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2019 FEDERAL BUDGET EMBRACES ELECTRIC VEHICLES – The most recent federal budget finds the Liberals singing the praises of electric vehicles….

ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 44

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CANADA: FULLY CHARGED FOR ELECTRIC CARS – With the introduction of the allCanadian Solo, Canada stands poised to enter a new era of transportation.

PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers rob@autoatlantic.com

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – PEI introduces new climate change initiatives.

EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com

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TOTAL SHOP WAGE PACKAGE is Measured Against Your Total Labour Billings – The aftermarket may now be considered a “knowledge profession” as Bob Greenwood tells us, but what’s that mean exactly for your business measurements?

SALES TEAM Meg Devries meg@autoatlantic.com

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – Vanity license plates are a pain in the Assman.

Page 22

NEW BUMPER TO BUMPER STORE OPENS IN STRATFORD PEI – a second location is cause for celebration writes Susan Bradley.

Page 24

TECH OUT A LIME – Would you believe a micro mobility market? Would you believe scooters are the new…go to? It is so, writes Kenneth E. Seaton.

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AVOIDING THE CARWASH SPRINGTIME BLUES – Tips and tricks to get your carwash up to speed and spring-time ready.

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THERE’S RUST IN YOUR EV FUTURE – Contrary to popular belief, EVs are NOT immune to corrosion. The question becomes, what can you do about it asks April Chadwick.

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AN ATLANTIC GRADUATION UNLIKE ANY OTHER – They came from Congo, Sudan, Yemen and elsewhere. They completed certificates in automotive installation and then they….

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iRACING AND NASCAR UP THE ANTE WITH eSPORTS SERIES – For those in the know, IRacing.com has been hosting thousands of weekly virtual races for a while now. What happens when, worlds, um, collide? Tim Terry explains.

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2019 PRO STOCK TOUR SCHEDULE – With 12 races spread over three provinces between May and September there’s speed happening near you.

Dan Hillier dan@autoatlantic.com OFFICE MANAGER James Somers james@autoatlantic.com Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3S 1H6. Tel 902.423.6788 • Fax 902.423.3354. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada.

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Letter from the Editor

2019 FEDERAL BUDGET EMBRACES ELECTRIC VEHICLES

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By Carter Hammett

INCE OUR FEATURE THIS ISSUE FOCUSES ON ELECTRIC VEHICLES, I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE INTERESTING TO CHECK OUT HOW THIS YEAR’S LIBERAL BUDGET TOUCHED ON THE SAME SUBJECT. Canada’s set a goal for all new car sales to completely electric by 2040, ambitious by any standard, but admirable too. According to clean-tech info company Fleetcarma, 8.3 percent of all new vehicles sold in Canada are electric. Sales figures are moving quite nicely thank you very much. Much of this is most likely due to healthy sales of the nation’s number one seller, Tesla’s Model 3. Following in second place, is the Nissan Leaf and the Chevy Bolt, which suffered a drop in sales the last quarter despite overall EV sales being up across the board last year. Part of the reason the Bolt’s sales stalled at 464 units during Q4 may have been partially

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due to the Ontario PC party’s decision to cut the Electric and Hydrogen Vehicle Incentive Program (EHVIP) which had lowered the cost of plug-in models by as much as $14,000. At the federal level, EV sales targets have been set at 10% by 2025 and 30% by 2030. The feds have thrown quite a few incentives in to sweeten the pot. Let’s check a few out. Affordability – The Liberals have outlined a plan that would offer potential EV buyers $5,000 toward the purchase of a new vehicle priced less than $45,000. The good news suggests that rebates will be able to be stacked on top of existing provincial programs in BC and Quebec—a province that currently offers up to $8000 on EV’s priced less than $75,000—which could bring the cost of a fresh Chevy Bolt down to about $30,000. The catch seems to be that a good many longer-range models will unfortunately be excluded. Expanded Number of Charging Stations – About $130 million has been allocated for Natural Resources Canada over five years to ramp up the existing number of new recharging and refuelling stations in public parking locations, workplaces

and thankfully, in remote locations. The upside to this should be reduction in taxes for charging stations. The downside is that the previous round of funding was allocated to hydrogen fuel cell and natural gas. Obviously, more monies for EVs are critical. Work with Auto Manufacturers and Business to Secure Voluntary Zero-Emission Sales Targets – the budget recommends that some zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) be eligible for a 100% tax write off the year they are put on the road. EVs, plug-in hybrids and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles would all be considered eligible, including light-to-heavy-duty vehicles purchased by a business. Capital costs for eligible zero-emission passenger vehicles will be deductible up to a limit of $55,000 plus sales tax. This is kind of a big deal. Imagine a fleet of ZEVs being purchased, the whole kit and caboodle able to deduct a princely sum from the total. Speaking of fleets, the budget implies municipalities—which often own their fleets—will most assuredly exploit the program. It also suggests that fleets converting will be accelerated, which in turn, implies a reduction in GHGs a heckuva lot faster than anticipated. Of course, the budget’s not being fully applauded. Almost immediately, the NDP suggested that Canadians will spend more money on foreign vehicles. Case in point: the Chrysler Pacifica Plug In Hybrid---manufactured in Windsor, ON--misses the rebate package because of its $51,000 price tag. According to union leaders, the Pacifica is the only Canadian-built vehicle that could qualify under the federal program, but for the price. As of this writing, petitions are being distributed; war cries are in progress. Far from the perfect, and despite a number of hiccups, the federal budget—as it relates to EVs, anyway-- is nonetheless a solid step in the right direction, a forward-thinking, proactive nod towards the future and an investment in technology that’s here to stay.


CANADA:

FULLY CHARGED FO WITH A THREE-WHEELED EXTERIOR, A COMPACT DESIGN AND UNHEARD-OF MILEAGE, CANADA’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE EV MARKET JUST GOT A LITTLE BRIGHTER.

By Jon Barry

I

T LOOKS LIKE WE MAY HAVE PASSED A TIPPING POINT IN REGARDS TO ELECTRONIC VEHICLES (EVS) IN THIS COUNTRY. Canada’s new electric car, The Solo, has launched in British Columbia and the federal and some provincial governments are trying to put their foot on the gas (or battery) to make electronic vehicles a more accessible reality. The federal government sees widespread adoption of electric vehicles as a crucial part of their plan to transition to a greener economy. We spoke with Frédérica Dupuis, senior advisor at media relations with Transport Canada and he outlined why the push towards zero emission vehicles is a crucial step towards the government’s dream of a green economy. “Transportation accounts for a quarter of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions, almost half of which comes from cars and light trucks. That is why the Government of Canada has set ambitious sales targets for zero-emission vehicles in Canada, including for 10% of new light-duty vehicles sold to be zero-emission vehicles by 2025, 30% by 2030, and ultimately 100% by 2040.” Many of these federal initiatives are a part of the grand Transportation 2030: A Strategic Plan for the Future of Trans6

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portation in Canada. Under their Green and Innovative Transportation initiative Transportation 2030 aims to “work with provinces and territories through a PanCanadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change to support a low-carbon transportation system.” Both the federal and some provincial governments are hard at work trying to figure out what the major barriers are to zero emissions vehicles taking over Canadian roads. “Over the past two years, federal, provincial, and territorial governments have worked closely together to better understand the barriers to greater adoption of these vehicles by Canadians in the following five areas: vehicle supply, costs and benefits of ownership, infrastructure readiness, public awareness, and clean growth and clean jobs. This included significant input from an advisory group, as well as over 160 experts in the field,” says Dupuis. We also spoke with Al Cormier, one of the founders of Electric Mobility Canada (EMC), which was founded in 2005 to advocate and lobby to “accelerate the electrification of transport in Canada.” Cormier explains the roadblocks for some consumers: “The cost is one barrier. The other barrier is what you could call range anxiety. How far will I go before I need to charge? Right now there is a whole national push towards EV charging stations across Canada. Some at level two which takes about three-to-four hours to recharge a car and some at level three which is 20 minutes or less. So there’s a lot of level three chargers being installed.

