Issuu on Google+

InsideOUT A Decade of the LA Phil at Walt Disney Concert Hall


Before the first note of music was even performed there in 2003, Walt Disney Concert Hall was already an internationally-recognized cultural landmark and icon of Los Angeles’ creativity. A decade after its opening, the Hall remains an architectural and acoustical marvel. Designed by architect Frank Gehry from the “inside out,” the building’s form followed its function—to be a welcoming home for living music. InsideOUT, a limitededition book created for the 2013/14 LA Phil Gala, is a pictorial celebration of Walt Disney Concert Hall and the LA Phil’s first ten years making music there. Front Cover: Model of the Walt Disney Concert Hall Founder’s Room ceiling vault, viewed from the inside out.


InsideOUT A Decade of the LA Phil at Walt Disney Concert Hall


F

rank Gehry imagined Walt Disney Concert Hall from the inside out. His vision began with the music that would be performed

on its stage and ended with the city itself. Function in perfect union with form, the building is, in his words, a “living room” built for us—the music lovers of Los Angeles and the world. When Walt Disney Concert Hall opened ten years ago, I wrote that it was both an invitation and a challenge. The invitation was to dream. The challenge was to develop—to push through to the new and innovative. What could the LA Phil become? How would this building shape us? What would we dream? In the following pages, you will see images that document Walt Disney

INTRODUCTION

Concert Hall’s construction and celebrate its beauty, but you will also see the artistic life it inspired. From The Tristan Project and the original Minimalist Jukebox festival, under then-Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen’s leadership, to our current Music Director Gustavo Dudamel’s Americas and Americans festival and Mahler Project, the LA Phil has never stopped evolving. As an orchestra and community member, we aspire to the model of creativity and collaboration given to us by Frank Gehry in the form of this glorious, iconic home. While we pause to celebrate this milestone in the history of the LA Phil at Walt Disney Concert Hall, we know that in the life of an institution, a city and an art form, a decade is just the blink of an eye. We have achieved so much over the past ten years, and yet, we have only just begun. As civic leaders, philanthropists and friends, you are the visionaries and the caretakers of Walt Disney Concert Hall’s past, present and future, and we could not be more grateful for your support. Let us commemorate this first extraordinary decade and imagine the next. Imagination never ends.

Deborah Borda President and Chief Executive Officer Los Angeles Philharmonic Association


THE MAKING OF WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL It’s kind of fun to do the impossible. – Walt Disney


A tribute from DIANE AND RONALD MILLER 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

THE GIFT In 1987 Lillian Disney made an extraordinary donation to the Music Center to build a world-class performance venue. It was to be both a gift to the people of Los Angeles and a tribute to her late husband Walt Disney’s devotion to the arts. Her generosity was the impetus and the inspiration for what would become Walt Disney Concert Hall. The Disney family would later add to this gift, leaving to the city a profound legacy of art and architecture. Pictured: Lillian and Walt Disney.

4


THE COMPETITION Following a competitive review that narrowed down 80 prospective architects to four, Frank Gehry was selected to design Walt Disney Concert Hall. His initial concept, pictured above, marked the beginning of a design process that evolved through more than 50 iterations and concluded with the unveiling of the building’s final shape in 1991. Pictured: Model of Frank Gehry’s competition-winning design for Walt Disney Concert Hall.

5


A tribute from SHERI AND ROY P. DISNEY

SUSAN DISNEY AND SCOTT LORD

THE VISION Frank Gehry’s vision for Walt Disney Concert Hall began with its function as a home for live performance, starting with the auditorium itself. Gehry wrote, “We essentially designed the structure from the inside to the outside. In quest of a synthesis of acoustics and architecture, the solution was a room shaped like a box, but with a sculptural seating arrangement. I likened it to the idea of a boat in a box; hence the evolution of the sailing metaphor. The ceiling started to be shaped like sails, and then, the outside started to be shaped like sails.” Pictured: Michael Maltzan and Frank Gehry.

6


ABIGAIL DISNEY AND PIERRE HAUSER

TIMOTHY DISNEY

THE PROCESS Realization of the soaring sail-like, steel exterior would require a massive internal structure, in counterpoint to the transitory beauty of live music. As Gehry said, “On the one hand, there is a structure composed of massive steel, but when you consider what is actually inside, it is very refined and elegant. Both graceful in their own way, the music that eventually infiltrates the space and, although concealed, the framework that defines it will form a lasting impression on the cultural landscape of the city.” Pictured: Cliff Neves and Frank Gehry.

7


A tribute from EDYE AND ELI BROAD

THE GROUNDBREAKING Walt Disney Concert Hall’s official groundbreaking took place on December 10, 1992. Although more than a decade would pass before the building opened, the occasion marked an important milestone in the history of the Music Center, which had secured the rights to the property for its eventual expansion in 1968. Pictured left to right: Deane Dana, Rita Walters, Sharon Disney Lund, Ernest Fleischmann, Frederick M. Nicholas, James Thomas, Frank Gehry, Edmund D. Edelman and Diane Disney Miller. 8


A tribute from THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

THE URBAN CORE Walt Disney Concert Hall was imagined not only as a home for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, but also as a keystone in the revitalization of downtown Los Angeles and development on Bunker Hill. A civic endeavor from the outset, the building’s construction carried with it the hope of an urban renaissance that would energize Grand Avenue and symbolize Los Angeles’ coming of age as a cultural capital.

9


A tribute from LYNN A. BOOTH

THE CHALLENGE The design of Walt Disney Concert Hall mandated state-of-the-art construction techniques. To convey his fluid vision for the building’s facade, Frank Gehry used a French computer program developed for the aerospace and automotive industries—Computer-Aided Three Dimensional Interactive Application (CATIA). Gehry wrote, “CATIA allowed extremely complicated steel to go together on the site. When an ironworker was on the scaffolding, he could get someone to survey him a point and know he was within an eighth of an inch.”

