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Celebrating the tenth year of sponsorship by BP Open to the public June 2013 Sat 15th - Sun 16th: 10.00 - 17.00 Mon 17th - Fri 21st: 10.00 - 20.00 Sat 22nd: 10.00 - 17.00 Enquiries: (01224) 263600 a.aitchison3@rgu.ac.uk www.rgu.ac.uk/degreeshow Gray’s School of Art Robert Gordon University Garthdee Road Aberdeen AB10 7QD


Welcome to the Degree Show 2013 It is a great pleasure to welcome you to this year’s show, which is also the tenth anniversary of BP’s sponsorship. Once again this year, our graduates will have overcome many obstacles in developing and presenting their work, and some of them will be rewarded with the coveted BP Awards in both Fine Art and Design. Henry Ford once said, “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal”. For the Gray’s graduating students of 2013, the focus of their goal might now change. At a casual glance it might be assumed that their recent goal has been getting a good degree, to learn things, and to achieve things. For some, this is indeed a laudable aim in itself. But it is not the sole purpose of an art or design education at Gray’s. The real experience of that process is firmly focused on developing the individual student in order for them to be able to best engage in their chosen career path and achieve their life ambitions. We would hope that the experience will also have developed sensitivity and respect for others and the environment; will have given them highly effective, transferrable skills in solving problems; the ability to apply their creativity in new contexts; expertise in using knowledge in effective ways, and to ultimately focus on achieving excellence in everything that they do. A few years ago the Arts Council of England was accused of only seeming “to be interested in access”, and that “excellence didn’t get a look in” by Jonathan Reekie, chief executive of the renowned Aldeburgh festival.


At Gray’s we would not necessarily differentiate the two. We would encourage our students to strive for excellence in their practice, but to also strive for excellence if their practice were focused on participation, in situated contexts, or in developing audiences. Why would participatory practice or even curatorship, be secondary to producing artefacts or other cultural outputs? Through a long history of being a challenger to postindustrial thinking, and by placing artists and designers at the heart of societal, industrial and policy contexts, Gray’s has built a persuasive heritage of creative intervention as well as the more obvious and visible creative production - and none of this at the expense of excellence. Visitors to Gray’s Degree Shows frequently notice that the graduate artists and designers are exhibiting both artefacts and interventions, often within the same portfolio, sometimes within the same work. I firmly believe that this is the product of an educational environment that focuses beyond a closed academic experience and award, and which addresses real ambitions and aims, set in contexts that have many obstacles to success. The issues addressed are often unsolved because of this very difficulty. Sometimes when we set our sights high we can miss our intended target, but the experience of addressing the obstacles is always the real value of the experience, and that which we will carry forward to future success. As Thomas Henry Huxley said, in his Life and Letters of Thomas Huxley, “the rung of a ladder was never meant to rest upon, but only to hold a man’s foot long enough to enable him to put the other somewhat higher” - to be permanently in-motion, perhaps? So, to our graduates of 2013, my colleagues and I would like to say: you have done well, we are all proud of you and your achievements so far, and we wish you every success as you find higher and higher rungs that will undoubtedly herald those difficult, and as yet unseen, obstacles of the future. But don’t focus on them, focus instead on your future success and your onward path. And of our guests and visitors to Gray’s Degree Show 2013, we would ask that you might help our new graduates to celebrate their current success as demonstrated through their current work, whatever that might be, as they embark on the next exciting stage of their own, personal journey. So, my thanks to BP for their generous support over the past ten years and thank you also for coming. We sincerely hope you enjoy the show!

Professor Paul Harris FRSA Head of Gray’s School of Art


What’s On Design BA BDes(Hons) BDes(Hons) BA(Hons)

Commercial Photography Design for Digital Media Graphic Design Visual Communication

BA(Hons) BA(Hons)

Fashion Design Textile and Surface Design

BDes(Hons) BA(Hons)

Product Design Three Dimensional Design


Gail Amey gail.amey@sky.com 07885521389 www.gailamey.com

I enjoy many aspects of photography; these constantly change and evolve over time. Photography still engages me in every way; I never tire in the exploration of its many possibilities. By completing my BA in Commercial Photography it has allowed me to get on the first rung of the ladder; I hope that each one consecutively will bring another positive element to my imagery.


