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auto CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS

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SUCCESSFUL START FOR EAST COAST MINI STOCK TOUR

(STORY ON PAGE 20)

CARWASHES • SERVICE STATIONS DEALERS • GARAGES • BODY SHOPS

JANUARY 2018 $4.95

APPING THROUGH THE SNOW (SEE PAGE 14)

NS AUTO RECYCLERS UP NORTH (SEE PAGE 26)

SNOW TODAY, GONE TOMORROW WITH NEW

SNOW REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY

THAT’S A (TRUCK) WRAP!

(SEE PAGE 32)

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A RUST CHECK SWAG BAG OF GOODIES OR A STANLEY 123-PIECE SOCKET SET FROM NAPA!

MOVING TO THE FOREFRONT, IS TRADITIONAL SNOW PLOWING BECOMING A THING OF THE PAST?

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A SEMI BY ANY OTHER NAME – Tesla’s new Semi truck is introduced…but is it the next big thing?

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SNOW TODAY, GONE TOMORROW – That’s if all this new technology writer Jon Barry introduces has anything to say about it…

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SNOW ISSUE SPURS NEW INNOVATION – introducing a handy little gadget to help keep snow off the roof off larger vehicles, the Trucbrush.

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SALES TEAM Meg Devries meg@autoatlantic.com

APPING THROUGH THE SNOW – Well, okay, the title doesn’t do it justice, but the content will! Kenneth E. Seaton plows through a selection of the latest apps.

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UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC MEMBER AND SUPPLIER SERVICE AWARDS – Celebrating the best of the best.

Bill Kaprelian bill@autoatlantic.com

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SUCCESSFUL START FOR EAST COAST MINI STOCK TOUR – It all began with an idea over coffee….

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NS AUTO RECYCLER TAKES EXPERIENCE TO REMOTE NORTHERN COMMUNITY – Scout Environmental’s Tunda Take Back program benefits far north residents.

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INDIVIDUAL STAFF RELATIONSHIPS MUST BE CONTINUOUSLY REVIEWED TO SECURE AND PROTECT THE SHOP’S FUTURE – By Bob Greenwood.

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THAT’S A WRAP! Carter Hammett profiles the owner of Big Rig Wraps and looks at a marketing form that’s stretching the imagination.

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THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – Amendments to NB’s Motor Vehicles Act • More!

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD – Oops! Left the baby on the roof again!

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SEMA SHOW 2017 – Bill Kaprelian reports on this year’s Specialty Equipment Marketing Association and learns that a lot has changed in the aftermarket category!

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WINTER TIRES NOW THE FASTEST GROWING TIRE CATEGORY IN CANADA – and Atlantic Canadians are second only to Quebec in terms of usage.

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Letter from the Editor

A SEMI BY ANY OTHER NAME

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By Carter Hammett

S OF THIS WRITING, THE WORLD’S BEEN ABUZZ WITH NEWS OF TESLA’S NEW SEMI FOR OVER A WEEK. THE REACTION SHOWS NO SIGNS OF SLOWING DOWN EITHER. According to Elon Musk, who launched the model in November in Los Angeles, the Class 8 heavy duty truck can travel an impressive 800 km on a single charge while hauling a load weighing 36,000 kilograms. Ultimately, the goal is to replace dieselfueled trucks with electric ones. Supposedly, the operating costs of the new model will be lower due to reduced maintenance costs and fuel savings. The Autopilot system is the same driverassist mechanism that exists in Tesla’s other vehicles. This particular system can maintain a set speed and is also capable of reducing speed automatically. It can features lane-keeping technology and can prevent jackknifing. Other features include “thermonuclear explosion-proof glass” in the windshield, better uphill performance and faster acceleration. Additionally, the company has designs to construct a global network of solar-powered “megachargers” to provide electrical charges to the trucks. Musk claimed the system could

power trucks for an additional 640 km after charging for a mere half hour. The new Semi emblemizes a global swing towards energy-saving technology and as such, serious resources are turning in this direction. Part of the reason, of course is greenhouse gases (GHGs), which manufacturers finally seem to be waking up to. About 25 percent of all transportation-relevant GHGs emissions are caused by trucks. Experts claim GHGs are responsible for trapping heat and warming the Earth’s atmosphere. But back to the truck, which is a sexy beast indeed and offers some unique features, including the battery pack’s location under the floor of the cab. The driver’s seat is also noticeably more forward positioned. The truck has a lower center of gravity than its diesel counterparts, which may contribute to high speed stability. The truck’s interior offers some unique components. For one thing, a driver can stand up and walk around because of the battery’s positioning, which creates more room. There’s also more storage space. There aren’t sleeping accommodations yet, but keep an eye open for future developments. Musk also alluded to

the intent that one day these bad boys might be driven autonomously. Two screen are featured on both sides of the steering wheel, which echoes an earlier release, The Model 3. One screen controls settings and vehicle functions, and the other is responsible for radio controls and typical navigation. Cameras placed beneath exterior mirrors allow the driver to see the sides of the truck while others located at the windscreen’s base that face oncoming traffic. And while it all sounds fairly impressive, Tesla’s facing increased competition from

transportation giants like Daimler and Cummins, which have already announced their plans for electrified large trucks. Furthermore, it hasn’t been exactly smooth sailing for Tesla this year, experiencing hiccups that include posting its worst financial quarter in the company’s history in October. These troubles were compounded by delays in production of the company’s Model 3 sedan, which has yet to be delivered to the half million customers patiently waiting for their car. Production for the Semi is slated to begin in 2019 and its other new car, the Roadster, will be available in 2020. It’s interesting to ponder on how the Semi would handle itself during a Maritime winter, which is what this issue focuses on. Jon Barry invites the reader to explore new snow removal technology in a revealing feature this issue, while Kenneth E. Seaton introduces the readers to a plethora of winter-pounding apps you never knew existed. It’s all here in the latest issue, along with a fine bunch of reading to help you get through those long cold winter nights. Enjoy. And please drive safely this winter. Happy New Year!

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SNOW TODAY, GO WITH NEW

SNOW REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY MOVING TO THE FOREFRONT, IS TRADITIONAL SNOW PLOWING BECOMING A THING OF THE PAST?

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By Jon Barry

ITH A WEALTH OF NEW TECHNOLOGY BEING INTRODUCED TO OLD SNOW CLEARING METHODS, TRADITIONAL PLOWING MAY BECOME A THING OF THE PAST. Winter is here and everyone from provincial governments to home owners are preparing for the seemingly endless barrage of snow while trying to figure out the best way to dig out from the dumps. Provincial governments need to be prepared both physically and financially for snowfall induced emergencies. Municipalities need to keep their streets clean for businesses while monitoring their budgets for snow removal. Residents need to be wary of street parking and road closures that could result in their car getting towed in the depths of winter. And homeowners 6

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need to keep their own driveways clear for easy access. In some circumstances, homeowners must even clear the walkways in front of their house or face a municipal fine. While much of the snow clearing ritual remains the same, governments are finding more efficient and innovative ways to clear the streets by employing Big Data strategies and modernized connected fleets. While much of the traditional plow technology remains, the old rigs are being updated with new tech and ice melting cargo that are really moving the industry forward. As the snow begins to fall, many governments are hoping not to get buried financially by snow removal. For many municipal governments, one of the largest issues in dealing with the unpredictable maritime winter is deciding how much money to set aside to dig out their cities. Snow removal is a costly business, but having uncleared roads has a higher price to shutting down the local economy

and businesses. This is a problem across Canada, with municipalities like Toronto and Ottawa also overspending on snow clearance. Some cities like Edmonton have been taking proactive approaches to test pilots new programs to get out ahead of the storms and under budget. Halifax is another city that is attempting to take a more researched approached to how it handles snow removal after a few years of under spending and also wildly overspending seemingly at the mercy of the maritime winter. Some winters it works out for the best, with 2016’s mild winter actually saving municipalities like Halifax about five million dollars in snow clearing costs. But the previous year saw a wealth of municipalities go over budget attempting to dig out of seemingly endless storms. In 2015, Halifax had overspent its snow clearing budget by $10 million. In total the city spent $30 million dollars to cover the costs of salting, sanding, and clearing their roads.


ONE TOMORROW

Much of the added cost was for overtime pay for plow operators with repairs and supplies like salt and dirt making up the remainder of the over spending. It wasn’t only the Halifax budget office that had a rough winter. Jennifer Stairs, a spokeswoman for the Halifax Regional Municipality told the CBC that Halifax residents made their voice heard about the inadequacy of the municipalities snow clearing services. The winter of 2015 was such a shock to Halifax that it is no surprise that the municipality set out to conduct an independent investigation into ways it could modernize its snow removal technologies with more efficient pre storm planning and new technological solutions. As we move into the more integrated and connected technological future, snow plows are just starting to make use of Big Data systems and connectivity that provides more information on the process of snow removal. Cities like Montreal have already implemented GPS and electronic

readers into their plow fleets to allow city officials to have a better understanding of how long it takes to clear an individual street and how much snow accumulates where. But it is not just governments that want update on plow locations. Provincial fleets in Nova Scotia have been outfitted with GPS systems that feed back into the provinces Plow Tracker System that provides web based updates to residents on the location of their plows. Plowtracker also “allows the user to turn on other information such as the provincial winter maintenance service levels, access to the provincial highway cameras, and the ability to see where winter maintenance activities have taken place within the last 30, 60, and 90 minutes.” Connected fleets are combined with enhanced weather monitoring systems, with some fleets even being able to supply real time information to the weather systems on snow accumulation, local

weather conditions, and the amount of salt on the road. An easy way to save money and the environment is to get out on the road ahead of the storm. Weather monitoring and coordinated fleets can do a lot to prepare the roads before the first drop of snow lands. When weather monitors see a storm is approaching, coordinated fleets of plows can spray the roads with a pre storm salt and water mixture known as brine. The water will evaporate and leave behind a thin layer of salt that will help breakdown snow and ice when the storm arrives. The application process is also more efficient, allowing fewer trucks to cover more ground. This not only makes the clearing out the storm easier, it cuts down on the use of salt and plow operator time leading to further budget efficiencies. Halifax adopted the strategy a few years ago and some cities like Edmonton have test piloted their own projects. While different municipalities and januar y 2018