10


A tribute from JANE AND MICHAEL EISNER

THE SOUND In collaboration with acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota, Frank Gehry designed Walt Disney Concert Hall to be one of the most acoustically sophisticated concert halls in the world, achieving a musical experience that is both visually and aurally intimate. The New Yorker architecture critic Paul Goldberger wrote, “The shape of the hall and its warm, rich wood suggest a musical instrument, although I doubt that Gehry thinks in such literal terms. He is an expressionist—a romantic expressionist—who has always designed by instinct, and what he did here was create a space that is not only acoustically suitable for listening to music, but emotionally right for it.”

11


A tribute from JOAN AND JOHN HOTCHKIS

12


GOLD

THE IRON The complex geometry of Gehry’s design for Walt Disney Concert Hall is apparent in the building’s massive iron skeleton. The structure is comprised of more than 12,000 non-identical pieces of iron. Placed end-to-end, they would stretch 49 miles. Constructing the S-shaped columns of the structure’s south side and the seventeen-degree, forward-leaning columns on the north required incredible ingenuity and precision from the project’s ironworkers, including Johnny O’Kane, who said, “I think Gehry is the ironworkers’ hero. Every ironworker likes a good challenge, and Frank Gehry throws an awfully good challenge.”

13


A tribute from WELLS FARGO

THE MAESTRO Esa-Pekka Salonen, LA Phil Music Director from 1992 through 2009, worked closely with Gehry in designing the Hall: “From the beginning, I was always amazed by Frank’s openness to the concerns of the orchestra, and also by his overwhelming curiosity—about everything. I found working with him to be a constant source of excitement and inspiration. There was never a moment of vanity in his approach to this project; he kept the focus totally clear from the outset—the Concert Hall would be for the orchestra, for music, he assured us.” Pictured: Esa-Pekka Salonen.

14


15


A tribute from BERNICE AND WENDELL JEFFREY

THE MUSICIANS Walt Disney Concert Hall is a building for music and musicians. Working in collaboration with the members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Gehry prepared a design that incorporated a spacious green room, library, lounge and practice rooms with windows looking out to Hope Street. Ernest Fleischmann, the Philharmonic’s Managing Director at the time of the Hall’s conception, said, “I know of no concert hall where musicians have had such important input.” Pictured from left to right: Los Angeles Philharmonic musicians Akiko Tarumoto, Jonathan Wei, Stacy Wetzel, Bing Wang, Martin Chalifour, David Weiss, Michele Bovyer, Carolyn Hove and Ben Hong. 16


A tribute from MARIA HUMMER-TUTTLE AND ROBERT HOLMES TUTTLE

THE ANTICIPATION Sixteen years following Lillian Disney’s initial gift, the combined efforts of hundreds of donors, politicians, administrators, advocates and artisans were close to making the opening of the Walt Disney Concert Hall complex a reality. In addition to the Concert Hall itself, the complex also includes REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater) and the Alfred E. Mann Los Angeles Philharmonic Association Administrative Building (pictured foreground), made possible by a gift from philanthropist Al Mann.

17


A tribute from JERRY PERENCHIO 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

THE TRIUMPH Opened on October 23, 2003, Walt Disney Concert Hall was heralded as an architectural triumph, instant landmark and profound gift to the people of Los Angeles. Los Angeles Times critic Nicolai Ouroussoff wrote that the Hall’s success “affirms both Gehry’s place as America’s greatest living architectural talent and Los Angeles’ growing cultural maturity.” The public’s excitement for the building was captured by artist Ed Moses, who said on the night of the Hall’s opening, “You know it’s magic when you get a sense of awe. This generates a sense of awe. When you walk up the stairs and look at it, it explodes like fireworks.”

18


ESA-PEKKA SALONEN AND THE LA PHIL AT WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL It is my dream that when Esa-Pekka raises his baton, the building will be his instrument, that he will be at the same time conducting the inside and outside of the building itself in a wonderful symphony. – Frank Gehry


A tribute from GIBSON, DUNN & CRUTCHER LLP

THE OPENING Walt Disney Concert Hall was introduced to Los Angeles audiences, and the world, with three nights of back-toback performances. Entitled Sonic L.A., Living L.A. and Soundstage L.A., the opening concerts symbolized, in the words of Esa-Pekka Salonen, “who we are and what we want to be.” Pictured left: architect Frank Gehry and chief acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota arriving at the opening night gala dinner. THE LEADERSHIP Salonen, his wife Jane Salonen, and LA Phil President and CEO Deborah Borda (pictured right) celebrate the orchestra’s first public performance at Walt Disney Concert Hall. On the night of the opening, Borda said, “It feels like levitation. We’re not touching the ground. To see the love affair that people are having with this Hall. It really belongs to the city.”

22


A tribute from GINNY MANCINI

23


A tribute from CAROL AND MURRAY GRIGOR

10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON


A tribute from WALLIS ANNENBERG

THE SOUND OF THE HALL Walt Disney Concert Hall’s inaugural concerts began with two solo performances: Dianne Reeves singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” and Principal Concertmaster Martin Chalifour performing the Preludio from Bach’s Partita No. 3. Described by Salonen as, “an aural exploration of our new home,” the evening’s performing forces gradually grew to include the entire orchestra. Pictured: Chalifour, Principal Concertmaster, Marjorie Connell Wilson Chair. Pictured on previous page: Inaugural gala performance, featuring Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

26


A tribute from JOHN WILLIAMS

THE MUSIC OF OUR TIME The second opening gala performance embodied the LA Phil’s investment in the music of our time. The program featured the world premiere of The Dharma at Big Sur, a new work by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Adams commissioned by the LA Phil for the occasion, and Witold Lutosławski’s Cello Concerto, performed by Yo-Yo Ma (pictured).

27


28


A tribute from HELEN AND PETER S. BING

THE TRISTAN PROJECT A collaboration between Salonen, director Peter Sellars and video artist Bill Viola, The Tristan Project utilized state-of-the-art video technology to realize Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde for the 21st century. The Tristan Project was an instant, international success. The groundbreaking production expanded the possibilities of orchestral presentation and would come to be recognized as a definitive milestone in Salonen’s tenure with the LA Phil. Pictured: A scene from Viola’s video created for The Tristan Project.

