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ROBERTO BUCHELI ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO MArch 2017, MSc 2018 Georgia Institute of Technology Work Samples 2008 - 2018


SEOUL ACCELERATOR design + research

ANIMATED MATERIALITIES S. accelerator facade prototype

INTERFACE living building challenge

MERGING SPACES a firestation for Savannah

QUITO HOTEL + CONVENTION BArch final project

LIVABLE BRIDGE BArch structural studio

THE WALL HOUSE a dwelling in the ravine

DIGITAL FABRICATION academic_personal

PASSIVE_DYNAMISM Hinman bldg. crtyd. installation

TABLE OF CONTENTS

001


SEOUL ACCELERATOR SEOUL BIENNALE 2017 - INTERNATIONAL STUDIOS

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TUTOR: Marc Simmons TERM: Fall 2016 - Spring 2017 COLLABORATORS: C.Dang, A.Davis, C.Dikinson, M.Forsell, J.Olson, P.Petromichelis, N.Schmeider, S.Shams, P.Steidl, V.Yee, S.Yifeng

SEOUL ACCELERATOR

Located in the Dongdaemun garment district of Seoul, South Korea, the Seoul Accelerator is a research and development center for textile and fabrication technology. This institution serves as an innovation laboratory that seeks to fuel the local garment industry and accelerate Seoul into the forefront of the fashion industry. The purpose of the project, as prompted by the 2017 Seoul Biennale, is to form a network of knowledge between academic, professional, and governmental stakeholders. We seek new forms of innovation that go beyond functional city planning toward a more integrated mixed-use urban landscape. The building design evolved into five translucent glass towers set into a sunken retail plaza, unified by a below-grade exhibition and performance center. The retail plaza is set at the same datum as the Cheonggyecheon riverwalk, allowing a physical connection to the river and public space. Each of the towers has an offset core embracing 30’ high laboratory/research compartments that support a flexible space, known as “accelerators.” The facade is a tension-supported, custom, glass brick wall that allows natural light while providing privacy for the researchers and fabricators.

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SEOUL ACCELERATOR

003


004

SEOUL ACCELERATOR


Dongdaemungu within Seoul Metropolitan City

SEOUL ACCELERATOR

Immediate project context 005


4.3

2.3

Ae

Tm

augmented experience

tailored metrics

SEOUL ACCELERATOR

Er

006

2.2

experimental retail

1.1

Rp

Il

robotic prosthetics

industrial logistics

2.1

Af

3.2

4.2

Bs biological systems

advanced fabrication

3.1

Iw

Ft

integrated wearables

future textiles

4.1

5.1

Ap adaptive packaging


SEOUL ACCELERATOR

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008

SEOUL ACCELERATOR

1 2 3

4

5

6


SEOUL ACCELERATOR

009


010

SEOUL ACCELERATOR


SEOUL ACCELERATOR

011


012

SEOUL ACCELERATOR


SEOUL ACCELERATOR

013

CLICK ANY IMAGE FOR EXHIBITION VIDEO


ANIMATED MATERIALITIES SEOUL ACCELERATOR MULTIMEDIA FAÇADE PROTOTYPE

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TUTOR: Marc Simmons TERM: Fall 2017 COLLABORATORS: C.Dang, C.Dikinson, M.Forsell, P.Petromichelis, N.Schmeider, V.Yee, S.Yifeng

ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

In the Seoul Accelerator project, the design of the facade consisted in a tension-supported, custom, glass brick wall with a rusticated surface texture to allow in abundant natural light while providing complete privacy for the researchers and fabricators. Each cast glass masonry is sleeved into stainless steel rods and clamped into place, the system does not need caulking or gaskets, as it is a thermal cavity barrier. Within the glass brick façade, an addressable low-resolution LED array is mounted across all surfaces of the building, allowing for a “Dusk ‘till Dawn” urban landscape and 24-7 operations. The challenge within the Seoul Accelerator project was to build a full scale sized mock-up of this facade, we built a 7’ by 9’ portion of the facade with more than 200 casted glass bricks. The prototype has more than 1500 LED lights installed and its controlled with an arduino board programmed using C. Our prototype is located at the Hinman Research Building in Georgia Tech and it’s meant to be a dynamic state of the art installation, able to be changed with the pass of time, maintaining its validity in the future. The display loops through a astablished set of dynamic mods with a pixelated abstract theme, following what we designed for the building.

