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THE SPY WHO DROVE ME - Did you know your car can tell how much you weigh and who you vote for? Fasten your seatbelts…

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FRANCHISE TOOLS – Jon Barry examines the current state of franchising and asks a pundit to weigh in on its virtues and pitfalls in this issue’s feature.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – What happens when 12 tons of liquid chocolate gets dumped on a highway? D’oh!

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SALES TEAM Meg Devries meg@autoatlantic.com

THE UNCONTROLLABLE VARIABLE – WEATHER! Tim Terry on how when it rains, it pours….but does that dampen the racing fans spirits?

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NAPA NB HOCKEY HEROES HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION – The largest weekend fundraiser in Atlantic Canada features the one-and-only NAPA Heartthrobs.

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ALL SHOPS “ARE NOT” CREATED EQUAL – Bob Greenwood considers all the variables around why some repair shops are successful and why others are not.

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UBER’S APPING ITS WAY TO THE TOP – Love it or hate it, there’s probably an Uber service near you. Kenneth E. Seaton looks into the world’s largest rideshare operator.

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ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – Nova Scotia proposes new Traffic Safety Act…More!

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TEST DRIVE AT WORK – With 40 percent of the automotive workforce over 45 years old, the career awareness program aims to lure a new generation to an exciting sector and a promising future.

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“WE’RE READY TO GO!” AMHERST AUTO SUPPLY JOINS NAPA NETWORK – What began as an auto supply centre five decades ago has evolved into a store serving a huge chunk of NS…and they’re up for the challenge!

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INTERVIEWING 101 – Paul D’Adamo – gives us the 411 on the 101 of cultivating effective interviews.

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UNIQUE CAR MADE RACING HISTORY – When Halifax mechanic Reg Hubley built himself a racing car in 1938, it’s doubtful he ever saw what it would one day become.

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Letter from the Editor

THE SPY WHO DROVE ME YOUR CAR IS SPYING ON YOU . . .

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By Carter Hammett

OU MAY BE ROLLING YOUR EYES AT THIS, BUT WHEN YOU REALIZE JUST HOW “CONNECTED” YOUR CAR REALLY IS, YOU MIGHT THINK TWICE.

Automakers are actually tracking data in newer Internet-connected cars that can determine personal data from cars worldwide. What information, pray tell, can they collect? Glad you asked. Would you believe what religion you are? The political party you support? The music you listen to? And even your weight. Consumer Reports looked at 44 2018 models and determined that 32 of them offer wireless data connection. Interestingly, many cars have cameras facing outside the vehicle but the Tesla 3’s actually faces…you, although Tesla claims that it will inform drivers when the camera’s to be turned on. Meanwhile, GM’s Cadillac CT6 also has an internal camera built right on the steering column. It suppos-

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edly monitors distractibility. So, it appears our own vehicles will be monitoring our driving habits.

THE QUESTION BECOMES, WHY?

Automakers claim that much of the information collected is being used for the eventual introduction of self-driving cars. Your data maps roads to learn how vehicles and drivers behave on those roads. What other data is being collected? Well, for starters, how about where you eat and s h o p ? Through its GPS system autom a kers can easily triangulate your favourite haunts. When combined with your car’s clock and GPS system, automakers can not only determine how often you strap yourself in, but what roads you do this on. Automakers can also create “driving profiles” consisting of

driver’s rate of acceleration and braking. Add to this music preferences, weight and a host of other items, and well, you get the idea. And while there’s voluntary guidelines around privacy there are some consumer groups calling for more transparency about exactly what data the car companies are gathering. The legalities of all this are pretty vague. A 2015 U.S. law states crash information belongs to the vehicle owner and not the automaker, but that info’s is just a miniscule slice of the data your car’s creating. There’s approximately 78 million cars on the road connected somehow to the Internet states ABI Research. Over the n e x t three years its predicted that 98 per cent of all new cars available in the U.S. and Europe will be connected. Seriously . . . it’s one thing if location data’s used to create a profile about your visits three times a week to your favourite pizza joint; it’s another matter entirely if your car is sending information to automakers about what political party you associate with or what mosque you may be visiting. This is sensitive stuff and there’s a lot of people who wouldn’t mind having a crack at some of this stuff. Furthermore, the practice raises questions about identity theft, monitoring and stalking among other things as well. There’s a lot of intimate and potentially sensitive information that many third parties would love to get their hands on, and not just so they can advertise about this week’s grocery deals. The day where big brother’s watching over you has finally arrived. He’s just equipped with a GPS and internal camera.


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GO WITH A FRANCHISE OR REMAIN INDEPENDENT? SHOPS JUGGLE DEMAND AS INDUSTRY SHIFTS GEARS

A

By Jon Barry

LOT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR HAS BEEN IN FLUX OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS AS NEW TECHNOLOG IE S, NE W BUYING HABITS AND CHANGES IN DEMOGRAPHICS HAVE LED TO A SHIFT IN GEARS FOR MUCH OF THE INDUSTRY. The auto repair industry is no different. The old days of the mom and pop shops are in decline, and in their place is a wave of repair shop consolidation under branded franchises sweeping across the nation. But just because the old small mom and pops are closing down doesn’t mean that the independent is dead by any means. For many, the decisions whether or not to go with a branded franchise repair shop or go it alone and be an independent is a difficult decision. There are costs and benefits to both models. For this article we sat down for a chat with Andy, who is closing in on 30 years’ industry experience. Andy started in the industry right out of high school in 1989. Andy is based out of New Brunswick and provides replacement parts to various repair shops including both independents and franchises. Andy is perfectly placed at a crossroads that’s seen lots of movement from both independent repair shops and

franchises. We chatted about the developments in the industry and how technicians and managers should be approaching the repair shop industry in the coming future. Andy is quick to caution that there is no absolute answer to the question of whether to go with a franchise or to go it alone. Both models have their own individual benefits and both models can end up in a badly-run shop if the managers aren’t up on the developments within the industry and their business. Much of the decision will be up to the individual technician or manager, their level of experience, and their geographic circumstances. The largest hurdle to cross for new shops is just getting your business off the ground. One of the most difficult aspects of the independent shop is just figuring out how to set it up. The legal, zoning permits, financing, interviewing and hiring, sourcing of parts and marketing are big challenges for an independent. For experienced business owners, this is just the price of doing business. But if you make the decision to go with a franchise the process is fairly different according to Andy: “I think everything would be cookie cutter. It’s cut-and-paste. Here it is. Here’s what you need and let’s go do it. We have people for that. I know some of the larger franchises, they handle the HR; they handle the payroll. It depends how deep a technician wants to go.” Andy argues that this structure makes a franchise a good strategy for young skilled technicians looking to open up their own shop versus going it alone out the gate without any support. “We see technicians who leave dealerships to open their own shops and struggle with the business side and eventually close the doors unfortunately.” Andy continues: “With the franchise model, if you can get it out of your mind that you need to pay a marketing fee or franchise fee and start up, bang, you are in if you are a good technician and follow the program. If you drink the Kool-aid you should be successful.” But just going

with a franchise doesn’t guarantee a wellrun shop. “There’s good franchisees and poor franchisees. The only saving grace for those guys is they may have a good banner with national recognition. I’ve been into some poorly managed franchise shops and I’ve been into some really well managed independent shops who are up to date and up to speed. They go for continual training. These are high-end, well-managed and structured independent shops” Another issue surrounding the old mom and pop shops is the fast moving pace of automotive technology and all the modern gadgets and gizmos that go along with serving a modern smart vehicle. Back in the day the mechanic would largely work on the mechanical engineering of the car, but that has changed dramatically over the past 30 years. Now repair shop workers are technicians because as their name implies, they are dealing with a wealth of different technology and knowledge. “Vehicles are more complex now than ever,” Andy explains, “You can’t just bang metal. You really have to [do] onboard diagnostics. We are looking at autonomous vehicles….If you get into a car there’s backup cameras and sensors and things like that.” “The technical aspect is unbelievable even to bleed brakes.” Andy provides an example: “Let’s take an old Dodge Journey 2010. You need a scan tool to clean the brakes.” “…I ran into a customer who owns a Dodge Journey and he has a shop and he’s an old school guy and he doesn’t own a scan tool. Well he couldn’t even fix his own car.” Andy ended up helping the customer out and connecting him with resources to learn how to use the diagnostic tool. But for many of the veteran technicians, cashing out to a new franchise or independent and retiring is a becoming more attractive than the constant race to stay current on technology. It’s not just keeping up with the fanjuly 2018

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Dollars and Sense

cy tech that’s difficult for an aging repair shop. The knowledge of how to use the new gear actively and effectively is just as important. “There’s a fair investment as well with these mom and pop shops in tooling and equipment to be able to keep up with today’s modern vehicles,” says Andy. The questions of staying current are: “Are they investing in themselves for training? Or are they investing in tools? Are they charging properly?” Being attached to a nationally branded franchise cuts out a lot of that work. Franchisees can rely on their connected networks and corporate offices that can provide swift and easy technology for new products before the product rolls into the shop. Attachment to a branded franchise can also help a shop access training and educational infrastructure for training opportunities provided by the franchises and its networks. Many franchises also host national training and networking events for technicians and managers to connect with each other and share their knowledge and success stories to help improve each other’s business. “I think with a lot of the franchisees there are a lot of online resources. There is probably quarterly meetings with the franchisees. As far as training for the technicians… some of the (franchise) guys have like a national trainer that will come in quarterly and they will talk about start-stop technology or gasoline direct injection is a new technology so how to repair these types of vehicles…” But this training is not only available to franchisees says Andy: “And with your independents they are buying from a jobber which is part of a national buying group. Everybody has their own training. There’s a training company out of Manitoba called