29


A tribute from NANCY ABELL, PAUL HASTINGS LLP AND LESLIE B. ABELL

THE ART OF COLLABORATION Under Salonen’s leadership, the LA Phil would continue to innovate on the model established by the Tristan Project—inviting the contributions of visual artists, choreographers, architects, playwrights and theater directors into its critically-acclaimed programmatic efforts. Pictured: Production of The Tristan Project at Bill Viola Studios.

THE GREEN UMBRELLA SERIES Green Umbrella was founded in 1982, making it the longestrunning new music series in the country. An accomplished composer himself, Salonen utilized the series to champion emerging voices and encourage experimentation by established artists. In its new Walt Disney Concert Hall home, the series grew in popularity as Salonen advanced what Alex Ross of The New Yorker described as his “tireless campaign to convince audiences of the power of the new.” Pictured: Salonen and David Howard, playing contrabass clarinet.

30


31


A tribute from MARI DANIHEL

THE ARTIST EXPERIENCE During Salonen’s tenure, the LA Phil further built its relationships with classical music’s most accomplished artists. These beloved musicians are treated not only as guests, but also as friends and collaborators, embraced by a receptive Los Angeles audience and invited to take creative risks in partnership with the LA Phil. Pictured left to right: Pianists Hélène Grimaud, Emanuel Ax and Yefim Bronfman.

32


33


THE MINIMALIST JUKEBOX FESTIVAL Staged in March 2006, the Minimalist Jukebox festival was a programmatic breakthrough for the LA Phil. Incorporating a wide range of musical genres, commissioned works and concert formats, the festival marked the first time a major American orchestra had taken stock of Minimalism. With programs that ranged from an all-night rave featuring The Orb to the performance of works by Steve Reich, Terry Riley and festival director John Adams, Minimalist Jukebox attracted an unprecendented number of new listeners to Walt Disney Concert Hall and set a template for interdisciplinary, cross-genre programming still in use today. M I N I M A L I S T

J U K E B O X

John Adams, Festival Director THE GREAT ARTISTS OF OUR TIME COME TOGETHER TO CELEBRATE MUSIC, FILM AND THE MINIMALIST MOVEMENT. f i l m f e st i va l

Jan 09 – Jan 14, 2006

m u s i c f e st i va l

Mar 20 – Apr 02, 2006

sy m po s i u m s

M a r 3 1 – Apr 02, 2006

Tickets start from $10 LAPhil.com/minimalism or call (323) 850-2000

WA LT DISNEY CONCERT HALL

34


A tribute from TOYOTA MOTOR SALES U.S.A., INC.

THE CONCERTS FOR CHILDREN The new curatorial ideas prompted by the opening of Walt Disney Concert Hall shaped both the LA Phil’s artistic and educational efforts. The orchestra’s popular celebration of Minimalism extended into the LA Phil’s long-running family concert series as well. In March 2006 the Symphonies for Youth presentation was devoted to Minimalist music patterns and composition. Pictured: Dancers from LEVYDance perform as part of the Toyota Symphonies for Youth program Minimalist Patterns in Music.

35


A tribute from JUDY AND TOM BECKMEN

THE COMPOSER AS HERO Nurturing the work of living composers was central to Salonen’s vision for the orchestra and in keeping with the model of innovation provided by Walt Disney Concert Hall. During Salonen’s tenure with the LA Phil, he oversaw the commissioning of more than 50 works and developed ongoing collaborative relationships with composers such as John Adams, Unsuk Chin, Louis Andriessen, Steven Stucky and Thomas Adès. Pictured: Alexander Mickelthwaite and Ed Barguiarena perform Steve Reich’s Clapping Music.

36


A tribute from TRACY AND JOHN MALLORY

THE VISIONARIES The creative partnership among Salonen, composer John Adams and director Peter Sellars flourished at Walt Disney Concert Hall. In the Hall’s earliest years, the LA Phil commissioned such new works from Adams as Dharma at Big Sur and City Noir, and drew on Sellars’ talents to stage Adams’ A Flowering Tree in addition to works by Stravinsky. Pictured: Sellars, Adams and Salonen.

37


A tribute from CLAUDE AND ALFRED E. MANN

MEETING SIBELIUS IS LIKE BEING CONFRONTED BY A POWER OF NATURE...

-Ture Rangström

THE TRADITIONAL MADE NEW The LA Phil’s move into the striking modern setting of Walt Disney Concert Hall empowered a programmatic approach that bridged the classical and modern in new ways. Salonen wrote, “We want to keep tradition alive. We don’t ever want to lose our umbilical cord with the great past. But at the same time, how can we keep classical music alive in a new century? This is the perfect moment to re-think our business.” One result was his series of critically-acclaimed festivals, including Beethoven Unbound in the 2005/06 season and Sibelius Unbound in 2007/08, which juxtaposed the work of classical music’s acknowledged masters with that of contemporary composers. Pictured left: Poster art for Sibelius Unbound festival; Pictured right: Salonen conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL

38

As one of Finland’s most celebrated composers, Esa-Pekka Salonen brings a special depth of insight to music by his famed countryman Jean Sibelius. This October, take advantage of an unprecedented opportunity to hear Salonen lead the Los Angeles Philharmonic in all seven Sibelius symphonies, plus tone poems and songs. Two of these programs will also feature a contemporary work by a composer whose art has been influenced by Sibelius.


39


A tribute from CAROL AND KEN SCHULTZ

THE FINAL CONCERTS On April 18, 2009, Salonen conducted Stravinsky’s Oedipus Rex and Symphony of Psalms in his final concert as LA Phil Music Director. The concert incorporated the talents of many of his longtime collaborators and friends, including mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, director Peter Sellars and the Los Angeles Master Chorale. Pictured right: The cast of Oedipus Rex at Walt Disney Concert Hall; Pictured above: Rodrick Dixon as Oedipus Rex.

