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FEATURING I N T E R V I E W S W I T H F E AT U R E D A R T I S T S .


LETTER FROM:

THE EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHER GRAPHIC DESIGNER ARTIST FRIEND C L A S S M AT E C R E AT I V E

There are photos down the

hallway and it's nice to see new artwork frequently. I remember my freshman year, I was thrilled to see what the senior artists created and I wanted to be just like them. So what did I do? I asked questions, network and show my artwork to people. This was the starting point. We are entering a time of rejuvinated confidence, and it's confidence in ourselves. Be proud of your work. Respect yourself and those around you. In this magazine, I have interviewed sixteen wonderful students. Feel free to connect with these wonderful people. It's these sixteen who had the guts and took advantage of this wonderful opportunity. So, let's connect and keep making great art.

Robert J. Lopez EDITOR IN CHIEF


Introducing

Robert Lopez Studio


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C O N N ECT W I T H U S . PR I N T. M O B I L E . S O C I A L . O N LI N E . TA B L E T. w w w.r o b e r t l o p ez st u di o.c o m /a r t i st s

Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Vine is a registered trademark of Vine Labs, Inc.® Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. All Instagram™ logos and trademarks are property of Burbin, Inc. deviantArt is a registered trademark of deviantART, Inc. ©2013. YouTube™ video community is a trademark of Google Inc ©2013. LinkedIn Corporation ©2013. LinkedIn, the LinkedIN logo are trademarks of Linkedin Coporation in the United States and/or other countries.


Featured A r tists

F a l l / W i n t e r 2 013

The INTERV IEWS of SUCCESSFU L A RTISTS

Network

Interviews The

Tr a d i t i o n a l Artist

We set aside reality and explore inner imagination and create work that speaks for a cause. Meet our wonderful painter Mirabel Wigon.

7 The

Graphic

In a series of pages, find out how to connect with these amazing artists.

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

V

The

8 & 24

Advice Come see what we found out about CSUEB art students and what their favorite advice was.

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Wise Quote Are you an inspiring photographer? Check out one of Ansel Adam's most memorable quote.

Artists

Master of print and web design. From stationery design to web design. The main mission is to let our art communicate an important message.

9 The

Multimedia Artists

Here are the master of all trades. These artist can work with print, web and film. Meet these ambitious students.

25 The

Photo Artists

These students are masters of light and post-processing. Capturing a slice of life that tell a story.

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V I TA E | FA L L 2 013

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Tr a d i t i o n a l A r t i s t


Mirabel Wigon Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Mirabel Wigon. I’m a senior and I am a Fine Arts major. I’m currently in the BFA program for Fine Arts. Q. Why be an Art major? A. I have a strong desire to create and put forth art that I hope someday will create an emotional reaction in people. I would like people to become more active in regards to global issues. The content of my work this quarter is politically charged and I would like to continue putting work out that is thought provoking. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. I remember going on family hiking trips and being ill prepared. Once we went on a day hike and my father decided to take a shortcut, which we ended up getting lost. We had to follow the river to get back to our car. It wasn’t a scary memory, but in fact it was quite fun. Q. What is your favorite art work? A. I am interested in many types of art, so I can’t say just one artwork per say. Currently I am very fond of Kent Williams work. Kent Williams is a painter and graphic novelist. I really enjoy the illustrations he did for the comic book The Fountain. Q. Which artist(s) inspire you? A. I’m particularly interested in old book illustrations and art nouveau from around the turn of the century. For example artists like Henry Justice Ford or Aubrey Beardsley who were book illustrators during the late 1800s. Henry Justice Ford illustrated for Andrew Lang’s Arabian Nights Entertainments 1898. Q. What is your dream project? A. My dream projects are many, so I’ll just list three: traveling the world to work on solo or collaborative murals, start my own publishing company to feature my graphic novels or work on an animation dealing with contemporary issues.

Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. To be able to work as an independent illustrator. Q. What are you currently working on? A. Currently I am working on a piece that explores the dualities of modern life; how the expense of quick entertainment gratification (aka video games) negatively affects the lives of unseen people. People fail to realize that we live in a capitalist society were the higher the demand for electronic products in turn results in the exploitation of resources such as cobalt or tantalum. The exploitation of such resources has a negative effect on local populations. Q. What are the themes and inspiration for your new work? A. The underlying theme is child exploitation, as well as issues regarding racism and stereotypes. I was inspired by the following quote:

“Kids in Congo were being sent down mines to die so that kids in Europe and America could kill imaginary aliens in their living rooms.” –Oona King Like many precious metals, cobalt and tantalum found in the Congo are used in the construction and final product of game systems like PlayStation. Congo exports raw materials to big electronic companies. The Congo is extremely unstable and with the exploitation of their natural resources creates a system were forced child labor is utilized. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. I reiterate; make a lot of art, even if it’s no good. By making art constantly you discover what you enjoy as well as develop many ideas. Regardless if the attempt results in disaster, you will always learn from mistakes.

Q. What’s the best piece of advice you have been given? A. Make a lot of art. All the time! My professor Dickson Schneider from my junior/senior seminar class told us that.

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Advice

Slow progress is still progress.Be open. That's the only way you can grow your art.Go to a different school if you expect any guidance or academic advising. You are blindly jumping in.Used items are not as bad as you think. As an artist be creative with your choices.The closer to campus you live the better.Just do it. To figure out what is it that moves them emotionally and how to channel that energy towards their art. That's what makes amazing art. Ask questions, get an advisor in your major, and network with other students. The connections made here can last a lifetime.The above cost only reflects one Art class per quarter. Art is an expensive major.Buy as you go. Some stuff you'll only need once so go cheap.There is a difference between creative innovative work and student-ish or childish like work.Stay on track and to focus on studies first and foremost.Stay ahead. Don't hesitate to help each other out, if you're there for your peers when they need you, they'll be happy to return the favor. You build valuable connectivity that can later assist you in the working world.Save your money if you want good equipment, especially dslr and video cameras. A good one will last longer and take you a long way.Enjoy and take advantage of what department offers.Get a real major. Produce, produce, produce! Please, above all, maintain the spirit of unceasing work, for even if one's performance is unsuitable to that which is deemed "artistic," it is only through the process of trial-and-error that any revelations can be made in one's self-discovery..........................................Enroll for any classes you can get..........................................Get to know your department really well......................................Do as much as you can in every medium of...................................art that you can.Take pride in all your work and always know that constructive criticism is always good. Really push Progress Bar yourself and challenge yourself to create the best work possiSlow progress is still progress. ble.Be ready for challenges both Creating Art 67% on enrolling to class and getting your job done in time.get as much training/intern as possible during every summer to prepare for upcoming classes and for career when you graduate. Don't buy supplies on campus.Go with your instinct and do what you like. Stay on task. Prepare to be stressed, sometimes it can be laid back but if the schedule is tight it can get stressful. Find a way to make the projects fun or else you'll have a hard time when you're stressed. Don't stare at the screen for too long. Just enjoy what you're doing.Make a lot of work. Try a bunch of different mediums that seem interesting to you and try to make them work. Be creative.Experiment, learn what you like and don't like. Always think you're a horrible artist so you can always get better.Have an idea of what your personal style is already and then be prepared to change or at least modify it. Never stop creating. Don't take breaks. Create Art every chance you get. Choose your focus before you enroll. Stick with it, otherwise it is an expensive hobby.Be open and ready to explore what is out there for you will never know were inspiration will come from. I suggest that they take workshop and classes outside of school. Explore the weekend art activities that the Bay Area has to offer!Invest money to make your name in the industry. Network, network, network!Carpool and get to class early.Don't procrastinate and listen. Look at the Art Annual Schedule and plan the next 4-5 years of your life!!!