The federal government is supporting that. The provinces are supporting that. Petro Canada announced a cross-Canada network of fast charging stations and I believe others are coming onboard as well. “People that have an electric car now say that’s not a problem because they have apps in the car that tell you where the nearest charger is. If you find a fast charger then it’s just like going into a gas station, you go in plug it in go in for a coffee or washroom or whatever come out and it will be charged. Once you get more fast charging stations across the country then range anxiety will disappear.” And thankfully the charging station gap is being bridged at top speed: “There’s a lot of initiatives...to increase the infrastructure of EVs and charging stations and that’s progressing very fast so that’s very encouraging,” says Cormier. Infrastructure is one of the largest projects that the government is trying to tackle: The government has already invested more than $180 million to support electric and alternative fuel infrastructure across Canada to expand the coast-to-coast network of electric vehicle fast chargers on the national highway system. Cormier outlines how the Maritime provinces are doing their part to create a greener economy: “On the east coast there are some interesting developments. New Brunswick Power...is installing fast charging stations across the province. So is Nova Scotia Power. Dalhousie University in Halifax is a world-renowned lead researcher on vehicle batteries and they are being consulted by the auto industry


OR ELECTRIC CARS

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Future Technologies

from all over on how to produce better performing batteries.” It’s looking like it might be just the right moment for EVs to turn the corner as the price of a vehicle goes down and the availability of infrastructure goes up. “Not that many years ago the cost of battery was calculated at 1000$/KWH and it’s now around the $300 dollar range and it’s expected to be at $100.00 range in twoor-three years.” says Cormier. Accessible and affordable electric vehicles are here. The eco-friendly stars are finally aligning for electric vehicles like the Solo, the brainchild of Henry Reisner and Jerry Kroll of Electra Meccanica. Electra Meccanica is looking to position itself as the Tesla 2.0 rival from the Great White North. Electra Meccanica is launching their push into the electric vehicle industry with their three-wheeled single passenger electric vehicle that they are marketing as “The Smartest Commuter Car On The Planet.” Electra Meccanica began its history in Italy in 1959 where founder Frank Reisner was building custom sports cars with his company Intermeccanica. In 1975, Intermeccanica relocated to Los Angeles where they began producing replicas of the Porsche 356. In 1981, Frank moved the company to Vancouver and his son Henry began to help them expand to become the premier manufacturer of 356 replicas in North America. By 2012 Henry had started a new venture to develop the electric vehicles with Jerry Kroll. “My background is being a racing car driver agent. Kinda a Jerry McGuire of race car drivers,” says Knoll. “It was in 2003, at the end of the season that I said, “You know what, there has got to be a better way than methanol to power race cars. Why don’t we start using sustainable electricity? And that was the launch point.” ”Kroll was previously CEO of CRAiLAR

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Technologies, a BC-based cleantech company. Kroll was also Green Party candidate in B.C.’s provincial elections, lending the company even more eco- friendly bona fides. By 2016 Henry Reisner’s “extensive knowledge of performance car production” combined with Kroll’s “passion for motorsports, his expertise in clean energy, the design and manufacture of electric formula one race cars and his passion for a sustainable environment. Two years later Electra Meccanica was trading on the NASDAQ stock exchange. The Solo is quite the impressive machine packed into a small space. The vehicle is a good fit to bridge the gap for those looking for an accessible commuter vehicle to use locally. And in many ways that is exactly the solution that Electra Meccanica is trying to provide: “When you look at what the Solo does, it’s smaller than you think you need, but 83% of people spend most of the time driving by themselves. That’s our niche. That’s everything. And I promise you when you drive the Solo for a week, you don’t want to give it back. You’re driving by yourself, going to all these places. You can park anywhere. It is literally like the iPhone or the Blackberry for the road. It is as addictive as a smartphone” says Kroll With a $19,888 CAD price tag, the Solo packs a 160 km range on a single charge, with a full charge time taking around three hours with quick charging stations and six hours with slow charging. The vehicle can travel from 0-60 mph in eight seconds and has a top speed of 130 km/h. Electra Meccanica claims that one of the biggest advantages for the Solo is how much you would save on annual fuel costs alone. If you drive a small car, your annual fuel costs could run you around $2365 a year at $1.35/L of gas, the average price for fuel in British Columbia. The

price to fuel a Solo over a year is only $281, making for an annual fuel savings cost of $2084. If you drive a big SUV, that annual fuel price rockets up to $3252 a year, meaning going with the Solo would save you around $2971 a year. Kroll is quick to point out the benefits of EVs over the long run: “People are now more and more recognizing that even if it’s $2000 more for an electric car, the monthly operating cost is a fraction of what it cost to run a gasoline car. It’s not like it’s 700800$ a month in gas, it’s $13-12 of electricity. On top of that, the resale value for an electric is so much higher than a gas car.” But with electric vehicles, it’s not just fuel savings cost that you save money. Electra Meccanica explains: “Your Solo has 99% fewer parts than a combustion engine—meaning significantly fewer opportunities for things to go wrong.” Less moving parts means less opportunity for those parts to break down. “Manufacturing EV requires 30% less steps than manufacturing a regular car. So obviously the process in the factories will be faster and requiring technically less people. It’s fundamentally because the number of components in an electric vehicle is far less than it is in an internal combustion engine. No muffler, no radiators, no exhaust pipes, no engine, and the electric motors are tough beasts. We’ve seen electric motors that have been around for decades and they still run. It’s a lot easier to manufacture but it’s a lot easier to maintain. There’s less servicing required.” Electra Meccanica has its eyes on more than just the commuter market: “We are in discussions with some of the biggest ride sharing companies in the world .It not only addresses that 90% of all car shares are usually one person. The biggest problem that car sharing companies have is parking. And you can park 2 ½


Future Technologies

Solos in every parking spot. So they can deploy more vehicles, be more efficient, without incurring any more parking cost. It’s brilliant for car shares” says Kroll. “The second big market for the Solo is last mile delivery for companies like Amazon, Ali Baba, Dominoes, Purolator. Huge market.” But for Electra Meccanica, their dreams of electric vehicles of the future don’t end with the Solo. They are also gearing up to launch the Tofino in 2020. The Tofino is a stylish two-seater electric sports car reminiscent of cars found in 1960’s Italy, where the company originally began. If that wasn’t old school enough for you, Electra Meccanica has recently teased the upcoming eRoadster, an EV replica of the Porsche 365, the car that kicked Electra Meccanica into high gear. Kroll gave us a little taste of what else is coming down the road: “We have several other vehicles in the product pipeline which will be announced in the next 12-24 months and not

all of them are land- based.” A teaser he loves to include. It’s looking like this year will be another big year for Electra Meccanica. “We have over 23,000 orders for the Solo. That’s like almost half a billion dollars’ worth of orders. Last month our share price went up 300% because of general public and media coverage. That doesn’t happen by accident. It’s the awareness of people saying we want electric cars not gas cars. This has happened before when people said we want the Internet we don’t want fax machines anymore. You are seeing the same thing happening on the road today,“ says Kroll The dream of an electric vehicle future is finally becoming a reality. While the country had a lot of catching up to do thanks to government initiatives, electric vehicles are becoming more accessible. The price per kilowatt for EVs with potential for parity with gasoline engines

MANUFACTURING EVS IN CANADA

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HE GOVERNMENT ISN’T JUST STOPPING AT INFRASTRUCTURE AND CONSUMER INCENTIVES. THEY ARE ALSO HARD AT WORK POSITIONING THE COUNTRY TO NOT JUST BE THE DRIVERS OF A NEW ELECTRIC VEHICLES, THEY ALSO WANT CANADIANS TO MANUFACTURE THE NEW VEHICLES. We spoke with Hans Parmar at Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, and he outlined the government’s plans for EV manufacturing in Canada. “The automotive industry is rapidly changing as consumers expect more technologically advanced, cleaner and fuel-efficient modes of transportation. The government believes the country is well positioned to “leverage our strong manufacturing base and technology ecosystem to drive advanced vehicle innovation that will deliver significant environmental, social and economic benefits. They argue that “continued investments in automotive innovation will help amplify Canada’s automotive manufacturing strengths, draw on Canada’s skills and talent, and continue to lay a foundation for positioning Canada as a natural home for the design, development, manufacturing and deployment of the ‘vehicle of the future’ through a number of instruments, including funding programs.” Parmar explains the government’s plans: “Since 2015, our government has invested $434 million in projects undertaken by Canada’s auto sector. In total, nearly $6 billion in automotive sector investments has been announced in Canada, including for major upgrades for next generation production.” The investments include a $41.8 million contribution to Honda including significant investments in a state of the art paint shop that will reduce GhG emissions by 44%; a $102 million contribution 10

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is coming down the road. Both governments and private companies are working at quick charge speed to build out greener EV infrastructure. Due to government incentives the purchase of an EV is more accessible in some provinces like B.C., Quebec, and Ontario. Groups like Electric mobility are lobbying for further federal level incentives as well. And companies like Electra Meccanica are using their decades of engineering, design and manufacturing experience combined with an eco-friendly vision to build the vehicles that will drive us into the future. And from Electra Meccanica’s standpoint they believe we have already passed over the tipping point into the future of EVs. “I think we have passed the tipping point already” says Kroll. “Every gas station is for sale and they are closing like crazy. I predict that within five years, it will be about as easy to find a gas station as it will be to find a blockbuster video store.”

to Ford included investments to increase research and development capacity in vehicle lightweighting...at its Fumes-to-Fuel R&D Centre of Excellence at the Oakville Assembly Complex; and a $110 million contribution to Toyota [to] support increased hybrid vehicle production in Canada. There is also a $49 million investment in Linamar [to] support advanced manufacturing processes and cleaner automotive technologies; a $41 million investment through the Strategic Innovation Fund to support a number of supplier-led R&D projects ranging from electric battery technology, to lightweighting projects using composite materials to advanced manufacturing projects that reduce waste. Parmar explains that “these investments all contributed to the

creation and maintenance of thousands of Canadian jobs, and to a cleaner economy for Canada.” Cormier also illustrates how it’s also not just the big auto manufacturing plants that are getting in on the excitement of EVs: “We have other companies that provide components and software to EV companies...I’d say there are probably 300 companies across the country involved in supplying parts and software to the EV car industry.”