Scott Baxter outsidetheboximaging@gmail.com 07746822855 www.outsidetheboximaging.com

I have a keen interest in all areas of photography and like nothing more than to go explore, find the image whether I am in the studio or on location. I prefer a more organic approach when working and let the image evolve rather than controlling every aspect of the frame. I see things differently and am always looking at the big picture so keep working until I have achieved the image I see in my head. “Life moves pretty fast, if you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you’ll miss it”


Robert Davis contact@robertdavisphotography.co.uk www.robertdavisphotography.co.uk

This project is about an exploration of the effects of light on night photography in areas around Aberdeen. Light painting highlights details that would normally go unnoticed and are created using torches to light up specific areas within the frame. This was combined with long shutter speeds using a technique that has been underused in our digital age of image production. Coloured gels were also used to enhance the effect. The commercial client would be Visit Scotland and places I photographed for the project were Castle Fraser, Aberdeen Beach, Union Terrace Gardens and Duthie Park.


Ian Devlin IanDevlinPhoto@live.co.uk www.iandevlinphoto.co.nr

‘Pauric Ó Dálaigh’

Identity can be a difficult subject to tackle due to constraints placed on us by society and our need to ‘fit-in’. How we are perceived by the world is important to us but how do we know from first impressions who a person really is? My work challenges these perceptions and raises questions about conforming to stereo-types. In broader terms when thinking about my work, ‘It’s the same old circus just a bigger tent’- Louis Malloy.


Louise Duguid lduguidphotography@gmail.com 07581458113

I define photography as a creative window full of opportunities. I like to observe my surroundings and think of unique ways in which I could display them within a photograph. My passion for photography began about three years ago and has grown to become an everyday part of my life. I am most passionate about fashion, advertising and editorial photography as it allows me to have complete creative freedom and incorporate my love of fashion at the same time. For my final major project I have chosen to promote new clothing company; “Walk on the Wild Side�. The style is influenced by British History, culture and sport.


Keilidh Ewan keilidhewan@hotmail.co.uk 07842901925 www.wix.com/keildhewan/photography

“a body that is bold to come� My work is based around consumerism and the disposable ever changing nature of fashion in modern culture. By working with classic iconic items of vintage fashion and combining them with the modern, I aim to create timeless imagery to promote the recycling of previously discarded luxury items. Primarily, I am working with real vintage animal fur pieces in order to represent the preciousness of our human nature throughout the work as well as reflect the animalistic qualities in our natural human form. All items of fur are genuine vintage pieces generously supplied by The Closet vintage store in Aberdeen.


Sari Fraser ascottishgirl@rocketmail.com 07880761817 www.ascottishgirl.com

I inherited my passion for photography from my grandfather and I have embarked on a photographic journey that I will continue to explore well into my old age. Studying has developed my photographic skills immensely. It has opened up a world of subject matter and techniques and everyday it opens my eyes to something new. My work is influenced by natural beauty, childhood memories, the world of film and storytelling. I love to incorporate elements into my images that create an interesting take on the original capture.


Robert Howarth boab72@homail.com 07934794062

As a photographer, my aim is to record my own personal history as I move through life from the places I visit to the people I see; my friends, colleagues and memories. My images allow the viewer to see the world through my eyes, looking at the happy moments, the sad moments, even the crazy eccentric moments. From all the genres of photography, I find that I don’t like to be pigeon holed into a specific area, but prefer to allow the camera to just shoot as I see, from the studio to the mountains, home and abroad.


Angela Milne ang_lor_mil@yahoo.co.uk 01224 879970

My passion is to create images that show my inner thoughts and relationship to childhood memories. Inspiration comes from reading books, day trips and most importantly my family values. Over my past 3 years of studies I have learned not only new techniques within photography but a whole new depth of critical thinking when trying to create an image. After university I want to continue with my photography. My passion is to have my work exhibited and I aim to achieve this after completion of each project that I do.


Ian Shewan ian@ianshewan.com 07840 299611 www.ianshewan.com

During my studies “The Portrait” has increasingly demanded my attention and imagination. More particularly, what I call the contextual versus noncontextual, where in one photograph clothing, pose and location can give context but in another these are stripped away; here we are forced to study the character of the subject in a face. The relationship between photographer and subject also fascinates; casual to intense, known to anonymous? A third aspect is finding an unknown facet of the subject’s personality or daily life, which I strive to capture and include in my work. In short: public personal – just me – alternative.