Graphic Design

Featured Artists Celso Batilo www.celsobatilodesign.com celsobatiloiii@gmail.com Tory DeOrian

www.torydeorian.com tdeorian@gmail.com

Christopher Giron

cgiron@horizon.csueastbay.edu

Altoni Leen Cabling

www.altonileencabling.com altonileen.cabling@gmail.com

Martin Hoang

martinhoangportfolio.tumblr.com martin.H.design@gmail.com

Chase MeĂŤ

www.chasemee.net chase@chasemee.net

Olivia Smith

www.facebook.com/AiviloArt aivilo89@hotmail.com

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Graphic Design Artist


Celso Batilo Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. I’m a graphic design major at CSUEB going for my BFA, estimated to graduate winter 2014. I’m also a Sergeant in the Army Reserves and have been deployed twice. I plan on retiring in the Army, so I’m trying to find a place in the army where I can use my graphic design skills, such as in the media branch of the Army. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. When I was trying to figure out what to major in I had special conditions that I follow. I asked myself, What am I good at? What would I want to do or see myself doing if the Army didn't work out? What job would let me spend time with my family, at the same time earn enough to support them. Graphic Design is what I came up with. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. Remembering what neighborhood I came from. A lot of people I know [are] either in jail for a really long time or dead. My strongest memory is looking back at [the] time where I was lucky not to fall in those two categories. Q. What is the scariest experience in school? A. My scariest experience in high school is going to funerals or friends who died. At the age of 14-17, seeing friends lying in caskets with make-up on really change a kid’s look at life. You start to realize how short life is and that you could be next.

Q. What is your dream project? A. My dream project would to work on a team that re-branded a big identity such as Adidas or Gatorade. Saying Nike or Jordan would be too extreme. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? “Fight to the Finish. You can do anything in life. You've endured more than any normal person is willing to endure. Everything else in your life will never be hard again. Remember that men.” –COLONEL THOMAS D "TOMMY" BOCCARDI

Q. Can you describe the experience, person or training that has had the greatest impact on your artistic career? A. I would have to say my military training. I always had trouble focusing and in art no focus=no creativity. The Army has taught me time management which can help me in meeting deadlines in my graphic design career.

Q. What are you currently working on? A. I’m working on wine labels, packaging and a brochure. I’m also working on my BFA project. I’m creating a comic book that’s going to complement my action figure packaging design. Q. What are the themes and inspiration for your new work? A. I'm just trying to improve my portfolio. Create pieces that show my digital skills. I look at websites of potential employers and see what projects they have done and try to have pieces like that in my portfolio.

Q. What is your favorite art work? A. I have a lot of favorites that we’ve seen in Dr. Levy’s classes, but I always have been especially fond of graffiti and street art. The reason being, street artist don’t have that luxury of time. They have to produce it fast because sometimes [their] art is considered illegal.

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To r y D e O r i a n Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Tory DeOrian and I am a graphic illustrator! I'm graduating in December 2013 with my degree in Graphic Design and I am totally loving college. While in school, I work as a faerie for children's birthday parties, but will hang up my wings when the right design job presents itself. I'm always covered in glitter and it's so much fun. Q. Why be an Art major? A. Art is my passion! I wish to make people happy with my sunny thoughts and bright imagination. Earning my degree in art has expanded my knowledge of tools and materials and introduced me to a fabulous network of other artists.  Q. Who is your favorite artist? A. My favorite artist is Oliver Jeffers for his beautiful children’s books and detailed illustrations. His stories are wildly creative and he is exactly what I aspire to be. His work has made me happy and I’m sure I’m not the only one! I hope that my talent can someday reach as many people as his talent has. Q. What is your dream project? A. To write and illustrate a world-renowned children's book. I have developed a lot of adorable little creatures that will be featured in my books. I’ll explain their story and why they are so fabulous for being different and unique. I want my books to be about friendship, happiness, and what makes each person and creature on Earth special. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Execute your craziest ideas! My Creativity and Innovation Professor on the Disney College Program put something into great perspective. He asked us "How many Beyonce songs can you name?" The average was ten. Then he asked us "How many songs does Beyonce actually have?" We decided she probably has more than a hundred. The point is to execute your maximum number of ideas. Some will be duds but the best ones will shine. 

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Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. I suggest to take workshops and weekend art classes outside of school. I've taken classes at The Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco that opened me up to a whole new world. Paper Source also has some fabulous workshops. I went away for an internship with The Disney College Program in Orlando, Florida where I earned my degree in Creativity and Innovation. I wouldn't have traded that experience for the world and hope that incoming students open their eyes to the amazing opportunities that college presents! Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. My goal is to be a renowned illustrator, with a reputation that grows with my hard work: Greeting Cards, Wedding Suites, Stationery, Children's Books, etc. I want people to look at my work and say "Hey! That's Tory DeOrian!"  Q. What is Tory DeOrian style? A. My greeting cards are for all different times of the year. My style is whimsical, colorful, happy. I want my wild imagination to make people smile. I want people to use my greeting cards and wedding stationery to brighten up their celebrations and make them memorable. Greeting cards are so often tossed away and forgotten. I see the value in giving someone a card that can be framed or adored in a photo album or scrapbook. Giving a well-made, colorful card sends more than a greeting and can be as personal as you wish. I see it as a mini piece of art with a message inside that will remind them of your appreciation forever. Q. What are you currently working on? A. I'm currently working on my senior project! I want it to blow people out of the water. I've begun designing greeting cards for major holidays, and will continue my project to include gift tags and some wedding stationery. Q. What do you find to be the most challenging aspect of you work technically? A. Oh boy! When an idea doesn't pan out like I intended, that's so lame. I usually put it away and come back to it, or dump the idea all together and accept the fact that my solution probably lies somewhere else. 

Q. Do you have a set schedule of working creatively everyday or is the process more fluid? A. YES! My schedule means everything. During my senior project, I have school MondayThursday. I work on Saturdays, so Friday and Sunday I spend ALL day working away with my Wacom tablet. Being that I am so focused on school, I've cut my workouts down to three times a week (but maybe that's just my excuse to exercise less! *wink*). 


Graphic Design Artist


Graphic Design Artist


Christopher Giron Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Christopher Giron. I am currently going to school at CSUEB. My major is in art, with the option in Graphic Design. Drawing and designing is my passion. Also, I work as a student assistant for the Veterans Office in CSUEB. I am a proud member of Alpha Kappa Omega Fraternity. For my free time I like to spend it with my family and friends. I dance Hawaiian Hula at the Academy of Hawaiian Arts. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. It started when I was young, about 2 years old. My mom would never be able to shut me up until she gave me crayons and paper. In my teen years, I grew a love for design after being introduced to Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and ImageReady. I used the programs to personalize my Blog sites. In college, I was a Business Major and a Nursing major but I did not enjoy taking any of those classes. Some people saw me when I was in nursing and knew I wasn’t happy. I went to vocational school and graduated in 2010. I worked in the medical field for a few years until I got hired at Google for a two year contract. My time there was very successful and revived my drive to finish my college degree. So I came back to CSUEB pursuing a degree in Business. I also realized that I did not want to be a Business major so I converted to an Art major. Since then I've really enjoyed being in school and became determined to be successful in the graphic design field. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. Strongest memory of my childhood was when I would hang out with my friends in my neighborhood every weekend and after school. I always had an amazing time when I was with them. It was always like an adventure. Unfortunately, we are all relocated in different parts of the world now.