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Snow Removal

governments are finding their own way towards modernization, some counties south of the border are going all in on new tech reports the New-Times Herald. The New York State Thruway Authority with its 570 miles of interstate highway are updating their 235 heavy duty plows with new GPS systems from AT&T. The new systems “will provide real-time route tracking, air and pavement temperatures, material application rates and other data.” They are also installing snow measuring stations along the highways with software from IBM and the Weather Company to “generate more and better real-time information about local weather and snowfall rates - including satellite images of road conditions - so crews can be deployed where they are most needed.” Howard County in Maryland has also gone fully futuristic in employing laser measuring systems to further improve their access to monitoring information. The infrared beams provide feedback on air and road temperatures while keeping track of salt levels and usage. And of course, like any discussion about large automobiles, there is talk of future self driving fleets of plows. One of the largest costs of digging out from a heavy winter is the cost of overtime for plow operators. Mercedes-Benz is currently test piloting a fleet of plows on an airport in Germany that cuts out the middleman for potentially endless autonomous clearing. While the project may be showing promise clearing a wide open runway, autonomous vehicles still have significant technological hurdles to operating on the windy roads of a heavy snow covered Maritime winter. There are even some dreams of a plow-less winter in the far future. Ideas like smart roads that are connected to the

electrical grid through various different designs would be able to heat up and melt any accumulated snow. This is a more advanced version of the snow removal tactic already used in Scandinavia and Iceland where they leverage geothermal heat to melt snow off roads and sidewalks. This eliminates the need for salt, dirt, brine or the big heavy plows and their operators. While this idea may be practical in the future, it is still many years off from substantial implementation without the ready supply of geothermal energy. While municipalities are searching for their own new ways to clear snow more effectively, there is a lot that individual homeowners can do to get rid of the never ending snowfall. New Technologies like snow melting cables can get rid of some of the snow before you are even awake. One manufacturer is EasyHeat that sells their EasyHeat Sno Melter Mats that “contain an electrical heating element designed to provide a fixed amount of heat. When connected to optional controls that detect moisture and freezing temperatures, they help prevent the accumulation of snow and ice accumulation on steps, walkways, driveways, parking areas, loading docks and roads.” Snow melting cables can not only save you some sleep, they can also help cut down on a lot of the environmentally hazardous side effects of snow clearing like road salt and other chemical deicers. It is for this same reason that electric battery powered snow blowers are becoming more popular. Rather than have to rely on gas powered machines that are not built for environmental efficiency or lugging a power cord through the snow as you clear, several manufacturers have built lithium battery powered snow blowers that can get around 45 minutes of plow time on a single charge.

But if you want to avoid all of the hassle of clearing your laneway on a daily basis, as the saying goes, there’s an app for that. “Uber for plow services” have been on the grow in Canada, and with a few false starts, companies are starting to expand their services out to Atlantic Canada. Ottawa-based TouchPlow is one such company that has expanded from their grass cutting service, Touchmow, to offer on-demand snow plowing service to residents and businesses. With services like Touchplow, the user requests a plow via the TouchPlow app. This request is then placed in a queue and relayed to their roster of service providers. The jobs are sorted by time and their distance from the provider, who can accept the job. Once the lane is clear the provider takes a photo to confirm for the user that the job is finished. After the user confirms the job, then payment is transferred to the provider. Apps like TouchPlow do rely on availability of plow providers, which are found in larger numbers in more densely populated urban centers. As plow sharing apps become more widely adopted, the price will become more attractive to consumers and the availability will broaden. While much of the industry process remains the same, the snow clearing ritual is gradually modernizing. Provincial governments, municipalities and homeowners are using every trick at their disposal to update an old industry to save time, money and the environment. With budget concerns driving a lot of the evolution, environmental options are also becoming more attractive. While self-driving plows and futuristic roads are still a ways off, there’s still loads that can be done to update and enhance the snow clearing industry.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS

of freshwater ways that can have a huge impact on plant and animal ecosystems. But it is not just the salt from the roads that impacts the environment. The large amounts of dirt that are also used to provide traction on roads will get mixed up with oil, gasoline and other hazardous chemicals that mix into the snow and present their own problems in the surrounding environment. It’s no surprise then that many municipalities and governments are taking steps to reduce their use of harmful materials while trying to balance their budget and maintain access to their local economy. Many are exploring alternatives to road

salt. Toronto based Monster Plowing Company have swapped their salt loads for an eco-friendly ice control called ClearLane Enhanced Deicer, that they have nicknamed Green Ice Melter. Included at no extra charge, they claim the melter is 84% less corrosive than traditional road salt. It is non toxic and safer for animals and surrounding vegetation. It has even been awarded the Safer Choice Label by the American Environmental Protection Agency. Not only is the Green Ice Melter safer, it also more efficient. While traditional road salt begins to lose its effectiveness at -10c, Green Ice Melter can continue to break down ice until -18c.

Its not just city budgets that take a beating during the winters. Environmental concerns of snow removal are also becoming increasingly more prevalent and are being factored into government and even individual contractor’s removal process. The snow removal process, for almost all of its industrial history has had a large impact on the environment. Salt is the usual suspect for discussing how the snow removal impacts the environment. Not only does salt wreck havoc on your paint job, it also has a substantial impact on the environment. The largest effect from salt is the increase salinity 8

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Around the Atlantic

FIX AUTO ATLANTIC CELEBRATES GROWTH IN TRUE MARITIME SPIRIT

F

IX AUTO WELCOMES FRANCHISE STRATEGIC PARTNERS FROM ACROSS THE ATLANTIC PROVINCES FOR REGIONAL MEETINGS, ALL WITH FAMOUS MARITIME HOSPITALITY. CHARLOTTETOWN (PEI), October 27, 2017 – The energy was high as Fix Auto franchise strategic partners from around the Maritimes converged on Charlottetown, PEI for the 5th Annual Atlantic Regional Meeting on October 18th and 19th. Paul Randles, General Manager for Fix Auto Atlantic welcomed the delegates to the historic city to give them the opportunity to connect with vendors, insurance partners, Fix Auto head office team and enjoy some famous Maritime hospitality. The event kicked off with an evening reception held at the PEI Brewing Company.  This fantastic venue was the perfect place to set the stage for the upcoming meeting.  Attendees were treated to great food, including a raw oyster bar, local beer brewed right on-site and a performance by a local PEI band, complete with their own Celtic dancer. The reception was also a great opportunity for shop

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owners to mingle with their colleagues as well as suppliers; all in a fun atmosphere that is representative of the Maritimes. The energy from the evening reception definitely carried forward into the next day’s meeting. “This marks our 5th year for this annual event which is extremely valuable for our franchise strategic partners,” said Randles. “Our shop owners in the Maritimes work as hard as they play; it’s our job to ensure they have the tools they need to continue to grow their businesses.” Presentations were delivered in an open format giving everyone the opportunity to ask questions throughout, encouraging an open dialogue and valuable feedback.  In the last five years, Fix Auto has grown to 14 shops in Atlantic Canada and is continuing on a positive growth path. “Joining the Fix Auto family, with its strong national brand awareness provides us with better leverage in our local market while the operational supports enable us to provide even better customer service,” said Donnie Hogan, owner of Fix Auto Miramichi in New Brunswick – the newest addition to the Atlantic family.   Attendees were also treated to special guest speaker Michael Cassidy, Assistant

Professor – Faculty of Business at the University of Prince Edward Island. Cassidy specializes in entrepreneurship and financial accounting and his key message of having an entrepreneurial mindset to move your business forward certainly resonated with all attendees. “You have to change to grow – to move forward,” stated Cassidy. This sentiment is echoed frequently within the Fix Auto family as it continues to grow and evolve. During the evening reception which included prize draws with all funds raised going to the Fix Auto national charity partner, Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of Canada. Total donations amounted to $3,160 being raised to help RMHC provide families of sick children with a place to stay while their child is being treated at a nearby hospital. Kate Horton, Executive Director for RMHC Canada and Lori Barker, RMHC Atlantic Director of Development were in attendance to accept the donation and deliver their heartfelt thank you on behalf of RMHC Canada and the over 30,000 families they serve each year. “Maritimers are known for their generosity and that was very evident with the overwhelming support shown for RMHC,” concluded Randles.


