. 19 Ignition starters 21 Tech department 22 Oil holder 25 Honda sedan 26 ____ Spectra

1 Nova Scotia town 2 Chevy car and an antelope 3 Wrench or hammer, for example 4 Bridge that crosses another highway, for example 5 Negative word 7 Radial 9 Toyota model with very good mpg 12 Honda SUV 13 Nissan compact car 16 Use a chair 17 Ford info and entertainment system 20 Automobile 22 Company, abbr. 23 State that neighbours Canada 24 Approve

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IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD 1

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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ascar race fans, we think you’ll like this image of a well known racer and his team! Maybe you can name what this well known team is, or anything more about it. Details please, and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better!

Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is July 15th, 2017.

Congratulations to EJerome Hartery of St Alban’s Newfoundland and Labrador who identified the famous bike driven by Wyatt “Captain America”, played by actor Peter Fonda, in the well known 1969 American road movie Easy Rider. The motorcycles for the film were designed and built by two African-American chopper builders. Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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Auto & Trucking Atlantic July 2017  

Auto & Trucking Atlantic July 2017

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