Kamila Sliwinska czterycmy@gmail.com 07585221902

I am heavily interested in Fashion; style of clothing, hair, decoration and the latest trends. It has been my passion since an early age. I would like to present my love for fashion and create work that is going to reflect this passion. My photographs are about more than just photographs of women/men wearing fancy clothing; they aim to tell the story about their feelings and show their characters and moods.


Michal Stano michalstanophotography@gmail.com 07515639044

‘Angels and Demons’

Photography is my way to make creative ideas in reality and show them to the world. This project takes the form of a fashion spread that deals with issues of gender representation and this is highlighted using the concept of Angels and Demons. The BA Commercial Photography course has influenced my present way of creating images. Photography gives me space to open my mind and express my creativity. My imagery is contemporary, personal, and unique. I take inspirations from everyday life, my surroundings and concerns. My work can be interpreted in different ways. You have to find your own way to view my work.


Gemma Thompson gemmathompson92@outlook.com www.facebook.com/gemmathompsonphotography

My final major project is based on the Seven Deadly Sins. I chose to concentrate on four of the sins in particular as I thought they related to today’s society more than the others. I chose Gluttony, Greed, Wrath and Vanity. These four sins convey messages and metaphors that respond and highlight issues within today’s society; also the most frowned upon in modern times. I wanted to achieve strong tightly cropped portraits portraying each sin, isolating many external references and showing off the make up for my commercial client.


Viktor Vass viktor@viktorvass.com 07809400409 www.viktorvass.com

‘Budapest in Silence’

I grew up in Budapest, Hungary, which is - due to its rich culture and beautiful architecture - one of Europe’s most beautiful cities. In 1956, Hungarian students started a riot against the Soviet forces that held Hungary under their occupancy after the Second World War. Despite the failure of the uprising it was highly influential in the downfall of the Soviet Union decades later. With my series of photographs I’d like to commemorate this event - which claimed thousands of lives in just over two weeks - by visiting the key locations of the riot and re-photographing them without the presence of people to highlight this loss of life.


Kalyan Veera kalyan.mario.veera@gmail.com 07896439597

‘Birds of Art’

The mission of these depictions is this: to present the impossible. Due to the miniature scale and speed of wild garden birds, the true appreciation of their movements and features prove difficult to the naked eye. In collaboration with bird expert Harry Scott, I have collated a series of photographs that illustrate various species of common birds found within Scotland. These portrayals allow viewers to observe the fine detail with distinct intricacy whilst also displaying flight by means of an artificially lit environment. Through my photography, I am able to capture the beautiful nature of these birds and bring them to light.


Stuart Walker omniaequestri@gmail.com 07719472044

‘Omnia Equestri’

I chose to study my degree in commercial photography to not only improve my skills as a photographer but to discover which genre suited me the most, this led me on a journey that saw me challenge everything from fashion to portraiture, advertising and on to my current project capturing imagery within the equestrian world and all that it embraces. This was ultimately to take the form of horses being photographed in a studio environment, I strived to capture these marvellous creatures in all their grace and poise and hopefully reflect their equine beauty in my photographic imagery.


Lindsay Allison zeemail1986@gmail.com www.zeeallison.com

‘Can You See Me Now’

I see myself as a ‘tradigital’ artist and designer exploring the application and use of both traditional mediums and digital software tools. This year I decided to create concept artwork that would portray the emotional and psychological effects of chronic insomnia that will be primarily used to inform those affected by the disorder to seek help. I also aim to increase public understanding and raise awareness of the condition and associated symptoms. My other projects include a cover for a graphic novel, a book jacket, posters and paintings.


Zack Anderson z.anderson54@gmail.com www.zackanderson.co.uk

I see myself primarily as a 3D CGI Artist, both in Modelling and Animation. This year I undertook a large-scale project investigating Hydrogen Fuel Cells and how they can be applied within the transport industry. One of the main outcomes for this project was an Interactive mobile application to illustrate how the Hydrogen technologies might be used to improve the sustainability of vehicles. This project, as well as another smaller project, prompted me to learn all about user interfaces and their usability. I enjoyed creating userfriendly and intuitive interfaces, complemented by visually appealing CGI content, inspiring me to develop further designs for mobile applications and the web.