Snow Removal

SNOW ISSUE SPURS NEW INNOVATION

A

By Debora Babin Katz

S THE OLD ENGLISH PROVERB GOES “NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION.” IT’S ALSO WHAT FUELED THE LATEST INNOVATION FOR CLEARING SNOW OFF FLEET ROOFTOPS CALLED TRUCBRUSH®.

disadvantages of methods employed by companies to try to combat snow accumulation, namely snow scrappers, throwers, truck washes, catwalks and rolling ladders, is what ultimately led our company to explore a new solution. In 2012, we

were hired by the manager of a large Boston-based airfreight company for snow management. He tasked us with finding a method to manage the largest snow-related issue in the trucking industry—the safe and effective removal of snow from

This mobile broom attachment, powered by the hydraulics of a front-end loader, quickly, effectively and safely clears accumulated snow and icy debris from the rooftops of trailers, trucks, busses, intermodal containers (including non-flat containers) and standard flatbeds. How did this mobile technology that operates under extreme cold conditions come to be? Accumulated snow on the tops of any vehicle in transit is a significant safety concern and one that the trucking industry has been trying to address for years. In 2008 an extensive study on the snowrelated issue for North America’s trucking industry was performed by the American Transportation Research Institute known as ATRI. “The size and weight of ice sheets that may dislodge from larger vehicles in transit create a more significant safety concern for the trucking industry. Operational impacts from accumulated snow and ice are also possible, including size and weight limit violations and lowered fuel economy,” said ATRI. Canadian efforts to address this safety issue mirror those in the U.S., though some aspects are more progressive than the U.S. Quebec, for example, has a regulation specifically prohibiting any vehicle operator from allowing snow and ice to fall from their vehicle. Removing snow and ice from the tops of large vehicles creates a series of safety and operational challenges however. While those who are not in the trucking industry may believe that the best solution is for the truck driver or maintenance employee to ascend to the top of a truck to remove snow, this is a highly risky method. Trailer/truck rooftops are extremely slippery surfaces which combined with high elevations and adverse weather conditions is dangerous for any person. In many cases, it can violate federal, state or provincial worker safety guidelines. ATRI’s report on the advantages and januar y 2018

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Snow Removal

the tops of the company’s fleet. Up until then, the company’s employees had spent countless hours trying to clear snow and icy debris from the fleet utilizing rolling ladders and manual labor. Safety was a primary concern, as was the lack of efficiency for the air-freight company. We identified all the issues and brainstormed possible solutions with the freight-forwarding manager. We knew that this new solution would need to be: (1) mobile and capable of being easily removed both between storms and after winter season as the airfreight company did not want a fixed system that would take up valuable space or be a potential hazard for a driver to back in to; (2) flexible enough to quickly and easily perform on various heights; (3) safer for both em-

become passionate, learn all they could, and design a solution was amazing. Not only did they come up with a solution to remove the snow, they outlined an entire safety protocol to manage the concept.” Prior to TrucBrush®, the airfreight facility would spend on average 20 man hours to clear the trucks manually of snow. Today with TrucBrush®, the entire fleet of approximately 45 trucks and trailers is done in 45 minutes. “Now the trucks were out soon after loading, while my competitors were still trying to get the snow off their trucks. It has had a huge impact on our efficiency,” he said. It takes approximately one minute to clear snow from a tractor-trailer and 30 seconds for a typical box truck. “TrucBrush® clears our intermodal contain-

ployees and their trucks’ fiberglass rooftops; and (4) fast. The outcome of all our efforts and engineering was TrucBrush® a patented, mobile, polypropylene-bristled broom device that brushes snow off the top of a truck, trailer or bus in a minute or less and operates from the hydraulics of a front-end loader “The whole conversation came about from a selfish standpoint, said the airfreight manager. “I needed a solution to a problem and the fact that the [TrucBrush®] team were willing to take on an unknown concept and put the time in to

ers with only a 34 second turn time per truck,” said Vinny Artese of Global Terminal. “The TrucBrush has been a pivotal component to our fleet when dealing with our harsh winters,” said TrucBrush customer Jarod Warsofsky, General Manager of Boston Trailer. “The savings we have gained from significantly reducing down time has made this investment well worth it. TrucBrush is quick, easy and very effective. Now we can effectively clear 20 to 30 trailers in the amount of time that it would take us to shovel one,” he said. While companies who handle their

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snow management in-house are able to purchase or rent the mobile device, TrucBrush can also be purchased by a company’s snow service vendor. “TrucBrush® is really the first device that is easily outsourced to a facility’s snow service contractor,” said David Kane, Operations Manager/Snow & Ice General Manager of Caruso Companies. “It is easy to operate, incredibly mobile, and quickly and effectively removes snow and icy debris from the truck’s rooftop,” he said. It’s easy to interchange the TrucBrush® attachment for a snow pusher or bucket. In the past, contractors could only employ manual labour, one of the most dangerous options for and a practice under scrutiny by insurance companies. “The tops of trailers are not designed to withstand the weight of a driver, or other personnel on top to clean the accumulated snow and ice,” said ATRI. “Furthermore, the potential for slips, falls and even death associated with individuals attempting to get to the tops of trailers covered in snow and ice to clean the trailer top far outweigh any potential benefits,” they said. Some snow contractors are utilizing TrucBrush to expand their service offerings. “I added TrucBrush® at two of my clients’ distribution centers as a secondary service to my snow management contracts, which also replaced a fixed snow scraper system at one location that had been an issue for my client,” said Dale DesMarais of DesMarais & Sons. Since its inception, TrucBrush® has been recognized by the Snow & Ice Management Association (SIMA) with an Industry Commitment Award for outstanding innovation and customer service, as well as, an innovation award from the Business Association of New England (SBANE). This year, Caterpillar became a global distributor of TrucBrush® offering it through its dealer network. From necessity and a desire to combat the harsher side of Mother Nature the transportation industry is employing a newer snow technology.


AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!


Future Technologies

APPING THROUGH THE SNOW . . .

T

By Kenneth E. Seaton

H E R E ’ S A C H I L LY BREEZE FANNING OUT ACROSS CANADA AND IT’S BLOWING FROM COAST TO COAST TO COAST. IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK A LOT LIKE WINTER AND PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO THINK OF TOQUES, WINTER JAMMIES AND LONG JOHNS. They’re also wondering where they packed them. Snow shovels, blowers and scrapers are getting uncovered or lifted down from hooks, dusted off and readied for work. Furnaces are being given a once over by homeowners. Vehicle or vehicles, as the case may be, are also receiving some personal and/or professional inspection time. What about your cell phone? Considering how much you use it and how much you may need it, doesn’t it also deserve a winter tune-up? Most people tend to upgrade their cell phones – around every 2 years or so – as they renew or change their cell phone plans. With a new or upgraded phone it’s common to just transfer your existing apps over to the new one. But, have you given any thought towards all the new app technology? How they could perhaps make your cell phone your new best friend during your winter travels? The old Boy Scout moto to “Be Prepared” is never truer than when you are climbing into your vehicle and heading out for some winter driving. The shear scope of usable tech information that’s now available to us is truly amazing. Now there’s no excuse to hitting the road and getting blindsided by 14

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treacherous weather or getting stuck in a surprise road closure. With your cell phone you can now track the progress of snow plows in your area. You can also find and pay for a parking spots in advance. Some apps will not only let you reserve the spot, pay for it, but will also keep an eye on the meter and add more money to the meter as needed! You ought to take the time to tune-up your cell phone, tablet or whatever type of device you carry with you when you drive. While the number of obtainable apps on the market may appear daunting at first glance, a little advance research will go a long way towards enabling you to make great choices. Here’s a look at some of the app technology that’s currently available to you.

Apps are in no particular order and prices range from free to more. Checking the Weather before Hitting the Roads It seems like just yesterday that we’d look up at the sky and try to guess what the next day’s weather would be. Now of-course, we get all sorts of weather forecasting via the media. There’s even a channel dedicated solely to the weather. Winter driving can prove very challenging – especially for some newcomers or newer drivers – who haven’t had the pleasure of experiencing a Canadian winter before.

THE WEATHER NETWORK (Android and iPhone apps) – Often this is the go to channel on many Canadian television sets and according to them, it has the world’s most downloaded Weather App. The app supplies up-todate and accurate weather information that has hourly, 36-hour and 10-day forecast options. Users receive alerts when active weather hits, and can track storms via their radar maps and news articles.

WEATHER TIMELINE – FORECAST (Android and iPhone apps) – Timeline is a simple weather app that presents its weather forecast in a timeline to help you quickly glance at and digest the information. It utilizes a strong focus on color to outline weather conditions. It also includes current weather alerts/ warnings for your chosen locations.

WEATHER BY WEATHERBUG (Android and iPhone apps) – Provides fast alerts, real-time weather conditions, accurate hourly forecasts & 10-day forecasts. Has 18 weather maps including Doppler radar, precipitation, local temperature, local pressure, local radar, wind chill, heat index, humid and much more.


Future Technologies

INTELLICAST WEATHER (Android and iPhone apps) – App provides forecasting information from the Weather Channel, and Weather Underground. Uses severe storm tracking and detailed interactive radar readouts features to deliver high-definition up-to-date weather info.

YAHOO WEATHER (Android and iPhone apps) – This app delivers attractive, location-specific backgrounds from Flickr. Hourly, five and ten day forecasts give way to current details, regional maps, wind and rain predictions, and sunrise/sunset times.

PLOWING THROUGH THE SNOW Every year, blizzard conditions, heavy snowfall and whiteouts combine to make driving treacherous and always seem to hit us the hardest on those days that we really needed a sunny day with dry roads. Getting weather warnings early on and having the ability to potentiality plan your route out in advance may be one of the best defences against Old Man Winter. Improved technology is now enabling some provinces and cities to provide its citizenry with the capacity to track snow

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plows in real time. Simply put; GPS devices attached to the trucks provide data that is collected and displayed onto maps. Users are able to track where the plows have been, where they are going and where they are currently plowing. The vehicles’ location is updated at regular intervals and a simple map refresh allows users to track its progress. To anyone who has patiently crawled behind a row of slow rolling snow plows – waiting for them to plow past your exit – this app should be a must-have no brainer! Check out your local governments’ website to see what’s available in your area.

GOOGLE MAPS (Android and iPhone apps) – Google’s in-car GPS cell phone navigation system provides users with turn-by-turn directions. It monitors upcoming traffic, accidents or construction and will automatically offer users with alternative routes. Has the capacity to locate pit stops along users route like; gas stations, coffee spots and can access indoor maps for big places like airports, malls, stadiums, etc.

WAZE (Android and iPhone apps) – App

will automatically reroute around traffic as road conditions change, provide police and speed camera alerts in real time. It allows you to use your voice or celebrity voices to announce custom voice directions. Waze can also alert users when it’s time to leave for events by syncing your calendars, or sound an alert when the speed limit is exceeded.