40


41


A tribute from the JAMES AND PAULA COBURN FOUNDATION

THE FAREWELL In his review of Salonen’s final concert as Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, The New Yorker’s Alex Ross wrote, “It is exceedingly rare to see orchestral musicians exhibiting feelings onstage, especially feelings for conductors; the code of the profession demands a poker face under almost all circumstances. Salonen’s farewell forced a breakdown of the code, to the point that out-of-towners felt as if they were intruding on a private affair. There was a sadness in the air, but you couldn’t get too hung up on it. This was the story of a man who took on a complex job, made all the right moves and departed in an uncommonly elegant way. You don’t read that story often.” Pictured: Salonen and musicians of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. 42


A tribute from ANONYMOUS

THE EXCHANGE On April 9, 2007, Salonen revealed the name of his successor as Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic—Gustavo Dudamel. At the press conference announcing the transition, Salonen said, “The LA Phil is widely regarded as one of the leading symphony orchestras in the world. We have never been stronger. And now, the right successor has been found. Gustavo Dudamel’s remarkable talent, intelligence and energy are the absolute right match for the orchestra and Los Angeles. I am peaceful and joyous about the artist to whom we will pass the baton. There could not be a more forward-looking choice.” Pictured left to right: Salonen, Dudamel and Deborah Borda.

43


GUSTAVO DUDAMEL AND THE LA PHIL AT WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL Our friend Frank Gehry lovingly built this masterpiece as a living room for the people, and we get to share it with you through our music making. – Gustavo Dudamel


46


A tribute from LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC AFFILIATES

THE ARRIVAL Gustavo Dudamel, just 28 years old, arrived at Walt Disney Concert Hall on September 30, 2009 for his first day on the job as LA Phil Music Director, Walt and Lilly Disney Chair. Pictured center: Dudamel hugs Principal Percussionist Raynor Carroll.

47


A tribute from VICKI KING

THE ANNOUNCEMENT The New Yorker’s Alex Ross reported on the excitement surrounding Dudamel’s arrival, “In just five years on the international circuit, Dudamel has become one of the most famous classical musicians alive. When he inaugurated his Philharmonic tenure, at the Hollywood Bowl, a crowd of 18,000 people greeted him with a hollering, stamping, pop-star ovation. Just as impressive was the hush that fell over the Bowl during the ensuing performance. Such feats of immersion explain why this young man has caused unaccustomed tremors of optimism in the classical world.” Pictured: Dudamel at the press conference where his appointment as Music Director was announced.

THE FIRST REHEARSAL In considering Dudamel for the role of Music Director, LA Phil President and CEO Deborah Borda studied the maestro at work: “Watching him rehearse our orchestra, watching him rehearse other orchestras, showed me a lot about his ability to lead, his ability to interpret, but it always goes back, as E.M. Forster said, to connection. His ability to connect, on many different levels—that’s what matters.” Pictured: Dudamel’s first rehearsal as LA Phil Music Director at Walt Disney Concert Hall. 48


A tribute from SELIM K. ZILKHA AND MARY HAYLEY

49


50


A tribute from ALYCE AND WARREN WILLIAMSON 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

THE CONDUCTOR AT WORK Dudamel’s conducting style has captivated audiences worldwide. Music critic Tim Page described Dudamel in action in Los Angeles magazine: “As Gustavo Dudamel looks out over the Los Angeles Philharmonic, only his eyes are in motion. They settle briefly on the faces of each of his 100 musicians. There is a moment of charged silence, a collective inhalation. Then he raises his baton with the life-or-death urgency of a rocket pilot just before liftoff. His face, his mien, his whole body seem to be saying, ‘I am going to take you on an adventure.’ No matter how often the orchestra members may have played this piece before, Dudamel’s bearing indicates that this performance really matters, that there are truths yet to be discovered.” Pictured: Dudamel’s Inaugural Gala performance with the LA Phil on October 8, 2009.

Pictured next page: “Pasión Gustavo” inaugural season banner.

51


A tribute from KIKI AND DAVID GINDLER


A tribute from MARGARET AND JERROLD EBERHARDT

THE CREATIVE CHAIR Coinciding with Dudamel’s inaugural season, Pulitzer Prizewinning composer John Adams was appointed to the newlycreated position of LA Phil Creative Chair. As Chair, Adams acts as a core member of the LA Phil’s artistic planning team. Dudamel said at the time of Adams’ appointment, “John’s work, vision and big knowledge of all music, especially new music, is so deep. For me, this will be a special partnership, one where we will create new opportunities.” Pictured: Dudamel and Adams.

54


A tribute from BARBARA AND JAY RASULO

THE CREATIVE CHAIR FOR JAZZ Jazz legend Herbie Hancock assumed the role of the LA Phil’s Carolyn and Bill Powers Creative Chair for Jazz in the summer of 2010. In this post, Hancock works with the LA Phil to craft its jazz series and related educational events. Under his leadership, the LA Phil has offered jazz programming from around the world with such artists as Wayne Shorter, Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club, Quincy Jones and Esperanza Spalding among others. Pictured: Dudamel and Hancock.

55


THE AMERICAS AND AMERICANS FESTIVAL The first festival directed by Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall, Americas and Americans, explored the shared musical traditions of the continents. It comprised more than two weeks’ worth of classical, pop and new music performances incorporating the music of Antonio Estévez, Aaron Copland, Evencio Castellanos and others. Dudamel described his vision for the festival: “This is our music. It is the language which links us as a people—borders dissolve, colors emerge and mix, and we find those voices which unite North, Central and South America as one.”

LAPhil.com/Americas

56


A tribute from MARILYN ZIERING

THE CANTATA CRIOLLA The centerpiece of the Americas and Americans festival, the LA Phil’s multi-media production of Antonio Estévez’s Cantata Criolla, incorporated original film footage from director Alberto Arvelo, poetry from screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga and live dramatic readings by actors Helen Hunt, Edgar Ramirez and Erich Wildpret. Pictured: Tenor Aquiles Machado as Florentino in Cantata Criolla.