Steven Bremner sbdesign@live.com stevenbremnerdesign.com

‘Dystopia’

Contemporary society does not appear to aspire to any idealistic goals (for example the desire for self-improvement) and this is reflected in the cultural effect that modern technology has on our everyday lives. My studio practice this semester has focused on imagery, literature and art that represent the future and technological progress. I have also been looking at the interconnecting relationship between art, design, science and technology, and how these apparently diverse aspects of culture all relate to each other in everyday society. My work this year has included various outputs in specialisms such as motion graphics, print design and web design.


Ruaraidh Cable ruaraidh.cable@gmail.com 07774359752

By working on the construction of physical artifacts derived from processes in the virtual domain, I have modified my views on the relationship between the physical and the virtual. Within the last year I have discovered a love for physical prop creation and this has been the driving force for the studio work. My main project focuses on the design of a character and the world he inhabits. This involves the design and fabrication of the armour worn by this character, in order to embody his physical and mental attributes. Through this process I hope to illustrate that virtual and physical representations can be mutually beneficial to each other, rather than one obviating the other.


Scott Alistair Henderson scottalistairhenderson@hotmail.co.uk 07905675565 www.sahdigital.co.uk

This year, my interests have focussed on the topic of energy waste. The project involved a wide variety of social issues that included economic and ecological factors. Approaching design in a very meticulous way, I focus on the details that others may not notice. Creating motion graphics has challenged my practice by telling the story of an uncertain future where the environmental effects of fossil fuels and global warming are having damaging sociological impact. I aspire to design that comes from careful thought, positivity and attention to detail. For any image, symbol or creative act to mean something, I believe it has to touch something deeper, connect to something true.


Anna Vahromejeva vahromejeva@gmail.com 07753217935 anyavdesign@behance.com

Inspired by original innovative ideas, concept generation is at the core of my design practice. Being inquisitive by nature, my work reflects the variety of my wide ranging interests, and my desire to experiment and search for unique solutions. My ‘superpower’ is imagination which I allow to wander freely. As a natural problem-solver I enjoy the challenge of client driven briefs and projects, where the constraints often lead to insights into my own creative practice. As a young professional I enjoy working within a range of media and choose not to limit myself to one particular area and I am equally comfortable with both digital and traditional media.


Rachel Furness rachfurness@gmail.com 07548443071 www.rachelfurness.com

This year I have researched methodologies and processes that have positively influenced the public through the transformation of cities and city aesthetics. Design within the urban setting is such a powerful tool for communication and it can help alter perceptions and impact people through visualisation of ideas. Human interaction is at the centre of my work and designing to promote social change has become a strong focus. The use of varied media, experimentation and a sense of play are critical within my design practice. I strive to transcend social issues and advocate that the need for culture to improve a person’s life is an ongoing and vital process that shouldn’t be underestimated by society.


Stacey Geddes staceygeddes@hotmail.co.uk 07814664472

The aim of my main Honours year project was to investigate the application of design theories and processes which in turn enabled me to explore my creativity and imagination and develop a range of skills as a designer. Through the research, development and evaluation of these graphic design processes my goal was to create a portfolio of design work approaching levels of professional practice. My other interests include branding and packaging and I have been collaborating on a range of merchandise and luxury goods for the marketplace including food and drink and products for the home and garden.


Gail Louise Gibb gaillouisegibb@hotmail.co.uk 07824885321

I prefer not to categorise my design practice by a specific type of design or style, opting instead to be inspired by a wide range of design methods and processes as reference or starting points. My time at art school, and particularly this year, has helped to broaden my horizons, experiment in more depth and develop my creative process. I see this as a sustainable element within my future design practice. I find it inspiring to be challenged by a variety of project briefs and clients where my problem solving abilities can be stretched. I believe design has the ability to add something to the world.


Tom Joy tom@tomjoy.co.uk www.tomjoy.co.uk

My programme of study started with initial investigation into to the growth of depression within the young male UK demographic. After personal research and inquiry to understand my own negative thinking and specifically how I might combat it through my design practice, the project developed into a journey of understanding self through the articulation of photography and image making. In an attempt to produce imagery that reflected my own personality, I challenged my previously established boundaries. Going forward I trust the knowledge and confidence gained can inspire my creative thinking to new levels. Ambition fuels my mind, fear of failure drives my ambition.