PARKME PARKING (Android and iPhone apps) – Advertises itself as the leading global provider of real-time and static on-street and off-street parking data. See real-time info on available parking spots and meters (in select markets only). It allows users to locate the cheapest & closest parking  spot to their destination. Pay for it via a credit card and the parking spot is guaranteed.

BOOKING.COM (Android and iPhone apps) – This app puts a huge range of hotels, apartments, villas, hostels, B&B’s at your fingertips. They also have a segment dedicated strictly to last minute deals, which may prove useful during any winter storm hiccups. Book & get instant confirmation, make changes on the fly and they offer


24/7 customer service.

FOR EMERGENCY USE ONLY As anyone who has driven through harsh winter weather – or just regular winter weather – can and will attest too, driving conditions can change in the blink of an eye. Even the best planned and prepared for trips can easily spin out of control. When preparing for severe weather, we stock our home shelves with emergency provisions. Here are some apps that you may want to stack your cell phones menu shelves with.

FIRST AID - CANADIAN RED CROSS (Android and iPhone apps) – The official Canadian Red Cross First Aid app puts lifesaving advice in your hands. The app helps you respond to everyday emergencies. It also gives you instant access to videos and simple step-by-step advice to help you maintain your life-saving skills and act when needed. Preloaded content means you have instant access to all safety information at any time, even without reception or an Internet connection.

WINTER SURVIVAL KIT (Android and iPhone apps) – The app holds a virtual survival kit for when a car gets stranded in snow. It will help determine your location, contact 911 in case of emergency, notify your friends and family

N O V A

S C O T I A

and can calculate how long you can run your engine to keep warm. The app also alerts the user every 30 minutes as a reminder to turn off the vehicle’s engine and check the exhaust pipe for snow buildup.

RED PANIC BUTTON (Android and iPhone apps) – Press the Red Panic Button and the app sends an emergency message or email with your address and location (GPS based or coarse GSM based) to an emergency contact. It features media widget for photo, audio and video alerts with unlimited number of panic contacts.

ICE (In Case of Emergency) (Android and iPhone apps) – The best app for putting your emergency information on your lock screen wallpaper and is a convenient way to store information that may be needed by rescuers and doctors. In addition to a list of chosen contacts, it also allows you to save information about taken medications, allergies and other important health information.

AND DON’T FORGET THE LOW-TECH IN YOUR TRUNK & GLOVEBOX Keeping some emergency gear – you know just in case – in your glovebox and trunk just makes good sense. Here are some suggested items to keep in your vehicle. Things like; a practicable snow shovel, bag of sand or non-clumping kitty

T R U C K I N G

S A F E T Y

litter, booster cables, tow rope or chain, flashlight with spare batteries, road flares, small tool & first aid kits, fuel line antifreeze, emergency foodstuff provisions (bottled water, non-perishable energy foods, hard candies, etc.), old coffee can with tea lights to burn in it, a blanket, old pair of winter boots and extra hat and gloves, any special medication that you may need in an emergency, etc. On trips try to always ensure that your cell phone has a full battery and keep a charged portable power pack handy. Purchasing a hand crank able USB Cell Phone Emergency Charger with a light could possibly just save your life one day. If your vehicle becomes trapped, be sure to tie a red (or any bright colour) piece of fabric to your vehicle’s antenna to help rescuers spot your vehicle in the snow. Getting from here to there can sometimes prove a little dicey when winter traveling. Ensuring that your map apps have the latest updates is enormously important. Another useful tip is to have more than one map app downloaded on your cell. That way, if one of them conks out, you will have backup support. As always, when winter driving use your common sense! When in doubt, pull off the road and stop – if possible – somewhere secure. Wait out the storm and then continue on your journey when it’s safe to do so.

A S S O C I A T I O N

Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association

380 Bedford Highway, Suite 205 • Halifax, NS, B3M 2L4 Phone: (902) 493-3051 | Toll Free: (888) 329-9660 • Fax: (902) 405-3115 | Email: safety@nstsa.ca


Around the Atlantic

UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC MEMBER & SUPPLIER SERVICE AWARDS

JEFF MAYE AND HIS TEAM WITH B & A AUTOMOTIVE SALES IN MARYSTOWN, NEWFOUNDLAND RECEIVING THEIR 15 YEAR SERVICE AWARD WITH UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC.

KEITH FARRELL -BUSINESS DEVELOP MANAGER WITH UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC PRESENTS A 25 YEAR SERVICE AWARD TO HUBERT BURDEN WITH PRO AUTO PARTS IN SAINT JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND.

BRENDAN O’BRIEN – REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC, PRESENTING BRAD MORASH WITH NORTON THE “LARGEST SALES INCREASE” AWARD IN PAINT & BODY FOR ATLANTIC CANADA.

BRENDAN O’BRIEN - REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC, PRESENTING KEITH MITCHELL WITH BLUESTREAK A “RECOGNITION AWARD” FOR HIS DEDICATED SERVICE TO THE UNI-SELECT ATLANTIC MEMBERSHIP.

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Human Resources

ADVANCING WOMEN IN TRUCKING WE ARE ALL LEADERS

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HE TRUCKING HUMAN RESOURCE SECTOR COUNCIL ATLANTIC HOSTED THEIR THIRD ANNUAL ADVANCING WOMEN IN TRUCKING CONFERENCE WITH A RECORD ATTENDANCE OF 80 PARTICIPANTS. The general theme of the conference was regardless of your title or years of experience – we are all leaders and we can all make a difference at our workplaces! Our keynote speaker, Micheline Roy, HR Reflexion kicked off the event with why women make great leaders, moving into a panel speaking to how industry could broaden their recruitment efforts. From there we had another speaker, Corrie Anderson, Optimum Talent speaking to leadership styles and wrapped up with an industry leaders panel sharing some best practices that have worked for their organizations increasing female representation and advancing the current staff. We also introduced a new award this year for Women Who Inspire. We had four (4) winners for the inaugural award. Professional Driver: Amanda Loomer, Armour Transportation Systems; Vice President: Denise Beaupre, Auction Transport; Office Administration: Jennifer Turnbull, REM Transport and Project Manager: Katrina Henderson, THRSC Atlantic. All women have demonstrated unique leadership traits and were recognized for their contributions to the advancement of women in the trucking industry. In lieu of speaker gifts we made a $500 donation to the Poppy Fund on their behalf – thanks to all our speakers and for giving back! We rounded the day out recognizing employers who are continuing to Build Diverse Workplaces Armour Transportation Systems, Classic Freight Transport, Atlantica, Clarke Road Transport and Eassons Transportation Group. januar y 2018

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Atlantic Racing News

SUCCESSFUL START FOR EAST COAST MINI STOCK TOUR By Tim Terry

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MEETING A M O N G R A C I N G FRIENDS AT A LOCAL COFFEE SHOP IN THE SUMMER OF ’16 HATCHED A PLAN TO CHANGE FOUR CYLINDER RACING IN THE MARITIMES. Eleven months after their first official meeting to become a series, the East Coast Mini Stock Tour wrapped up their first season on November 11th at Kartbahn Racing in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Their Awards Presentation was slightly different than others in the region’s stock car ranks.

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The event featured a meal from a Rustic Crust, a food truck specializing in wood oven pizza and was closed with a friendly

match on the kart track for the over two dozen who had assembled. The East Coast Mini Stock Tour of-


ficially got the ball rolling on December 18th, 2016 at a formational meeting at Dooly’s in Bedford, Nova Scotia. The Board of Directors was formed with Dartmouth’s Drew MacEachern and Elmsdale’s Mark Williams being selected from the group as the President and Vice President, respectively. For two “rookies” at race promotion, it was baptism by fire. They, along with their team, drafted a rule book for Four Cylinder Honda models that was modernized and that could be met by drivers at any venue in Atlantic Canada with minor, if any, changes to their cars. The series had conversations with all nine oval tracks in Atlantic Canada, with only two tracks outright declining an event in the first year and two tracks doubling up with two scheduled events for 2017. The series, after a hurdle in coming to the name East Coast Mini Stock Tour, had signed MJS Holdings Limited as title sponsor for the series. The distributor of Rotary Lifts in the region made perfect sense as a partner for the tour. They secured contingency and product sponsors including Lucas Oil, EIT Race Radios and Gilmet Designs, welcomed in race sponsors including TJ Greenlawn Landscape Construction and Pub’s Drive Thru Bottle Exchange and secured to have their trophies created by Phil-ko Plastics and Finish Line Vinyl Design. Meetings were held with drivers and teams including one pre-season meeting in March to discuss rules, schedule, pay structure and address any issues heading into the season. Everything was falling into place as the series raced closer to kicking off their inaugural season and their first race at Shediac, New Brunswick’s CENTRE For Speed. Then it started to rain. Two events were scheduled for the upstart series in June, both in the Province of New Brunswick. Both saw wet weather wash out those events. With the racing season being compacted into just over 20 weeks in Atlantic Canada, the events could not be rescheduled at the CENTRE For Speed and Speedway 660 and were both lost. The good news for fans in those two markets was that those tracks had two events on the schedule and would see the series in September and October, respectively. Rain also played a hand in pushing the TJ Greenlawn Landscape Construction Dirt Clash at Valley Raceway back to October. It would mean the first event for the MJS Holdings Limited East Coast Mini Stock Tour would be run on Friday, August 18th at Riverside International Speed-

way. The historic, high banked oval in the shadows of Antigonish, Nova Scotia welcomed four cylinder competitors back through its gates for the first time in 2016 since the remodeling of the facility a decade prior. After all the pre-season hype and all the rain, the series was ready to open their first season and the weekend at Riverside, which included the NASCAR Pinty’s Series.