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Injectronics or Lindertech.” It’s not about being an independent or franchise, it’s about thinking about the future: “There’s training going on in the industry all the time. It’s a matter of who’s engaged in their business and wants to keep up” It’s the question of charging enough to customers to pay for all these services and upkeep that causes a lot of the headaches for smaller independents just starting out: “This is where a lot of the mom and pop independent shops fail because they don’t really understand how to charge or the profitability of productivity. Whereas these national franchises, there is a matrix and you plug it in and there it goes...”. Andy says. “[The Independents] have to diagnose the problem.” “With the independent and mom and pop shops, they don’t like to charge for diagnostics”. But, Andy argues that “You have to have a strategy to repair the vehicle and you need to charge for that shop time.” “Let’s face it, an electronic diagnostic tool is at minimum a couple thousand dollars so there’s an investment. And then he’s got to invest in software, updates every year and things like that. And the guy has plugged in and hasn’t charged for it!” Andy continues “There’s a lot of leakage when it comes to managing your shop and billable hours and things like that.” “It’s the neighbourhood shop and Johnny’s a good guy and we are gonna go to Johnny but we are also going to put him out of business because he isn’t charging us anything!” At the big name franchises Andy says “that’s all billable hours” that makes pricing and charges straightforward. But of course, this type of software is not only locked to franchises. The seasoned independents have their own pricing models well figured out and don’t fall into the same

traps as young independents. Many of the “modern independent shops also use shop management software programs ” for pricing says Andy. This structure could help a new independent learn how to charge and manage their business, whether it’s an independent or a franchise. There is also the issue of the decline of maintenance needs as vehicles are made more efficient: “LED, it’s a game changer with lighting. You go from a sealed beam incandescent bulb to a halogen bulb and now it’s LED with 100 thousand life hours. We’re not replacing things as often.” Andy argues that shops can make improvements by focusing on preventative maintenance “It is preventative maintenance. You’ve got to get guys in a couple times a year.” But new tech can also help franchisees and independents get the cars into the shop on a more regular basis for that preventative maintenance. Much of the new tech entering the repair market is also attached to the new and fancy “Internet of Things”. The Internet of Things is a connected environment of all kinds of hardware and software that can communicate through the connected internet. In the new high tech repair shop model connected to The Internet of Things, a customer’s smart car will notice it is time for an oil change, then the car will send a service request to a local dealer through the connected cars internet or smartphone. The vehicle can then sync with both your own calendar and the calendar of the repair shop to schedule a time for a visit that works best for you. This is done with almost no interaction from the staff or the customer Telematics. Andy explains, “We look at Telematics... for predictive maintenance. So I could plug something into my onboard diagnostics transponder and


Dollars and Sense

it will tell the shop or the dealer when my vehicle is going to need repair.” The software can then make all of the appointments and scheduling on its own. This saves the customer the hassle of keeping track of their maintenance and having to call and arrange a convenient time. It also frees up shop staff to work on other tasks to increase productivity rather than making follow up calls. In the days of self- driving cars, you won’t even have to take it to the shop. But you have to have all the fancy new tech already in the office to be able to connect to these connected customers. “Franchisees are going to pay for this kind of software….but the independent guy…the sharp ones will.” In relation to all the new fancy tech, Andy says there are many independents that are “cutting edge technicians” that are up to speed with even the largest franchises. And it’s not just easier access to training and technology that a less experienced technician can benefit from with a franchise. There is also the added benefit of being attached to franchise’s global supply line. “Lets take an OKTIRE or a Speedy or something like that. Tires are a huge part of their business. Being part of these franchises, they have access directly to the manufacturer of tires. Whereas an independent you may not have, or if you do your buying conditions may not be as favorable” “If you are part of a franchise, your buying conditions may be better. There’s some volume rebates that are predetermined and pre-negotiated.” When you are just starting out, access to these supply lines and distributors is a big help. But more seasoned business owners in the industry may prefer to build up their own personal relationships with distributors rather than adhere to the corporate run relationships. There are also marketing benefits for less experienced technicians to attach themselves to a national brand without having to develop their own marketing strategy according to Andy: “There’s a value proposition there too and a comfort level. A regional or national presence. For Joe Whoever “Oh I feel warm and fuzzy going into an OK Tire, I’ve seen them on 10

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the television as opposed to an independent shop” Even though the independent shop “may have a loyal customer base, when it comes to attracting new clients it might be a bit more difficult for them.” But many of the seasoned independent pros may prefer to develop their own branding and marketing that reflects their individual company and market rather than rely on decisions from a distant corporate office. While there are benefits to both franchise and independent models, much of the decision is up to the individual technician or manager, their level of experience, and their geographic circumstances. Franchises can be easier for newer technicians but too rigid for experienced business-

men. “We have lots of really high technically skilled independent repair shops that are good business people as well. And it’s just like the franchisees.” Andy thinks the franchisees are kind of like comfort food: “Ok I see a Speedy sign, great, they are across the country, I am going to feel warm and fuzzy cause I had a good experience in BC and I am bound to have a good experience in Atlantic Canada.” “It’s like McDonald’s or Burger King”. Just because you know what to expect from a fast food chain doesn’t mean you can’t have a great burger at a mom and pop restaurant. Andy continues: “I think it all goes back to clear communication and trust and getting these guys in for preventative maintenance. Whether you’re at the dealership, a franchise or an independent shop.”

MACRO MOVEMENTS Like most of the automotive industry, there are large macro economic trends

that are driving a lot of these new developments. One of the biggest shifts happening in the industry is the shift towards the consolidation of repair shops under branded franchise chains. This topic was front-and-center at last year’s International Autobody Congress and Exposition according to Canadian Business. The traditional repair shop model was largely filled by mom and pop shops that operated independent of each other. These were often family-run businesses, but the younger millennial generation is less car passionate and not that interested about the industry. Andy agrees: “A big deal in our industry at all levels is succession. There’s a huge generation gap and there’s a lot of blue sky when it comes to an independent shop trying to sell their business.” “Their children don’t want to become technicians or whatever the case is.” As those baby boomers begin to age, they are looking to sell off the business for some decent cash to retire. And those old shops are being brought up in record numbers by big branded franchised repair shops at a rapid pace. “We are seeing it on the body shop side, there’s huge . . . consolidation with Fix Auto… There will be consolidation in all regions at some point. How fast it will happen, I don’t know. But technology changes so quick and these guys at the end of their careers, if they are not keeping up they are out anyways. “Consolidation at the automotive service provider level is inevitable for the aftermarket to survive. I think at some point in Atlantic Canada you are going to see it too. We have an awful lot of shop owners early-tomid 60’s with no exit strategy. Somebody has to consolidate these shops.” These franchises are not only building off their own success, they are also backed by venture capital from big financial institutions. Canadian Business points to the similar trend of the late 1980s and 1990s where large branded hardware stores like Home Hardware and eventually Home Depot, created national and international hardware and construction brands by buying up and refurbishing older mom and pop stores.


Tires and Treads

TIRE INFLATION SURVEY A WAKE-UP CALL TO DRIVERS

C

AMBRIDGE, ONTARIO - CANADIAN DRIVERS HAVE GLARING GAPS IN THEIR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HOW TO MAINTAIN PROPER TIRE INFLATION, ACCORDING TO A NEW TIRE MAINTENANCE ATTITUDINAL SURVEY CONDUCTED BY LEGER ON BEHALF OF THE TIRE AND RUBBER ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.

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While nine-in-ten drivers surveyed believe motorists have a responsibility to make their vehicles as fuel efficient as possible and 96 per cent say proper tire inflation is important, the survey also finds that: Only 30 per cent measure their tires’ inflation pressures monthly, a practice essential to fuel economy, road safety and protecting the environment 65 per cent are unaware inflation pressures should only be measured when tires are cold. (A vehicle should be stationary for at least three hours or not have been driven more than two kilometres prior to

checking tire inflation. Measuring pressures when tires are warm gives an inaccurate reading.) 37 per cent refer to the air pressure stamped on the tire’s sidewall when identifying the correct pressure for their tires. (The imprinted sidewall pressure is the maximum pressure a tire can contain under maximum load, not the recommended inflation level. Prolonged driving at this inflation pressure may result in uneven tread wear and reduced traction, particularly on wet surfaces.)  22 per cent rely on visual inspections to determine if their tires are inflated


Tires and Treads

properly. (A tire can be underinflated by 20 per cent or more and look normal.) Among motorists who say proper tire inflation is important to them, top reasons cited include: vehicle safety (84 per cent) followed by longer tire life (74 per cent), fuel economy (73 per cent) and improved vehicle handling (71 per cent). Other positive news emerging from the study is that 61 per cent of drivers use a personal air pressure gauge when measuring tire pressures. As well, 86 per cent report they rotated their tires in the past year and 66 per cent had their vehicle’s tire alignment checked in the past 12 months. “Canadian drivers understand the benefits of proper tire inflation and that’s great news,” says Glenn Maidment, president of the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC), which represents tire makers. “However, the survey also emphasizes the urgent requirement for broader driver knowledge and education on tire inflation facts and procedures. The need is particularly acute among younger drivers who are significantly less likely to know inflation pressures should be measured monthly and when tires are cold. Learning a few simple facts and procedures ad-

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vances safety, maximizes fuel efficiency and protects the environment.” Fuel economy, environmental benefits measuring tire pressures monthly can result in cost savings. Motorists can improve their gas mileage by 0.6 per cent on average – up to three per cent in some cases – by keeping tires inflated to the proper pressure. Underinflated tires can lower gas mileage by about 0.2 per cent for every one psi drop in the average pressure of all tires. The environmental benefits of proper tire inflation are also significant. Drivers operating their vehicles on underinflated tires are expected to waste more than 500 million litres of fuel in 2018. This is enough fuel to drive 275,000 vehicles for a full year. This wasted fuel will release an additional 1.2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Low Rolling Resistance Tires A recent TRAC survey also found 81 per cent of Canadian drivers are unfamiliar with low rolling resistance (LRR) tires. These tires are designed with specialized tread patterns that keep vehicles moving efficiently, advanced rubber technologies and materials that minimize internal movements inside the rubber itself and

materials that lower weight, increase rigidity and improve aerodynamics. The result is a range of two to four per cent in improved fuel economy. For motorists who drive approximately 25,000 km per year, this translates to between $50 to $100 in fuel savings per year, so the average motorist can expect to save hundreds of dollars over the lifetime of these tires. To help motorists improve their fuelsaving know-how, TRAC is providing an informative ‘Get Fuel Fit’ Guide – a free, online resource offering advice on tire selection, maintenance and driving habits that improve fuel economy and protect the environment. May 14 to 21, 2018, was National Be Tire Smart Week, during which the tire industry will be reminding motorists about the fuel efficiency, safety and environmental benefits of proper tire inflation and maintenance. Canadians can also learn more by visiting  www.betiresmart.ca. Methodology, A survey of 801 Canadian motorists was completed online between April 12 and April 19, 2018, using Leger’s, LegerWeb panel. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of ± 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.