57


A tribute from ADRIANA CISNEROS AND NICHOLAS GRIFFIN

THE MUSICAL FRONTIER After its move to Walt Disney Concert Hall in 2003, the LA Phil was able to expand its programming by 50 percent. This included an increase in the number of world music, jazz, pop and cross-disciplinary concerts presented by the institution. LA Phil Vice President of Artistic Planning Chad Smith explained, “The Phil’s strategy is to aim at different niches. We’re not for this one audience. If we’re doing our jobs right, we’re for dozens of audiences.” Pictured: Experimental electronic music duo Matmos and Kronos Quartet perform as part of the LA Phil’s West Coast/Left Coast festival.

58


A tribute from EDISON INTERNATIONAL

THE WORLD’S STAGE In addition to hosting the LA Phil’s orchestral performances, Walt Disney Concert Hall has become a home for world music’s most renowned performers. Pictured: The late Ravi Shankar celebrating his 90th birthday with a concert at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

59


A tribute from SUTTON AND CHRISTIAN STRACKE

THE ORCHESTRA AS TEAM Speaking with Intelligent Life, Dudamel explained how he perceives his role within the orchestra: “The conductor is just a person who is part of the team. Imagine I was just ‘conducting’ here, now: you would receive nothing. You’d think I was just some crazy guy waving my arms around. The thing is, you need the orchestra. You need them much more than they need you.” Pictured: Dudamel in rehearsal with the LA Phil.

60


A tribute from SARAH H. KETTERER AND ALAN J. VORWALD

THE REHEARSAL PROCESS Dudamel described the primary goal of the rehearsal process as one of connection: “To create the best music— or to re-create the best music—you have to be really well-connected with the people with whom you are playing. This is my main goal, this connection in the approach to the music.” Pictured: Dudamel in rehearsal with Principal Concertmaster Martin Chalifour.

61


A tribute from DIANE B. AND M. DAVID PAUL 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

62


THE MUSICIANS OF TOMORROW Inspired by Dudamel’s formative experience with El Sistema, Venezuela’s revolutionary youth orchestra movement, the LA Phil began its own instrumental training program in 2007. The Youth Orchestra Los Angeles program, known popularly as YOLA, provides children in underserved communities with access to instruments and a free, high-quality orchestral education. Pictured: Dudamel and YOLA’s musicians at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

63


A tribute from DUNARD FUND 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

THE MAHLER PROJECT For the historic Mahler Project in early 2012, Dudamel led the LA Phil and the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela (SBSOV) in performances of the composer’s entire symphonic oeuvre on two continents. The Project included historic performances of Mahler’s Symphony No. 8, which incorporated more than 1,000 musicians each, in Los Angeles and Caracas. The latter concert was broadcast to movie theaters across North America as part of the orchestra’s theatercast initiative, LA Phil LIVE. Pictured right: Dudamel conducts SBSOV in Mahler’s Symphony No. 2, featuring soprano Miah Persson, mezzo-soprano Christianne Stotijn and the Los Angeles Master Chorale. Pictured above: Dudamel conducts the LA Phil during the Brahms Unbound festival.

64


65


A tribute from UNION BANK®

THE AVANT-GARDE Just as Frank Gehry employed advanced aerospace technology to create Walt Disney Concert Hall’s undulating steel sails, the LA Phil draws on cutting-edge video, gaming and digital technologies to explore the possibilities of orchestral presentation. In October 2012 Dudamel led the LA Phil in performances of Oliver Knussen’s opera Where the Wild Things Are, based on the classic children’s book by Maurice Sendak. Directed by Netia Jones, the production utilized back projection and real-time animation to place the performers in the world of Sendak’s beloved illustrations (pictured).

66


A tribute from DODY WAUGH AND ERIC SMALL

THE VIRTUOSOS The pristine acoustics and panoramic sightlines of Walt Disney Concert Hall have made it a prime destination for established soloists as well as classical music’s rising stars. Appearing alongside the Los Angeles Philharmonic or in intimate recitals as part of the Colburn Celebrity Series, these world-class artists take full advantage of a performance space where they can connect deeply with audiences—whether it is for the first time, or for what simply feels like the first time. Pictured above: Lang Lang at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

67


A tribute from THE LLOYD E. RIGLER - LAWRENCE E. DEUTSCH FOUNDATION 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

66


67


A tribute from LINDA MAY AND JACK SUZAR

THE MOZART/DA PONTE TRILOGY In May 2012 the LA Phil embarked on a three-year celebration of the collaboration between composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte. Entitled the Mozart/Da Ponte Trilogy, the project drew on the talents of esteemed architects and fashion designers to realize Mozart’s and Da Ponte’s operas for 21st century audiences. The Trilogy began with a production of Don Giovanni, featuring sets by architect Frank Gehry and costumes by fashion designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, and continued a year later with The Marriage of Figaro as envisioned by architect Jean Nouvel and couturier Azzedine Alaïa. Pictured: The cast of The Marriage of Figaro at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Pictured previous page: The cast of Don Giovanni at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

70


A tribute from LAWRENCE FIELD

THE CHALLENGE OF MOZART Dudamel chose to focus on Mozart’s operatic music for both its technique and its ability to create “a different sense of teamwork.” Music critic Tim Page explains the challenge inherent in the composer’s work: “Because Mozart’s music is flowing, direct and eloquent, many listeners think it must be easy to perform. Not so.… Other composers demand more in terms of muscle, pyrotechnics and flashy virtuosity, but there is an extraordinary transparency to Mozart’s music, and any imbalance, no matter how slight, is glaring. As such, the interpretation of Mozart remains one of the supreme tests of any great musician.”

71


A tribute from LENORE AND BERNARD GREENBERG

72

A tribute from NANCY AND BARRY SANDERS

The Gospel according to the other mary

The ambassadors

In May 2013, the LA Phil premiered Peter Sellars’ theatrical staging of John Adams’ oratorio The Gospel According to the Other Mary, commissioned by the LA Phil with the support of the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund. This postmodern retelling of the Bible’s resurrection narratives combined texts by writers such as Dorothy Day, Louise Erdrich and Primo Levi, and was hailed by critics as a masterpiece. The New Yorker music critic Alex Ross called the oratorio “some of the strongest, most impassioned music of Adams’ career.” Pictured: Dudamel’s working score from The Gospel According to the Other Mary.