Twenty cars made the haul to the track for the 50-lap feature and when all the dust settled, it was Tim Webster of Beaver Bank, Nova Scotia who took that prestigious win. Webster’s Mini Stock career has spanned nearly two decades and includes championships at Scotia Speedworld and Moosehead Premium Dry Speedway (Exhibition Park) and was in the process of defending his Petty International Raceway title won in 2016. He had won many

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Atlantic Racing News

big races heading into that August race at Riverside International Speedway and was able to add a trophy from the historic track with his win. He was joined on the podium at Riverside Speedway by two more seasoned Honda drivers. Andrew Warren, a former winner on Atlantic Cat 250 weekend and a Scotia Speedworld Thunder champion along with his brother Matthew, was able to nail down second in the No. 31 car.

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Chris Hatcher, who had been racing for the championship in Halifax and was having a career year to that date, continued the momentum with a third place finish. The Tour would head to New Brunswick for the second round of the series at Speedway 660. Much like the Riverside Speedway event, the Pub’s Drive Thru Bottle Exchange 50 took place on one of the biggest weekends of stock car racing in New Brunswick on SpeedWeekend.

The Saturday show thrilled fans and featured one of the best finishes of the season, let alone the weekend. Rookie Darren Flemming won his heat race and led the field to green at Speedway 660, pacing the pack for the first 48 laps. Dave Matthews, a multiple time champion at Scotia Speedworld, put his car to the outside of Flemming as the two ran hard for the top spot. As they ran side-by-side, the two would not touch a door and Matthews would creep closer to inching ahead. Matthews ended up out front for the final two laps, the only ones he led in the feature, to take home the Pub’s Drive Thru Bottle Exchange 50 in a finish that left fans on the edge of their seats. Following technical inspection that night, Daniel Delorey would finish third. Delorey was driving for Bobby Landry, who was sidelined for the season after an off-track injury. Landry, one of the biggest supporters of the series since it was announced, would put Honda freshman Neil Miousse behind the wheel of the No. 55 for the rest of the season following the Speedway 660 podium finish. The event also featured Mike Edwards going for a barrel roll down the front straight after contact with another driver in his heat race. Edwards emerged from the car without injury, ensuring that the safety features mandated by the series did their job in the wreck. The aforementioned scheduling in a Maritime racing season can be difficult and was shown again with the late season crunch of races on the East Coast Mini Stock Tour. From Speedway 660 on Labour Day weekend, the series visited River Glade’s Petty International Raceway and Speedway Miramichi in Douglastown on back to back Saturday evenings following their race in Geary to start September. Webster returned to the top, taking his second and third wins on the East Coast Mini Stock Tour season with victories at Petty International Raceway and Speedway Miramichi. On the same night of his Petty International Raceway win, he also wrapped up the track championship, his second in as many years. The Speedway Miramichi visit was the first time a touring series had visited the venue since the track re-opened on a regular basis in 2012. Their next event, the re-scheduled TJ Greenlawn Dirt Clash at Valley Raceway would also mark the first time a touring series would visit the Melvern Square, Nova Scotia dirt track. In fact, it was the first time any of the active touring series in Atlantic Canada visited a track with a dirt or clay surface.


The event paid bonus points for the unique three segment event and championship contenders Webster and Matthews were held off the scoreboard. Jesse Deveau, who began his racing career at Valley Raceway, won the event in dominating fashion. The former Four Cylinder champion would finish two laps up on President MacEachern and the ageless Jerome Tracey. Deveau won all three segments of the race, won his Sticker Fool Heat Race and the Diamond Water Treatment Dash for Cash. While he wasn’t on the lead lap, Matthews put on a show during the race and was able to pass Deveau at one point. His run was later disallowed after the event as officials found he did not take the initial green flag of the race. The final race of the year, the Sticker Fool 50 at the CENTRE For Speed, would see Webster enter with a 14 point lead on the Warren brothers and a 20 point advantage on Matthews. While it was not a lead that was mathematically clinched, it was a comfortable lead with one race to go. The championship would flash before Webster’s eyes though as a flat tire would force the No. 86 Civic to pit road. As he was heading to the pits, a caution would come out for a spin on track. The caution effectively saved Webster from going laps down changing the tire and ultimately keeping Webster in the championship lead. Matthews would drive to the feature win after winning his heat and would land eight points short at the end of the day. Webster would rebound after the flat tire to finish third to clinch the championship, joining Matthews and Deveau on the podium at the end of 50-laps. The Warren brothers, Andrew and Matthew, would wind up third in the standings after six races, 15 points out of the inaugural MJS Holdings Limited East Coast Mini Stock Tour title. MacEachern and the Landry entry completed the top five in the standings. Six teams competed in all six events in the inaugural season with ten teams competing in at least two thirds of the events. Of the top ten teams, Cody Byrne and the LDR Racing team finished as the only entry based outside of the province of Nova Scotia. The Orwell Cove, PE based team finished sixth in the standings. In all, 28 teams competed in at least one of the six events. While the season might not have been perfect, the first full season for the MJS Holdings Limited East Coast Mini Stock Tour can be viewed as a success for a staff that had never put together a race in the

past. Fans recognized the series by placing them second in the Tim’s Corner Motorsports Best of Racing Awards for Fan Favorite Short Track Touring Series in Atlantic Canada behind the juggernaut Parts for Trucks Pro Stock Tour. The process will restart over again in December as the series will hold their Annual General Meeting to select their Board of Directors for 2018. The team will again work on rules, sign contracts with race tracks and sponsors for the new season and get ready for their second season. The

good news is that MJS Holdings Limited verbally committed to being with the series again in the new year and Webster will be back to defend his Tour championship. You can follow along with the East Coast Mini Stock Tour online by following them on Twitter @ECMiniStockTour, liking them on Facebook at Facebook.com/ ECMiniStockTour or on their website at EastCoastMiniStockTour.com. Stay tuned as the series prepares for their second season of operation in Atlantic Canada!

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AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!

januar y 2018


NOW AVAILABLE THROUGH YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!


At the Recycler’s Yard

NOVA SCOTIA AUTO RECYCLER TAKES PRO EXPERIENCE TO REMOTE NORTHERN COMMUNITY

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By Andrew Skaling

OT MANY MARITIMERS FIND THEMSELVES IN AUGUST GAZING OUT, NEXT TO THE MOUTH OF THE GREAT WHALE RIVER, AT THE VASTNESS OF HUDSON BAY.

This past summer, Paul Bell, who works at Poehls Auto Recycling in Kentville, NS, was doing just that. He had the experience of a lifetime sharing his professional experience in the adjoining remote Nunavik communities in northern Quebec of Kuujjuarapik and Whapmagoostui (combined population about 1500), as part

of Scout Environmental’s “Tundra Take Back” program. Paul spent two weeks in the community sharing his knowledge, skills and the best practices of modern recycling with two other volunteers who were flown in and room and boarded by the Program. The “Tundra Take Back” program is one of several initiatives established by Scout Environmental that sends qualified volunteers to remote northern communities to work with local community members to deal with the safe handling and recycling of end of life vehicles and large machinery, appliances and associated fluids. Paul was there with two other volunteers and, during their stint, they trained six locals in modern recycling methods.

Recycling in a remote community that is only accessibly by air year-round and by ship for a window in the warmer months is far different than in Nova Scotia or anywhere south of 60. A bit of improvisation is required and to this end some of the community’s snow removal equipment was repurposed to crush the vehicles down to size and for removal to a safe holding site outside the community. Ultimately the scrap and safely stored fluids were destined for shipping to the south when the sea lanes were free and the transport and supply ships could steam in to drop off their usual load of months worth of supplies and pick up the recycling. Paul’s first comments in discussing

ALLEN AND ADRIAN AT WORK TAKING FUEL OUT OF THE OLD AIRPORT SNOWBLOWER

LEFT TO RIGHT IS ALLEN, ADRIAN, CHARLEE, ROGER, ROBBIE, ROB AND SCOUT REP ROB IN THE TUNDRA TAKE BACK SHIRTS

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Truckers At the Recycler’s Corner Yard

this adventure were to relate the “unbelievable beauty and sheer expanse” of being on the edge of Hudson Bay and the warmth and kindness of the residents and their welcoming and well maintained little corner of Quebec. He was also quick to point out that although indeed a very isolated spot on the map, it’s not remote enough to keep that icon of Canadian caffeine in a cup from having an outlet, that does double duty also serving up well known fried chicken, albeit at a cost for a sandwich that would be measured in buckets of extra crispy in the Maritimes. Hoping for a glimpse of some perhaps unique to the North wildlife what Paul got was the sight of a lot of geese. The Co-op Hotel was comfy, the food fine, connection to the wider world easy via satellite TV and the satisfaction of helping keep a

community safe and clean rewarding. The team spent most of their time dealing with the recycling load which added up to over one hundred automobiles, appliances, boats, a few pieces of heavy equipment, snowmobiles and snow blowers and other miscellaneous implements. One thing that was not on the recycling list but caught the attention of Paul and the others were two old Bombardier Snow Buses, formerly in the service of Hydro Quebec, in traditional yellow, still looking pretty solid for such ancient beasts. Once ubiquitous in the north these are a pretty rare sight these days. Probably relics of the days when government considered damming the Great Whale River. Paul’s experience was priceless and, without missing a beat, asked whether he’d return to the North with the program again,

he replied: “oh, yeah – no question, I’m there! I’d love to get others in our industry involved too.” As he points out, it is so critical to ensure that modern and safe recycling practices are used and in place everywhere it is perhaps no more so than in remote communities, like those in Nunavik, where the environment is particularly fragile and the people’s dependence on it for healthy survival so vital. Over the course of only a couple of weeks, Paul, his fellow recycling pros and the team of locals covered a lot of ground in protecting the health of the community and the planet for years to come. Further information about the Take Back program and other similar projects run and initiated by Scout Environmental is available at: http:// scoutenvironmental.com/programs/program/tundra-take-back-nunavik

A VAN BEING DRAINED OF ITS FLUIDS BY SOME OF THE CREW

SUNSET AT THE INUKSHUK AT THE MOUTH OF THE GREAT WHALE RIVER

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Bob’s Business Development

INDIVIDUAL STAFF RELATIONSHIPS MUST BE CONTINUOUSLY REVIEWED TO SECURE AND PROTECT THE SHOP’S FUTURE

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By Bob Greenwood

VERYONE ACKNOWLEDGES THE SHORTAGE OF COMPETENT PEOPLE WITHIN THE AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET INDUSTRY. It is therefore imperative that management “inventories” on an on-going basis the current staff talents, and attitudes, to

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S NLES STAI EL!! STE

Tel: (506) 458-9322

Fax: (506) 459-6110

360 Route 10, Fredericton, NB E3A 7E1 idealequipment@outlook.com www.idealequipmentltd.com Still have Cleanburn parts and service for our customers! 30

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ensure that a strong, positive, relationship is in place and that a “career” mind-set exists between that particular competent staff member and the shop. If the staff just look at their position as a “job”, the only thing they want is a pay cheque, however if the staff member has a “career” mind-set, then they want to be able to contribute to the business.