Q. What is your favorite art work piece, style or series? A. My favorite art series has got to be the Geisha compilation of Zoe Lachhei. Her art work is remarkable! Q. Which artist(s) inspire you for your new artwork today? A. Recently, I am totally in love with Audrey Kawasaki's work. Her art style influences a lot of my current artwork. There is something about the women she draws and paints. It intrigues me when I see their expressions and body placement. In addition, all of the women she paints are very beautiful. They are created from the top of her head. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Do internships, get your name out there, and make connections. It's also important to build a really good portfolio. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. My goal is to work for various companies as their designer for anything they need. Graphic design, web design, illustrations, photography, et cetera. I want to be a designer known to be adaptable to any projects given while producing well executed designs.

Q. Can you describe the experience, person or training that has had the greatest impact on your artistic career? A. I was privileged to be a part of the Academy of Art University high school program for a few years. This training drastically change the way I create my artwork. I was introduced to college level art classes in graphic design, interior design, film/media, photography, and figure drawing. Every Saturdays I would have class from 10:30am until 5:00pm for 10 weeks. Each Saturdays for 10 weeks we would focus on one subject and after the ten weeks we would switch to another for another 10 weeks. Just like college. This prepared me for what I expect in art classes in the future. It was intense but I was very honored to have experienced it. Q. What part of your artwork gives you the most happiness? A. The middle part the process of creating an art piece gives me the most happiness. Starting an art piece can be challenging because you would have to plan what your going to have to create. You have to make sure it is going to be wonderful. Ending the piece is a little depressing because it means the piece is almost done. I like the middle part where the artist just gets lost into the piece of art they are creating.

Q: What company would you like to work for? A. I haven’t thought of that yet. I was researching for different places but it might be too early since I’m new. I was looking at some of the requirements and I’m not quite there because I'm still new. In the future, I would like to work for companies like Project6 Designs. They are the world renown, award winning Graphic Design firm in San Francisco Bay Area. What are you currently working on? A. I am currently working on a lot of my own design work. I am researching a lot about what makes a good design and how to create them. My only challenge is that I want more guidance. I want to connect with teachers for guidance with work that I plan to display in my portfolio. I am also in the process of making a website and utilizing social media to showcase my artwork.

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Altoni Leen Cabling Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. I’m Altoni Leen, that’s my full first name. Most people just call me Altoni for short. I love to bake specially made cupcakes. I think everyone knows that about me and I would love to think I’m a patisserie connoisseur but cupcakes are just my thing. I work two jobs, one at the print lab at Cal State East Bay and one at Old Navy. I work at the print lab as a Senior Lab Technician, Monday to Thursday, and I’m a Sellebrity (Store Associate) at Old Navy. I’m part of the Marketing team, Markdown team, and the Shipment team at Old Navy so I work the early morning shifts that usually starts at 3 am. That allows me to still do my Print Lab job that starts at 9 am. Aside from those jobs, I am also a part time Senior at California State University, East Bay and I’m finishing up my Bachelors Degree in Art with a Graphic Design option this quarter. As you can see, that’s my whole day schedule all detailed out and that doesn’t even include the hours I spend on homework and the freelance work I do on the side. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. Well, I grew up in a family of artists. More towards computer arts and not so much fine arts type of family. Both of my parents are Architects and my little brother is pursuing a degree in Animation. I guess you could say it’s in my blood. I originally wanted to be a chef and study Pastry Arts right after high school. Still in the line of being artistic and creative but I’m passionately into baking. However, my parents thought it was just a hobby and not a career where I can get a decent job with a decent pay. Many thought I would pick to be an Architect too but Graphic Design was the best choice for me. Having that luxury of being exposed to a computer at a young age and trying to keep the creative side of me, led me to picking a Graphic Design program in college. Q. What is the scariest experience in school? A. The most scariest experience is if I get a B- or A-, because if my parents see a A-, they would be like , “What? You are just in school, doing homework,.Why did you get an A-?” I’m expected to always get an A. So for me to get a B would be like getting an F. Now that I’m in college, getting a B wasn’t so bad after all. I got my first B in my College Algebra class when I thought I was going to get a D because it was a challenging class. When I saw my grade, it was the first time I was happy to see a B on my report card.

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Q. Which artist(s) inspire you? A. Walter Landor, who re-designed Coca-Cola’s signature logo, worked on the FedEx logo, the Cotton Company and many more. He was involved in branding the big companies we now know of—very simple but yet conveys a message. That’s really hard to do and he does a very good job at it. He established his headquarters, Landor Associates, located in San Francisco, Ca. I would love to work for them. But before I learned about Walter Landor and the rest of the other artists in the world, there had been several artists that inspired my whole life: my lovely parents, Arnold and Arlene. I can’t thank them enough for making me the way I am now. Q. What is the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. My teacher back in high school was like a second mom to me. She was my Business Ownership and Marketing teacher. She teaches students how to properly act in a professional environment but yet she is clumsy and super sweet around her students. It’s like she has this split persona. She told me that, “Do what you love and money will follow” She also said, “Don’t force yourself to love something just because there is money involved.” You are going to end up regretting it. You are going to grow old and look back and think, ‘Why did I do this?’ Then after years of doing that the same old boring job, the time you have left to do what you love will be limited. She always said, “Find that one thing you love doing, do it, and eventually money will come. If not, at least you did what you loved. It’s a win-win situation." Professionally, what is your goal? A. Right after college, I would like to work at a design firm or for a company within their creative department. I been working at Old Navy for two years now and this company is under Gap Inc. so I would like to try my luck my put my skills to the test and see if I could find a career job within Gap. I also would like to give Landor Associates and other companies a try and see If I fit in their environment. In the long run, I want to own a bakery. I want to sell cupcakes and make custom ones too. It would be cool to have my first location in San Francisco and maybe work my way up to New York or down in Los Angeles.

Q. What advice would you give incoming art students? 1. Take advantage of the resources you have that’s being offered by the teachers and campus, but at the same time, don’t depend on it. Do your research out of campus. Just like in printing, don’t always rely on the print lab, go out there and talk to other print shops, learn more about different kinds of paper and printing formats. In the long-run, the print lab is not going to be here to help you. 2. Network as much as you can. I’m not talking about get a facebook and be friends with everyone but actually learn how to put yourself out there and meet different professionals in your field of study. 3. Be involved in the art community. Don’t put yourself in a closed box, in your room working on assignments and design away. Go to art galleries, go to drawing/sketching events, and talk to other artists. There are some great local events here in the Bay Area for artists.