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Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND PIECES OF THE STRANGE, BIZARRE AND NEGLECTED COMPILED FROM AROUND THE INTERNET, SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO! AUTO EROTIC? Sex in a car is surprisingly significant cause of distracted driving, but unless you’re David Cronenberg, most people know where to draw the line between man and machine. Local media reported a 24-year-old man was arrested in Newton, Kansas, for attempting to have sex with a car. Police responded to a call, finding the man underneath the car. He was naked and attempting intercourse with the car’s exhaust pipe. The make and model are unknown.

before the road would be able to reopen. According to the manufacturer, spilled chocolate is more difficult to remove than oil and needs to be shifted gradually using pressurized hot water. In some areas, the chocolate was so thick that heavy machinery was brought in to scoop up the mess.

WOULDJA BELIEVE A TANK-CAR HYBRID? Canada’s Shawn Cormier used whatever mechanical bits were available to build the vehicle he calls Tankenstein. The tracked portion comes from a Bren After failing to respond to commands, Newton Police were forced to use a taser to subdue the man. Police say he was nearly incoherent, and they believed he was both drunk and under the influence of drugs. His blood-alcohol level registered at 0.35, more than four times the legal limit. He was taken to an emergency room rather than to jail. The man is likely to be charged with a misdemeanor of lewd and lascivious behavior. It’s unclear if he was previously familiar with the vehicle.

MMMM CHOCOLATE JACK-KNIFED TRACTOR TRAILER Reuters recently turned in a story about emergency workers in Graboszewo, Poland, as they were called out not to clear flames, but chocolate. A tank truck carrying 12 tons of liquid milk chocolate overturned in the early hours of the morning after colliding with a traffic barrier, causing waves of the sugary liquid to coat Poland’s A2 motorway between Wrzesnia and Slupca. The incident led to a rather sticky situation as traffic came to a complete standstill. Police said it could be several hours 16

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plete with jagged, original glass in the window. Power comes from a 305-cubicinch (5.0-liter) V8 that allows for a top speed between 45 and 50 miles per hour (72 and 80 kilometers per hour). Cormier estimates Tankenstein’s cost  to build at  around $2,500 – a bargain for something this cool in our opinion.  To complete the look, Cormier dresses up in military garb when driving Tankenstein, and he even carries a toy Tommy gun with him. A big Canadian flag emerging from the pickup bed adds a patriotic touch, but it gets pretty muddy here. When not working on  Tankenstein, Cormier keeps busy wrenching on other projects like what he calls the Black Widow Monster Trike. This weird rig features three gigantic wheels and mixes running gear from the Chevrolet Chevette and S10 pickup. It looks like quite a handful to control. Cormier picked  the three wheeler up largely complete but performed the finishing touches to get the machine running. 

ROLLING RESTROOM ISN’T JUST A CONVENIENCE

gun carrier – a lightly armored British infantry support vehicle circa World War II. On top, Cormier places the cab from a 1947 Mercury tow truck, which is com-

When North Korean bad boy Kim Jong Un isn’t dropping metaphors with Donald Trump, he’s dropping other things too. Kim doesn’t do air travel. His recent trip to Beijing was his first foray out of the country since he assumed power, and he traveled there by private train. But in the annals of strange stories about the Kim regime, this is one of the strangest: Wherever Kim travels by car throughout the Hermit Kingdom, such as the trip to Panmunjom this week, a special car follows - containing toilet facilities. (As for what he drives, the Kim regime


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has been partial to Mercedes, though Kim’s father, Kim Jong Il, rode to his reward, or whatever it is he deserved, in a Lincoln. We have no insight as to whether the toilet car is a Mercedes, though that’s all we see in the photo) “Rather than using a public restroom, the leader of North Korea has a personal toilet that follows him around when he travels,” defector Lee Yun-keol told The Post. Lee worked in the North Korean Guard Command before defecting to South Korea in 2005, where he runs a think tank, the North Korea Strategic Information Service Center. The West first became privy to the potty car when word of it leaked from defectors and from sources within North Korea, in a Seoul publication called the Daily NK. It’s not just that this man of the proletariat won’t stop at a villager’s house. It’s a matter of security — his security, by way of his excrement. According to the Daily NK, a vehicle in his convoy is a rolling restroom that only he may use. Obviously, because he’s a dictator. But also because samples are regularly collected to monitor his health.

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And the flip side of that: It prevents foreign spies from collecting samples for that same kind of intelligence. “We know intelligence agencies around the world are monitoring the health of foreign leaders,” he wrote in Foreign Policy magazine. “But we should have realistic expectations for what we might learn.”

‘SINGING ROAD’ STRIKES THE WRONG CHORD WITH DUTCH VILLAGERS Take the highway past the Dutch village of Jelsum, and the road will play you a tune. Created by strategically laid “rumble strips” as a way of livening up journeys across the flat landscape, the novelty has worn thin for locals who say the constant droning melody is driving them mad. The tune is created when car tires drive over the strips — which are more typically deployed at the side of major roads to warn drivers they are straying off course. If hit at the correct speed — the 60 kph (40 mph) limit — the road will sing out the anthem of the Friesland region, a

northern part of the Netherlands that has a distinct language and culture. But it is loud, and the sound travels, and locals say the musical road had created a never-ending cacophony that keeps them awake at night. “Last Saturday night the taxis were driving from Leeuwarden to Stiens and on the way back, they tried to go across the lines as quickly as possible and we had the anthem played all night at high speed,” said local resident Ria Jansma. That’s not the only road out there annoying people. There’s one in California that plays a terrible rendition of the “William Tell Overture.” It was originally a marketing gimmick by Honda more than a decade ago, and the neighbours weren’t crazy about this one either, and yet it persists.


Atlantic Racing News

THE UNCONTROLLABLE VARIABLE WEATHER! By Tim Terry

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F YOU ASK A PROMOTER OF ANY OUTDOOR VENUE, REGARDLESS OF WHAT THAT VENUE IS USED FOR, ABOUT THE KEY TO SUCCESS (OR FAILURE) OF AN EVENT AND CHANCES ARE THEY’LL SAY SOMETHING IN REGARDS TO THE WEATHER.

run on schedule with warm temperatures and a dry forecast. That’s not how it works though.

When it is calling for rain on race day, the track has to make a decision whether to push on with the scheduled event. The

Stock car racing is no different. In a climate like Atlantic Canada’s, the weather can change drastically from hour to hour. Whether it is a temperature swing from hot to cool or clear to cloudy, weather can change a lot when it comes to the sport. Then there is the uncontrollable element of precipitation. Race teams and track promoters can deal with days that are not pristine as long as they are dry. Overcast and cool will have a driver chasing his or her race car because the attitude and handling will change over a day that is hot and sunny. The track changes with the weather as the grip level is more or less depending on the heat within the track and the rubber that the surface takes as cars work around. It’s a variable that makes for a better show for those who can adapt to changing conditions and a long day for those that cannot wrap their head around it. No pun intended, but when it rains, it pours. Precipitation changes the game for everyone on race day. Let’s begin with a track promoter. Track management sets a schedule at the start of the calendar year and releases it to the public. For most race fans in Atlantic Canada, their local track will release their schedules in February or March so teams, fans and officials can plan their summer months from May to October. Most tracks have a day of the week that works for them. For example, Scotia Speedworld operates their Weekly Racing Series on a Friday night while Speedway 660 and Oyster Bed Speedway have run on Saturday nights for many years. In a perfect world, every race would july 2018

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Atlantic Racing News

forecast will help influence a decision, whether the track waits it out as the call might be for drizzle or scattered showers or cancel the event outright because of steady rain. The decision, either way, is a guaranteed loss of revenue. Think about this. If you are a race fan or race team and it is calling for rain and the track goes on with the program but gets rained out, you are out your travel money to and from the track. Sure, there are diehards, myself included, that if there is a chance in getting a show in and the management at the venue says they are going to try it, we will be there even if we had to drive through a hurricane (been there, done that). Those part time teams or fans that might have a longer drive ahead of them might stay put and put that potential loss of funds into another race weekend. On the other side, should a track promoter pull the plug on a show, they are out the money for advertising for that race. Most tracks buy blocks of advertising in print, television and/or radio and those ads run through the week or weeks leading into the event regardless of what the weather calls for. It’s easy to say, but you can’t pinpoint weather on a Friday