East Coast Road Report

THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE ATLANTIC REGION SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO NEW BRUNSWICK

Spring weight restrictions for roads Spring weight restrictions for truck traffic came into effect at midnight on Sunday, March 10, in southern New Brunswick, and at midnight on Sunday, March 17, in northern New Brunswick. Restrictions will continue until midnight on Sunday, May 12, in the southern part of the province, and until midnight on Sunday, May 19, in the north. The duration of the restriction period is determined by monitoring weather conditions and tracking the progress of the thaw, using sensors located around the province. “During spring thaw, the road strength weakens by 30 per cent or more, and we must restrict the weight limits to ensure that our road infrastructure does not suffer damage during this annual frost and thaw cycle,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Oliver. “We provide this notice to the trucking community so that they may prepare to reduce their loads or plan alternate routes during

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this period. I thank members of the industry for the co-operation and patience they demonstrate each year while these restrictions are in place.” For the purpose of these restrictions, northern New Brunswick includes: the area lying within the counties of Northumberland, Gloucester, Restigouche, Madawaska and Victoria; the portion of Route 108 within York County; the portion of Gordon Vale Road and Holtville Road within York County; the portion of Route 123 within Sunbury County and Queens County; the portion of Bloomfield Ridge Road between Holtville Road and Route 625; and the portion of Route 625 between Gordon Vale Road and Route 8. Details are available online.

NEWFOUNDLAND The following statement was given March 4 in the House of Assembly by the Honourable Graham Letto, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Environment: Provincial Government Enhances Fire Protection Vehicle Program

Mr. Speaker, I rise in this Honourable House to highlight our government’s recent announcement of the expansion to the Fire Protection Vehicle Program. We have made changes to the program so that it works better for communities, fire departments, and the residents they serve. We have expanded the program to allow communities to apply for cost-shared funding under one of three funding streams, depending on which stream best suits their financial needs. Communities can now apply for cost-shared funding for used fire protection vehicles, as well as for a fixed contribution for new vehicles. The program has been improved so that our fire protection budget will make a bigger impact in more areas of the province. The changes will also provide increased opportunities for communities to collaborate and take a shared approach to fire services. I would like to thank all the firefighters, their families, and the fire departments in the province for their dedication and sacrifices. I would also like to acknowledge the good work of the Newfoundland and


East Coast Road Report

Labrador Association of Fire Services. We look forward to continuing to work with our fire services partners to strengthen the level of fire and emergency services for Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.

NOVA SCOTIA

Province Reduces Regulatory Burden for Truck and Forestry Industries Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Road reclassifications to allow efficient truck axle configurations will help make the trucking and forestry industries in Nova Scotia more competitive. “The department has worked with the trucking and forestry industries to identify undue regulatory barriers,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines. “Not only do these changes reduce regulatory burden but they will also decrease greenhouse gas emissions by reducing fuel consumption.” The change allows B-trains - two trailers linked together by a fifth wheel – to travel on additional roads, enabling the movement of more materials at one time. This configuration reduces damage to roads because the weight is spread out over more axles. This change represents annual savings of $7 million to the industries. It contributes to government’s $25 million red tape reduction target. “By making these regulatory changes, the provincial government is providing the conditions to make our sector more competitive,” said Jeff Bishop, executive director of Forest Nova Scotia. Government expects the change to become effective by next fall.

emissions on farms and sequestering carbon through reforestation.  

The province negotiated an exemption from the federal government on heating oil under carbon pricing. Removing the provincial portion of the HST on heating oil is saving Islanders $83 million a year. The rebate of the provincial portion of the HST on electricity, propane and wood-based fuels will save Islanders $10 million a year. Through efficiencyPEI’s incentive programs to reduce energy, Island residents and businesses have saved more than $10 million on their energy bills. Taken together, these and other initiatives will save Islanders more than $100 million annually over the next five years, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions to meet our target.

Prince Edward Island has the secondlowest per capita emissions in Canada. The provincial target requires annual emissions to decrease to 1.4 million tonnes by 2030. Because of the efforts of Islanders, Prince Edward Island is already one-third of the way to meeting that goal. Islanders are turning to other sources to heat their homes. Prince Edward Island has reduced the use of heating oil by 40 per cent, from 200 million litres in 2003 to less than 120 million litres in 2017.   The use of heat pumps has increased by 300 per cent in one year. 

OUR CLIMATE TARGET

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Prince Edward Island has joined with the federal government to achieve the national emissions target under the Paris Agreement. That target is 30 per cent be-

Energy-conscious Islanders have reduced CO2 emissions by 33,000 tonnes through the energy efficiency programs alone. Efficiency PEI offers advice and in-

low 2005 levels by 2030. We are meeting these targets by reducing our energy consumption because Islanders are already turning to more environmentally friendly forms of energy.  The province has  committed $24 million over the next four years to the low carbon economy fund. Combined with federal contributions, government is supporting Islanders with $48 million to improve the efficiency of their homes and developing ways to reduce

centives on reducing energy consumption in homes and businesses. This includes financial assistance for energy audits, home heating and insulation upgrades, along with additional assistance for low-income Islanders. Learn more about the Government of Prince Edward Island’s energy efficiency rebates - and how you can do your part to help the environment at www.efficiencypei.ca.

LEADERS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Saving you money while helping the environment The Climate Change Action Plan is focused on helping Islanders reduce carbon emissions while saving money at the same time. Government is offering incentives to help residents and businesses reduce greenhouse gas emissions while returning all revenue from the carbon levy on gas and diesel directly back to Islanders through: A grant to help reduce transit fees on T3 Transit buses (link is external)  Free driver’s licenses  Free vehicle registration for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles Half-price registration fee for hybrid vehicles  20% reduced vehicle registration fee for other vehicles 14

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Call Pierre Legere in Halifax, NS at 902-455-7878 1-888-545-7878 krownhalifax.com


5 00 0 D $

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(OF F

ER E ND S MAY 31/1 9)


Bob’s Business Development

TOTAL SHOP WAGE PACKAGE IS MEASURED AGAINST YOUR TOTAL LABOUR BILLINGS

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By Bob Greenwood

HE AFTERM A R K E T BUSINESS HAS CHANGED S U B S TA N T I A L LY AS WE ARE NOW IN A “KNOWLEDGE” BASED PROFESSION. That means many business measurements must change also as the old criteria and formats do not work in this new business reality. Let’s start with a key new measurement that you must pay attention to. Here is a very simple measurement but very effective tip for your business. Add up the shop’s TOTAL gross wage “package” paid for the month. The wage package includes the gross wages of all technician wages, service advisor wages, management wages, administration wages, tire tech wages, casual wages and any other wages paid plus all employer burden (business portion of CPP and EI

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paid), group insurance, workers compensation and employee benefits. The total amount of labour billed should equal 130% of the total wage package. The ratio is $1.30 in labour billed to $1.00 paid in the total wage package. If the total wage package is $32,000 for the month, the shop should have billed $41,600 in total billed labour for the month. ($32,000 X 1.30 = $41,600) When the shop’s total labour billed does not cover the total wage package, it is pretty simple --- no net income is made. The shop lost money that month. You are busy creating “activity”. If any net income is made it is because Management does not take out a professional wage from the company (in the area of $150,000 per year for their Family), therefore they are truly “subsidising” the business. That is a smoke and mirrors show management does not want to admit to. I have seen shops where the top tech makes more than the owner. It is the owner that has the investment and liability risk exposure. On top of that what kind of business do you have to sell when the investor can’t take out a professional livelihood? Business people who buy busi-

nesses today will not invest to buy themselves a job, so you will not get the kind of money you thought you should receive from the sale of the business after a lifetime of work. Start by making sure FIRST that the shops total billed labour covers at least 1.20 times the current total wage package each and every month, then move forward from there to work towards 1.30. When the total wage package is not being achieved the shop has a site efficiency problem that must be addressed by management. Site efficiency is another learning item to be clearly understood. As you can appreciate there is much to “relearn” in this new aftermarket, but the new opportunities are enormous and exciting and everyone must embrace them to build an exciting profitable business. I think the critical question that has to be asked is “Are you ready to relearn the business or are you going to sit there and say I’m out of here in 2 to 3 years, I don’t need to change what I have.” Well sir or mam – time to be straight forward with you --- “Good Luck – that will prove to be your biggest business mistake in your decision process of your career.”


NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND PIECES OF THE STRANGE, BIZARRE AND NEGLECTED, COMPILED

FROM AROUND THE INTERNET SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO. YOU’RE WELCOME. SNOWPLOW DRIVER GETS UNEXPECTED SURPRISE Back in February, Autoblog reported on a woman who was supposedly living in her car which was bumped by a snowplow after being buried in snow. Reportedly, the snowplow driver bumped into the back of the car, which popped the vehicle’s trunk open. After that happened, workers from the plow truck started shoveling around the vehicle to prepare to tow it. That’s when the woman put her hand on the window from the inside. “She wasn’t trying to get out,” he said Wednesday. “She wasn’t making any noise.” The name of the woman was not released because police did not cite her for any violations, Fiore said. She declined medical attention and left, and the vehicle

was towed. The woman said she’d been in the car for about five hours and seemed unconcerned about what could have happened had the snowplow not hit her vehicle, he said. The car’s battery was dead and she couldn’t roll down the windows.

VANITY LICENSE PLATES DENIED ARE AN ASININE MOVE Apparently, authorities in Saskatchewan lack a sense of humour. Ttwo years ago, Lorne Grabher from Nova Scotia was denied vanity tags with his last name, and now another similar case from Saskatchewan emerges. Railroad worker David Assman (pronounced OSS-men) of Melville, SK, who made his first attempt to put his last name on a vanity plate in the final decade of the last century but got it rejected as “profanity.” Recently, he filled a new applica-

tion but was denied again because of his name being “offensive, suggestive or not in good taste.” Assman’s name is German in origin and comes from David’s great-greatgrandfather. It is believed Assman derives from “ash” but, apparently, that doesn’t mean much to the local government. “Even if a word is someone’s name and pronounced differently than the offensive version, that’s not something that would be apparent to other motorists who will see the plate,” Saskatchewan Government Insurance spokesman, Tyler McMurchy, said. Finally, after being denied once more, Assman decided he would make a large replica of the Saskatchewan’s license plates with his name on it and put it on the tailgate of his truck. David Assman is now a hit over social media with people autoatlantic.com

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admiring his decision to stand up for himself. Who’s laughing now?

OREGON MAN TRAPPED FIVE DAYS IN SUV WITH HIS DOG SURVIVES ON TACO SAUCE PACKETS Jeremy Taylor’s four-wheel-drive vehicle got stuck Feb. 24 in snow on a U.S. Forest Service road as he headed to do some off-road driving in the wilderness outside the central Oregon city of Bend. As night fell, Taylor, 36, decided to sleep in his SUV with his Australian shepherd, Ally, and hike out the next day, his aunt, said in a telephone interview. Taylor fashioned some snowshoes from pieces of the roofrack he uses for his kayak and started off the next day. But after a mile (1.6 kilometers), he had to return to the truck because the dog was sinking in the deep snow and could not continue. Taylor carried Ally back to the car and the two hunkered down there, sharing a sleeping bag to keep warm. Taylor had a full tank of gas and was able to blast the heat briefly when it got unbearably cold and ate a few packets of taco sauce he had with him, she said. He and the dog drank melted ice, but his aunt said does not think Taylor fed the 20

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dog hot sauce. “That’s his world right there, that dog. She goes everywhere with him,” Tremaine said of the dog. “He would never, ever leave that dog in the car.” What Taylor did not know is that by Feb. 27, his friends had realized that the self-employed building contractor was missing. He had not shown up to work and no one had heard from him, so friends reported him missing. Search and rescue crews combed the forests outside Bend by snowmobile, airplane and drone and as word spread on social media, friends and acquaintances searched on their own using snowmobiles. On Friday afternoon, a snowmobiler found Taylor and he and his dog were brought out of the woods on a snowcat, a type of snow tractor, and they were reunited with family and friends. He returned home to find his roof was damaged from heavy snow and his water pipes were frozen, Tremaine said.

come back to life after being underground for over a year. But how far can it go after taking a bottle of Coke? The people at Garage 54 on You tube spared a little of their time and made this a reality. Using an old, rusty Lada, some guys poured a bottle of Coca-Cola into the fuel tank and then drove it around to see far it can go. The car went through the first kilometer without any problems at all. However, after hitting the 1.7 km (1.05 miles) mark, the Lada’s engine started to act up. The driver tried to salvage the car and keep it running but to no avail – the car stalled shortly. He even tried jump-starting the vehicle while being towed but then again, there’s only so much a Lada can take, especially if it’s not really designed to use Coke as its fuel. As expected, the Lada’s oil filter was drenched in Coca-Cola, as well as its carburetor. We’re guessing all the hoses are filled with Coke, too. 

THAT’S A LOTTA LADA

NIGHTMARE: MAN’S CAR STOLEN WHILE HE’S ASLEEP IN THE BACKSEAT

Attempts to murder a Lada have been attempted before. It has ingested vegetable oil, sugar, salt, and only to see it live for a bit and then die. They have also

Autoblog reported about how a New Jersey man’s nap in the back of his car


Carter’s Corner

in Delaware turned into a nightmare after the car he was sleeping in was stolen and crashed. Musician Justin Koerner told local media he had spent a night playing music with friends, went to sleep in his vehicle and had a dream. “I had a weird dream that somebody sat on my head and that somebody jumped into the front seat of my car,” Koerner said. “It was all very surreal.” A Newark police statement says someone drove off in the car Sunday morning and bailed after seeing the man sleeping in the back. Police say the car crashed. Koerner says he awoke and saw car treads on a lawn and a destroyed bush, then realized he hadn’t been dreaming. Neighbors confronted him, and suspicious police appeared ready to take him away before another officer said a neighbor had security camera footage that showed two men getting out of a white Suburban, jumping into his car, then bailing. Police hadn’t released the footage, but Koerner says it saved him from having to prove his innocence. “It was a ridiculous situation,” he said. “It was like the Shawshank Redemption of GTA.”


Around the Atlantic

NEW BUMPER TO BUMPER STORE OPENS IN STRATFORD, PEI

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By Susan Bradley

MONTH AND A HALF AGO, JASON MOOR E OPE NE D HIS SECOND BUMPER TO BUMPER STORE ON PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND.

The store, located just outside of Charlottetown, is a sister to the well-known Bumper To Bumper establishment in Montague. For Moore, a life-long resident of P.E.I., it is one more step on a business and career path he began as a boy. “I started working at a parts store when I was 13 years old,” Moore, who is now 40, said in a recent interview. “My father was partners in a parts store at Kings Auto Parts in Montague. He got me working during the summer. He didn’t like me playing Nintendo so he took me to work.” The new Bumper To Bumper store, about 3,700 square feet, employs 11 and has been popular in the community since it opened its doors. Carrying top-quality lines such as

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Raybestos, Worldparts (the home brand of Uni-Select), Shell, Purezone and Gates, the Bumper to Bumper stores are committed to supplying products and equipment, tools and spare parts and industrial chemicals and fluids to wide variety of P.E.I. industries and sectors. “It’s been good, the community really embraced it and there’s been nothing but positive comments from people who’ve come in just to look around,” Moore said. “We give them tours, to give them an idea of what we do here, it is similar to Montague. At the outskirts, you have farming, agriculture, as well as commercial businesses around here and we have fishing communities.” It’s important to supply top-of-the-line equipment parts and industrial chemical products that those businesses and sectors require, he said. His stores are invested in make their customers successful, he said. “We do a lot of marine in our Montague store,” Moore added, with more farming and industrial customers in Stratford. The company provides delivery service in Kings and Queens counties, accessing products from Uniselect which

has a warehouse in Moncton and provides next-day delivery. Bumper To Bumper also caters to retail customers. Moore likes the corporate and marketing support supplied by Bumper to Bumper. “It’s been a really good program. The flyers, they help out a lot. With the Bumper to Bumper program, the flyers go out. In Stratford, so far, we’ve gotten really good feedback with them.” Moore recalls his early days in the business, working at what was then known as Kings Auto Parts in Montague, and became a Bumper To Bumper store. He is now a partner in the business with his father Ralph Moore. “I started in the business right from the first, sweeping the floors and doing what everybody else didn’t want to.” Moore now has two children, 13 and 10, who may follow in their father’s footsteps, starting – literally - on the ground floor. “They want to,” he laughed. “That’s how you learn.” Moore certainly loves the business. “It’s a really neat job, every day you’re doing something different,” he said.