Graphic Design Artist


Graphic Design Artist


Martin Hoang Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Martin Hoang and I’m 20 years old. I’m a junior here at CSUEB. I work as a graphic designer, photographer and videographer at Reach Ashland Youth Center. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. Why not be an art major? Being an art major means being a genius in art. Being an engineer is being a genius and inventing. Being a doctor is being a genius about the human body. We all coexist in this world and we need one as much as another. The fact that people don’t look at art as something we need in this world makes me want to be an art major. I want to prove to these people that if I can make a living off it, they can too. Picasso once said, “Every child starts off as an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” Art gives the world hope when there isn’t any. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. It would be my first trip back to Vietnam with my dad. That’s when my grandmother died and I didn’t know. This was when I was about three years old at the time and it was my first experience in the country life. There were chickens, wild ox and oxen. I just remember I held this one chicken throughout the whole time when I was at my dad’s house. I would just stroke the chicken and feed it. This would be my earliest memory. Q. What is the scariest experience in school? A. Giving myself such a high expectation every quarter. Every first day of class I would challenge myself to meet as many people as possible. Yes, it’s uncomfortable, but it forces me to network and give myself confidence I would need later on.

Q. What is your dream project? A. It would be Kate Upton for GQ magazine in Hawaii. That would be my dream. I’m just kidding, to be honest with you, I would love to travel the world and do photography for National Geographic. That was my first and still my big dream to do so. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. To never give up on my dream. My badminton coach and physiology teacher Gary Duran from Mount Eden high school in Hayward said, “The only reason why people give up on their dreams is because someone told you that you couldn’t do it. That message affects mind and it stops you from going for it.” The person who told you that you couldn’t achieve your dreams probably failed themselves, and so they told you that you couldn’t achieve yours either. I’ll never let another person tell me I couldn’t do something ever again. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. Never give up. It’s going to be hard regardless what job you go for. It’s how you go on about it and how you find that solution to it that really matters. It’s not all about just designing something, it’s also about networking, representing yourself to clients, and not depending on your diploma only. Go out there and be ahead of the game, because there will be thousands of other graphic designers graduating the same time as you.

Q: Do you have any tips to help with time management? A. My only tip is don’t overwhelm yourself. Take what you can handle, fill up your plate all the way up and don’t take seconds. Whatever you have on your plate, finish it off and take your time. Once it’s done, then you can start scooping up more. Q. What are you currently working on? A. I am also working on my independent study for photography class. I’m going to be working on a skater photo shoot. Most of the kids I’m going to be taking photos for are all sponsored by different skateboarding brands. I want to take photographs of these skaters, post it and let them know where they came from. Another project is inspired by the song, “Crooked smiles” by J.Cole . A lot of these kids try really hard not to represent where they are from. They want to forget where they are from. Your roots are really important for you and where you come from because that’s what made you today. Q. What are the themes and inspiration for your new work? A. The themes and inspirations for my work come from the positivity I see in the world. We’re always reminded of how cruel this world can be. It’s good to have something to remind you it’s not all that bad.

Q: How do you handle stress? A. When you are doing something you love, it’s not too stressful. My new thing is that I don’t touch Photoshop on the weekends. I usually workout and hit the gym to be active.

Q. Which artist(s) inspire you? A. I always look back to Banksy. Banksy proves to me that you don’t need your work in a museum to be considered a “successful” artist. As long as you do what you love, people will take notice. Who cares what others think of you and your success. As long as you’re successful in your mind and love what you do, that’s all that really matters.

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Chase Meë Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Chase Meë. I am a graphic designer and Advertiser. I love, a deep love for marketing. I think that it is used in everyday life the same we use oxygen. Every second you can change the way people think about you whether that be bad or good. The fact marketing is a part of your brand. Your brand needs to be promoted if you want to be successful in life. Q. Why be an Art major? A. Why be anything? If I was to wake up one day and all I wanted to do was be a surgeon I’d take my ass to medical school. If I wanted to fight fires I’d take my ass to the fire academy. I chose being an art major because that’s what I love doing and I’m not bad at it either. I found what I like doing. I don’t take breaks from working on projects or get distracted, or even have to force myself to work because I love doing what I do. The moment you start feeling like what you’re doing is a hassle, pick something else to do for a living. Q. What is your favorite art work? A. I really don’t have a favorite but I would say the one that I am most proud of is my old room at my mom’s old house. I covered every inch of white space with something. I had anything from a drunk Bart Simpson to the Black Panther logo. It took me from 2007-2011 to fill every inch of white wall. Sine [then] my mom’s old house was sold it has since been painted over, but from what I’ve heard the Panther bleeds through the white paint. Q. Which artist(s) inspire you? A. I don’t really look up to any artist in particular. I really like the people that take their craft seriously and work hard at perfecting it. Take a look at someone like Benny Gold that worked in the corporate cesspool for years and felt like this isn’t anything he wants to do so he quit with the bullshit and started a clothing line, and it looks like he’s having the time of his life. People like that, even if their work isn’t the best, the fact that they work hard to work hard and the effort isn’t just for a dollar. Q. What is your dream project? A. Clothing line, I love the feeling when someone is walking around in a shirt that I made from scratch. Sh*t is orgasmic. I would love to design a jersey for a sports team as well. Getting an opportunity like that, that’s what dreams are made of.

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Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. Take the time to prefect your craft. Once you find what it is then there won’t be enough hours in the day. That is when life wakes you in the morning, not an alarm clock. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. At the moment I am the definition of struggling artist. So to not be that. I would love to own a clothing shop and have a restaurant connected to it. The restaurant would only serve BBQ chicken pizza, hot wings, tacos for exactly $1, torta al pastor, and French fries and those would all be amazing. Q. What brings inspiration for your new work? A. I figured I have a dream so starting towards that would be nice, at least I feel like the effort I’d put into it would be great. I don’t like doing things I don’t want to do. Which is obvious but I don’t think people get that concept. Like I don’t want to work retail, so I wont ever work retail I’d rather starve than work retail. I feel like things like that are worst than hell. So like when people just come up with bullshit to work on just to get it done I feel like really? You’re wasting everyone’s time— go home. Q. Where do you draw or create your initial ideas? A. To be honest I just like being around people. When I talk to people, it gives me all sorts of ideas. It could have nothing to do with what I have to work on but the company gives me, I don’t know, something.. Q. Do you have a set schedule of working creatively everyday or is the process more fluid? A. Fluid, I never set myself time to work, because that’s bullsh*t. I work all the time. Every breath I take is a part of my creative process. Q. What part of your artwork gives you the most happiness and do you find your creative process to be more rational or instinctive? A. I would say instinctive, but everything brings me happiness. But to pin point something I would say that moment when you start something and you have no idea what to do, so you take a walk, come back, still nothing, do laundry, come back still nothing, and then out of nowhere the perfect concept comes to your mind and it’s like an epiphany. I truly love that moment.

Q. Which CSUEB class inspired you most and why? A. I would to say that my web authoring class. I had ZERO love for coding before I took it. For the most part now, I feel like I am a beast at it. Also the stories Ian Pollack used to tell us were great. Ian Pollack once said, “Anyone can come up with one good idea, a great designer comes up with 15 good ideas.”