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ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

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016

ANIMATED MATERIALITIES


ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

017


°

°

018

°

ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

CLICK ANY IMAGE FOR FABRICATION VIDEO

Steel Mold _ Disassemblable

Steel Mold _ Movable Wall

Glass Pouring

Glass Cool Down _ Shape Consolidation


Molten Glass _1370° C

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Preheating Mold

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After 24 Hour Annealing °

Flame Torching _ Prevent Cracking

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20

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ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

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019 20 50

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ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

CLICK ANY IMAGE FOR PROTOTYPE DISPLAY VIDEO

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ANIMATED MATERIALITIES

021


INTERFACE

A LIVING BUILDING FOR GEORGIA TECH

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TUTOR: David Yocum TERM: Spring 2016 COLLABORATORS: C.Dikinson, V.Yee PORTMAN COMPETITION: 2nd Place Prize

INTERFACE - LBC

Adhering to the Living Building Challenge proposal, we designed a project that would take the Place petal as the essence of it, acting as a threshold between the campus and city, student and practitioner, and humanity and environment. A thin footprint is achieved with faรงade openings to take advantage of daylighting and cross ventilation. Create a building that breathes, with an open space for every enclosed space connecting occupants to the outdoors with views and physical adjacencies to the environment. On the adjacent landscape, a wide array of uses is suggested in order to create density in the openness. As part of the seven petals that entail the LBC, we spanned an array of PV panels across the length of the entire building and created a Cladding system based on bamboo to modulate solar gain. The building collects rainwater from the roof, treats it with living machines, reuses the grey water, and returns treated water back to the aquifer. Finally, as part of the Health, Happiness, and Equity petal, we give the site back to the public. Urban agriculture is created for the community, and open spaces are designed in section to provide access to nature throughout the building to its users.

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INTERFACE - LBC

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INTERFACE - LBC

024

Site = Threshold

Program Gross Sq. Footage

Footprint Minimized

Create Permeability

Activate Landscape

Lift Building Mass

Urban Relationship

Voids Hierarchy


INTERFACE - LBC

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026

INTERFACE - LBC


INTERFACE - LBC

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028

INTERFACE - LBC


INTERFACE - LBC

029


030

INTERFACE - LBC


INTERFACE - LBC

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MERGING SPACES A FIRESTATION FOR SAVANNAH, GA.

FIRE STATION MAIN PROGRAM

FIRE STATION ORGANIZATIONAL SCHEME

FIRE STATION + MERGING SPACES

Dinning

APPARATUS BAY

LIVING QUARTERS

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER

COMMUNITY SCHOOL

Dinning Storage

GREEN AREAS

Storage

Bathrooms

Bathrms Kitchen

Lockers DORMS Excercise

Storage

Kitchen

Lockers

Conf. Room

Storage

DORMS Storage

Dayroom

Conference room

Offices

Storage

Excercise Offices

Public Restrooms

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TUTOR: Stuart Romm TERM: Fall 2015 Mechanical / Electrical