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night in July when you buy ads in March. If an event is scheduled to run and it rains in the middle of production of the event, the promoter is out operating costs to that point, not to mention equipment costs to help dry the facility in hopes of getting the show restarted. If it is early enough in the night, management may have to give out rain checks. If that is the case, the revenue that would have come from admission evaporates. The call itself is tough as well. If a promoter calls a race due to a forecast of rain and it stays dry (or worse, the sun comes out after the cancelation is made), the promoter looks like a bad guy in the eyes of racers and fans. As described above though, it is the last call they want to make because either way he or she is losing money whether the gates open or not. If the promoter decides to push ahead with the day’s racing and it rains, again, he looks like a bad guy from all those who say the forecast did not look good or they had no window to get the race in. Now, if the management tries to get the show in on a day where the forecast looks grim and they succeed, they are heroes in the eyes of the racers. Remember those fans we mentioned earlier though

that look at the same forecast and say “there is no way we’ll race today?” They still did not show up, which is lost revenue at the gate. The saying “you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t” is thrown around a lot after looking at a forecast for race day. Is there a correct decision for a track owner to make in these situations? Not really. At that point, you are betting on whatever forecast and whatever meteorologist you trust. At the end of the day, we’re all human and we all make mistakes. Some will always blame the race track for making the call, whether they believe it is right or wrong. Sure, it is frustrating, but it is something out of anyone’s control. The situation is even made more complex when you have a racing Series involved. Take the 2017 River Glade International at Petty International Raceway for example. On that night in River Glade, New Brunswick, you had two Touring Series on the card - the Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour and the Maritime League of Legends Tour. The support classes, the Mini Stock and Bandolero, each had cars from outside provincial borders competing. The weather, that was to be hit or


miss all day, rolled in prior to qualifying. When it rolled in, the precipitation was light enough not to be detected on the radar. Calls from up the road no more than five miles had said it was bone dry. The track and sanctioning bodies waited it out and even got a set of qualifying heats on the track before it started to get wet again. The call was made to finally pull the plug early in the evening. A number of teams and fans will make a day trip out of these events. They will leave in the morning or early in the afternoon, drive up and watch or compete in the event and drive home. For those that had a three or four hour drive one way now had a decision to make. With the city of Moncton booked solid when it came to hotels, most would have to drive an hour one way to find a hotel for the night or drive home. Some teams drove home and did not come back the next day and some fans did the same too. Those that stayed for the Sunday show saw a good race and, like the day before, the forecast threatened for rain late in the day. Fortunately, the track and series beat the rain and Shawn Turple won his second River Glade International. Another topic of conversation that surrounds rain is rain dates. Big events, like the aforementioned River Glade International, typically have rain dates built in for inclement weather. Typically, those are scheduled for the next day but in some cases of a full weekend washout, tracks have to move events around in their schedule that already resembles a jigsaw puzzle to accommodate another race. Some tracks, like Speedway 660 and Scotia Speedworld, do not build rain dates for their regular shows into the schedule. Some don’t agree but I can see why they do that. Some folks build their summer months around the schedules that are released in the winter. Whether that is booking time off work or juggling family commitments some plan months in advance for that Friday or Saturday night to be at the race track. When a track rains out a Friday night and schedules an extra event for the next day, for example, some cannot get work off or someone to cover their shift. It creates lost revenue or a decision to take a sick day to go to the track, a decision some simply cannot afford. Regardless what side of the fence you sit on, rain takes a toll on all of us that love stock car racing. Do me a favor the next time you see rain in your future for the weekend - step back and take a deep breath. There is a lot to consider when that call is made, likely multiple forecasts consulted to come to a final decision and

hundreds, if not thousands, of folks the result affects. Nobody can control the weather and until they come up with an affordable and environmentally sound dome to put over tracks, it will be just a part of the racing equation. But, let’s not dwell on that, shall we? Here’s to clear skies and warm temperatures as you plan your upcoming weekend at the track! Until next time, keep the hammer down and we’ll see you at the track!

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Around the Atlantic

NAPA NB HOCKEY HEROES HEART & STROKE FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER

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HE HEART & STROKE FOUNDATION IS ONE OF CANADA’S LARGEST AND MOST EFFECTIVE HEALTH CHARITIES, WHO MEASURE OVERALL FUNDRAISING EFFECTIVENESS BY THEIR ABILITY TO MAKE A DISTINCTIVE HEALTH IMPACT OVER A LONG PERIOD.

Since inception, Heart & Stroke has invested more than $1.45 billion in heart and stroke research, making them the largest contributor in Canada after the federal government. The proceeds of their fundraising is used to provide operating funds to support pertinent research, discovery, exploration and innovation in the areas of heart disease and stroke.

Heart disease and stroke are one of the leading causes of death in Canada & the US. One person every 7 minutes dies from H&S related diseases in Canada and the ratio in the US is even more severe as one person every 45 seconds dies due to the disease. It’s also the single biggest driver of prescription drug use, costing the Canadian economy more than $20.9 billion every year. The Heart & Stroke Foundation is working hard to change these statistics. 90% of Canadians have at least one risk factor for heart disease and stroke, most of which are preventable. The Heart & Stroke Foundation are trying to reduce those risks by doing the following: • Lobbying to restrict marketing of food and beverages to children and advocate for tougher laws on sugar labelling and salt content. • Reduce tobacco’s appeal through advocacy campaigns. • Fund research breakthroughs that 22

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will help prevent heart disease and stroke. • Provide first aid and AED training The Heart & Stroke Foundation of NB hosts the largest weekend fundraiser in Atlantic Canada, and the 2nd largest hockey fundraiser in the world, the annual NAPA Hockey Heroes Weekend. The event kicks off with the ultimate fantasy draft during a reception of over 500 players on 28 Teams, each of which gets to choose one of the 28 NHL or Team Canada Alumni to play with. The Players are drafted based on the teams ranking in fundraising and they play all weekend in a round-robin format, finishing with the Heart Heroes Game pitting top fundraisers off

against the Alumni. The NAPA Heartthrobs were the top fundraisers in 2017, raising a whopping $60,784.17, which allowed them the opportunity to pick the number one draft choice, naming former Quebec Nordiques’ player and NAPA Auto Parts, 4 store owner, Alain Côté. Last year marked the sixth year of the Hockey Heroes Weekend and the total fundraising for the year reached $820,000.00, bringing the six-year event total to more than $3.75 million! The NAPA Heartthrobs have participated in this event since 2014 and have raised a total of $170,657.32 since joining. Dan McKim, the Regional Vice President of NAPA Auto Parts, Atlantic said it was an easy decision to get involved with the Heart & Stroke Foundation after losing his mother to heart disease in 2004, something that is clearly important to the McKim family, as both of Dan’s children now participate in the weekend to support the cause. The Heartthrobs have set a goal for 2018 year to break the $100,000 mark and be the first team to do it, they have many different fundraising campaigns happening to do this, such as a “Chase the Ace” 50/50 weekly draw, big bike ride, and a very successful Golf Tournament. If you are interested in being part of a fundraising team, or would like to make a donation, reach out to NAPA Auto Parts or the Heart & Stroke Foundation of NB.


Bob’s Business Development

ALL SHOPS “ARE NOT” CREATED EQUAL

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By Bob Greenwood

HE INDEPENDENT SECTOR OF OUR IN DUSTRY HAS A FUNNY WAY OF LOOKING AT ITSELF. TOO MANY SHOP OWNERS BELIEVE THAT THEY ARE THE SAME CALIBER OF BUSINESS AS THE MAINTENANCE/ R E PA IR FACILIT Y DOW N TH E STREET. NOTHING COULD BE FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH. Why can one business charge $115 per hour and the shop is constantly full, and a shop within two blocks charges $75 per hour and is struggling to find work? One would obviously think that the

“potential” for business with the higher priced shop that is steady must be different than the “potential” for business with the lower priced shop. That is a fair assumption to make, but sorry, it is wrong. All shops within the market trading area have the same potential. Potential of a marketplace is dictated by the population base of the given marketplace. As the population increases, the potential for business increases. As the population decreases, the potential for business decreases. What is distinctly different from each shop in the marketplace though, is their “capability” to maximize their potential. Every shop has different capabilities, and by measuring the capability, it becomes clearer why some shops are busier and more profitable than other shops. There are six items I consider in examining a shop, and I call them “the six questions of capability”. Every problem within any shop falls within one of these

six categories, therefore, it is easier to define where the business “cancer” is, and allows one to focus on resolving the problem once it is clearly defined. The first question to examine is “Attitude”. What is the attitude of the shop owner and the staff? Ever noticed when you walk into a shop you seemingly can “feel” the attitude of the premise? Is the attitude positive or is it negative? A negative shop will never reach its potential in business. The owner is usually complaining about his lousy, cheap customers, the fact that business isn’t like it used to be and you will never be able to make the kind of money that we made in the “80s”, or complaining how you can’t keep any good staff any more as “they always want more and don’t want to work for it.” It is obvious that this environment is not a fun place to be, and the owner is, quite frankly, a pain to work with. When the owner is in this frame of mind, I can guarantee you the staff will have a nega-


Bob’s Business Development

tive feeling about the entire business. The owner has no vision for the business, no plan for the future, he just likes to complain all the time, “for the sake of complaining,” and always points the finger at someone, or something else, for all his woes. The second question to examine is “Personnel”. What is the “quantity” and “quality” of the people working within the shop? Every November the shop is extremely busy, so busy in fact we could use double the staff. However we don’t have that “quantity” on board, therefore we rush the cars in and rush them out to ensure all clients are looked after. The rushed process however, ensures that we don’t maximize our potential for business because we didn’t have the time to properly inspect the vehicles as we were “too busy” and management didn’t have

shop? Without the right “quality” of people, potential business is lost, comebacks are usually high, and client perception of the shop is low. The third question to be examined is “Inventory”. Is the shop carrying the right inventory to serve the current client base? Does the shop inconvenience the clients by making them wait time and time again for parts to arrive because we didn’t carry the obvious inventory we should have to serve this client? Is the inventory management system “tight” enough to ensure the right inventory turns are being met each year, and that the proper quantity of stock is re-ordered on time? A poor inventory management system can create inefficiency within a shop, and create lost potential sales for the business as the client simply says, it’s ok, I’ll catch you next time for that item, as I don’t have the twenty minutes in time

the right “quantity” of people to ensure a full vehicle inspection could take place to maximize productivity and service to each and every client. Also the shop must look at the “quality” of the staff to maximize its potential. An apprentice technician is not qualified to do high end diagnostic work, yet if that is all the shop has on staff, then the “potential” for diagnostic labour is lost. Does the shop hire and train the right “quality” of staff to serve the client base it is selling too? What is the talent depth of the

to wait for it now to arrive. We all know what happens here; next time never happens, and the sale is lost.........potential is lost. The fourth question is “Equipment”. Is the shop properly equipped to meet the demands in automotive maintenance/ repairs of its current clientele? If the shop does not have the right equipment and some work is done by “faith-healing” the vehicle, then in time the reputation of the shop goes down, as word travels among clients that the shop is not competent enough to handle “my” vehicle. This