Graphic Design Artist


Graphic Design Artist


Olivia Smith Who are you and what do you do? A. Hello! My name is Olivia Smith, my major is Graphic Design. I transferred here from Delta college, in Stockton and Mountain House. I’m currently a freelance illustrator on and off. I grew up in the bay area. I was born in Hayward and grew up in Fremont/ Union City, then moved to Tracy when I was in 4th grade and stayed until I started junior college. Then I transferred to East Bay and I now live in Hayward, full circle moment. For fun I like to read, draw and do yoga. I mainly read novels and articles on the Internet. Other than that, I just surf the web and play classic video games or hang out with friends.

Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. I want to be a book cover artist, concept artist or storyboard artist. Something that deals with illustrating and/or layout. I can see myself illustrating for children’s book.

Why Be an Art major? A. I always loved art. I started getting into art when I was about 6 or 7 years old. I just really liked it. I think anime, old Nintendo video games and Disney really inspired me. I use to practice by drawing in their art styles. I kept getting better and having more fun with it. That’s why I’m an art major.

Q. Can you describe the experience, person or training that has had the greatest impact on your artistic career? A. Deviantart. From the ages of 18-21, I was always going on there to explore art. I wasn’t competing with other artists on there, I was competing with myself. I found the art on there to be very inspiring.

Q. What is your favorite art work? A. I love realism and semi-realism old and new. I really like this artist on Deviantart, his name is Jace Wallace. His work is so accurate and inspiring. I hope to reach his skill level one day but with clothed models.

Q. Where do you draw or create your initial ideas? A. Um, they just come anywhere pretty much. Usually when I’m listening to music, watching a movie or TV. I tend to imagine things while listening to music the most. I listen to anything, Pop music, rap, oldies, R&B, classical, soundscapes. I need active music when I draw so it is mainly artists like Madonna, Seal, Outkast, Marvin Gaye, The Doors. Even new artists like Curren$y, Lady Gaga, Odd Future, J. Cole and whatever sounds good to me at the time. As far as movies go, mainly animated movies, like Pixar, Disney, and Ghibli films.

What is your dream project? A. A hit graphic novel and/or cartoon movie. I have created one animated GIFs already. But honestly I would be happy just working for a small company or freelancing for the rest of my life. Or even starting my own graphic design company would be nice. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. I pretty much sum up my own advice. Just to keep my feet on the ground, stay positive and everything will work out accordingly. The world is our oyster and we belong here, it’s not as bad as it seems, you see what you want to see. The ground will always be there when we fall and it doesn’t judge us, it comforts us.

Q. What are you currently working on? A. Right now I’m on/off working on my comics. I have two comics. One of them, I’m still trying to figure it out. I have another one I started working on since I was 16. It’s taking long because life gets in the way. Right now it’s about 150 pages long. It’s a web comic. It’s taking awhile. In my digital imaging class I am working on a fantasy landscape..

Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. Keep an open mind.

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Advice

It's okay to be yourself


Multimedia

Featured Artists Taylor McCullough

tmccullough@horizon.csueastbay.edu

Jonard La Rosa

www.nsomniart.com jo@nsomniart.com

Charles Williams Jeffrey Clemente

charlesrodger_w@yahoo.com

Jessica Attard

www.jessattard.com jessjess0624@yahoo.com

jclemente.cmma@gmail.com

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Ta y l o r M c C u l l o u g h Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Taylor A. McCullough and I’m a senior. My major is Multimedia, I do design and animation. I don’t work cause I don’t have a car. It’s hard to get a job without a car. Yeah, so, I’m a full time student. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. Why not?! What is wrong with people who don’t want to be art majors? They are pretty damn awesome. Q. What is your favorite art work? A. I don’t really have a favorite style, I prefer cartoony style over any. Anything that is super real is like —meh. I like the cartooniness because you can be a more playful person. Q. "Cartoony," is that regarding American cartoon style or Anime? A. Both, a mixture of those two. It’s so beautiful. Transformers is the current cartoon that I like. I actually want to work for Hasbro. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Keep practicing and don’t give up stupid. I would get really down on myself. You know how you get better? You practice stupid. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. I want to work for Hasbro, they just opened an animation office, so Hasbro is going to make the Transformers show. Before they use to commission studios in Canada and Japan. Q. What are you currently working on? A. Animation. I work on a lot of projects. I’m learning flash, the program. The first one was a stop-motion one. It was alright. There was one part I scream in it. So I scared everyone every time.

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Q. What do you find to be the most challenging aspect of your work technically? A. Timing in the animation, you have to get everything just perfect. If something is just half a second off it can blow off the whole thing. Start off with a story board, write down the scenes I want. How long each scene is going to take.

Q. What art course did you find the most challenging? A. I guess, figure drawing, with Kirk. You have to do realism. I used to do realistic drawings with charcoal. Some reason it wont click again.

Q. Do you have a set schedule of working creatively everyday or is the process more fluid? A. I’m definitely more fluid. Unless I’m working on a project, but if I’m feeling like, eh, I’m drawing this now. I feel more comfortable to work at night than during the day. Like if I’m going to work on a project at 8 PM then I’ll work until midnight.

Q. Which instructor helped you the most in your work here at CSUEB? A. All of the instructors have been helpful. Suzy, Kirk, Gwyan Rhabyt helped me the most, the three main ones. Suzy, since I had her the most.

Q. Which do you prefer, quarter or semester system? A. That’s what I wrote on my writing test on. Yeah! I passed. I chose quarter system because I didn’t really care. You get out faster and pay less in debt. It’s more convenient for students who have families. It doesn’t drag out too long. I favor more with the quarter system because it would help me get out of here quicker. I been tired of school since high school. I just want to start animating stuff. I just want to get in the field now. Q. Which CSUEB classes inspired you the most and why? A. Animation with Gwyan Rhabyt, because it helped me think differently. Animation, I finally realize I can do animation. Before, I had all these ideas but didn’t know how to execute them. Once I knew Flash, I was like, “Oh my gosh.” The class with Suzy, Illustration, allowed me to experiment with different mediums, which I appreciate. You get a bare minimum base of the project and you can do whatever you want.


Multimedia Artist


Multimedia Artist


Jonard L a Rosa Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Jonard La Rosa, I work in the ASI marketing department and I do posters, web graphics, random stuff like t-shirt or car charger give-aways. Outside of that I sometimes do freelancing for clients, band, small shop, DJs, make websites, press kits, design a logo in a Youtube channel—general freelance. Q. Why be an Art major? A. I already knew I wanted to make video games or create a cartoon. Multimedia is really suited for what kind of artist I want to be. It’s because I didn’t really see it as one thing—like to stick with it. It’s not so much of why be an art major but what can I get out of this major, multimedia. Multimedia seems to be the best suited for me. Q. What is your dream project? A. I want to do this, I want to have this company where the characters represented in games, then have their own cartoons and/or webcomics. Fans have an option to buy merchandise that feature these characters. Have all that on a website. I kind of want an emphasis on video games and even comics. Instead of TV into a game. I really want it to come from the characters. If the character is liked enough, it transcends to other mediums. People would draw fan art work. It’s more of creating a character and a story, so thats like my dream. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. “Fake it till you make it. Do what it takes and keep learning. " Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? 1. “Don’t need permission to excel. You are not going to get kicked out for doing more.” 2 “It’s easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.”