LET’S AT LEAST ACKNOWLEDGE AN IMPORTANT POINT:

ket, so, employees are starting to ask for a greater return for taking on extra responsibilities. Some of the best methods of making employees feel good about work, “other than pay raises” is to ensure they are feeling empowered, informed, and valued. They like to be treated with respect and have the opportunity, and room, to perform well. When was the last time you sincerely thanked an employee for being part of the company?

If you let your people sincerely know that they are valued, they’ll repay you with their ideas, and success in this new aftermarket which is moving from a mechanical vehicle to a comprehensive computer platform vehicle will belong to those companies where ideas run rampant. Rolling out the red carpet for employees can win more than just staff loyalty and mutual respect………it can fortify the bottom line.

“You can buy a man’s time; you can buy his physical presence at a given place; you can even buy a measured number of his skilled muscular motions per hour. But you cannot buy enthusiasm, you cannot buy initiative, you cannot buy loyalty, you cannot buy devotion of hearts, minds or souls. You must EARN these”. The only sustainable competitive advantage in the future will be educated people with a positive attitude and creative mind-set. A Learning Culture must be continuously embraced in the shop today by management and all staff. The competition can copy your technology, products and latest feature, but they can’t copy the skills, knowledge, judgement and creativity of your committed workforce. People will definitely be the edge tomorrow. There is a new “social contract” being made where companies are asking employees to change…………..and change they must, to be innovative and creative to be able to embrace the new aftermar-

Reading this? You’ve just proved that ads work. We can help sell your product. Visit us online:

www.autoatlantic.com or call us in Halifax at: 902.423.6788

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Truckers Corner

THAT’S A WRAP! TRANSPORT TRUCK ADVERTISING COULD BE THE NEXT BIG THING IN MARKETING

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By Carter Hammett

F YOU ASKED ANGELA BALTKOIS WHAT SHE IMAGINED HER CAREER PATH WOULD LOOK LIKE IN FIVE YEARS, IT’S PROBABLY SAFE TO SAY THAT HER VISION DIDN’T INCLUDE 50 FEET OF VINYL. But that’s exactly what happened after having coffee with a former client who was waiting for a delivery of 50 brandnew 53-foot trailers. “I said I hope you’re putting your logo on them,” she says remembering that day. “The client said he wasn’t but if I wanted to offer ad space to any clients, I could feel free. Five years later the Oshawa ON –based Jensen Trailers has six fullywrapped export trucks, says Baltkois. That was the beginning of Big Rig Wraps (www.bigrigwraps.ca), a company based in Oakville, ON west of Toronto. In a time where most advertising seems directly headed to your smartphone, Baltkois’ company is literally hitting the road, with customized messaging on heavy duty vinyl that’s seen by an average of 50,000 people daily. Baltkois points out that’s a conservative estimate. According to the Outdoor Advertising Association outdoor signage, billboards and transport truck advertising

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are the most effective communication mediums because “they reach a mobile, mass audience of daily commuters. Unlike other forms of media that can be switched off, the ad exists in the environment your target lives, works, commutes and plays. No matter how often your ad is seen, each encounter helps to reinforce awareness of the goods and services you offer. The end result is that an individual will see your ad repeatedly, for an extended period of time and one day determine that the good or service advertised meets their need when they are ready to buy.” Last year US advertisers spent over $7billion on outdoor advertising, indicating healthy growth for the industry, especially when traditional homes of advertising—TV, print, radio—are declining. This type of advertising is effective on a number of levels, says Baltkois. “For one thing you have a captive audience. You’re driving with your eyes on the road and the advertising gives people something to look at. Secondly, it gives the feel of leadership. It boosts brand recognition and gives the look and feel of a large reputable company.” Still Baltkois admits the format was initially a hard sell and not every potential customer was as enthusiastic as she was. “It’s been difficult at times,” she admits.” Some people are more conservative and they might not feel comfortable trying new things.” That viewpoint’s justified

since transport truck advertising is still a relatively new concept in Canada, she says. “If you go to Europe or the United States, it’s common to see this advertising. I’m sure it’s just a matter of time before every truck will be wrapped.” The process begins with a needs assessment. Baltkois probes new clients about demographics and what advertising has been done in the past. She tries to figure out goals and determines where they want to be seen—currently, most of her trucks are either in Ontario or Quebec, although she’s positioned to advertise in other corridors across the country—and then she works with a design team to get the message out. Trailers can be either partially or fully wrapped. Some clients choose to cover just the trailer’s back door, while others advertise on the truck’s side. “I seriously enjoy what I do and go above and beyond expectations,” says the former web design company owner. “We’re concerned about the marketing and do a lot of fun stuff like holding Facebook contests or taking the trucks off the road to attend special events. “I never planned this business. It just sort of fell into my lap and it’s turned out to be both fun and sustainable.”


East Coast Road Report

ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT BITS AND PIECES OF NEWS YOU CAN USE GATHERED COLLECTED FROM AROUND THE REGION. NEWFOUNDLAND

Asphalt Testing Pilot Project Begins on Avalon Peninsula A road construction pilot project that will help government determine the best type of asphalt for our province’s climate and traffic volumes is currently underway on the Trans-Canada Highway on the Avalon Peninsula. As part of the Department of Transportation and Works asphalt testing pilot project, five sections of the highway between Foxtrap and Holyrood have been paved using different types of liquid asphalt, resulting in five different mixes. Each section is just under one kilometre in length. The sections will be monitored twice annually to determine how well it is performing based on factors such as traffic volumes and weather conditions. Signs alongside the highway will notify motorists of each section. This is the latest initiative being undertaken by the Provincial Government in an effort to identify new ways to upgrade road infrastructure in Newfoundland and Labrador. Recently, a night-time pilot project was conducted and results are currently being reviewed by the department.

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“We’ve all seen the rutting on our provincial highways and we know we are not getting the same life out of our asphalt that we have in the past, so it’s important to this government that we first understand why this is occurring so that we can take steps to address it. By determining which asphalt mix works best for our traffic volumes and conditions in Newfoundland and Labrador, we hope to be able to produce longer lasting asphalt in the future, ” said the Honourable Steve Crocker, Minister of Transportation and Works To learn more: Five-Year Provincial Roads Plan - www.tw.gov.nl.ca/TenderingandContracts/PDF/5yearplan.pdf

NEW BRUNSWICK

Amendments to Motor Vehicle Act introduced The provincial government introduced amendments to the Motor Vehicle Act that would set standardized speed limits in school zones, while allowing variations where warranted by the application of engineering principles. “ T h e safety of children attendi ng our schools

and motorists driving on our highways is our number one priority,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Fraser. “The changes being proposed will contribute to the safety of students, staff and drivers.” The amendments include setting standardized speed limits of 30 kilometres per hour in school zones within municipalities and 50 kilometres per hour in school zones in all other areas, unless otherwise posted. An Act to Amend the Motor Vehicle Act will authorize the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure to prescribe a speed limit that is higher or lower than the default speed limit on all roads under provincial jur i sd ic t ion where warranted by the results of a technical evaluation approved by a professional e ng i ne e r. The technical evaluation shall be based on national guidelines established by the Transport at ion A s soci-


East Coast Road Report

ation of Canada. “These amendments very clearly set out the circumstances in which the speed limit in a school zone can be varied,” said Fraser. “It is important that those variations are based on engineering principles.” Factors considered in the technical evaluation include: traffic volume, geometry of the road, road conditions, the presence of any bridges or railway crossings, residential and commercial development, intersections and prevailing traffic speeds. Engineers also consider observed pedestrian and motorist behaviours.