Future Technologies

TECH OUT A LIME

T

By Kenneth E. Seaton

H E Y S TA N D LIKE SILENT SENTINELS ON BUSY STREET CORNERS. POISED TO ROLL OUT TO THE RESCUE OF NEEDY PEOPLE, WHO ARE SEARCHING FOR A RIDE. Sometimes they arrive with much ballyhoo and fan fare, other times, they just appear in the light of a new day. And all it takes to take off on one is; a smartphone, an electric scooter and bike sharing app, an account and a need to go. The micro mobility market for electric scooters is growing by leaps and bounds. While the company names; Lime, Grin, Bird, Yellow, Jump – just to name a few – may sound trivial and frivolous. There certainly is nothing trivial about them, as industry analysts expect the global electric scooter market size to reach USD 28.56 billion (CAN $37,923 billion) by 2025. More and more cities are having to deal with many rush hours worth of crippling traffic congestion. The business of moving people from point A to B is growing ever more complex, stressful, timely and increasingly costly. Too often, the existing public transportation systems are struggling just to keep up with an ever more demanding and increasing ridership. It’s little wonder that commuters, students, day trippers and ordinary people alike are searching for any viable alternative to the local traditional transportation systems. Ride-hailing, bike & car sharing, and micro mobility services (i.e. electric bikes and electric mopeds) companies are rapidly springing up around the globe. 24

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THESE WHEELS ON THE SCOOTER GO ROUND & ROUND Scooters have come a long way since riders first began nailing roller-skating wheels to boards. With the addition of a handle bar cross piece (made up of 2x4s) a cool scooter was born. They could only go as fast as the rider could step – unless a steep hill was involved – and more often than not, they had a nasty habit of disintegrating at the first sign of a pot hole. Today’s electric scooters have plen-

ty of zip. The Lime-S scooter comes equipped with a 250-watt motor and has a 20+ mile (32+ km) range. E-scooters can reach a maximum speed of 14.8 mph or 23.8 kmph and they run on airless tires. Riders press down on a throttle to go and squeeze on the hand brake to make it stop. Smartphone’s provide riders with a means of accessing the Lime app. Tech-

nology then takes over and riders use the app to; locate the newest scooter location, scan a QR code or just unlock it, undertake their journey, then relock the scooter and the cost of the ride is automatically charged to the credit card recorded on their account.

WHAT IS LIME Lime launched its first fleet of pedal bikes in Greensboro, North Carolina in June 2017 and is based in San Francisco, CA. It first developed a fleet of GPS enabled smartbikes that work on wireless technology and are equipped with self-activating locks. Lime has continued to develop and grow and now deploys dockless electric scooters, electricassist bikes, and multiple models of its original standard pedal bike. In late Dec 2018 Lime’s One Year Report¹ was released and it reported that Lime had surpassed 13 million scooter and bike rides in just over a year. Some other highlights were: 22% faster Electric scooters take riders to their destination 22% faster than traditional pedal bikes (For the same distance traveled). 20% of riders in our major urban markets reported using Lime to travel to or from a restaurant or shopping destination during their most recent trip. 27% of riders in our major urban markets reported using Lime to connect to or from public transit during their most recent trip. 39% of riders in our major urban markets reported using Lime to travel to or from work, school or appointments during their most recent trip. Lime was funded by Silicon Valley’s leading VC firm Andreessen Horowitz and is still headquartered in San Francisco, CA. By partnering with local key stakeholders Lime wants to revolutionize mobility in cities and campuses by empowering resi-


dents with greener, more efficient, and affordable transportation options that also improve the areas urban sustainability. Since it first launched in 2017, Lime has expanded to over 100 markets across the United States and Europe. They hire locally and partner with neighborhood organizations to cultivate community growth through their goal of improving urban living. By the end of 2018, Lime plans to launch in 50 new cities, both nationally and internationally.

SOUTH OF THE BORDERS IN MEXICO CITY Lime-S e-scooters first hit Mexico City street corners in October last year and they caused an instant sensation. To access the service, Lime users paid $10.00 MEX ($0.70 CAD) to unlock the scooter via its app and $3.00 MEX ($0.21 CAD) per minute per ride. When the trip was

over, the dock-less scooters could be left curbside on any street, in designated operating areas. Mexico City resident, 22-year-old Dani Fernandez Sanchez, loves Lime. “I come out, grab one and I’m gone!” She gushes, “What can be better than a cheap means of getting around and I just roll onto the sidewalk and miss the traffic log jams.”

WATERLOO LEADS OFF IN CANADA Lime’s electric-powered scooters made its Canadian debut via a pilot program that rolled out on a 6.5-kilometre trail path that links the University of Waterloo’s main campus with its adjacent technology park. Riders had to be at least 18 years old and hold a valid driver’s licence. It cost $1 to unlock the scooter and $.15 per minute to ride in most areas. A detailed user agreement made the riders solely responsible for any liabilities arising from any accidents with the scooters. Taylor Bennett, Head of Public Affairs for Lime stresses that, “It’s been a tremendous experience serving the Waterloo community and we’ve learned just how valuable our green, affordable and convenient transportation option is for residents and visitors. We’re excited to bring scooters back to the streets soon and look forward to continuing our partnership with the city to help create a meaningful ecosystem for this new and evolving technology. We think everyone deserves access to greener, more affordable transportation options. We look forward to continuing our conversations with cities across Canada and we’re excited about the opportunity to serve even more people with our smart mobility solutions.” Bennett adds that the first phase of our Waterloo, Ontario e-scooter pilot ran from October 2 to Nov. 30th, 2018, and is set to recommence in phase 2 on April 1, 2019: Lime completed nearly 20K trips with thousands of riders in Waterloo  Median trip time: 6 minutes Median trip length: 0.75 km Total CO2 saved: 4,880 kgs Total gas saved: 1,260 litres Waterloo is currently Lime’s only market in Canada offering e-scooters and in Calgary Lime is operating a fleet of ebikes. In July 2018 the Globe and Mail reported that representatives from Lime had recently been showcasing their scooters to councillors and staff at Toronto City Hall. autoatlantic.com

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Future Technologies

She says that all her friends also use the e-scooters as a way of getting around in Mexico City notoriously famous heavily congested city streets. In March, LimeNews released figures claiming that 64.2% of micro mobility riders in Mexico City, who indicated – in a Lime conducted survey – that they used Lime e-scooters to transport themselves to or from public transit last month. Lime states that the numbers clearly demonstrate the very real impact that “patinates electricos” are already having on personal mobility in the largest city in North America.

sions on halting or removing their scooters from service. Open-minded thinking will enable a company to keep its scooters earning road revenue. It will also allow them to pause service whenever inclement weather may prove costly mechanically or possibly be unsafe for their riders.

POINT AND COUNTER POINT

E-scooter operators such as Lime, Bird, Skip, Spin, Lyft, Grin and Jump, etc. are continuing to – or planning on – deploying scooters wherever and whenever

Lime and other micro-mobility ridesharing companies have encountered some resistance in several U.S. and foreign cities. So much so, that in several cities’ websites have sprung up showcasing photos of damaged or destroyed e-scooters. Additionally, some vandals have taken great delight, in dumping the e-scooters in lakes and waterways. The public’s principal issues with escooters seems to be; that they are often left parked blocking access to crowded walkways, that they are sometimes discarded in non drop-off areas, that helmet-

they can. Old and new companies alike, are hard at work developing all weather contingency plans. Plans that will allow them to quickly adjust to ever changing weather conditions. Constant monitoring by local service providers for extreme changes in temperatures, icy and snowy conditions will allow companies to make real-time deci-

less riders weave in and out of traffic and that headphone wearing riders drive carelessly on sidewalks with little or no regard for pedestrians. Drivers and pedestrians alike, are expressing growing anxieties of either hitting or being hit by an e-scooter. City governments are concerned about the legal ramifications and that any lawsuits

THE ELECTRIC SCOOTER MARKET IS A CROWDED SOMETIME WINTERY MARKETPLACE

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– either for or against – might prove enormously costly. Responding to public complaints, some cities have gone so far as to ban e-scooters outright. Other cities are conducting pilot projects in designated areas, as they try to figure out just how to deal with the influx of e-scooters. On the counter point, all new business ventures experience some teething problems. You either grow or you go. In fact, the explosion in the e-scooter market has spawned a thriving cottage industry of independent contractors who make money re-charging the electric scooters. The chargers, or “juicers”, pick up the e-scooters, take them to their homes & charge them (usually with only a slight increase in their hydro bills) and then return the e-scooters to the streets in time for the morning rush. By partnering with local key stakeholders Lime and other companies are striving to make game changing improvements to getting around WHERE IT ALL STARTS in an urban environment. Large companies like Ford & General Motors to smaller ones like Uber & Lyft are now investing in the everincreasing more lucrative micro mobility bike and scooter sharing market. Lime’s list of competitors is large, varied and driven. And finally, in February LimeNews reported that the company was now valued at $2.4 billion dollars. They have secured more than 10 million sign-ups and over 34 million trips have been taken on a Lime vehicle. Lime now operates in over a hundred cities, towns, company campuses, universities and communities throughout 15 countries across five continents. ¹ Lime One Year Report, Prepared by: Lime. PDF file. Dec 2018.