Q. What is the scariest experience in school? A. Scariest experience is probably being disqualified for financial aid. I had chronic fever and it was really hard to concentrate for the whole quarter. The teacher saw me and ask, “Did you see a doctor? You should see one.” Eventually, I found out I had a sinus infection. I never had that before and I had no idea. So I was like, “No, it’s just allergies.” It was allergies, but if you don’t take care of your allergies, like meaning taking Antihistamines or taking other things to keep your sinus dry,

Q. What part of your artwork gives you the most happiness? A. Well, for one, it’s a little bit of everything. Have you ever laughed so hard when you see something so cool? Like, it just blow you off. It’s like, “Oh man, this is amazing!” When you finally play a demo of a game you just started making. I get that feeling like “it’s alive!”

then if you are just keeping it runny and wet, it’s open for bacteria in there—then getting a sinus infection. So, I had to take antibiotics. I was late all the time. I just had super bad grades over several months. The teachers tried to give extensions but even so, it was difficult to catch up with all the classes. They are all art classes so three hours labs. Anyways, my GPA dropped below 2.0 and got disqualified and I was like, “ Aw, F*ck.” But I was able to write an appeal and raised my GPA to 2.7. I have been getting straight A’s. Also around that time, 2008, the recession was going on, what made that period even harder. Right after I got that appeal, my family was losing our house to foreclosure. Right after that quarter, I can’t do it, we have to find a place to live. My brother was the bread winner, my parents don’t have college degree, they have low-paying jobs. We couldn’t afford a house anymore. It went to foreclosure and then I needed to stop school and get a full time job. We were trying so hard to find anywhere to live. We ended up settling with a 3 bedroom and half room. The lady that did help was a suspicious illegal lady from China. Silver lining, I actually got a full time job at Namco Bandai and so I got a taste of being inside the video game industry. I got to see the development work and relationship between game developer and game testers. It’s pretty interesting experience.

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Charles Williams Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Charles Rodger Williams. I am an artist and a dancer. Right now, I’m a student and I have three jobs, two of them teaching dance and another working at a private school. I teach at Academy of the Performing arts in Tracy and at Holly Rochelle Dance company in Manteca. Q. How do you manage your time? A. I had to buy a car first. It’s a lot of commuting. I work in San Jose, Manteca, and Tracy. My girlfriend also goes to San Francisco State, so the whole bay area from Tracy where I drive, not to mention school! I just have to schedule and budget my time on paper. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. Since I was nine, I never really had access to formal training of any. Actually I didn’t start shading or learning dimensions until 8th grade and freshmen year in high school. My dad was the artist in the family. He always encouraged me. It’s just a passion I have. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. First freehand copy I did of Dragon Ball Z and it was when Gotan and Trunks would fuse together and power up. I never drew or paid attention to detail before that. I have no idea how long it took but it remains one of my favorite pieces of all time. Q. What is your favorite art work? A. One of my all time pieces is Michaelangelo’s “The Creation of Adam” in the Sistine Chapel. I actually got to see it in person when I was in high school. It was on a big Europe trip and I got to go. It was, i can’t even explain it. It was incredible. It was completely silent and we couldn’t make a sound—we just looked. Yeah, it was really intense but I have to say “The Creation of Adam” is my all-time favorite. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Relax, don’t beat yourself up, take a break and don’t throw it away. Back up and look at your art.

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Q. What are you currently working on? A. I am really new to electronic arts and I’m rusty on traditional arts. I’m studying history of Art and Technology and Modern Art. I’m taking Basics of New Media so I’m learning Adobe Illustrator and I’m looking forward to going pass that. I’m getting a feel for electronic arts. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. I would like to work in Southern California for a while. As an artist, I would like to have some experience at an animation studio, something like Pixar or DreamWorks. I want to work in that field, study that process and hopefully I can acquire the skills to succeed at places like these. I am a bit behind but I’m trying to manage my dance and my art. Q. Where do you draw or create your initial ideas? A. Everywhere. I would definitely choreograph or envision something in my head. It can be seeing how someone fell out of a car in a movie to seeing a sun reflecting in the waves. Everywhere I am I always try to draw inspiration. Sometimes I draw it out but usually I just go for it. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. Just be diligent. Don’t slack at any point. Even if you aren’t doing art, do art. Devote at least an hour a day of just doing it. Sharing is what you want to do. Diligence and consistency is pretty much it. Q. Which CSUEB class inspired you the most and why? A. Painting 2 & 3 with Grace. I was able to find myself and my style. That’s when I learned to go for it. I started with acrylic and it dries quickly, so I had to go for it. I found myself as an artist in this time.

Q. What is your dream project? A. If I could, I would love to choreograph and fully animate a dance movie. With all kinds of dance such as ballet, hip-hop, and modern. All those dance movies we see over and over again, I’m going to switch it up and animate it. Get the dancers and choreograph it myself. Animate the whole thing. Even if it’s just a short animation it would be amazing. Music would range from Björk to Chris Brown. I just want a wide range of music.


Multimedia Artist


Multimedia Artist


Jef frey Clemente Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Jeffrey Clemente and my major is Multimedia. My nationality is Filipino mixed with Spaniard blood. I live in Hayward. My hobbies are martial arts: I know taekwondo (yellow belt), Olympic taekwondo(yellow belt), Judo (green belt) but at the moment I'm not doing any because I need to focus on my education. My other hobbies are: watching anime, playing video games, reading manga, watching movies, hanging out with friends, drawing, making videos and more. I'm Christian it’s more like a relationship with God like a friend. I'm a Sunday school teacher in my church and I teach the children about the bible. Q. Why be an Art major? A. At first, I was undecided so I focus on my G.E. requirements. They don’t have my favorite major, which is game design. I chose Graphic Design, and then changed to Multimedia because it was the closest thing to working with the gaming industry and I am familiar with Multimedia. I am currently a junior at CSUEB. My goal is to graduate in two years due to family concerns. I’m pushing myself to the limit. Q. What is your favorite art style? A. I would say my favorite style will be Anime, it means Japanese productions. They have more detail than compared to American style. American style in comics do too much shading that covers some of the details. Anime have realistic details like for example, the body, they draw the joints, limbs, and other body parts of the body very realistic. American Cartoons such as Adventure Time have like noodle arms and the drawing are not as detail but, their style is more simple. However, I do watch American cartoons because they are funny, interesting stories and they are entertaining to watch. I am both sides when it comes to entertainment.

Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Life is getting difficult especially with drama. It’s better to leave drama in the past behind, and move on. Have faith, God is always there for you, and even though you are going through hard times. My youth leader say, “Do what is right even if you stand alone.” Q. What is your dream project? A. My dream project took about 4 years to write and develop this story. Also, the story’s time line is 4 years starting from 2009-2013. It would be an Anime and a video game. It is a love story that is a better love story than Twilight. The characters are in a long distant relationship. There is drama, comedy, suspense, and action in the story. It’s based on true events in life. There are two protagonists, the boyfriend named Jack and the girlfriend named Ren. Ren is multi-talented, she knows 6 types of martial arts, she can sing, she is a composer, she knows how to use many musical instruments and much more. Jack at first was obese, weak and a loser. However, Jack gets inspired by Ren and decides to learn mixed martial arts. The conflict of the story is suspense because the characters are trying to figure out what is causing accidents. Later on in the story, Ren is being followed by a ghost and she gets cursed. Ren gets stabbed, got hit by a car, fights with gangs and other problems. The script isn’t done but I’m trying to cut it short. If it was a video game it would be a beat’em up side scrolling game. In the game, it would have RPG elements, upgrades, real techniques from martial arts, you can buy clothes and cosplay costumes, and much more. It would have multiple endings in the end of the game. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. Do your best if possible. Do what you love doing and follow your passion. Show your innovations and ideas. Study hard and do not procrastinate because it is a bad habit. Be focus and manage your time.

