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THE

BAREFOOT GALLERY

ROB MILLER Northern moods Paintings of the Hebrides


The Barefoot Gallery are more than happy to introduce Rob Millers atmospheric paintings of the north to art lovers and collectors in Yorkshire and on the East Coast. This catalogue details 5 new works based on the outer Hebrides accompanied by drawings and notes from Robs sketchbook

“As we hunted for the shoals of herring� Traditional Folk song

Fishing crofts above the Minch Original size 60cm x60cm Print size

50cm x50cm

Edition size

200

Artist proof

1-10


“I dream the dream I learned, lad, By the light o' the peat-fire flame, Light for love, for lilt o' grail-deeds, By the light o' the peat-fire flame, The light the hill-folk yearn for� K Macleod The Peat Fire Flame

Croft in storm light Original size 60cm x60cm Print Size 50cm x50cm Edition Size 200 Artist proofs 1-10


Row bonnie boat like a bird on the wing” Trad folk song

Two Crofts overlooking Skye Original size 60cm x60cm Print size

50cm x50cm

Edition size

200

Artist proof

1-10


“Nae Day Sae Dark Nae day sae dark; nae wüd sae bare; Nae grund sae stour wi' stane; But licht comes through; a sang is there; A glint o' grass is green.

Wha hasna thol'd his thorter'd hours And kent, whan they were by, The tenderness o' life that fleurs Rock-fast in misery?” Richard Stour British Navy

Croft and Monarch Islands Original size 60cmx60cm Print size

50cm x50cm

Edition size 200 Artist proof 1-10


Rob Miller Born in 1954 I Whalley Lancashire award winning artist.Rob Miller was introduced to painting and drawing at an early age, painting his first oil on board seascape at the age of seven. He has been involved in the visual arts ever since. He is currently the resident artist and Director at Artisan Fine Art Bolton and has recently become a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. Why do you paint I am fascinated by creation, by the land and the passage of day light, through the seasons. I feel that drawing with colour gets me closer to a moment that maybe meditative, whether its a quivering of Andalucía grasses, the shine of leaves glimpsed in the English green wood or the vast skies of the Western Isles; it ignites the need in me to create. When did you first see the Hebrides My first experience of the Hebrides was through watching a war film on the television as a kid growing up in Blackburn with a family who were keen on sailing and walking. Later I was lucky enough to sail on a sigma 36 from Largs and then from Oban with a small gang of mates around the Hebrides. I’ve also spent some time in solitary wander on the various Islands painting and drawing over the years. Each experience informed the other but although I have a strong interest in the geology , botany and history of a place it’s the poetic mood or stimulation to meditation that inspires me to paint. With the Hebrides there is less of a struggle on the interface of the canvas and the mind. What's your favourite Hebrides place Scarp and Braigh Mor on Harris and the view of Sky from the entry of Loch

Hourn


ART OF ENGLAND Northern Moods Excerpt page 63 issue 88 December 2011 “I gather most of the materials for my paintings from my walks. Assembling the mechanics of a place, by creating a painterly collage distilled as drawings and notes into my sketch books (parts of which I have used here). This direct observational drawing and writing is crucial to my work, immersing the ‘I’ with the geometry of place. From reading and listening I also try to catalogue the romance that we humans have with a location, in this way I hope each piece or series has its own emotional narrative or sense of place. ….. …..After a week or two I had become a kind of a ‘North Briton man’, not only did I like the squidgy, scratchy, cold, damp, hard feel of these remote parts but I was now beguiled by the romance inherent in Briton mans poetry. I mused on this in solitude and then I decided a more sublime northerly experience was in order; A week later, much further north, Tarbet was dead ahead of me and the Minch off to starboard. The skies were now shifting bastions of

silvered light, shining high above the Caledonian ferry’s wake. The Hebrides are a place, were you feel, that you know, that the gods exist. So bleak is the land, so open are you to what is elemental that you feel a notion of joy when you come across a simple white croft and a sign of human survival. Lone places like small white ships moored between a shifting blue grey sea and sky. I couldn’t stop painting and drawing them. Roving about the Hebrides fascinated by the hardness of the land, it is the vastness of this space that began to form the narrative for my Hebrides paintings, Fishing Crofts, Croft in Storm light, The croft with the rusted roof and others still in the making…..

End of the line... Isle of Lewis


The weaving of the tarten by Alice Macdonell of Keppoch 1894 Isle of Lewis

I saw an old dame weaving a web of tarten fine Sing high she said sing low she said Wild torrent to the sea That saw my exiled bairnies torn in sorrow far frae me

Croft and Beach isle of Lewis Original size

60cmx60cm

Print size

50cm x50cm

Edition size

200

Artist proof

1-10


+44 (0) 1937 845 135 info@thebarefootgallery.com

ART GALLERY LEEDS - THE BAREFOOT GALLERY Located in the elegant Georgian town of Boston Spa near Wetherby, The Barefoot Gallery exhibits Original Contemporary Art from a selection of outstanding British and European artists. Our paintings are accompanied by a beautiful array of unique, hand blown glass art and a stunning variety of pieces from the gorgeous range of Italian furniture by Moda.


Prices Individual original work ÂŁ1490 Hand signed giclee print on quality paper ÂŁ280


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