NOVA SCOTIA

Preparing for Winter Driving in Nova Scotia The province is advising Nova Scotians to get ready now for winter driving. “Although Nova Scotians have enjoyed unseasonably warm weather this fall, winter is coming,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines. “Our staff and winter maintenance equipment are ready to go to keep our roads safe to drive this winter. It’s time to make sure Nova Scotians are ready for safe winter driving too.” Make your service appointment now and take the necessary steps to be prepared for snow and ice conditions. Vehicles should have snow tires, cold temperature antifreeze and an emergency kit. The following are some winter driving safety tips: - wear your seatbelt - slow down and leave extra space be-

tween your vehicle and the one in front of you - use brakes carefully and remember that it takes more time and distance to stop in adverse conditions - don’t crowd the snowplow. Please maintain a safe distance behind the plow. Be patient and give the driver plenty of room to do the job keep you gas tank at least half full - plan ahead and give yourself extra time for possible delays. “Road conditions can deteriorate quickly,” said Inspector Dan Murchinson, officer in charge of traffic services for the Nova Scotia RCMP. “By planning ahead and following winter driving safety tips, you can help prevent a tragedy from occurring on our roads and highways. I know I speak for all first responders when I say we want motorists to arrive safely to their destinations.” Nova Scotians can check road conditions, view highway cameras, winter driving tips, plowing priorities, follow plows using the plow tracker tool, and more at novascotia.ca/tran/winter. During a storm or any winter event, follow @NS_TIR on Twitter for the latest road condition updates.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

New driver licences will be more secure, cost effective The enhanced security features of Prince Edward Island’s new driver licence and photo identification card will better protect Islanders from identity theft and fraud. Beginning in November, cards will

be produced from a centralized system that will increase the security of the cards. It will add new features to deter counterfeits and provide the ability to investigate possible fraud quickly. “The province of Prince Edward Island is committed to providing Islanders with the most secure and convenient solutions for the issuance of driver licence and identification cards,” said Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy Minister Paula Biggar. “Our new system will not only enhance security and fraud prevention features, but will ensure personal information is housed in the most secure of production facilities.” While Islanders will still visit an Access PEI location to purchase a driver licence or identification card, the cards will now be mailed directly to individuals within 14 days. Individuals will be given a receipt at the Access PEI service counter, which will serve as a temporary licence good for 30 days. Individuals can also use their existing card (if they have one) until the new card arrives. The process is similar to that used to deliver Canadian passports, credit cards and other important documents. The Province of Prince Edward Island has joined with the other Atlantic Provinces in this initiative. This will mean costsavings for all provinces and consistency when travelling across the region. For more information, visit www.princeedwardisland.ca/secureID.

Interstate Batteries • 593 St. George Blvd. • Moncton,N.B. • (506) 386-6777

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Carter’s Corner

NEWS OF THE WEIRD BITS AND PIECES OF THE ODD, THE STRANGE, THE BIZARRE GATHERED FOR YOUR READING PLEASURE…AND OURS. WISCONSIN WOMAN ACCUSED OF DRIVING WITH CHILD ON MINIVAN ROOF Autoblog recently reported about a Ozaukee Wis., mom who was charged with child endangerment after police say she had her nine-year-old son ride atop her minivan to hold down a plastic pool she was transporting. According to court documents, Amber Schmunk, 28, was trying to get the pool home in Saukville, Wis., but it wouldn’t fit in her vehicle. Police said she “decided to put the pool on top of the minivan, but had no way to strap it down, so she had her child climb on the roof and hold it down while she drove.” She also reportedly told officers it was “only for a short time, maybe 20-30 seconds,” and that she thought it was OK because her father had “let her do things like that when she was that age.” Here’s a puzzler to this report. According to Milwaukee’s local media she also told police that she thought it was safe because she had used a strap to hold the boy down. So if she had a strap, it’s hard to understand why she didn’t use just the strap, rather than the boy-strap combination. The report doesn’t specify how fast she drove nor how far, other than saying it was within her neighborhood. Police were tipped off by a motorist who was behind her, who raises another puzzle, as the motorist reported watching Schmunk stop to put the child and the supposedly too-big-to-fit pool inside the van.

108 YEARS OF TRACK FROM INDY Recently, Motor1.com printed a fascinating story in layers. In its 108-year history, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway has been paved, several times over in the ongoing pursuit of drivable road. A massive core sample revealed layers upon layers made over the years. Fresh off the speedway’s official Twitter account, the core sample is fresh out of the ground, with a photoshopped image alongside it detailing all of the contents – from the original creek gravel, to the modern asphalt that lays atop the track today. The bottom layer is a two-inch thick layer of creek gravel, followed by two inches of crushed limestone, followed by 38

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a half-inch coating of crushed stone chips mixed with larger stones. In 1909, the track underwent its first major renovation, and was covered in a two-inch layer of sand to fix the damaged surface. That same year, the first layer of brick was laid onto the sand. The bricks were separated by approximately one-quarter of an inch, with a mixture of sand and Portland cement poured between the cracks for “fixing.” It was in 1961 that the bricks were covered up by the tracks first layer of asphalt. The only remaining memory of the original brick was the three-foot strip at the start/finish line, which remains to this day. The most recent repaving came in 2004. The entire 2.5-mile oval surface, pit lane, and warm-up lane were covered. Approximately 2.5-inches of asphalt was removed from the surface prior to the extensive repaving. All told, the track was repaved eight times in various different materials. The core sample is an astonishing look at the iconic race track’s history.

I MIGHT HAVE FINED HIM TOO FOR THAT SONG… Autoblog also told a story recently about how Montreal police gave a motorist a $117 ticket after pulling him over in late September. His alleged crime: the 1990s, relic “Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)” by C+C Music Factory. Taoufik Moalia, 38, told CBC News Montreal he was driving along, singing, when he saw flashing lights. And then four(!) Montreal officers approached his car to ask what he was doing. He said, “Nothing.” To which he says they replied, “Did you scream loudly?” “No, I was just listening to my favorite song,” Moalla recalled saying. And then here is where he may have hurt his situation: “I repeated, ‘Everybody dance now!’” The cops’ response was a $149 ticket

for “screaming in public.”

HOT WHEELS THROWBACK TIME The “car” is believed to actually be a miniature chariot. This is a truly biblical toy, literally. Archaeologists found it during a dig in the ancient city of Sogmatar, a place where it’s thought Moses went after escaping Egypt. Wait, that Moses? Yeah, him. The toy, however, is a tad older. According to a report from International Business Times, the small earthen chariot was found in a tomb along with other toys that are estimated to be 5,000 years old.

That dates back to the early Bronze Age, which began in Turkey around 3,300 BC. It’s believed that such toys were given to children of royalty, so while it looks fairly crude, this would basically be the ancient equivalent of modern-day exotic pedal cars, not unlike the ones we saw selling earlier this year in Monterey for as much as $30,000. Only these are far too small to ride around in, obviously. Sogmatar is one of the oldest known settlements in the world, with upwards of 120 tombs uncovered in 2012. Yes, here’s where things get a bit creepy, because just as Egyptian pharaohs were often buried with items from their life, so apparently were children in Sogmatar. This tiny chariot was also found with a rattle, suggesting baby rattles have a much longer history than any of us had known. But an attachment to wheeled toys literally dates back a millennia. Pretty cool. Those of you with Matchbox cars from childhood maybe better pack it away. Your vintage ain’t showing up too well.


Around the Atlantic

IN THE ISLAND’S CAPITAL CITY TANTON’S ACCESSORIES IS NAPA’S CHARLOTTETOWN ASSOCIATE STORE

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By Andrew Skaling

HEN YOUR BUSINESS HAS BEEN RUNNING LONGER THAN GUINNESS RECORD SETTING ANNE OF GREEN GABLES – THE MUSICAL YOU KNOW YOU’VE GOT A GOOD AND SOLID BUSINESS, IF NOT AN ISLAND INSTITUTION. In Prince Edward Island’s charming and lively capital city, garage owners and auto enthusiasts have been relying on Tanton’s Accessories Ltd for their auto parts needs for decades. Operating in one form or another since the 1950s, today the auto parts store is Charlottetown’s NAPA associate and go-to store for rapid and reliable customer service, parts sourcing and delivery.

Rob Phillips bought the business four years ago, in 2013, as it “just happened to become available and I knew the business quite well.” No surprise that he would be deeply familiar with Tanton’s Accessories/ NAPA as during his days as a student at UPEI he was a delivery driver for several years for the company between classes and exams and other student activities. Post-university Rob worked in the recreational marine and boating industry on the island, in sales and service, but once the opportunity arose to buy his old employer’s business he couldn’t resist the opportunity. “I always liked the business, going back to my university driver days, so I was excited to have the chance to pick it up.” Located centrally in the city, Rob and his ten full and part-time employees primarily serve the professional garages in Charlottetown and the immediate envi-

rons but also cater to the Island’s enthusiasts and home mechanics through their storefront operation on Queen Street. Although a relatively cozy shop at the moment, Rob said he’s always thinking about expanding to the larger retail store model but that business growth is still in the conceptual phase for the time being. As it stands, the Tanton’s team will continue to deliver on their reputation for outstanding service and the quality, access, selection and speed of delivery of product that comes from being part of the vast NAPA auto parts family network. Tanton’s Accessories ltd/NAPA is located at 420 Queen Street in Charlottetown and is open daily from 8:00 AM to 5:30 PM weekdays and 8:00 AM to noon on Saturdays. Rob and his team can be reached at 902-566-4555 and you can find them on Facebook.


AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!