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Jessica Attard Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Jessica Attard. I am a 2D/3D Animator. I am graduating with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Studio Art with emphasis in Multimedia. I am currently unemployed, but in pursuit of a full-time position as soon as school ends. I am an intern for a motion capture company. I enjoy dancing, drawing, camping, painting and spending time with my family. Q. Why be an Art major? A. I chose to be an Art major because I am passion driven in creating Art with life. I decided on an Art major since I was in high school. I started out by taking graphic design courses and then I realized that my heart was not as passionate about it as I am with Animation. Q. What is the scariest experience in school? A. My scariest experience in school would have to be speech class. I had to overcome my fear of speaking in front of people. In community college, I had to take a speech class. I despised it. I think I cried the first day we had class. My teacher had us draw our topic from a hat. I got “thank friends and family for coming to your husband/wife’s funeral.” I had to wing it and make a speech based on that. After that day, I realized it can’t get much worse. I ended up getting more and more comfortable with speaking in front of people. Q. What are you currently working on? A. I am currently working on my senior project, which is a five minute animation of my inspirational art story. After all, everyone has a story. Q. Which artists inspire you? A. I am inspired by Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Modigliani, and Julius Sanchez. I enjoy Diego Rivera’s “Symbolic Landscape”. Frida Kahlo painted mostly about her pain, as she spent several years in a hospital. Her “Broken Column” painting really grabbed my attention. Julius Sanchez is an amazing present day artist. He has formulated a program that eliminates film motion capture suits. I intern for him, and every day I continue to learn more of his intellect. I could not ask for a greater gift.

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Q. What is your dream project? A. My dream project is to complete a full-length film animation on my own. I mean ALL aspects…(all but voice overs, I don’t do many voices). I want to sketch, storyboard, illustrate the landscapes, character rig, skin the characters, and animate all on my own. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. The best advice that I've been given is "Always have confidence in your artwork. If you aren’t proud of it, I won’t even want to see it.” This advice was given to me by Jack Chang, a concept artist at Gree Games, Inc. He has also been a sketch artist for Pixar. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. My advice would be to keep pushing. It is so easy to give up, or feel unworthy. You deserve this chance. Keep practicing and keep driving towards your goal. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. My goal is to work on a team of animators at a well-known studio that creates animated motion pictures. A team-environment that is fun, energetic and openly collaborative. I would enjoy working for people that are as outgoing and productive as I am. Q. Can you describe the experience, person or training that has had the greatest impact on your artistic career? A. I would say that my mentor and boss, Julius Sanchez, has inspired me a lot. He has introduced me to a new way of thinking. He has begun to train me on 3D animation, to expand my career skills. Q. What do you find to be the most challenging aspect of your work technically? A. The most challenging technical aspect of my career right now would be that I over think aspects. When it comes time to make the images come to life, I get frustrated if I do not know how to do one simple idea in the program. I have bigger creative ideas than I know how to work on my computer so far. I can never stop learning.

Q. Do you have a set schedule of working creatively everyday or is the process more fluid? A. The process is more fluid for me. I would love to set additional time aside each day to create art, but I don't. I like to feel like creating, prior to feeling like I need to create. When the pressure is on, I don't want to do it as much. Q. What part of your artwork gives you the most happiness? A. My favorite part is seeing my artwork come to life. It's the best feeling in the world. True accomplishment is knowing that I did something that I can share with the world and make them smile.


Multimedia Artist


"You don't take a photograph, you make it." —Ansel Adams


Featured Artists Andrew Parker

www.awpphoto.com pokornowski@outlook.com

Monique Blodgett

www.cillaploushe.com cillaploushe@gmail.com

Richie Desamito

richdesamito@gmail.com

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Andrew Parker Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. I am Andrew Parker. I work at Starbucks as a barista and I am a BFA photo student. The current project I’m working on is to build up my portfolio for my senior show which is next quarter. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. When I first came to school, I was pursuing a BS in biochemistry. In my second year I was really dissatisfied with the program here. I was trying to fill up my F1 requirement so I took a black and white class with Paula. She encouraged me and I went for it. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. When I was 5-years-old I was, in a catholic youth basketball team. There was this gravel court and apparently we haven’t cleared all the sharp rocks yet. I was pushed over and my knee landed on a sharp rock and split my knee right to the bone. I remember feeling no pain whatsoever. I was in immediate shock. Q. What is your favorite art work? A. I liked Rothko’s "Orange and Yellow" but I’m more drawn to literary arts than visual arts. Favorite authors like Andrzej Sapkowsk with "Last Wish" and any book by Robert E. Howard. Q. Which artist(s) inspire you? A. I get most of the inspiration from the books I read. Probably the one that I’m drawing most from to my images is Jim Butcher and his series of novels. His stories are a mix of mystery and fantasy style. Q. What is your dream project? A. I really would like to be a director of photography for a movie set. I feel like much of my work takes the form of a story or a sequence of events I’d like to apply that thought into a motion picture. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. I can’t remember who told me this but they said, “You can always work harder.”

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Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. You need a job. It’s a really expensive major. Printing and framing cost a lot of money and if your going to attempt film then you need to buy the chemicals, film and paper. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. I really would like to at least try my hand and do art professionally. I’m a really practical person so I probably find a job anywhere…really. I would probably head toward assignments and editorial work. Q. What are you currently working on? A. I’m doing a series kind of a mixture of night landscapes and portraiture with a sort of a supernatural theme—ghosts. I have always been interested in ghost stories and that kind of thing. I’ve read a ton of folkore stories. I get a lot of my ideas from the old Polish and Irish tales of monsters. Q. What do you find to be the most challenging aspect of your work technically? A. Finding models willing to stay up to take their photos in the middle of nowhere from 12 am to 3 am. I can’t just walk up to a random person I don’t know and say, "Hey, would you like to model for me? I think you’d make a great Wilas (pronounced Vilas)." By the way it’s at midnight in the middle of Niles Canyon. Q. Do you have a set schedule of working creatively everyday or is the process more fluid? A. After I’ve come up with the idea and I found a model, I stick with a strict schedule but coming up ideas is rather fluid. It just comes to me.

Q. What part of your artwork gives you the most happiness? A. I kind of enjoy the whole process. I like taking the image, editing and displaying it. There is not one part of the process I don’t feel more fulfilling than the rest. I wouldn’t say it gives me happiness but fulfillment. Q. What makes you happy? A. A good book.