At The Car Wash

A CHANGE OF SEASON: AVOIDING THE CAR WASH SPRINGTIME BLUES

SPRING HAS SPRUNG AND IT’S A GREAT TIME FOR CAR WASH OWNERS TO ENGAGE IN A LITTLE SPRING CLEANING OF THEIR OWN

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By Carter Hammett

Y THE TIME YO U R E A D THIS, THINGS WILL BE A LITTLE GREENER, PEOPLE’S MOODS WILL BE A LITTLE BRIGHTER AND ROAD TRIPS CONCEIVED DURING WINTER WILL MOVE CLOSER TO REALITY. Of course you’ll want your car nice and shiny for the trip, so a trip to the carwash just might be in order. This is also the time of year where your friendly neighbourhood car wash is making adjustments to its stock after wicked winter winds have finally departed. This winter has been especially rough, says Halifax-based Marc Adams, a provincial distributor of all things car wash. “We have the Atlantic Ocean and the influence of salt water and its much colder here,” he says. It might not surprise you to realize that winter is the busiest season of the year for car washes. About 32 percent of all business occurs during the whitest period of the year. Spring clocks in second. With that in mind, car wash owners need to position themselves to prepare their business for the next change of season. Adams thinks the biggest nuisance to deal with is road film. For the uninitiated, road film is the transfer of contaminant and winter dirt that transfers to the side of your vehicle. “With the change in season in Atlantic Canada, it’s challenging because the temperature will release contaminants. Driving through the rain, your car becomes contaminated. It really becomes a challenge for touchless washes to clean”, says Adams. Adams says it’s important for car wash owners to go back and adjust amounts of the chemical application that’s used to meet the seasonal challenge. “You need to reassess application amounts and compo28

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sition,” he says. “The quality of the chemicals need to be top notch.” Another consideration to realize is your own housekeeping. Salt and grime have a nasty habit of getting stuck in tunnels and stalls after they’ve been removed from vehicles during winter washes. Likewise, hoses and guns in self-service bays may have become cracked while enduring freezing temperatures as well. Time to review your equipment and any damage that may have occurred during the winter. Winter can also have a tremendous impact on elements like chains and rollers. Check for any deterioration on these. The conveyor can potentially become misaligned at certain points over its working life so spring is a good time to assess performance. Don’t forget to take a peek at mixing tanks and clean if necessary. Finally, spring is also a good time to engage in managing chemical adjustments and possibly even some professional development on the subject for your staff. Adams, who also distributes Mondo products, issues a friendly reminder to car wash owners about the importance of environmentally-friendly products. Mondo products claim to be the first car wash chemical company to be EcoLogo certified in Canada. “We’re very conscious of the environment,” Adams says. “The seal of approval means those products are biodegradeable a lot quicker. Car wash owners should ensure they’re meeting that standard. autoatlantic.com

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Industry News

THERE’S RUST IN YOUR EV FUTURE

E

By April Chadwick

LECTRIC VEHICLES WE ARE TOLD ARE THE FUTURE, IT C E R TA I N LY S E E M S TH AT WAY, THEY ARE SLEEK, QUIET AND GREEN.

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EVs are a world away from the exhaust emitting and often rusty regular (internal combustion) cars we all grew up with. Compared with my first car, a 69 Ford Cortina, a Tesla Model 3 or Chevrolet Volt looks as if it could have been lifted from an episode of the Jetsons.

Even celebrity classic car collector Jay Leno believes electric will be the future, “I have a Tesla Model S. That’s the future… I predict a child born today, most likely by the time they’re 18, may not have ever ridden in an internal combustion car.” Plug-in cars offer lower operating and maintenance costs compared to internal combustion vehicles with the added benefit of producing no local air pollution. Of course there are tradeoffs with range, recharging times and the unknown future costs associated with battery replacement. The futuristic image surrounding battery powered electric vehicles (BEV) doesn’t mean they are made with alien technology. BEVs are still cars made out of steel and aluminum and they will still rust and corrode. A number of them even share their conventional steel bodies with internal combustion twins, such as the Ford Focus Electric, Kia Soul EV and VW e-Golf. “There is a huge misconception about electric and hybrid vehicles, owners think the new technology makes them corrosion proof, but all cars rust”, says Kelly a busy Rust Check dealer in Mississauga, ON. The deadly chemistry that turns metal into iron oxide, encouraged by liberal helpings of sodium chloride and calcium chloride (road salt & liquid brine) still applies, whether you have a few thousand laptop lithium-ion battery cells under your feet or a couple liters of displacement under your hood and a tank full of crushed dinosaur juice. The belief that electric vehicles are somehow immune to the effects of road salt and liquid brine is widespread. Surf the forums and you will discover numer-


ous threads that companies like Tesla have some secret formula to “dip” their cars so that they are protected from rust. All OEMs whether they are building EVs or ICE vehicles do their utmost to protect their cars from corrosion. “New cars are better protected from the factory today than they were 10 – 15 years ago”, says Jim Gordon, the head of research and development at Rust Check. “However, depending on the amount of driving and the level of exposure to bad weather vehicles will show visible signs of corrosion within the first 3 – 5 years.” “Another myth we run into”, says Gordon “is that it is not safe to treat electric vehicles, that the materials we use could damage sensitive electronics.” “Not true, Rust Check’s proprietary Rust Inhibitor and Coat & Protect products have a high molecular weight and unlike tar based undercoating contains no solvents. Our formula actually serves to protect electronic connections from corrosion and moisture.” Rust Check dealers have years of experience protecting hybrid and electric vehicles with no ill effects. Technicians focus on known rust areas, targeting inner doors, quarter panels and fenders, well away from the sealed battery packs. In addition it is becoming unnecessary to drill any holes. Modern cars have numerous body plugs and removable chassis covers that easy allow access to potential rust zones. The rust proofing process has two stages, first the light Rust Inhibitor formula is applied to the inner body panels and under the hood where it can creep into every spot weld and seem. The vehicle is then placed on a lift where a heavier gel, called Coat & Protect is sprayed on the underbody and wheel wells. The products contain a proprietary mixture of chemical bonding agents and corrosion inhibitors that are environmentally friendly and non-toxic. Given the harsh Canadian climate, an annual application of an oil based rust proofing solution is a necessity to survive our brine soaked roads, whether your ride of choice is a BEV, hybrid or full size pick-up.

sales of all electric vehicles overtook hybrid models led by the Chevrolet Bolt, Nissan Leaf and the new Tesla models 3. The federal government is also doing its part to influence the marketplace in favour of all electric vehicles; the recent budget included a $5,000 incentive on the purchase of any BEV under $45,000. Despite these numbers Canada lags well behind the rest of the world, only squeaking into the top ten if hybrids are added to

the sales mix. Apart from California, the top five BEV markets are dominated by Scandinavian counties with Norway at an amazing 49.1% of new vehicle sales being all electric. Overall electric vehicle sales in Canada represents 1.5% of total new vehicle sales and will likely remain well short of the government’s target of 5% by 2020. Still, that is a lot of vehicles that will need rust proofing.

WHERE DOES CANADA RANK? Currently in Canada there are approximately ten manufacturers offering BEVs to consumers, while almost every OEM has multiple hybrid vehicles in their product line up. Canadians are slowly starting to embrace the all-electric trend purchasing a record 18,564 BEVs in 2018, up 86 % from the last year’s record of nearly 10,000 zero emission vehicles. For the first time autoatlantic.com

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Human Resources

AN ATLANTIC GRADUATION CEREMONY UNLIKE ANY OTHER

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N MARCH 26, 12 IMMIGRANTS OBTAINED AUTOMOTIVE INSTALLER CUSTOMIZED TRAINING CERTIFICATES OF COMPLETION FROM NSCC AT IMMIGRANT SERVICES ASSOCIATION OF NOVA SCOTIA (ISANS).