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shop can’t fix the vehicle the right way the first time. Once again, without the right equipment, technicians are forced to be inefficient with their work and usually management is blaming the technician for low productivity vs management in competencies by not ensuring the shop was equipped right in the first place to do the work called for. The fifth question to be examined is “Facility”. Does the facility look professional, is it attractive to come to, is it set up to properly accommodate its clientele it is selling to? Take the time to do this simple exercise. Stand across the street for ten minutes and look at your facility and honestly answer this question to yourself; I am new in town, I am looking for a competent automotive maintenance/ repair outlet, what would make me WANT to turn into your location and check you out? Clients today do not want to turn into and deal with a facility that is a “grease-pit”. Is your facility set up to the way your clients want it, or the way you want it? Pay attention to your clients views, not yours; sorry you don’t count anymore. It is the client who pays you, it is the client that must be pleased, so give them, and set up, the facility the way they would like it to be allowing them to come to it on a regular basis with a comfortable feeling. The sixth and final question to be asked is the “Finance” situation of the shop. Without the proper finance in place, you cannot create the professional facility that is appealing to the clientele you desire to sell to, purchase or lease the right equipment required, stock the correct inventory at the right levels, hire and train the most capable personnel in your trading area, and believe me, without the right finance in place, your attitude is something less than to be desired. It is important to note though, that out of the six questions, the most important one is your ‘Attitude”, since it is your attitude that affects all the other questions being examined. Without the correct attitude in place you can’t even get started at solving any problem of your shop including how you set your labour rates. The next time you’re looking around and you see one shop steady and the next one not, review the six questions of capability, and I am confident you will find the correct answer your looking for.


Industry News

UBER’S APPING ITS WAY TO THE TOP

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By Kenneth E. Seaton

T SEEMS THAT – OR SO THE STORY GOES – IN 2008, DURING A DARK WINTERY NIGHT, RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF A PARIS SNOW STORM, THE RIDESHARING JUGGERNAUT INSPIRATION THAT WAS TO BECOME UBER WAS BORN. Travis Kalanick and Garrett Camp, two buddies who were attending a tech conference were having a little trouble in hailing a cab. Supposedly, they started musing about a timeshare limo service, one that could be ordered up simply by means of an app on a smart phone. After the conference ended, the two entrepreneurs went their separate ways. Camp returned, nonethe-

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less, a seed had been planted and he couldn’t get the limo service idea out of his mind. He even went so far as to purchase the domain name for UberCab.com. That seed became a bud that just kept growing and growing. Camp – while still CEO of StumbleUpon (a discovery and advertisement engine) – found the time to work on UberCab and in 2009 he invited his entrepreneurial friend Kalanick to join him as UberCab’s ‘Chief Incubator’. They first road tested their idea in New York with three cars and officially launched UberCab in San Francisco in 2010. The rest, as they say, is history! Uber has grown to become, arguably, the world leader in the rideshare market. Its website boasts that, “It took us 5 years to reach our first billion trips and 6 months for the next billion. Then we completed the last 3 billion trips in less than a year.” It also states that its service is available in 83 countries and over 674 cities worldwide. In 2017 Bloomberg News reported Uber’s paper valuation at $69 billion dollars.

WHEN IS A FRANCHISE NOT A FRANCHISE? The businessdirectory.com defines franchising as an arrangement where one party (the franchiser) grants another party (the franchisee) the right to use its trademark or trade-name as well as certain business systems and processes, to produce and market a good or service according to certain specifications. Also, the franchiser gains rapid expansion of business and earnings at minimum capital outlay. An argument could be made – and currently is being made in the courts – that Uber is the franchiser and its drivers are franchises. There are many companies that operate under franchise models and use contractors or franchises, i.e. McDonald’s (MCD), 7Eleven, RE/MAX, Lyft and Uber, etc. One of the foundations of Uber’s business model is that it treats its drivers as contractors or partners. This position is causing some conflict with some of its drivers. These drivers want to be classed


AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!


Industry News

as employees’. This would entitle them to normal worker rights such as; minimum wage, overtime and vacation pay, etc. Resultantly, Uber has and is facing a number of court challenges from drivers or its partners. In 2017 some Ontario Uber drivers launched a class-action lawsuit requesting that the courts make a decision as to whether drivers are Uber employees rather than independent contractors. Uber has responded to these challenges through the courts. Conveniently, in 2018 it launched its “180 Days of Change” campaign. This campaign is focused on rebuilding its drivers trust and is “committed to delivering the best driver experience possible, 365 days a year.” An important part of the rebuild has Uber performing a major redesign on its driver app. In an interview with The Atlantic, Uber’s new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, said that the reworked version of the app embodies the new, kinder Uber. Hundreds of Uber drivers were asked to provide input and suggestions on how they felt the app should work.

driver. If the rider believes that the driver deserves more or less recognition, they can use the app to give the driver a rating of between 1 to 5 stars. There’s even a list of common issues that allow for more specific feedback from rider on the driver or the trip. Of-course Ubers’ app isn’t just for riders, its adding muscle to the driver’s version. And it’s a very busy, busy newly designed app. Drivers spending around 8.5 million hours logged on to it. The Uber app supplies the how, when and where to drivers and is considered to be their workplace platform. When drivers are ready to work they use the app to go online and will begin to receive trip requests in their area. They’ll receive directions to their riders’ pickup location and after pick up, destination directions are posted. The new app includes an earnings tracker that informs the drivers of just how much

UBER HAS APPS FOR THAT From opening up the smartphone downloaded Uber app, a rider is only a few clicks away from getting a ride. Because Uber is a technology platform it makes it almost too easy to arrange for a pick up. It found the sweet spot for riders, offering a theoretically safe and convenient way to order up a private driver. Through the app the rider creates an account – including a valid credit card – and they are ready to ride. From the “Where to?” screen to when the vehicle arrives it takes almost no time to arrange a pick up. Uber also allows riders to make a stop on their trip. Before the driver arrives riders know; how long the trip will take, the vehicle’s model and plate number, the driver’s name, how much the trip will cost and riders can even pay in advance for their trip. Type of services run from riding in a basic vehicle, to travelling in style in a higher-end model vehicle. There’s even a car-pooling service called UberPool that lets riders share the cost of the ride. Uber also offers uberASSIST vehicles. These vehicles offer accessibility traveling & additional assistance to seniors and/or persons with disabilities. Upon reaching their destination riders can, if they feel that it’s warranted, tip the 30

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they’ve earned since going online and it also keeps track of the number trips they’ve completed.

WHO’S DRIVING FOR UBER According to their website, Uber completes 15 million trips on a daily basis and has 75 million riders with over 3 million drivers. There are more male than female drivers’ – 14% are women – and 25% of the male drivers are over the age of fifty. A notable 71% of Uber drivers have dependents living at home! Nearly 9 out of 10 drivers wanted to work for Uber because they wanted “to be my own boss and set my own schedule”.

A further 85% of its drivers reported that a major reason that they work with Uber is to allow them to have a greater worklife balance. Additionally, nearly a third of Uber’s drivers have full-time jobs, but use the Uber platform to boost their overall household or family income. Uber launched its expansion into Latin America by offering a ridesharing service in Mexico City during the summer of 2014. Mexico City has grown to become one of its largest markets and the success there has helped Uber in deciding to further expand southward into Central and South America. One of Uber’s fine Mexico City drivers is 46 year old Juan Perez. He’s driven for Uber for over 2 years now and he just loves it. He says, “I used to work in a sales job that had me driving all over the city. It wasn’t much fun and I paid as much to run my car as I made in sales.” Due to Mexico City’s renowned traffic woes – like congestion, roadwork, demonstrations and often brutal pollution – he thought to himself that there’s got to be a better way to make a living! That’s when he discovered that with Uber he could travel around and make money while doing it. Thanks to them he can now choose his own hours and he often works between 35 to 40 hours a week. Juan gets paid via the Uber app payment system and the money goes right into his bank account. He believes that, “Techy stuff, like cell phones and GPS, not only gets me work, but the GPS tells me how to get around in his crazy city!” He hopes that one day soon he will drive around enough to be able to afford a GPS device that will continually update itself while he’s traveling. “My life is now much better,” he adds, “and my wife is happier that we have more money to spend.” He treats all his riders like family and he’s found that if he is nice to them they are usually nice to him. (**Due to the current relationship between Uber drivers and cab drivers in Mexico City, Juan didn’t want his picture taken or posted for this article.**) One issue that drivers seem equally divided on is Dynamic or Surge pricing. Uber’s fares are dynamically priced and the fare that a rider sees is based on variables subject to change over time. Uber explains its policy as; “During times of high demand, fares increase (via


an algorithm) to help ensure a driver is always nearby, and that people can get rides when they need one.” Uber’s website states that, “These variables include (but are not limited to) the estimated time and distance of the predicted route, estimated traffic, and the number of riders and drivers using Uber at a given moment.” However some drivers, like Juan, feel that the increase in ride pricing may cost them some riders. Usually, it seems that the pricing increases are implemented, just when riders need or want the service the most.