The Lower 48

SEMA SHOW 2017

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By Bill Kaprelian

H E A N N UA L G AT H E R I N G OF “SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT MARKETING ASSOCIATION” (SEMA) PARTICIPANTS CONVENED IN LAS VEGAS IN LATE OCTOBER. Much has changed since this trade show’s inception 50 years ago (just 98 exhibitors big), but then much has changed too in the automotive/truck aftermarket category. SEMA 2017 was home to 2,133 exhibitors. Over 140,000 (buyers/retailers/manufacturers/media and those allied with this engaging category) filled the show aisles, parking lots, adjunct tent pavilions and all the space in between at the Las Vegas Convention Center from 9 to 5 for 4 solid days. It was a blast to walk the show and just become consumed with all the possibilities; to customize, to sell and of course to profit by. If I had to boil this enormous collection of products down to a few words, it would be rugged, adventurous, exotic and fast. Both Ford and BMW featured a nonstop display of various models essentially laying rubber (complete with audio and smoking tires to boot) around a cement walled area to the delight of the myriad of smartphone users capturing it digitally. Attendees were treated to a ride along complete with a loaner crash helmet for the 90 seconds or so spin around the skidmarked parking lot. It was mesmerizing

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at first but I suspect part of my lingering to watch at the Ford corral and then the BMW track was just me waiting to witness a miscalculation – it never happened and so I moved on. I happened upon a group of first-time start up companies in one of the tented areas. (Yes all three halls of the Las Vegas Convention Center were jammed with exhibitors as were the break out rooms of the South Hall that housed all the new products displayed at SEMA – 4 rooms worth!) The group I discovered represented not only new products but bona-fide new companies. They were all part of a SEMA sponsored Launch Pad business competition. Together were the final 10 entrepreneurs in a shared area, all having endured a “pitch” on their product before a panel of industry marketing types. Grypmat was chosen as the #1 new product and awarded Tom Burden, the inventor, a check for $10,000 and a booth at next year’s SEMA. He’s also headed to network TV with an appearance on ABC’s Shark Tank. Not bad for his first SEMA trade show. It’s the right “tool” for your tools; grypshon.com. And there were other “firsts” at this event (for me at least) – a crated after-market diesel engine from Cummins ready to go; Cummins Repower™. The R2.8 turbo diesel is totally designed with off-roading in mind with a remote-mount oil filter for maximum front axle clearance. 3M had buyers 3 and 4 deep around their exhibit capturing a glimpse of a car with a design in the finish illuminating on and off via power from the car’s battery – it was a

sight. And on the practical side 3M has eliminated a step in automotive painting by incorporating measurement as part of the paint cup which allows you to mix/ measure and apply from the same paint cup. And as #3 of the top three never happened to me before at a trade show, a Chinese based company, Joiner Machinery & Equipment was where I met Zhong a true “entrepreneur” working his booth with brochures, products and despite speaking very little English, with an interpreter at his side to help him complete any deals. As I am not versed in Mandarin, I’m glad Zhong thought everything through before he arrived in Las Vegas to make his mark. He had a very interesting array of practical products from truck cranes, wheel chocks and a cargo compartment frame – check it out – www.joiner.com.cn - if you happen to need to hoist a ½ ton… ah 453.59 kg or pull 4 ½ tons/4,309.12kg. Zhong has it for you! I was also surprised to see eBay motors exhibiting – until I thought it through. UPS shipping and the US Post Office were touting their continental and international capabilities from their respective booths plus 2,000 other companies that page space in this issue nor my memory will allow for coverage here. Well I hope my brief recollection of this colossal car and truck extravaganza has piqued your interest to “save the dates” this year and plan on a sure thing in a town that bets you’re coming….SEMA 2018, October 30 – November 2, it’s worth the trip.


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY ADVERTISER

PHONE

INTERNET

Adams Car Wash

1-902-497-7260

adams.carwash@ns.sympatico.ca

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AIA Canada

1-800-808-2920

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Atlantic Autowash

1-506-459-8878

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Atlantic Car Stereo

1-902-435-0600

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Atlantic Chemex

1-800-565-5144

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Auto & Trucking

1-902-423-6788

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Cabot Shipping

1-800-565-0606

cabotss.com

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CASE (ISN Canada)

1-800-575-4085

toolweb.com

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Feed Nova Scotia

1-902-457-1900

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Ideal Equipment Ltd

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Interstate Batteries

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aautowash@nb.aibn.com

PAGE

Krown Rust Control 1-888-545-7878

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Krown Rust Control 1-888-545-7878

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mjsholdings@ns.aliantzinc.ca

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MJS Holdings

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Maritime Auto Parts 1-800-565-7278

maritimeauto.com

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Maritime Car Wash

1-902-861-4747

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NAPA Auto Parts

1-800-263-2111

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NLS

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NGK Spark Plugs

1-877-2-SPARKY ngksparkplugs.ca

NS Trucking Safety

1-888-329-9660

nstsa.ca

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Parts For Trucks

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partsfortrucks.com

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Uni-Select (BtoB)

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Rotary Lifts

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Rust Check

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rustcheck.ca

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Shell

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shell.ca

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Toromont Cat

1-902-468-0581

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Traction Truck Parts

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Worldpac Inc. 1-800-888-9982

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WINTER TIRES NOW THE FASTEST GROWING TIRE CATEGORY IN CANADA

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INTER TIRE USE IS GRADUALLY RISING, BUT DRIVER EDUCATION ABOUT SAFETY BENEFITS REMAINS ESSENTIAL TO WINTERTIME ACCIDENT PREVENTION. FOUR-IN-TEN DRIVERS OUTSIDE QUEBEC STILL DO NOT OWN WINTER TIRES.

CAMBRIDGE, ON, Nov. 14, 2017 /CNW/ - Winter tire shipments across Canada have grown at an annualized rate of four per cent over the past five years making winters the fastest growing tire category, according to the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC). The growth of this category is due to efforts by tire makers, retailers and the government to educate drivers about the superior traction and shorter stopping distances provided by winter tires. Government incentives to make winter tires more affordable have also had a positive impact. TRAC’s 2017 Canadian Consumer Winter Tire Study, conducted by Leger, found that 66 per cent of Canadian motorists ride on winter tires. But outside Quebec, where winter tires are the law, the percentage drops to 60 per cent. For the approximately 40 per cent of motorists found by the survey not to be using winter tires, the top reasons were the belief that all-season tires provide sufficient traction (51 per cent), reduced driving in winter (22 per cent) and cost (21 per cent). Regionally, the 2017 study found: 60 per cent of British Columbia drivers ride on winter tires Alberta’s usage rate is 57 per cent In Manitoba and Saskatchewan usage stands at 48 per cent 59 per cent of Ontario drivers use winters In Atlantic Canada, where winter tire usage is surpassed only by Quebec, the usage rate is 83 per cent To support consumer education, TRAC has just released a new report detailing winter tire use in Canada and the latest market and test data. Read the full 2017 Winter Tire Report here: http:// bit.ly/Winter-Tire-Report-2017 or www.tracanada.ca. “Despite increasing winter tire usage, educating drivers about the safety benefits of winter tires remains critical to making our roads safer in winter,” says Glenn Maidment, president of TRAC. “The fact that four-in-ten motorists outside Quebec are not using winter tires puts at risk everyone who drives in cold-weather conditions – regardless of whether the road surface is dry, snowcovered or icy. Every motorist needs to understand winter tires radically outperform all-seasons in all cold-weather driving conditions.” The superior traction and braking capabilities of winter tires are the result of advanced tire technology, particularly in tread design and rubber compounds. These advances have improved traction performance across all tire categories, but especially for winter tires. The “soft” tread compounds in today’s winter tires retain their flexibility even in extreme cold. At temperatures at or below 7 degrees Celsius, winter tires provide significantly better traction than all other types providing greater control on all cold-weather road surfaces and significantly shorter stopping distances. “Research by the Quebec government shows that, since the winter tire law was enacted, the province saw a significant decrease in injury accidents in the province,” says Maidment. “Imagine the massive reduction in vehicle damage and personal suffering during the winter driving season across Canada if all drivers protected themselves and their families with winter tires.”


Crossword Contest

CROSSWORD (ANSWERS IN THE NEXT AUTO & TRUCKING ATLANTIC)

NOVEMBER 2017 WINNER!

Janice Heighton of New Glasgow NS is our latest Crossword Puzzle winner! Congratulations on winning your new Rust Check package of goodies. Deadline for entry is January 15th, 2018

IT’S SO EASY TO WIN!

CROSSWORD BY MURRAY JACKSON - THECROSSWORDGUY.COM

YOU COULD WIN THIS SWAG BAG OF GOODIES FROM RUST CHECK THAT INCLUDES A JACKET, BALL CAP, TOUQUE AND TWO RUST CHECK PROTECTION PRODUCTS. ENTER WITH YOUR CORRECT PUZZLE ENTRY, AND IT COULD BE ALL YOURS!

Fill out info below and fax your crossword to us in Halifax, NS at: 902-423-3354, or mail us: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6, or Email us at: rob@autoatlantic.com NAME: ADDRESS:

PHONE:

ACROSS

DOWN

1. ‘70s New Brunswick-made car 5. Beatles lovely meter maid 9. Toward the ocean 10. ‘60s 8-track player button 11. Auto-repair pro, briefly 12. Certain 14-Across vehicles 14. Farmer’s frequent ride 16. White limo passengers, perhaps 19. Carmaker’s written guarantee 20. Vehicle-related urban haze 23. An edible seaweed 24. Famous border falls 25. Decrepit old car, slangily 26. Dealers’ trade-ins (4,4)

1. Urban transit pickup point (3,4) 2. Gravity theorist Newton 3. Dodge Aries or Plymouth Reliant (1,3) 4. Harley-Davidson’s rival until ‘53 6. Far north seasonal route (3,4) 7. Certain transmissions, briefly 8. Frozen cargo trailers, informally 13. Storm-related power problems 15. Toyota with ‘60s debut 17. Indicates intent to turn 18. Burnouts, drifts and wheelies 19. 205 in 205/55R16 tire code 21. Mazda for top-down touring 22. Worn-out tire term

IT’S FUN! IT’S EASY! LAST ISSUE’S CROSSWORD

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NAPA Guess & Win contest

NAPA GUESS & WIN!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

A

utomotive technology fans, we think you’ll like this photo of this future concept vehicle! Maybe you can name what it is, or anything more about it. Details please, and a FREE Stanley 1/4” and 3/8” Drive SAE 123pc Socket Set from NAPA is all yours! The more the better!

Congratulations to Ruth Reid of Grand Falls/Windsor, NL who identified the winning MPST driver Shawn Turple of Enfield, NS driving in the Lucas Oil 150 at Scotia Speed World in Enfield, NS in Car #0 for Dexter Construction.

Send in your answer at autoatlantic.com/Contest.htm or Fax us at: 902-423-3354, and make sure to include your name, town and province and telephone number. Maybe this time it’ll be you! Deadline for entry is January 15th, 2018.

Thank you to all who entered our contest, you could be next!

YOUR NAME: DAYTIME PHONE: CITY / TOWN / VILLAGE: PROVINCE: EMAIL: YOUR ANSWER:

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January 2018 Auto & trucking Atlantic