Compressor Room

CLASSROOMS

Washing Bay

Laundry Room

Unisex Restroom

Community Display

Storage

Meeting Room

Mechanical Electrical

Administration Office

Laundry Room

Comm. Display

Public Lobby

Storage

Overlooking Terrace

Storage Mezzanine

Restrms

CLASSROOMS

Meeting Room

Medical Attention

Admin. Office

Public Vestibule

Hose Storage

APPARATUS BAY

Outdoor Lounge

Public Restrms

Compress. Room

Washing Bay

Unisex Restroom

IT Backup

Storage Mezzanine

Entrance Vestibule

Medical Attention

PUBLIC VESTIBULE

Hose Storage

APPARATUS BAY

Public Lobby

Dayroom

Firemen Recreation Patio

Restrooms

SAVANNAH LAYOUT RELATIONSHIP

Backup

Public Water Edu. Patio

Entrance Vestibule

It is notable that the 3 main programmatic components of Fire Station No. 1: a traditional Fire Station as well as an Emergency Operations Center, plus a Community School are very distinct from each other, making the whole project a challenge to achieve one unified concept and building. The idea behind my design is to propose a solution to this problem, creating Merging Spaces that will connect the three main elements of the program as well as the diverse users of the building, bringing cohesiveness to the proposal. Merging Spaces are defined as exterior open areas that will connect the different programmatic areas of the Fire station either visually or physically, bringing nature into the project. There will be 4 main Merging Spaces: Gathering Plaza, Overlooking Terrace, Water Void + Lounge and Firefighters Recreation Patio. These spaces will be located along the main circulation curves of the project. The 2 main types of circulation, firefighter circulation from the living quarters to the apparatus bay, and public circulation from the main entrance to the Overlooking Terrace. In order to characterize these spaces, the base geometry of the building will be re-defined with slices and cut-outs following the main movement curves. Specifically, on the Ground Floor and Third Floor, slices will occur, whereas on the Second Floor, cutouts will take place connecting the building in a sectional way. Finally, a central Merging Space, The Water Void, should be a place to raise awareness about sustainability issues as it will serve as a water collection feature to recirculate grey water for various uses in the Fire Station. Shower

Storage

SCBA Room

Shower

Conference room

IT

Storage

IT

SCBA

Storage

Storage

Offices

Mechanical Room

Water Service

Offices

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER

Mechanical Room

Generator Electrical

MERGING SPACES

Water Service

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER

Generator Electrical

Public Gathering

032

Conference room

Restrooms

Public Gathering

Restrooms


MERGING SPACES

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MERGING SPACES

034

Merging Spaces

Void Cutouts


MERGING SPACES

Nature Flow

Water Flow

035


Glass - Water Trail

2nd Floor Glass Void

2nd Floor Structure

Glass - Water Trail 1st Floor Glass Void

MERGING SPACES

1st Floor Structure

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MERGING SPACES

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QUITO METROPOLITAN HOTEL + CONVENTION CENTER

UNIVERSIDAD SAN FRANCISCO DE QUITO TUTOR: Igor MuĂąoz TERM: Spring 2011 B_ARCH: Thesis Project As a graduation project, I engaged in the design of a hotel + convention center in the city of Quito, Ecuador. This project aims to meet the future needs facing the city when the new Quito airport at Tababela is completed generating a high quantity of visitors. Nowadays, there is a lack of hotel accommodations in the area near to the airport site that this project is trying to fill. The project is located in the northeastern part of the city. It is placed in a site adjacent to the new oriental avenue, which is the main road in the new territorial reorganization of the city connecting the city directly to the new airport. In addition to this, the selected location is on the edge of the biggest park in town, the Metropolitan Park. The convention center can be used as a whole room and has a capacity of up to 3000 people. Nevertheless it can also be divided in 6 smaller rooms to accommodate simultaneous events. The partition of space is done with retractable walls that hide within double fixed walls. The circulation is located in the perimeter of the rooms so all areas work independently from each other. With this organization, it connects directly to the hotel, with the intention of using the Hotel staff as the service provider

QUITO H+CC

of the convention center.