The poll showed that nearly half of all millennials said that they would rather use their Uber app for a ride than call a cab. The older the group, the more the preference went to taxis. From those aged 35 to 44, only 23 per cent had used Uber, and that number dropped to only 14 per cent with respondents who were over 65. The survey discovered that half of Canadians (49 per cent) have a positive view of Uber, and that 34 per cent say it “should

definitely be allowed to operate” in their community. Also in Canada, the Toronto Star reported that in January the Ontario Superior Court stayed the $200-million  proposed class action lawsuit brought against Uber by some of its Canadian drivers. The court determined that if Uber drivers want to fight their employer in court, they will have to go to the Netherlands to do it. More to come!

UBER IS NO LONGER JUST A RIDE SHARING BUSINESS Uber offers its riders many ride choices; uberX, uberXL, UberSELECT, UberSUV, UberBlack, UberLUX and UberPool. The different names denote differences in trip prices and the type of vehicle that riders travel in. Of-course, all the different ride choices may not be available in every city that Uber operates in. Also some vehicles, i.e. Uber Rickshaw are only offered in certain unique cities. Uber is expanding and growing with other new services like; Uber Freight is a free app that matches carriers with shippers. Instead of riders the app will connect truck drivers to freight. Carriers and their drivers can now book loads with the touch of a button. Uber Eats is also another free app that allows customers to order food, pay with through their Uber account and track the order as it’s delivered to their door. Uber Health is a newer service that will help patients who need rides to and from their doctors. It’ll partner with health care providers – who will cover the cost of the rides – as they schedule rides for patients using a special digital platform. And coming soon to a rooftop near you is Uber Air.  Riders will use the app to hail the air taxi and board it at an Uber Skyport rooftop facility. The plans are to use planes with multiple props and electric motors to ensure that the planes will be relatively quiet. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi  said in a CBS interview that Uber plans to launch trials as early as 2020.

UBERLY IN CANADA, EH The Vancouver Sun reported in May that Canadian millennials would rather call up an Uber than a taxi, while older residents still prefer a cab. This was according to a new poll conducted by the Angus Reid Institute. In its survey it asked respondents what they preferred when it comes to ride sharing services. july 2018

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East Coast Road Report

ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE GLEANED FROM THE ATLANTIC REGION

NEW BRUNSWICK

Investment of $15 million in roads in the Grand Falls region The provincial government will invest more than $15 million in transportation infrastructure projects in the Grand Falls region this year, as part of its 2018-19 capital budget. “Strategic investments in transportation infrastructure help stimulate the economy and create jobs for New Brunswickers,” said Premier Brian Gallant. “As part of our multi-year economic growth plan, we are focusing on creating the right environment for job creation and economic development to occur.” Projects in the Grand Falls region this year include repairing the Saint-Léonard/ Van Buren International Bridge, paving on sections of Route 17 and Route 108 and chip seal on sections of Back California Road, Diamond Road, Lane Road, LeBel Road, Ouellette Road, Third Tier Road and Violette Station Road.

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“These projects will greatly improve travel in this region and create employment opportunities for local residents,” said Victoria-La Vallee MLA Chuck Chiasson. “I am proud to be part of a government that recognizes the importance of rural roads.” Chiasson attended for Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Fraser. Under the Municipal Designated Highway Program, the provincial government will fund the paving of a 1.1 kilometre section of Route 108 in Drummond, a 500-metre section of Route 17 in SaintLéonard and a one kilometre section of Route 255 in Saint-André. In Grand Falls, the province will share the cost of paving a 1.2 kilometre section of Tobique Road, along with the installation of storm sewer, curb and gutters, with the municipality. The program allows municipalities to apply for funding assistance for capital upgrade projects. Funding for the Municipal Designated Highway Program has more

than doubled since the 2014-15 fiscal year, increasing to $25 million in 2015. It has remained at that level as part of a government commitment to sustain funding for municipalities. The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure’s $688.2 million capital budget reflects the government’s priority of investing strategically in its buildings, highways and bridges. Strategic investments in infrastructure are a key component of the multi-year New Brunswick Economic Growth Plan, the province’s framework for growing the economy and creating jobs.

NEWFOUNDLAND The following statement was given May 3 in the House of Assembly by the Honourable Steve Crocker, Minister of Transportation and Works: Minister Crocker Provides Update on Provincial Roads Plan Mr. Speaker, I rise in this Honourable


East Coast Road Report

House to update Newfoundlanders and Labradorians about the steps our government is taking to improve highway infrastructure in our province. In February, the Department of Transportation and Works updated its provincial roads plan that outlines road projects over the next five years. Our approach has been praised by the Heavy Civil Association of Newfoundland and Labrador as a way for contractors to plan their expenditures, plan their work and keep Newfoundlanders and Labradorians working in the province. The plan allows us to take better advantage of our short construction season through early tendering, which leads to more competitive bidding and ultimately better value for taxpayers. Mr. Speaker, this approach to transportation infrastructure delivers on commitments in The Way Forward to strengthen the province’s economic foundation, operate a more efficient public sector, and deliver better services and outcomes for residents. I’m happy to report that tenders for 29 of the projects identified in the five-year provincial road plan have already closed, enabling contractors to hit the ground running as soon as the asphalt plants open in the coming weeks. We’ve also taken steps to improve our summer maintenance activities. We know our municipalities have concerns about highway infrastructure in and near their communities. Earlier this week, I wrote all municipalities in the province, asking them to identify the infrastructure issues, such as potholes, guiderails and highway shoulders that are most important to them. Mr. Speaker, we anticipate a busy road construction season ramping up in the coming weeks. While we take great pride in our provincial roads plan, we must stress that our top priority is the safety of motorists and our crews. We remind mo-

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torists to be patient and drive slowly and cautiously in all road construction zones.

NOVA SCOTIA

Province Proposing New Traffic Safety Act The Nova Scotia government is planning to replace the Motor Vehicle Act with a new Traffic Safety Act. Nova Scotians will have a chance to provide feedback. One of the first areas being updated are rules of the road, including distracted driving, speed limits and bicycling. “Nova Scotians are on our roads every day and we want to hear what they have to say as we develop the new act and regulations,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines. “The existing act was written in the early 1900s and we need to modernize our laws. We want the new act to be more flexible and responsive.” The new act, expected to be introduced in the Nova Scotia legislature this fall, governs and regulates the registration and identification of motor vehicles and the use of provincial highways and roads. This includes driver’s licences, the registration and inspection of vehicles, traffic laws and equipment standards.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Governments of Canada and PEI invest in safer and more efficient roadways Modern and efficient roadways are crucial to encouraging and supporting economic activity, facilitating trade, and creating well-paid, middle class jobs. The governments of Canada and Prince Edward Island are investing in infrastructure that will make it easier and safer to move people and products across the province, while supporting sustained economic growth for years to come. The Honourable Lawrence MacAuley,

Member of Parliament for Cardigan and Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; and the Honourable Paula Biggar, Prince Edward Island Minister of Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy, today announced joint federal-provincial support of over $7.9 million for a series of road improvements across the Province. The Government of Canada is contributing more than $3.6 million through the New Building Canada Fund. The Province of Prince Edward Island will provide the remainder of funding. The work will include resurfacing, widening, and adding roundabouts at locations across PEI’s National Highway System, National Roads and Community Connectors. Today’s event also marks the completion of a number of previously announced projects that are contained in the PEI National Regional Projects Umbrella Agreement, with a total federal investment of over $14.9 million for roadway improvements. These improvements increase safety, provide greater travel efficiency, and will extend the use of PEI roadways for decades to come. “The province’s National Highway System, and National Roads and Community Connectors, are integral to the safe and efficient transportation of people and goods. We are committed to working in collaboration with our partners and showing flexibility to their regional needs. Our decision to add eligibility criteria to our infrastructure programs allowed for projects like the ones we are announcing today to happen for Islanders,” said Lawrence MacAulay Member of Parliament for Cardigan and Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities.c


Around the Atlantic

ARAAC HALIFAX ANNUAL MEETING

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HE AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLERS ASSOCIATION OF ATLANTIC CANADA (ARAAC) HOSTED THEIR ANNUAL MEETING IN HALIFAX ON MAY 26, 2018 WITH 60 DELEGATES FROM ACROSS THE REGION, CANADA AND THE USA. Numerous exhibitors, sponsors and guests from the Nova Scotia government were also present. The event started with a Board of Directors meeting that said goodbye to Shelley Roy from Blenkhorns Auto Recyclers in Brookside NS as Treasurer, and Heather Langille from Capital City Auto Parts in Fredericton NB as Secretary. Paul Bell from Poehl’s Auto Recyclers in Kentville NS was elected Secretary, Dalbert Livingstone from Island Auto Supply in Charlottetown PEI was elected as Treasurer, and Larry Rushton from Sunrise Towing & Salvage in Port Howe NS was elected as Director for Nova Scotia. There was a lively Recycler-Repairer panel discussion featuring Dave Meery

from Carstar Canada. It was great to hear directly from the repairers ordering used parts about the challenges shops face with insurers, car owners, technology, and the OEMs. The morning wrapped up with a presentation by Paul Arsenault from the Nova Scotia Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal project STEVE FLETCHER, MANAGING discussing the stakeholder DIRECTOR OF THE AUTOMOTIVE consultations with the new RECYCLERS OF CANADA Traffic Safety Act. Paul your busiD’Adamo from Rhode Island provided a ness goals. keynote address on personal growth, and TUNDRA TAKEBACK’S PAUL BELL C h a d later provided insight in to the role that Counselman from Alabama and Steve auto recyclers can play in helping manage Fletcher from Ontario rounded out the the Takata airbag recall crisis. program with updates from the USA’s Paul Bell (photo above right) provided Automotive Recyclers Association and a visual presentation of his time spent in the Automotive Recyclers of Canada The northern Quebec on the Tundra Takeback event included a facility tour of Maritime Program processing end-of-life vehicles in Pick-a-Part, and concluded with a dinner Canada’s Far North. celebration on the historic docks of HaliRobert Alfers and James Somers from fax harbour. Auto & Trucking Atlantic Magazine preNext year’s meeting is scheduled for sented on the in and outs of marketing, June 8th in Moncton New Brunswick. advertising and communication to achieve

PANEL DISCUSSION ON COLLISION REPAIRERS USING RECYCLED PARTS. ANDREW MACDONALD (LEFT), MARITIME AUTO PARTS; DAVE MEERY (MIDDLE) ZONE DIRECTOR EASTERN CANADA, CARSTAR CANADA; LUKE GAMM (RIGHT), CAR-PART.COM

ARAAC DELEGATES MAKING THE COMMITMENT TO “YANK THE BAG” IN THE TAKATA AIRBAG RECALL PROGRAM.