Michael Loudon michael.loudon70@btinternet.com michaelloudon.com Twitter: @LoudonJames

‘Fresh Start’

SCOTLAND BEGINS

879

921 963 1005 1047 1089 1131 1173 1215 1257 1299 1341 1383 1425 1467 1509 1551 1593

SCOTLAND JOINS THE UK

1677

1635

1719 1761 1803 1845 1887 1929 1971

2014

CONTINUE THE RED LINE? OR TIME FOR A

FRESH START?

The possibility of effecting political and social change motivates me. How to be a designer and retain an individual voice has been an area of exploration throughout the year. The main self-directed studio project was an opportunity to create work that is politically charged and unambiguous. The project focussed on political disengagement and Scottish independence. In the upcoming referendum in 2014 there is a momentous choice to be made. Will the public respond and be motivated by design which is informed by personal political conviction? This approach was complemented with a range of smaller commercial projects taken on throughout the year.


Kurt Macdonald kurt2289@gmail.com 07823443309 www.kurtmacdonald.weebly.com

‘Break Free From Tradition. Your Career, Your Future.’

My studies this year have encouraged a re-think of previously held assumptions about the role, processes and impact of Design. I have developed a growing interest in advertising. The process of designing a campaign from idea generation through to final realisation has proven to be immensely enjoyable. The project opened with an investigation and research of perceived and actual cultural gaps, which developed into the issues surrounding gender (in)equality, and it is currently exploring the promotion of gender roles and stereotypes. The project strives to enable future generations of young people to make informed and confident choices about their career.


Neil McKenzie neilmckenziedesign@gmail.com 07557091604 www.neilmckenziedesign.com

‘Gamification of education’

My main project this year has been to investigate how design might positively affect how we teach children into the 21st century. My research has led to gamification, a process of reinterpreting and applying key elements of video gaming culture within non-video gaming contexts. Evidence shows when children are engaged, then they learn more effectively and that the information resonates and is retained for longer than if the child is not engaged. My work aims to show how gamification can be applied to enhance engagement within teaching and learning environments.


Michael Ridley www.michael-ridley.co.uk

‘Boo’

Boredom is a curious thing, ever present, yet fleeting and decidedly a modern trait; it represents an epidemic of discontent in our age of plenty. But why are we bored? We have boundless amounts of distractions to keep us occupied, from work, friends, gadgets and entertainment, so why? Paradoxically, we are living in the most visually saturated period of history and yet why do we appear more disinterested than ever before? The 21st century boredom we now face is not one of lack but of excess choice. Burdened by this choice in an age of over-stimulation we are all playing a big game of peek-a-boo…


Grant Sinclair grantcsinclair@gmail.com grantsfoilo.co.uk

‘Castle Locations of Scotland ‘

The main focus of my Honours year project was to research and further develop my interest in the culture and history of Scotland. I chose this theme based on my personal experience of heavy weight events within the Highland Games circuit. I have used my experiences as a basis to explore the traditions and heritage of Scotland which has informed my studio practice and the application of information graphics.


Jennifer Smith 0907465@rgu.ac.uk 07981745682 jennifersmithgraphicdesigner.com

My main focus of study this year has been towards changing society’s attitudes towards homeless people, both locally and globally. I chose to investigate the power of Graphic Design as a tool for change and its power to influence opinion. Having worked on an arts project with homeless people in Aberdeen, I have gained first hand experience of the problems they face. As well as Graphic Design, I am interested in photography, screen-printing and packaging design. During my 10-week placement with a creative agency, I gained valuable experience of professional practice and working within a creative team.


Kamilya Tultabayeva

‘Packaging Design for D&AD Brief’

My interests span Graphic Design and Illustration. My main project this year has been to investigate the multicultural environment in UK universities. Internationalisation plays an important role within the university community, promoting improved communication skills and increased cross-cultural awareness. In practice however, all too often a natural segregation between students of differing origin and backgrounds can occur. The purpose of the project is to help new international students adjust to university life, take advantage of opportunities, socialize and be more confident in their new environment.


Grant Anderson grant_anderson@live.co.uk 07597563672 www.grantanderson.me

At the heart of my honours year project is the idea of ‘sustainable’ design. I chose this subject because it corresponds with the 3 main aspects of my life, I love the outdoors, sport and design. It is imperative for me to make an effort to preserve the environment around me both socially and ecologically. I feel as a designer I have the ability to promote a positive change in these fields. The aims of my project are to raise awareness about issues in sustainable design and consumerism and to clarify the relationship between these, both for myself and the people I influence through my work.