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QUITO H+CC

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QUITO H+CC


QUITO H+CC

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LIVABLE BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STUDIO

UNIVERSIDAD SAN FRANCISCO DE QUITO TUTOR: Victor Viteri, Pablo Moreira TERM: Spring 2009 B_ARCH: Structural Studio

LIVABLE BRIDGE

This project embraces the design of a bridge and its structure in order to surpass a 30 meters long ravine. The project is called “The Livable Bridge� which means we had to design the bridge for two main purposes, first we had to create a direct pedestrian crossing for the ravine, and then we had to design areas that could deliver different spatial characteristics. These characteristics, included exhibition spaces, transition spaces between both floors, areas to stay and enjoy the view and finally, closed spaces. The main element to be considered was the design of the bridge structure based on structural elements such as girders and columns. In order to test the design, we had to build a wooden model of the bridge in a 1:50 scale that could resist up to 10kg without collapsing. This studio, was based on the trial-error methodology, adapting the design until we could find the best solution to the structure. For the models we constructed, we could use wood with a maximum thickness of 2mm and we could not use any binding material such as glue, all its elements had to be interconnected together in order for it to work. This was my first encounter with hyper precise wood physical models which had to be all hand cut and assembled.

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LIVABLE BRIDGE

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LIVABLE BRIDGE


Structural Stress Response

Girder Multipilication

Secondary Girders

Column Positioning

Space Creation

LIVABLE BRIDGE

Critical Point

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THE WALL HOUSE A DWELLING IN THE RAVINE

PROFESSIONAL DESIGN + BUILD: Inmolusso Cia Ltda. LOCATION: Quito, Ecuador. 2012-2013 COLLABORATORS: Jaime Miranda, Daniel Miranda, Eduardo Cabrera

THE WALL HOUSE

This 350 sq. mt residence, was designed to satisfy the needs of a young family with two kids. The house is located in a suburban valley near the city of Quito in which the warm climate and nature are one of its major characteristics. This family wanted a residence in which they could be able to feel the peacefulness of nature and escape from work and diverse obligations of daily life. Placed in a very steep site with negative slope, the main idea was to generate a dwelling which seems to emerge naturally from the ground. In order to create this sensation, the main element is a wall made out of local handcrafted brick, in the main facade. The other elements of the house were designed as additional volumes to the main brick wall. The project tried to be very respectful with the nature of the terrain so the entrance to the house is located on the second floor through a steel bridge. As soon as you enter the house, a lobby welcomes you, immediately contrasted with an inverted double height ceiling as you look down into the living room located in the ground floor. The programmatic composition of the residence was done in such a way that the bedrooms were placed in the entrance level, in order to take advantage of the view of the site. This decision was reinforced with the idea of placing the social areas on the ground floor, letting those spaces have a direct relationship with the garden providing the sense of peacefulness that the client requested.

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THE WALL HOUSE

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Connection with Site

Social Spatial Relationship

Private vs. Social

THE WALL HOUSE

Nature of Site

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THE WALL HOUSE

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DIGITAL FABRICATION ACADEMIC+PERSONAL

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TUTOR: Jake Tompkins TERM: Fall 2016, Spring 2017

DIGITAL FABRICATION

Digital Fabrication consists of two projects, the first one within an academic background called Tiles 3.0 and the second one as a personal project named Wave Table. Both projects have emerged within the need of learning how to turn digitally designed shapes into reality with the aid of CNC machining in a process of learn by doing. Tiles 3.0 was a project in which we created an assembly that would hold 3 tiles (12” x 12”) made out from different materials. The tiles were designed in 3D and followed a concept of subdivision in which the concrete tile was divided into 2” x 2” squares, the wooden tile was divided into 1.5” x 1.5” squares and the plastic tile into 1” x 1” squares. Each material has it’s own properties and follows it’s own construction methodology so we had to use CNC subtracting miling processes as well as waterjet or thermoforming techniques in order to create them. Finally they were all mounted into an overall assembly which had to account for tolerances in order to fit into a whole course asembly. The wave table was a personal project to build the center table of my parent’s house. They wanted a table with curvatures with a contemporary feel so we decided to create a shape that ressembled the shape of a relaxed fabric. Then the shape was analized parametrically to obtain the profile curves that went through the 3D solid which later drove the CNC Router at milling all the pieces. All the pieces were assembled and finished using the techniques learnt previously at the DFL.