Following its world premiere in Los Angeles, The Gospel According to the Other Mary was staged in London, Paris, Lucerne and New York City. The tour was an act of cultural ambassadorship, combining the creative talents of hundreds of California-based artists and musicians, including the LA Phil and Los Angeles Master Chorale. Pictured left to right: dancer Troy Ogilvie, dancer Anani Dodji Sanouvi, mezzo-soprano Kelley O’Connor and dancer Michael Schumacher.

73


A tribute from LENORE AND BERNARD GREENBERG

72

A tribute from NANCY AND BARRY SANDERS

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THE OTHER MARY

THE AMBASSADORS

In May 2013, the LA Phil premiered Peter Sellars’ theatrical staging of John Adams’ oratorio The Gospel According to the Other Mary, commissioned by the LA Phil with the support of the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund. This postmodern retelling of the Bible’s resurrection narratives combined texts by writers such as Dorothy Day, Louise Erdrich and Primo Levi, and was hailed by critics as a masterpiece. The New Yorker music critic Alex Ross called the oratorio “some of the strongest, most impassioned music of Adams’ career.” Pictured: Dudamel’s working score from The Gospel According to the Other Mary.

Following its world premiere in Los Angeles, The Gospel According to the Other Mary was staged in London, Paris, Lucerne and New York City. The tour was an act of cultural ambassadorship, combining the creative talents of hundreds of California-based artists and musicians, including the LA Phil and Los Angeles Master Chorale. Pictured left to right: dancer Troy Ogilvie, dancer Anani Dodji Sanouvi, mezzo-soprano Kelley O’Connor and dancer Michael Schumacher.

73


A tribute from CIO SOLER AND MAURICE MARCIANO

74


THE FUTURE Honoring Gustavo Dudamel as 2013 Musician of the Year in Musical America, music critic Mark Swed wrote, “Dudamel is already at the height of celebrity and approaching the top of his profession.… He’s climbed the Mahler mountain. He has a shelf of prizes. At 31, Dudamel should be just beginning. The good news is that he knows it.” Pictured: Dudamel and the LA Phil on stage at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

75


A LIVING ROOM FOR THE CITY The entire building was meant to invite people to come inside. It was intended to be accessible to everyone, to feel casual, not pompous or overly formal, and I think those qualities, those goals, have been achieved. – Frank Gehry


A tribute from DAVID C. BOHNETT 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON


A tribute from SORAYA AND YOUNES NAZARIAN

THE URBAN OASIS The Walt Disney Concert Hall Community Park—State of California (pictured) is one of the many architectural elements that exemplify Gehry’s desire to create an accessible, welcoming environment for all. For this rooftop garden, landscape designer Melinda Taylor and landscape architect Lawrence Moline chose plantings —six species of trees and more than 30 flowering shrubs and perennials—that would change colors throughout the LA Phil season and provide shade in the summer. The mature trees were hard to find: six coral trees came from an apartment complex in Marina del Rey, and others were purchased directly from the yards of Los Angeles homeowners. Pictured previous page: Walt Disney Concert Hall at dawn.

80


A tribute from CAPITAL GROUP PRIVATE CLIENT SERVICES

THE COMMUNITY SPIRIT Walt Disney Concert Hall’s official opening was preceded by a week of performance previews for children, educators, construction workers, county employees and others involved with the realization of the project. This spirit of community lives on with free events such as Phil the House,Youth Orchestra Festival Day and insideOUT. Pictured: Performers at the Grand Avenue Festival.

81


A tribute from PATINA RESTAURANT GROUP

THE INTERACTIVE HALL Walt Disney Concert Hall comprises multiple spaces that encourage a vibrant cultural community. In addition to the Ron Burkle Ralphs/Food 4 Less Foundation Auditorium, cultural events are held in BP Hall, the Blue Ribbon Garden, the Edythe and Eli Broad and Nancy and Richard J. Riordan Founders Room, the Capital Group Companies Choral Hall, the Nadine and Ed Carson Amphitheatre, the Ernest Fleischmann Gallery and the W.M. Keck Foundation Children’s Amphitheatre. Pictured: A gala reception in BP Hall.

82


A tribute from PYRO-SPECTACULARS BY SOUZA

THE CONCERT EXPERIENCE Speaking with The New York Times, Diane Disney Miller, daughter of Walt and Lillian Disney, said, “The more I look at the Hall, the more I realize it’s not a lofty structure at all. The hope in our minds, and Frank’s mind, was to take away any sense of elitism. We want it to be a populist hall for the people. We want to demystify the reputation, the perception of symphonic music.” Pictured: Families attend a Toyota Symphonies for Youth performance by the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

83


A tribute from ANONYMOUS 10TH ANNIVERSARY PATRON

84


THE HOPE The Hall’s populist aspirations have come to extraordinary life under the leadership of Gustavo Dudamel, whose signature educational effort YOLA brings the transformative experience of music into the lives of children who might not otherwise have the opportunity to learn an instrument, play in an orchestra or perform at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Pictured: Gustavo Dudamel and YOLA musicians.

85


A tribute from TEENA HOSTOVICH AND DOUGLAS MARTINET

THE FIELD TRIP Every year, more than 13,000 students attend free, school-day concerts at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Called Symphonies for Schools, these special performances by the Los Angeles Philharmonic introduce young learners to basic musical concepts and the workings of the orchestra. For many students, a Symphonies for Schools performance is their first encounter with live orchestral music. Pictured: Students from every region of Los Angeles County arrive at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

86


A tribute from THE COLBURN SCHOOL

THE YOUNG MUSICIANS In addition to its concert programs for families and students, the LA Phil works with young, pre-professional musicians and composers through such efforts as the Youth Orchestra Mentorship Program and Composer Fellowship Program. The LA Phil also partners with its Grand Avenue neighbor, the Colburn Conservatory of Music, to connect the next generation of artists with today’s most prominent performers through regular masterclasses. Pictured: Colburn Young Artists Academy student Mayumi Kanagawa performs with The Colburn Orchestra led by Music Director Yehuda Gilad at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

87


A tribute from WESTERN ASSET MANAGEMENT COMPANY

THE PERFORMANCE OF OUR LIVES Weddings, quinceañeras, commercial photo shoots—Walt Disney Concert Hall has proven to be an irresistible backdrop for professional and avid amateur photographers. The curving lines and beautiful light are particularly appealing to brides and grooms, who frequently immortalize their commitment with photos taken at the Hall.