Marco Bevilacqua iwantsome@wantsome.co 07719313129 wantsome.co

My work is a mirrored and slightly skewed interpretation of you. Yes, that’s right, YOU! Satirical hyperbole of contemporary society, the zeitgeist and disturbed promulgations are predominant hallmarks. The fusion of hand made and digital techniques within the work, projects a reflective element of multi-media culture and lends itself to having a strong visual contrast, and crafted aesthetic. Now, go love it! It is you after all.


Rachel Dixon rachel.dixon@hotmail.co.uk www.racheldixon.co.uk

Throughout my Honours year I have explored the use of various media within the context of creative advertising in an effort to achieve a number of objectives both socially and commercially. As a designer I enjoy the creative challenge of exploring ideas and applying concepts targeted at different markets. Many of my campaigns allow the audience to interact and engage with the brand and/or organisation as well as view the advertisements as standalone visuals.


Lorna Glencross lorna.glencross@outlook.com 07969572776 staygoldfang.tumblr.com

‘Ownership by Decoration’

As a designer I aim to be as free standing and forward thinking as possible with an ability to communicate ideas to the public in their entirety. I am particularly interested in street art, fashion, popular culture and the nature and behaviour of people. This year I have mainly focused on iconography and how visual language is perceived as the universal native tongue. I would describe my aesthetic as decadent and decorative.


Robyn Hasler r.hasler@rgu.ac.uk 07738532524 www.robynhasler.co.uk

I am a multidisciplinary designer and throughout my student career I have been interested in analogue techniques and processes and applying these along with digital methods to create well-rounded, cohesive outcomes. As a designer I feel compelled to embrace traditional practices to show the marks and styles that cannot be so readily recreated with digital techniques, whilst making use of newer, time-saving approaches to design, in order to be as informed as possible. I am interested in the real and tactile, and have pursued this interest in my honours year project, exploring methods to enhance the experience of narrative and storytelling in ways that are not possible with digital media.


Danielle J Howe daniellejanehowe@hotmail.com 07506501638 www.designer-creative.com

‘Listen to this page’

Throughout my studies I have always had a visceral need for knowledge, to learn, to know. Understanding the Human Condition and our inherent need to construct order out of chaos is as important in Design as it is in life. Knowing the rules can be important if you intend to break them. This year I have been investigating the many facets of the theme ‘Communication’. Making human connections in a technology-driven world has never been more difficult or more important. Even as technology has allowed us to connect with an ever-expanding global network through the click of a mouse, learning face-to-face communication skills are still as important as ever.


Susannah Leake Susannah@sleake.com 07905296528 www.sleake.com

‘Aphasia’

I am a multidisciplinary illustrator and designer. Most of the work I create relates to printed ephemera and exists as tactile publications, books, and print. This ranges from designing books to creating hand-made zines. This form of output appeals to me because of the tactile quality in holding a magazine, newspaper or book and it allows me to cross many disciplines and explore typographic work alongside illustrative and photographic pieces. The main project has allowed the exploration of themes relating to remembrance, nostalgia and memory disorders. My interest in this diverse subject is rooted in the importance of memory in contemporary culture.


Alex Love lovealex@hotmail.co.uk 07724772489

In a world with many social and economic problems I believe that design can inform people and motivate positive behaviour. I decided to research the cause and effects of childhood obesity, which has developed to pandemic levels in modern Britain. This focussed on: the home environment; school environment; social issues; government policy; and the use of design to effectively raise awareness and educate people. In addition research has included wartime home-front propaganda issued by the British government, dealing with a variety of social problems and made specifically to instruct and motivate, as well as modern advertising techniques designed to grab attention.


Danielle McCann 91danielle@live.com daniellemccann.co.uk

‘Break The Silence’

“It is often finding themselves the victims of a crime that triggers designers and students to look at crime issues.” - UK Design Council As a designer I want to raise awareness of an important issue that is commonly overlooked and prompt people’s thinking and behaviour. In particular my aim has been to highlight alcohol facilitated rape and sexual assault amongst young females, whilst out socialising. I want my work to be thought provoking and engage people in a positive way which will hopefully benefit wider society and make a real difference.