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DIGITAL FABRICATION

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Wood Panel

Plastic Panel

DIGITAL FABRICATION

Concrete Panel

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DIGITAL FABRICATION

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DIGITAL FABRICATION


DIGITAL FABRICATION

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PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

MOIRÉ WALL INSTALLATION AT ARCH. BUILDING OF GEORGIA TECH

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TUTOR: Jude Leblanc, Scott Marble TERM: Fall 2017 - Spring 2018 ... In Progress COLLABORATORS: A. Ali, J. Buades

PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

The Hinman Research Building of the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech was designed by Paul Heffernan and built in 1939; fast forward to 2010 when NADAA + LAS renovated the building and created a courtyard behind it. Eventhough this courtyard was meant to be a space for the students to relax and use, it has never taken off as the enjoyable patio it was planned for. Due to this, the opportunity arised to design exterior furniture that would draw people fom the interior of the building to inhabit the outdoor space and turn it into their own. In order to achive this, we proposed three elements, a floating moiré wall, a pavillion and movable seating on existing steps. The floating moire wall is located and attached to Hinman building’s brick facade enclosing the courtyard. Programatically, the floating wall will provide an exterior space for pinups and presentations, as well as a comfortable stucture to sit an relax and also for people to gather around. Finally the intention for this element is that it becomes a disinctive feature of the courtyard, a night beacon that would amaze passers with its dynamic double layered moiré system. A Moiré pattern is a visual effect in which two existing overlaping patterns create a third pattern that isn’t there. We engineered this effect into our wall so that it appears to be a dynamic element eventhough it is completely passive. In order to do this, we generated a pattern using grasshopper that would draw leave profiles that appear to be falling into space as a stop-motion film using six frames. We worked in the DFL to create various visual and performance mock-ups and we are on the process of fabricating this 44’ x 10’ wall by May 2018.

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Generated Moiré Pattern

PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

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Pin-up presentations

PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

Pin-up Presentations

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Lounging Lounging

Lunch Meeting / Lunch

The installation fulfills 3 programmatic needs for the space. It allows for pin-up presentations, lounging, and a place to eat a meal. The simplicity of the form and construction allows for the object to blend easily into the courtyard. This in turn gives control over to the inhabitant to utilize the object in any way they seem fit.


PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

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PASSIVE_DYNAMISM


PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

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PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

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1. 3. 4. 6. 7. 8.

12 Ga. Perforated & Formed Steel Sheet (Front) 14 Ga. Perforated & Formed Steel Sheet (Back) 12 Ga. Perforated & Formed Steel Sheet (End) 10 Ga. Perforated & Formed Steel Sheet (Seat) Stabilized Ash Wood Slats Unistrut Slotted Channel P1000T

9. 10. 14. 23. 26.

1/2” Steel Round Bar Unistrut Brackeet P2945 10 Ga. Formed Steel Plate (Light Supports) LED Light Fixture for Exterior 1/2”dia. x 3-1/8” Embed with Rods


14 Ga. Back Panel Fabrication flat drawing

PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

12 Ga. Front Panel Fabrication flat drawing

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PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

CLICK ON IMAGE FOR PROTOTYPE EFFECT VIDEO

064

1. 2. 3. 4.

Moire Wall Artificial Ligthing condition Close-up of moire pattern on back panel Seating unit top view Seating unit front view


PASSIVE_DYNAMISM

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Roberto Bucheli - Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate Portfolio 2008 - 2018

Roberto Bucheli - Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate Portfolio 2008 - 2018

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