88


A memorial to JEANNE AND EDWARD KRAUSE

THE LIVING BUILDING Walt Disney Concert Hall is many things to Angelenos and visitors alike—a concert venue, a tourist destination, a garden oasis and a workplace. Above all else, it is a home brought to life by the people who interact with it and the music that fills it. Indeed, it has gotten better with age. LA Phil President Deborah Borda has noted, “As someone who has worked in the Hall since it was built, I can tell you that familiarity has bred only wonder.”

89


A tribute from ROLEX


92


SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGMENT The LA Phil is grateful to the many civic leaders, philanthropists and friends who contributed to the creation of Walt Disney Concert Hall and who continue to invest in its mission. On the 10th anniversary of the Hall’s opening, we extend a special acknowledgment to the Walt Disney Concert Hall Committees from 2003, which were central to the building’s completion and inaugural celebration.

WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL COMMITTEES (2003) CONCERT HALL COMMITTEE Frank O. Gehry William E.B. Siart Yasuhisa Toyota

HONORARY COMMITTEE Andrea L. Van de Kamp Eli Broad Richard J. Riordan Zev Yaroslavsky LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC ASSOCIATION Esa-Pekka Salonen John F. Hotchkis Robert J. Weingarten Deborah Borda

INAUGURAL GALA COMMITTEE Ginny Mancini, Chair Helen Bing Jennifer Diener Lenore S. Greenberg Carol Henry Joan Hotchkis Nancy Olson Livingston Joni J. Smith Liane Weintraub

WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL I, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS William E.B. Siart, Chairman Robert S. Attiyeh, Chief Financial Officer Eli Broad Robert B. Egelston Gerald L. Katell Stuart M. Ketchum

Kent Kresa Richard J. Riordan Stephen Rountree Barry Sanders Andrea L. Van de Kamp Zev Yaroslavsky, Ex Officio Director

93


LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS as of August 2013

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRS

DIRECTORS

Maurice Marciano

David C. Bohnett*

Jerrold L. Eberhardt*

Julie Andrews

Bowen H. “Buzz” McCoy

Jane B. Eisner*

Wallis Annenberg

Younes Nazarian

PRESIDENT AND CEO

Ginny Mancini*

David N. Barry, III

Leith O’Leary

Deborah Borda

Vicki McCluggage*

Lynn A. Booth

Diane B. Paul*

William C. Powers*

Linda Brittan

Barry D. Pressman, M.D.*

Jay Rasulo*

Anthon S. Cannon, Jr.*

Dudley A. Rauch*

Adriana Cisneros

Ann Ronus

SECRETARY

Mark Houston Dalzell*

Jennifer Rosenfeld

Alan Wayte*

Mari L. Danihel

Armin M. Sadoff, M.D.

Kelvin L. Davis

Nancy S. Sanders*

Donald P. de Brier*

Eric L. Small

Kenneth M. Doran

Christian Stracke

Louise D. Edgerton

Ronald D. Sugar*

Lawrence N. Field*

Jack Suzar

Stephen E. Frank*

Jonathan Weedman

Timothy F. Gallagher

Alyce Williamson

Sheri Gill

Marilyn Ziering

David I. Gindler* Cecilia Aguilera Glassman Donna Gotch Lenore S. Greenberg Carol Colburn Grigor Pasi Hamalainen John F. Hotchkis* Darioush Khaledi Joyce A. Kresa Ronald Litzinger John V. Mallory* 94

*Executive Committee Member

HONORARY LIFE DIRECTORS Frank Gehry Bram Goldsmith Diane Disney Miller Rocco C. Siciliano H. Russell Smith


LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC ASSOCIATION 2013/14 WINTER GALA CHAIRS AND COMMITTEE Walt Disney Concert Hall 10th Anniversary Honorary Chair Diane Disney Miller Honorary Gala Chair Eloísa Maturén Dudamel Co-Chairs David C. Bohnett Joan Hotchkis Alyce Williamson Gala Committee Julie Andrews Wallis Annenberg Judith Beckmen Lynn A. Booth Edye Broad Carol Colburn Grigor Mari L. Danihel Jane B. Eisner Kiki Ramos Gindler Maria Hummer-Tuttle Ghada Irani Joan Jacobs Sarah H. Ketterer Ginny Mancini Soraya Nazarian Annette O’Malley Diane B. Paul Sandy Pressman Ann Ronus Cio Soler Marilyn Ziering

95


96

GALA SUPPORT

PHOTO CREDITS

The LA Phil gratefully acknowledges the generosity of all the Walt Disney Concert Hall 10th Anniversary Gala patrons. In addition to those who contributed the tributes on the pages throughout this book, the LA Phil recognizes the support of the following donors (list complete as of August 2013).

Front Cover: courtesy of Gehry and Partners

Julie Andrews Deborah and Benjamin Ansell, M.D. Margaret and David Barry Kathy and Ambassador Frank Baxter Elizabeth Bloze, M.D. Yuki and Alex Bouzari Linda and Maynard Brittan Rick Chivaroli David Conney, M.D. Melanie Cook and Woody Woods Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Cutietta Jennifer and Royce Diener Carla and Gerald Du Manoir Louise and Bradford Edgerton, M.D. Helgard and Irwin Field Marianna and David Fisher Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. Cecilia and Jeffrey Glassman Alexandra Glickman and Gayle Whittemore Michael Gorfaine Pasi Hamalainen Dwight Hare and Stephanie Bergsma Henry Family Fund Andrew Hewitt Linda Joyce Hodge Ronald Hudson and Allen Brannigan Jonathan Kagan Josh and Melanie Kaplan Linda and Don Kaplan Carrie and Stuart Ketchum Shahpar and Darioush Khaledi