Eleven of the twelve newcomers arrived as refugees to Nova Scotia within the last two years. They came from Sudan, Eritrea, Congo, Ethiopia, Liberia, and Yemen. Participants learned basic skills in automotive maintenance and safety in the workplace. Most students began with basic or no skills within the automotive trade industry. Over five weeks, they learned the importance of safety and vehicle systems maintenance through in-class theory and hands-on practice in the shop. At the end of the five weeks, students could safely place vehicles on the hoist, remove, install and balance tires, as well as do routine oil and vehicle maintenance.

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“NSCC Akerley Campus created the ISANS Automotive Installer Program to focus on safety practices, tool identification and usage, along with trade specific terms and language. It’s truly been an honour working with ISANS for 3 years now, preparing New Canadians with skills and knowledge for opportunities in the automotive industry.”  - Gord MacKenzie, Trades & Technology Academic Chair, NSCC Akerley Campus Patrick Soumaro is a graduate of the class. Mr. Soumaro received his first and only proof of formal education from ISANS-NSCC customized Automotive Installers’ training. He is one of many newcomers that benefits from ISANS’ programs and services, including settlement support, language training and innovative employment programs and services.

RESILIENCE Mr. Soumaro came from an area of unrest and lived many years as a refugee before he arrived to Nova Scotia in 2016. When he was 11 years old, civil war broke out in his native country, Liberia. He lived

in an Ivory Coast refugee camp for 26 years before arriving to Canada through private sponsorship. Despite enduring hard times, his resilience and determination are apparent. He has overcome his lack of formal education through self-learning, and he is passionate about auto body repair which he learned on the job while in Ivory Coast. Mr. Soumaro has seven years of experience in the auto body repair field, in addition to the customized training course that he took through NSCC. He says “the automotive installer training has given me the opportunity to learn about Canadian automotive standards.” He adds it “was especially important for me as I did not have an opportunity to get any formal training or education. It was also an opportunity to further my skills in the automotive field.” “The most rewarding part of the program was to see how the students connect, support and hold each other accountable. It was incredible to witness the passion they have to make sure a job is well done. The motivation and excitement throughout was a contributing factor


Human Resources

in their learning. To see how much the class progressed in such a short time is a testament to the support of all of the partners involved, the structure and content of the course curriculum and, of course, the individual student commitment to success”. – Dave Giles, NSCC Faculty

OPPORTUNITY TO HIRE Employers in the automotive field have the opportunity to hire immigrants who will not only bring with them essential automotive skills, but also resilience, punctuality, hard work, and passion. Connecting this group of enthusiastic newcomers with employers is crucial for their successful integration into the labour market in Nova Scotia. ISANS work closely with employers to support this goal. Partnership and collaboration are key in the success of this program. Through government funding, a strong partnership with NSCC, and the willingness of employers and business owners in the automotive field, immigrants, former refugees, and skilled workers will become successful, settle, and stay in Nova Scotia.

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WASTE OIL FURNACES THAT BURN HOT & SAVE MONEY!

S NLES STAI EL!! STE

Tel: (506) 458-9322

Fax: (506) 459-6110

360 Route 10, Fredericton, NB E3A 7E1 idealequipment@outlook.com www.idealequipmentltd.com Still have Cleanburn parts and service for our customers! autoatlantic.com

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Atlantic Racing News

IRACING AND NASCAR UP THE ANTE WITH ESPORTS SERIES By Tim Terry

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V E R $100,000 ON THE LINE IN MARQUEE ENAS CAR PEAK ANTIFREEZE IR ACING SERIES, TWO HALIGONIANS RACING FOR CHAMPIONSHIP It has been said that auto racing truly began after the second automobile was built. If that is the case, the first race on a video game console or computer was built when the second racing game was produced. Fast forward from the days of the first computer into 2019, where iRacing. com continues to make headlines as the top virtual racing platform in the world and a training tool for some of the world’s top racers. For those unfamiliar, iRacing.com

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hosts thousands of virtual races a week for tens of thousands of active members. Their subscription based service features cars and tracks that are laser scanned to the millimeter to replicate their real world counterparts to get the closest feel to what it is like to be on famed tracks in iconic racing vehicles. Over the last decade, iRacing has grown to include various disciplines of racing from road course racing and oval racing on pavement to the recent movement with dirt racing. The service runs races around the clock and gives drivers a chance to test and tweak their cars as freely as they want, giving drivers an opportunity to train, keep sharp and get track time whenever they want. iRacing’s partnerships with motorsports sanctions is an impressive list and includes IndyCar, ISMA, USAC, World of Outlaws, V8 Supercars, US Legend Cars International and NASCAR, among others. For an oval iRacer, the partnership with NASCAR has reached a new Peak, no pun intended, in the last year. While NASCAR

has sanctioned oval racing on the iRacing service for many years, the increased involvement in the eSports movement has prompted a new life into the simulation and specifically the eNASCAR Peak Antifreeze iRacing Series (NPAiS). The Series, which features the top 40 oval sim racers in the world and runs every second Tuesday evening at 9pm Eastern, received a shot in the arm with numerous eSports and real world racing teams getting involved in 2019. The teams drafted two drivers per each, with those drivers adopting the branding on their virtual race cars for the year. Familiar names to the racing scene like Joe Gibbs Racing, Wood Brothers Racing, JR Motorsports and Roush Fenway Racing were now pitted on the virtual track with gaming giants like G2 eSports, Flipsid3 Tactics and Renegades with their logos and sponsors featured on the cars of iRacing’s quickest oval drivers. The newfound promotion of the NPAiS, which runs the laser scanned


Atlantic Racing News

Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series cars at venues the real world counterparts runs on, grew the brand exponentially. Tens of thousands tuned in live to the first race to see Zack Novak drive his virtual Roush Fenway Racing Ford to the win at Daytona and a $1,000 first place prize. The exposure of the Series caught the eyes of Chicago Bears Guard Kyle Long, fifteen time Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race winning crew chief Steve LeTarte and 2018 Daytona 500 champion Austin Dillon for them to form teams after the season started with drivers who had initially been undrafted in the initial process. A win by Series rookie Eric J Smith at the virtual Auto Club Speedway gave life to those, at the time, 14 independent drivers that with preparation and opportunity they could find themselves winning in the NPAiS. With the new involvement came a boost in the purse. A Series that previously paid its champion $10,000 in cash to win got a total boost to over $110,000. Each race would carry $850 in extra prize money to the top three, broken down with $500 to win each event, $250 for second and $100 for third. Not to mention, the champion’s cheque rose to $40,000 with the eventual second place finisher in the championship in 2019 ($12,000) receiving more than Ray Alfalla did in 2018 for his championship. In total, the top 25 receive a part of the $83,800 total purse money. Add that in with the money available to the podium on each race, plus $500 for each driver that was initially drafted by one of the original 12 teams, and you have a purse of $112,000 in cash for the drivers in the Series. For those keeping score, you can compare the $500 race winner’s purse to local short tracks in Atlantic Canada and you’d be hard pressed to find a local regular lap feature paying that much to win. For comparison, the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour champion, the top short track touring series in Eastern Canada, receives a $10,000 champion’s cheque. Sure, it’s a different comparison from real world racing to simulation racing, but the newfound exposure shines a light on the drivers and teams who spend hours tweaking their race car setups to find extra fractions of seconds to go fast every second Tuesday night.