Fine Art Photographer


Fashion Photographer


Monique Blodgett Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Monique Blodgett and I do photography and draw, as well as paint. My major is Art with an option of Photography. Currently I am only working on my major without a minor. I go to school full time and am working when I shoot for others. For fun, I like to write songs, sing, sew, fix electronics, play video games, do puzzles and watch funny movies. I also like to take my daughter to fun places so she can explore and learn. Q. Why be an Art major? A. I was born to create. My heart feels alive when I pursue my talents. I have painted all of my life and have taken photos for the last 12 years. Therefore, I feel like if I were to be doing anything else, I would be lying to myself about what is most important to me. Q. What is your strongest memory of your childhood? A. I remember being about 9 years old with my grandmother and explore life in all its greatness. I really want to record what it is like to be in love in order to give others a chance to experience love in a new setting. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Read Mathews 19:26 “But Jesus beheld them, and said unto them, with men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.” Have 100% faith and keep moving forward. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? Be honest and true to yourself. Be serious about your goals. Always make friendships with others. Don't waste time and just learn how to smile and appreciate the opportunities that you have to make an impact.

Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. I am working towards getting my own photography and art studio so I can start my small business in the next 5 to 6 years. I want to either be involved with high fashion print or go into photojournalism. Overall, my goal is to make an impact on others with my photographs and ideas and to gain the artistic freedom to explore and create, as I desire. Q. What are you currently working on? A. I am doing freelance work right now. I mainly shoot at events for other people and also set up photo shoots for upcoming artist and models. I am working out of San José some of the time and out of Berkeley the rest of the time. The artist that I have worked with are mainly musicians and the models that I get are up and coming individuals who are just starting out to build their careers. Right now I just work for myself but eventually, I would like to work for an agency in the near future. Q. Can you describe the experience; person or training that has had the greatest impact on your artistic career? A. In 2007, I traveled along with 20 other people to Africa (Ghana and Egypt) for two and a half weeks. This journey for me was the most eye opening experience I had ever experienced in my life. Everything from the former slave castles, the beautiful coast, the historical monuments, and the old villages gave me a new perceptive of life. In Cairo, we did things like visit an art museum, visit a textile shop, see the sphinx up close and also were able to touch the oldest pyramid ever built. Overall, this whole trip helped me put in perspective my purpose as a human being and as an artist.

Q. What do you find to be the most challenging aspect of your work technically? A. When it comes to photography, knowing how to adjust and manipulate my lighting is the most challenging thing for me. I prefer using outdoor lighting with my subjects because it feels more organic when I shoot. I think that there are times when I use my external flash and I end up blasting out my subjects with too much light, which causes me to become frustrated but after I finish my work, I do appreciate the studio light that I work with. Q. Where do you draw or create your initial ideas? When it comes to my photography, I do a lot of my work at home. Sometimes if I’m in an area that is peaceful, like the water, I sketch out my ideas. Majority of the time, I tend to plan things right in my head before I make a quick note of what I want to do then I set it up. I really like to play around with the lighting as I go along but I’m still establishing myself in that area. Q. Do you have a set schedule of working creatively everyday or is the process more fluid? A. Right now I have a strict time schedule that only gives me limited time to create. Therefore, when I start my art classes, I will be able to do more creative work on campus and at home. I guess I can say that being in the quarter system causes me to focus more on the curriculum then my personal projects, which is a challenge.

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Richie Desamito Q. Who are you and what do you do? A. My name is Richie Desamito and I am studying photography at CSUEB. Q. What is youre dream job? A. I do have two dream jobs.I want to be an art director for a magazine or to teach photography at a university. Q. Why Be an Art major? A. When I graduated from high school, I wanted to be an art/animation major. My dream in high school was to be an illustrator and animator for Disney. Then, bad things happened and I stopped going to school for a bit. I worked for Barnes and Noble for about 10 years. In my fifth year working there, that’s when I went back to school. I changed my major to English and did that for a while; but my drive for English and literature just went down. After that I got disqualified from San Jose State. Then I switch back to being and art major and I realized that I missed it. I realized that the most inspiration I got were from teachers and art. So I decided to try to do both. As for Photography, It’s something I love doing. I love recreating fantasies that are in my head. Also, photography is something I could use to inspire people. Q. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? A. Try everything. If it doesn’t work then do something else. If you don’t try it, how do you know if it’s not going to work? I use that for my photography a lot. If the lighting doesn’t work, change it. If it’s not working, set aside your pride and change it. Q. What advice would you give for incoming art students? A. Learn everything you can. Learn every technique given to you.

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Q. Which artists inspire you? A. The artist that inspired me in the beginning is August Sander, Eugene Meatyard and Richard Avedon. August Sanders and Meatyard are some of the first photographers I was exposed to when I started taking photography classes. What I love about August Sanders was his way to capture the character of the subject. So I tried to emulate his composition and I tried photographing full body portraits. Meatyard flipped me on my head. When I first saw his portraits with masks, that’s when I realized that photos could have a deeper meaning. His portraits allowed me to look past the faces and look deeper within the subjects. I started looking at the “whole picture.” His images force me to invest my own personal insight into the people he photographed. Richard Avedon amazed me because of his work, In the American West. I just found the work so honest in my eyes. Especially since he was a fashion photographer. He was another photographer who captured the essences of the people he photographed in this project. Q. What is your dream project? A. One of my dream projects is that I want to take photographs of homeless people. I would photograph them in their environment; then take them to the studio and photograph them in the clothing from their last job. One environmental photograph and business portrait of these individuals. The question that I ask in this project would be, “Who and what were they once?” The idea came from CSU Summer Arts. The teachers were talking about some photographer that photographed homeless people but it was very exploitive. He was photographing for himself. I don’t want mine to be exploitive. I want it to help these people. Q. Professionally, what is your goal? A. Professionally my goal is to teach. After I graduate, I’ll work in the field for two years and then go for my masters. For me that’s what I want to do. Photography is just second to teaching. Another dream is that I want to teach and in the summer I want to travel and do photography. I love teaching more than anything else. I also love photography. I want to teach what I love.

Q. Can you describe the experience, person or training that has had the greatest impact on your artistic career? A. It has to be CSU Summer Arts. I took the Documentary Photography class. The guest artist there really pushed me to my limits. It was like Hell’s Kitchen for photographers as far as critiques went. It gave me new ways of looking through the camera lens. Horizontal is my friend now. When people start learning photography, instructors tell you, “Don’t stay horizontal. Try vertical.” Then everyone shoots vertical. I got used to shooting vertical. Then again, I love taking portraits and that’s how portrait photographers usually photograph. That’s why the Documentary class was difficult because I had to photograph differently. In portraiture, I have control over my subject, but in Documentary photography, I wasn’t allowed to touch my surroundings. I had to try to photograph the reality in front of my lens. I couldn’t move things or alter the scene. Q. Where do you draw or create your initial ideas? A. Now I’m starting to draw out my ideas. I am usually at home, but I think I should start going to a park. When I used to write, I used to go to the park. I would actually do a pre-write at a park or bench in a middle of a town square. I used to write with my left hand whenever I was brainstorming. I’m left handed. My parents thought it was bad luck so I had to learn how to write with my right hand. I can write with both hands but only draw with my left hand. Q. What are your thoughts about the CSUEB Art Department? A. I think the photography department is small, that’s for sure. In San Jose State University, they have more teachers and they have more sections. I think quality of instruction is about the same. I think the culture that is created within the art department is the best I have ever experienced. It promotes creativity, especially people like Robert and Evelin. All the students here are so supportive with each other. I’ve never experienced that before, even when I was an English Major.


Fine Art Photographer



Vitae Magazine