Human Resources

TEST DRIVE AT WORK

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ESTDRIVE IS A CAREER AWARENESS PROGRAM MANAGED BY THE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR COUNCIL (ASC) IN PARTNERSHIP WITH NOVA SCOTIA APPRENTICESHIP AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT, REGIONAL CENTRE’S FOR EDUCATION AND NOVA SCOTIAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY EMPLOYERS. The Program - funded through the Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency - gives high school students exposure to different automotive trades through paid summer co-op positions. The Automotive Industry in Nova Scotia is facing numerous challenges, one being the lack of technicians trained and ready for hire. Forty percent of the automotive workforce is over 45 years of age. There are already large generational gaps within automotive workplaces and employers are challenged to find qualified journey persons. TestDrive helps bridge the generation gap in the workplace through mentorship orientation, and helping employers and mentors understand their young employees. Through this experience, students have the opportunity to build long term relationships with an employer, and are introduced to youth apprenticeship and direct entry pathways to apprenticeship training. TestDrive is now in its sixth year and has had close to 100 students successful complete the program. If your business is interested in supporting and mentoring the next generation of the auto trades, contact testdrive@autohr.ca.

WASTE OIL FURNACES THAT BURN HOT & SAVE MONEY!

S NLES! I A T S EL! STE

Tel: (506) 458-9322

Fax: (506) 459-6110

360 Route 10, Fredericton, NB E3A 7E1 idealequipment@outlook.com www.idealequipmentltd.com Still have Cleanburn parts and service for our customers! 36

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Around the Atlantic

‘WE’RE READY TO GO’ - AMHERST AUTO SUPPLY JOINS NAPA NETWORK By Susan Bradley

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ANAGING A NAPA A U T O PARTS STORE SERVING A LARGE REGION OF NORTHERN NOVA SCOTIA BRINGS A WIDE RANGE OF CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES, AND BILL HAGERMAN OF AMHERST AUTO SUPPLY COULDN’T BE HAPPIER. Amherst Auto Supply began in the town more than 50 years ago, and most recently changed ownership in January 2018. It serves a wide area outside of Amherst, from New Brunswick to Oxford, Nova Scotia. Providing top quality NAPA products to its customer base of automotive garages, the area’s logging sector, industries and retail customers has been a pleasure, Hagerman says. “Since we took the store over, we’ve increased our inventory by $100,000. We just finished an upgrade in our showroom, with the help of the NAPA team.

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We changed shelving around, we added shelving, new products and new signage,” he said. The front of the store was also recently painted. “We had a facelift and we’re ready to go.” June 2 was the store’s grand opening, with a car show scheduled. With 35 years of experience with NAPA, Hagerman said he was delighted to continue to run Amherst Auto Supply under the NAPA banner. Hagerman is from Carleton County, New Brunswick while his wife, a nurse, is from Amherst, so moving to the town was a homecoming of sorts. “We were looking for a chance to move back to the area. It worked out well for both of us.” The company’s six dedicated employees are its strongest asset, he said, adding they all live within one kilometre of the store and their knowledge of the NAPA product lines is superb. “It’s a small town and the guys on the counter know most of the people who walk in the door,” he said. “For example, some of our guys, they’re not on call, but the customers know their personal cell phone numbers and every now and then, we’ll come in and service that customer for something they need on the weekend. It is a plus for that customer that he knows there is someone he can call.”

Amherst Auto Supply is open from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. In a very competitive industry, that personal service is very valuable, Hagerman says. NAPA Auto Parts stores feature top-ofthe-line brand names as well as private brands such as NAPA, UltraPro, UltraCraft and BodyPro. The quality lines are known by professional mechanics and repair shops, commercial fleet owners and do it yourself-ers for their reliability and affordability, says Hagerman. “We have a full line of tools, our UltraPro brand of tools through NAPA, we have air compressors, battery chargers, everything a garage would need to service their fleets,” he said. “It always comes down to quality and price, having the right product. We sell the quality. Most of the time price is primary for the customer. If you are able to explain to them the quality, then sometimes the price is not the issue and the longevity of the particular product they are buying. “You don’t want to buy a part today and in six months, have to replace it again. We pride ourselves in that we sell top quality NAPA products.” Amherst Auto Supply carries a full line of automotive chemicals, additives and a


Around the Atlantic

good selection of cleaning products, from Spray Nine, Armour All and all the waxes such as Mother’s and Meguiar’s. To assist customers, NAPA has a monthly retail flyer. That has been a plus for Amherst Auto Supply, Hagerman said. “It’s a really great calling card for us. It gets mailed to the individual customer and it has really been working well for us. It’s really neat to see someone walk in the store with the flyer in his or her hand and then to see them walk out with what they wanted, at the price they want to pay.” Another valuable service for customers is the availability of product. “The beautiful thing about NAPA is the fact we have overnight delivery. We have a full line of couriers that service us out of Moncton. That is where our warehouse is. The service we provide in that way is second to none.” A large part of the store’s customer base is the region’s logging sector. “We provide our logging sector with

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top quality lubricants plus filtration. That is a big part of our business, keeping these guys equipped with their lubricants and filters that we sell.” There’s always room for expansion in the store’s customer base, Hagerman said. “You are always in the market for new customers. We have a salesman on the road every day. He is checking out new sales prospects all the time. It is what you need to keep growing.” Amherst Auto Supply is also attentive to the needs of its industrial accounts including Weston Bakeries and Oxford Frozen Foods. “Some of these places require food grade products which we are able to supply,” Hagerman said. That means machinery fluids such as lubricants and hose products, he said. “If it is in contact with any food product that is being produced, it has to be what is called food grade which is basically edible. “

Amherst Auto Supply also counts the Municipality of the County of Cumberland as one of its customers, providing products to service government’s fleet of vehicles. Hagerman says the large region requires specialized knowledge that his well-informed staff, with their local backgrounds and strong local connections, can provide. The store emphasizes getting product to customers when it is needed, he said. “We have four service vehicles on the road every day and there are a lot of days we could use 10. We have a good team that does our delivery service. They are out and about in the community, all over the place,” he said. “Our customers really appreciate the fact we provide that service, delivering to them in a timely manner. “Under the ownership change, the 7,000 square foot store has added more than $100,000 of inventory to service their customers.


INTERVIEWING 101

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By Paul D’Adamo

F ONLY HIRING WAS THIS EASY! THIS ARTICLE IS AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEWING.

It will include some basic rules of interviewing, the reason why we are interviewing, a description of question types, some quick tips on what to watch, and what not to ask. The first rule of interviewing; don’t fill the time talking about ourselves or the company. Our primary role is to ask questions and LISTEN to the interviewee. While we are looking to discover new information not covered in the resume, we are looking to determine whether the person in the resume is the person in front of us. We do this by asking good questions and listening. The general rule is that you should be listening approximately 75% and speaking 25%. The next rule is to prepare for the interview. We expect the candidates to

prepare, let’s set the same expectations for ourselves. Don’t wait until someone is in the lobby to read their resume and formulate questions. One recommendation would be to tag team in interviews with a Supervisor, HR person, or anyone who will have oversight of the position. Create a game plan with the secondary person and stick to it. Read the resumes prior to interview and game plan what questions you need answers for. Allow time for a de-brief after the interview to compare notes. Resumes can be distracting. Align the responsibilities and expectations in the job description with what you see on the resume, then create an outline of ques-

tions that give the candidate the opportunity to fill in any gaps and allow you to identify “soft” skills and behaviours this candidate is bringing to the job. We are looking for a good “fit” for our company. While a candidate may look great on paper, will their personality and behaviour be a good match for our company and our culture? Some experts say we should hire for the soft skills and train the july 2018

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hard skills. Another rule is to ensure that your job descriptions are robust with key responsibilities, duties and requirements. The job description sets the standard for your expectations. Did you know that interviewing skills can be used for other Managerial tasks? I often used the interview when conducting reviews of safety accidents, as well as on the job harassment claims and potential theft by existing employees. Learning to ask the right questions is critical for anyone with supervisory oversight of others. Common types of interview questions include open or closed, primary and secondary. An open question opens the door for a well thought out answer by the candidate. The most frequently asked question is “Tell me about yourself”. I am looking for someone to answer this in a timely fashion with the ability to summarize their primary characteristics in the context of the position they are applying for. While it could be considered a softball question, it is actually very difficult for someone who has not done any preparation. Other open questions might include “Why did you leave your last job?” or “Can you tell me about a significant ac42

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complishment and what you learned from it?” It wouldn’t be out of the question to follow up with “Can you tell me about a failure and what you learned from it?” As with any question, your job is not only to listen to their answer, but monitor body movements including hand and facial gestures, posture and eye contact! Sometimes it is not what a candidate says, but how they say it. Look for authenticity, credibility, and honesty in their verbal answers and their non-verbal behavior. Use your eyes and other senses to identify any hesitation or uncertainty in their delivery. My belief is that integrity is one of the most essential traits necessary for an employee. A candidate’s eye, body, and hand gestures could be a harbinger of future behavior. The contrast to the open question would be to ask a closed question like “Can you work on Saturdays?” or “Do you have any certifications that might be applicable for this position?” The closed question is designed to get a short answer or a yes or no response. The interviewee’s ability to answer briefly tells you that they won’t turn a simple question into an hour’s long dialog. The primary and secondary question

technique allows you to ask a primary question, whether open or closed, and then follow up with a secondary question. Ask for examples of job performance and specifics as to how they “handled” certain situations. What not to ask? The most important is to understand that there are protected classes, including race, gender, nationality, religion, military status, and age. Ask specific questions like “Are you able to perform the essential functions of the job with or without accommodation?” and “Can you work weekends?.” There is not enough room in this article to tackle all the legalities of personal questions. Do your homework and know how to ask the right questions to get the necessary answers to select the candidate that will fulfill your expectations for the role. The last rule I will leave you with is to understand that we might be selling auto parts but we are “People Managers!” Our people are the most important resource we have because nothing gets done without them. Hire good people, nurture them, and create a culture which promotes gratitude and appreciation for the work we ask them to do.