MARITIME FLAIR Two of those drivers within the Series hail from Nova Scotia and both of those drivers have won races at the top level of the eSport before. Keegan Leahy and Dylan Duval both hail from the Halifax area. While their paths to the eNASCAR Peak 40

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Antifreeze iRacing Series (NPAiS) varied a bit, both have proved that talent can come from all points in the world. Keegan Leahy is one of iRacing’s newest NASCAR stars. Away from the wheel, Leahy is a physics student at Dalhousie University with aspirations of becoming a meteorologist. He, like most on iRacing, is a race fan and frequents the track whenever his schedule allows. Whether it is taking in a NASCAR weekend on a vacation in Bristol, a Friday night weekly point race at Scotia Speedworld or getting laps at Kartbahn Indoor Karting, Leahy is an active member within both the real and virtual racing communities. On the track, Leahy has impressed in the two full time NPAiS seasons he has competed in. After finishing third in the 2017 NASCAR iRacing Pro Series, the qualifying division for the NPAiS, Leahy ran his rookie campaign in 2018. He impressed in his freshman year, winning three of the 18 races on the season, qualified for the Playoffs and fell just short of making the Championship Four at Homestead-Miami Speedway. With all the new eyes on the Series in 2019, Leahy hasn’t seemed to crack under the pressure. He was drafted early by G2 eSports, a professional eSports club that has ten different teams between titles like Fortnite, League of Legends, Rocketleague, APEX Legends, Counter-strike, among others. With a social media following of over 430,000 on Twitter and a quarter million likes on Facebook, Leahy was about to be introduced to a whole new crowd through his iRacing exports. The 2019 season has been met with the terrible twos, after all it is his second season in the series. In the third race of the year at Auto Club Speedway, Leahy virtually came from nowhere in the last lap only to fall short to Eric J Smith by nineteen thousandths of a second. In the next race at the Texas Motor Speedway, he found himself battling up front after a late race caution bunched the field up. This time, he would fall 55 thousandths of a second short, this time to former Series champion Ryan Luza. On the strength of the pair of runner-up finishes, Leahy finds himself second in the standings heading into the fifth round of the NPAiS at Richmond Raceway in April. Away from the NPAiS, he is also quick in iRacing’s various other series. In just over 1500 oval starts in his iRacing career, he has boasted 331 wins, equating to a win percentage of just about 22%. He also has 26 career wins in 131 road course starts. When he is not racing himself, you can

find Leahy at the Virtual Racing School, one of his marketing partners on the No. 62 car in the NPAiS. Leahy helps out with up and coming iRacers and those looking to get more speed into their rides as a car setup and a driver coach. Not only is he fast on track, he helps others get up to speed in his spare time! Dylan Duval has been around the iRacing simulation for almost a decade and has been around the upper echelons of asphalt oval racing since 2012 when he entered the NASCAR iRacing Pro Series. After paying his dues in the qualifying series for the NPAiS with limited starts, he broke into the Series full time in 2016 and became the first Canadian winner when he won the round at Indianapolis. Duval has two top ten point finishes within the Series, coming in fifth and tenth in 2016 and 2017, respectively. Following a part time schedule in the NPAiS in 2018, Duval raced his way back into the top tier of oval iRacing oval racing by virtue of a 14th place finish in the Pro Series. Undrafted as of press time, Duval has shown speed throughout the 2019 season but luck hasn’t greeted the veteran driver. In four races, his average finish is 29th, but with 14 races to go there is nowhere to go but up. Duval’s win percentage on the Service’s paved oval official races is almost 20% with 226 wins in over 1100 starts. He also has a road prowess with 28 official victories in 126 starts. His racing efforts are sponsored by sim racing product maker SimCraft and supported by The Team, which was the same team that helped Kenny Humpe to his NPAiS championship in 2015. Among Duval’s teammates include accomplished sim racers Cody Byus, Kevin King and Justin Bolton. Both Duval and Leahy also have the distinction of being the two highest rated Canadian drivers on the oval side of the iRacing service. The service ranks each driver with an iRating, which is a number based on performance and is used to match drivers of similar skill level within the same racing field. As of March 27th and ranked on active drivers, Duval ranks 32nd in the world with a 7524 iRating, which is first in the Canadian club. Leahy isn’t far behind, ranked 36th of 53,000 active drivers with a 7363 iRating. Of note, Bathurst, New Brunswick’s Patrick Mallet and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia’s Nic Doucette also find themselves in the top 100 oval racers on iRacing by iRating. Mallet is ranked 40th overall and Doucette is ranked 75. Only seven Canadians find themselves in the top 100, which features the likes of Monster Energy NASCAR


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Cup Series drivers Dale Earnhardt Jr and Timmy Hill. The top oval iRacer in the simulation is Late Model star and NASCAR Xfinity Series driver Ty Majeski from Wisconsin. Doucette will be a driver to watch on the rise in the next few years. A driver who got his start on iRacing, Doucette took part in the inaugural eNASCAR Ignite Series in 2018. The Series was established to create a legitimate entry point into real world racing and was open to youth aged 13-16. While Doucette didn’t come home with the championship, he gained knowledge of what it takes to run in a major organized Series. When he turned 16 this past summer, he and his family entered a four cylinder car at nearby Lake Doucette Motor Speedway. His knowledge and experience behind the wheel on iRacing certainly was credited when he caught on to the real world car quickly. His biggest accomplishment came in just his fifth race meet, when he drove to the overall win in the Four Cylinder Free for All at the season finale on the high banked half mile in Hectanooga, Nova Scotia. While he is still a few years away from becoming the next Colby Smith or David Heino to come out

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of that area and make a name for himself on major Maritime circuits, those that have watched him in his first year believe he has what it takes to put him in the upper echelons of stock car racing in Atlantic Canada early in his career.

GET STARTED YOURSELF . . . Hearing about all the successes of local drivers to Atlantic Canada is great - but how can I join them on track you may ask? It is easier than you think. All you need to get started is an updated computer, an internet connection (one that is high speed and hard wired is a major plus) and a controller, whether that be a preferred wheel and pedal combination or a handheld gaming controller. You will need an iRacing subscription which you can access at iRacing.com. Most of the time, iRacing runs specials where you can get discounts on new memberships for the first three months. The account comes with all the content you need to get going as a rookie, including eighteen different tracks and eighteen different cars. Once you get logged on and get the simulation downloaded, you’ll have access to 24/7 track time at your finger tips. You can race in official races with driv-

ers across the globe that will help build your license through safety rating (a formula based on the amount of safe corners completed) and the aforementioned iRating. You can also join private leagues and race against your friends. If you are a Maritimer, may we suggest the Maritime iRacing League. The MiRL is made up of a number of local drivers, crews and fans of short track oval racing in the region, runs on Wednesday evenings in the winter and is overseen by Ricky Arbeau, a former Atlantic Modified Tour driver and current corner official at Speedway 660 in Geary, New Brunswick. The iRacing.com website is the place to get all the information on the simulation service, including a full list of the over 100 tracks and cars you can race, the minimum PC requirements to run the simulation, news on the various World Championship Series and much, much more. To find more information on the eNASCAR initiatives, you can log on to eNASCAR. com. So, what are you waiting for? Who knows, with track time and a lot of preparation, you could find yourself racing with the top drivers for the big money and fame in the eNASCAR Peak Antifreeze iRacing Series!


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HE PARTS FOR TRUCKS PRO STOCK TOUR IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THEIR 2019 SCHEDULE OF RACES. THE SERIES WILL CONTEST 12 RACES AT FOUR SHORT TRACK OVALS WITHIN THE MARITIMES, TRAVELLING TO THREE PROVINCES BETWEEN MAY AND SEPTEMBER. The 2019 season will mark the 19th year for the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour. The Series will kick off on Saturday, May 18th at Petty International Raceway in River Glade, New Brunswick and crown a champion at Scotia Speedworld in Halifax, Nova Scotia on Saturday, September 14th in a 200-lap feature. All events on the Series are scheduled for a 150-lap distance, with the exception of 250-lap features at Riverside International Speedway in Antigonish, Nova Scotia on Saturday, July 20th and Scotia Speedworld on Saturday, August 10th. Petty International Raceway will also host a 200-lap main event on Saturday, August 24th.

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Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

MARCH 2019 WINNER!

Ben Ouellet, of Dieppe, NB is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is May 15th, 2019

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CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

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1. McQueen’s “Bullitt” ride 5. Service and repair pros, briefly 8. Greenfield, NS drag track, informally 9. Big rig’s built-in bunk 10. NB to PEI bridge 11. ‘29-’61 Chrysler Corp. brand 13. Bombardier watercraft (3,3) 16. “Fixer-upper” car ad words (2,2,9) 20. Engine incontinence inhibitor (3,4) 21. Stem’s opposite, boat-wise 22. Pub missiles and defunct Dodges 23. CB adjunct on big rig mirror

1. Cape Breton’s Celtic Colours focus 2. Leaf and coil components 3. Item trucked from Annapolis Valley 4. Full-bodied, pump-fuel dragster 5. New driver description, often 6. ‘50s Lincoln and ‘70s-’90s Mercury 7. ‘03-debut Kia SUV 11. International truck emblem shape 12. Speed cop souvenirs 14. Coldbrook, NS film theatre (5,2) 15. Flying Ford in Harry Potter movie 17. Truck stop rule breaker, maybe 18. Road map’s city blowup 19. Kawasaki sport bike

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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Congratulations to Joshua Arthur Noiles of Newport, NS who correctly answered that the vehicle in the photo is a 1959 Miller-Meteor Futura “Endloader” Combination hearse / ambulance built on Cadillac Motor Car Division’s Commercial Chassis. From the 1984 film “Ghostbusters.” Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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Profile for Auto & Trucking Atlantic

May 2019 Auto & Trucking Atlantic  

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