Carol Krause Charlotte and Thomas Lane The Sherry Lansing Foundation Karin L. Larson Grace Latt and Tony Rossi Mary and Mark Lipian, M.D Elizabeth and Robert Lowe Barbara and Buzz McCoy Janis B. McEldowney The Mesdag Family Foundation Maria C. Linder and Gordon Nielson Cathryn and Victor Palmieri Pat Pratt and Jake Adajian Sandy and Barry D. Pressman, M.D. Michele and Dudley Rauch Sharon and Nelson Rising Michael Rogerson Lois Rosen Carla and Fred Sands Dena and Irving Schechter Samuel H. Schwartz Linda and David Shaheen Rocco C. Siciliano Mark S. Siegel Bill Silva Lisa Specht and Ron Rodgers Eva and Marc Stern The Rose Hills Foundation Cindy and Richard Troop Christopher Yo

Front Cover Fold-out and Back Cover: photographs by Vern Evans Back Cover Fold-out: photograph by Adam Latham Title Page: original sketch of Walt Disney Concert Hall by Frank Gehry, courtesy of Gehry and Partners Introduction: photograph by Federico Zignani p. 2 view of the last remaining residence on Bunker Hill, future site of Walt Disney Concert Hall, 1969; Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection p. 4 courtesy of the Walt Disney Family Foundation p. 5 photograph by Tom Bonner p. 6 courtesy of Gehry and Partners pp. 7, 10 courtesy of Gil Garcetti p. 8 photograph by Craig Schwartz pp. 9, 37, 82 courtesy of Los Angeles Philharmonic Archives pp. 11, 12-13, 14-15, 17 photographs by Federico Zignani p. 16 photograph by Todd Eberle pp. 18-19, 82 photographs by Frazer Harrison, Getty Images p. 21 photograph by Perrin, courtesy of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Archives pp. 22, 23, 24-25, 27 photographs by Carlo Allegri, Getty Images p. 26 photograph by Kevin Winter, Getty Images pp. 28-29, 30 photographs by Kira Perov pp. 31, 32-33, 35, 36, 40, 41, 42, 46-47, 48, 49, 54, 55, 62-63, 65, 6869, 70, 73, 83, 84-85, 86, 94 courtesy of Mathew Imaging pp. 39, 45, 64, 71, 74-75, 90-91 photographs by Vern Evans p. 43 photograph by Al Seib, Los Angeles Times pp. 50-51, 57, 67 photographs by Lawrence K. Ho, Los Angeles Times pp. 52-53, 60, 61, 72, 80, 89 photographs by Iris Schneider p. 58 photograph by David Livingston, Getty Images p. 59 photograph by Kevin Winter, Getty Images p. 77 photograph by Mary Ann Jackson pp. 78-79, 95, 97 photographs by Adam Latham p. 81 photograph by John McKoy, courtesy of Music Center Archives p. 87 photograph by Philip Pirolo, courtesy of The Colburn School p. 88 top and bottom right photographs by Iris Schneider; bottom left photograph by Zan Dubin Scott p. 92 top courtesy of Gil Garcetti; bottom photograph by Vern Evans p. 98 “A Rose for Lilly� fountain dedicated by Frank Gehry to Lillian Disney in the Walt Disney Concert Hall Community Park; photograph by Adam Latham


CITATIONS Borda, Deborah, “President’s Letter,” Performances, May 2013. Burton-Hill, Clemency, “Gustavo Dudamel’s Next Mountain,” Intelligent Life, March/April 2013. Gallo, Phil, “Orchestral Maneuvers,” Billboard, February 27, 2013. Garcetti, Gil, Iron: Erecting the Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2002. Gehry, Frank O, “Introduction,” Iron: Erecting the Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2002. Goldberger, Paul, “Good Vibrations,” The New Yorker, September 29, 2003. Green, Emily, “Symphony of Colors,” Los Angeles Times, March 21, 2002 Henken, John and Dennis Bade, editors, Gala Opening – Los Angeles Philharmonic – Walt Disney Concert Hall, October 2003. Johnson, Reed, “Gustavo Dudamel rides a wave of Dudamania,” Los Angeles Times, November 23, 2008. Johnson, Reed and McNamara, Mary, “Disney Hall Opens to Fanfare,” Los Angeles Times, October 24, 2003. Koshalek, Richard and Hutt, Dana, “The Impossible Becomes Possible: The Making of Walt Disney Concert Hall,” Symphony: Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2003. Mason, Kerri, “Second Life,” Billboard, October 20, 2012. Ouroussoff, Nicolai, “Review of Disney Hall: Reflection of the City Around It,” Los Angeles Times, October 19, 2003. Page, Tim, “A Rare Genius,” Los Angeles, June 2011. Pollack, Sydney (Director), “Sketches of Frank Gehry,” American Masters, Sony Pictures Classics, 2006. Reese, Carol McMichael, “All Shiny and New: Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Rehabilitation of Downtown Los Angeles,” Symphony: Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2003. Ross, Alex, “Adieu,” The New Yorker, May 4, 2009. Ross, Alex, “Anti-Maestro,” The New Yorker, April 30, 2007. Ross, Alex, “Sacred Dissonance,” The New Yorker, June 18, 2012. Ross, Alex, “The Venezuelan,” The New Yorker, December 14, 2009. Salonen, Esa-Pekka, “Variations and Traditions: Classical Music in the Twenty-First Century,” Symphony: Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2003. Swed, Mark, “Finally, the LA Phil and Mozart are a good match,” Los Angeles Times, June 7, 2013. Swed, Mark, “Musician of the Year: Gustavo Dudamel,” Musical America Directory, 2013. Tatge, Catherine (Producer/Director), The Question of God, Tatge/Lasseur Productions, 2004. Webb, Michael, “A Barge with Billowing Sails,” Symphony: Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2003. Weinraub, Bernard, “A New Auditorium with Larger Goals,” The New York Times, October 21, 2003. TRIBUTE BOOK CREDITS Art Director: Gretchen Citrin

Writer/Researcher: Julia Ward

Project Editor: Robin Rauzi

Photo Editor: Iris Schneider

97



Insideout book