Atlantic Racing News

UNIQUE CAR MADE RACING HISTORY NOW ON DISPLAY AT MARITIME MOTORSPORTS HALL OF FAME By Hugh Conrod, Submitted by Mike Kaplan

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HOME-MADE RACING CAR, WHICH IN ITS DAY TOPPED THE BEST PROFESSION ALLY BUILT RACERS FROM UNITED STATES TRACKS, HAS BEEN RECONDITIONED BY A WOODSIDE RESIDENT AND THE SPUTTER AND ROAR OF ITS POWERFUL ENGINE BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF A ONCE POPULAR HALIFAX AREA SPORT.

Auto racing reached a peak in this area in the period just before the Second World War and in 1938 a talented Halifax mechanic, the late Reg Hubley built himself a racing car which roared around the Halifax Exhibition grounds track at speeds up to 100 miles an hour, good enough to cop top honors against a field of speedsters from leading United States racing centres. The familiar “Number Six,” which still glistens on the hood of the veteran car which won this race is still remembered by fans of the sport. They recall this type of auto racing as more refined and technical than the stock-car racing sport of today.

Ted Jenkins of Woodside, was given old “No. Six” by Milton Hubley of Halifax, father of the original builder of the car. Ever since its record breaking race on that memorable day in 1938 the car has spent its time in retirement tied up on the beams of a Vestry street garage. When he was given the car this Spring, Mr. Jenkins decided to see if he could get it in operating condition again. A few dabs

of oil, clean spark plugs and a couple of coughs and the old motor was purring away again almost as good as new. “Number Six” is a mechanics delight. It is a composite of many old cars… and even a truck or two. It boast such items as the radiator of an old Chevrolet truck, it has four Marmon wheels, a Ford undergear, a Bausch magneto, and a 490 Chevrolet block. The head has been ground down and souped up, and to give it more speed the car has only one forward high speed gear. In all, five different cars contributed parts to this unique vehicle. This racing car was built on a dare. The late Reg Hubley, recognized as one of the most talented mechanics ever born in this area, was challenged by some friends to build a racing car that could hold its own with professionally constructed race cars from the United States tracks which were being imported for the Halifax Exhibition annu-

al auto race. Taking up the challenge he designed and built this machine and then drove it to the top spot in the only race it ever entered. In 1937 a speed of 100 miles an hour was fabulous, yet this make-shift machine reached that mark, a tribute to the skill of its builder. Such innovations as a pressure feed fuel system are included in its design. A special tank which can be hand-pumped up by the driver keeps a steady air pressure on the gasoline tank, providing a steady flow of fuel into the carburetor. Eliminated is the need for a fuel pump of conventional design. Twin exhaust pipes, and an outside had-brake also add to its unusual appearance. “Number Six” will be retained as a vestige of those nostalgic 30’s. Now repainted, its distinctive markings brightened up, this old car will be placed on public display at various places this summer on loan from the Canada Science and Technology Museum Corporation in Ottawa. This unique car is now on display at the Maritime Motorspots Hall of Fame in Petitcodiac N.B. Thanks to the efforts of Jim Halihan, Ernie Ledwidge and Atlantic Tiltload who brought it down from Ottawa. july 2018

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ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca

AIA Canada

1-800-808-2920

aiacanada.com

Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

aautowash@nb.aibn.com

Cabot Shipping

1-800-565-0606

CARQUEST Atlantic

1-506-631-3807

Dunphy’s Mobile Wash 1-902-210-7279

INTERNET

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carquest.ca

17

halifaxpressurewashing.ca

36

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Prime Lift / MJS

1-866-461-1045

mjsholdings@ns.aliantzinc.ca

1-902-861-4747

Maritime Pro Stock Tour 1-902-873-2277

19

cabotss.com

1-506-458-9322

Maritime Car Wash

19

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

11

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

15

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

23

NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

napaonlinecanada.com

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NGK Spark Plugs

1-877-2-SPARKY ngksparkplugs.ca

NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

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NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

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NLS

1-800-465-0500

nlsproducts.ca

INSERT

Parts For Trucks

1-800-565-4700

partsfortrucks.com

Uni-Select (BtoB)

1-506-857-8150

uni-selectcanada.com

27

Rotary Lifts

1-866-461-1045

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Rust Check

1-888-RUSTIES

rustcheck.ca

13

Shay Tire

1-902-538-1155

shaytire.ca

18

Shell

1-800-661-1600

shell.ca

37

Stark Auto Sales

1-416-654-7222

starkautosales.com

14

Traction Truck Parts

1-506-857-8840

Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

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UAP HEAVY DUTY DIVISION

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HE HEAVY DUTY DIVISION OF UAP IS MADE UP OF TRACTION, TW WAREHOUSING, TRACTION ASSOCIATE PROGRAM AND TRUCK PRO™ SERVICE CENTER BANNERS. At UAP we strive to offer the best possible program at all levels of the industry, whether it is to sell parts or to install them, we have what you need. Traction began over 50 years ago and has grown from one location then to over 100 locations across this great country. With a mixture of both independent owners and corporate stores, Traction has what you need, with the largest coast to coast network, superior value and service and a complete range of truck and trailer components. With a Traction location near you, you can count on having the right part at the right time. We support over 200 quality OEM vendors such as Bendix, Federal Mogul, Grote, Monroe, Firestone and too many others to mention. We also have our own brand of quality Parts under the HD Plus brand name. Traction has their own brand that does not compromise OEM quality, comes with an outstanding warranty, large product selection and very competitive pricing. With products such as brakes, valves, wheels and lights, we have what you need at a competitive price. With three (3) TW warehouse across the country, we can have the hard to find part in your hands in a matter of days. With our up to date on line ordering system, you can search out and find the part where ever it may be, without ever having to pick up the phone. Our Truck Pro ™ Banner gives our customers a chance to be part of a large coast to coast repair shop banner which will give you access to our warehousing and our local stores for your part needs. The program offers diversified services and personalized attention coast to coast with over 130 members as of March 2018.A nation-wide warranty, very competitive hourly rates. As a Truck Pro™ member, you have access to technical training, as well as the top representatives of all of the major OEM parts manufacturers in the country. Roadside assistance program is one advantage to being a Truck Pro member along with clothing and insurance savings. UAP is your one stop shopping for all of your needs, regardless of what you may require. Parts and warranty, second to none. Service centers under the Truck Pro™ banner and of course the Traction store network. For more information on Truck Pro™ and our Traction Associate program, please contact: Stephen Henman at 1-506-381-6988 or shenman@uapinc.com.


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

MAY 2018 WINNER!

Kathy Irving, of Summerside, PEI, is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is July 15th, 2018

IT’S SO EASY TO WIN!

CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME: ADDRESS:

PHONE:

ACROSS

DOWN

1. Custom car type (6,3) 6. Checker product, in days past 8. Canada’s car-plant province 9. Road trip stopover option 10. Driving test challenge, ____ parking 11. Burn fuel pointlessly 13. Post-crash assessment 15. Used-vehicle vendor’s venue (3,3) 18. Entertain in public for donations 19. Ghibli and Quattroporte brand 22. Homeland of 19-Across 23. Emblem on 19-Across 24. Cribbage player’s marker 25. Fixer-upper car-ad words (5,4)

1. Obeyed an octagonal sign 2. Palindromic disc-brake component 3. Drag race fans’ gear (3,5) 4. Tradesman moving up in the world 5. Dealer’s test drive car, briefly 6. Central Halifax historic site 7. Worrisome tire sidewall sight 12. Certain ‘70s AMCs 14. Sally’s Wilson Pickett song ride 16. CAA route-planning product 17. Sound car makes when something is wrong. 18. Goodyear’s airborne icon 20. The final Olds 21. PM William ____ Mackenzie King

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN! BROUGHT TO YOU BY

C

lassic car fans, we think you’ll like this photo of this famous trend setting German car! Maybe you can name what it is, or anything more about it. Details please, and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better! Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is July 15th, 2018.

Congratulations to Bob Gordon of Apohaqui , NB who correctly answered that the vehicle in the photo as JR Motorsports, no. 88 Camaro car is used part-time by Chase Elliott and Dale Earnhardt Jr. JR Motorsports began in a shed on the property of Dale Earnhardt, Inc. in 1998 with just one employee. Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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July 2018 Auto & Trucking Atlantic  

July 2018 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

July 2018 Auto & Trucking Atlantic  

July 2018 Auto & Trucking Atlantic