Laura Phimister lauraphimister@hotmail.co.uk 07702049546 www.lauraphimister.co.uk

Throughout my studies my practice has been directed towards the exploration of movement and the process of animation. This year has been mainly focused on narratives and through this I became very interested in folklore from various cultures, particularly in stories involving animals. This led onto an exploration of the portrayal of animal locomotion and the creation of atmosphere within my animations. I have investigated various methods of animating throughout my time at art school, from traditional methods to using computer software. I enjoy the challenge of bringing an extra dimension to my illustrations and watching my work come to life.


Jessika Shaw JessShaw@hotmail.co.uk 07871164714 www.jessikashaw.co.uk

Combinations of digital and handmade components intrigue me, especially through the application of collage and other mixed media. Within my practice I like to include these elements and a degree of tactility as I want the audience to both engage and interact with the work. As an illustration style I also like to explore the use of shape and apply a vivid use of colour. Throughout my Honours year I have also diversified my work and further developed my communication skills by involving a wide variety of people from different backgrounds who have helped inform my final year projects.


Anastasija Soldatenko 0911827@rgu.ac.uk 07833747645

‘Is it our fault that we were born in the wrong country?’

My work can be defined by showcasing the ordinary and the extraordinary through two main interests. For me Photography and Design are means of exploring the world and telling stories: not about myself but about the people I meet and the things that I see. I consider it important that every event, the beauty of every moment, every little thing I notice, and every memory suddenly seems too valuable to be forgotten. The camera is my tool for sharing those moments with other people. I am also passionate about using design to solve problems and small puzzles that are present in every brief.


Zoe Statham zstatham91@gmail.com www.zoestatham.co.uk

‘@caradelevingne’

In a world obsessed with digital and social media, our generation has embraced the opportunities of our “Global Village.” However, is our increasing use of social media a digital manipulation of our identity? How will our use of it affect our future? Or the way we are remembered? Are we heading for a new kind of dystopia unpredicted by Orwell and Huxley? My work investigates the effect of the omnipresent digital world in both its themes and mediums. The simultaneous collaboration and struggle between digital image making and traditional analogue techniques is key to my practice as an illustrator and photographer.


Megan Kate Wood mekatewood@gmail.com www.megankatewood.com

‘migration’

As a designer and illustrator my interests cover a variety of areas, mediums and styles. I enjoy work that has a strong base in the hand drawn and hand crafted, including such mediums as simplistic hand drawn illustration and type, paper artistry and collage, as well as creating physical sculptural pieces. Alongside this, I find the use of photography and digital methods both enjoyable and integral in the output of work. My final year project has looked at areas linked with travel and journey, in particular at animal migration, distances travelled, and also at the sending of mail.


Kaye Bonnar kaye.b@hotmail.co.uk 07523201950 www.kayebonnar.co.uk

‘Sacred Roots’

“A flower is not in a painting to fill space; it is there for a reason.” I chose to explore the symbolism of plants in Pre-Raphaelite paintings and the preservation of plants in botany. I was facinated by the passion and precision shown in the work of a Botanist, meticulously preserving plants for centuries. The Pre-Raphaelite’s work exudes a romantic richness as flowers and their symbolisms played an imperitive role with their work. My collection amalgamates these two topics, merging the use of luxurious fabrics in touch and colour with a lamination process, preserving flower petals within each garment. I aimed to create something unique and innovative while maintaining a classic silhouette.


Amy Clydesdale amy.clydesdale@gmail.com 07792784069

“Going Down To La La Land”

“La La Land” refers to the “fanciful state” or “dream world” entered into during the course of a contemporary club night. Music, technology, clothing, the interior and exterior of club venues and the consumption of intoxicating substances provide the foundations for this culture. The unique combination of these contributing elements embodies the club cultural experience. The manipulation of inner silhouettes composed of casual fabrics is given depth and luxury through embroidery and prints of club interiors and toilet walls. Perspex and metal accessories adorn the body reflecting the addition of intoxicating substances to further heighten conscious alteration.


Ruby Coyne dreamlandstudio@hotmail.co.uk 07821746703 www.takemetodreamland.com

‘Cutting Shapes in the Shadows’

‘It is strange how we hold on to the pieces of the past while we wait for our futures.’ Inspired by days sat down on Brighton beach staring up at the pier, and thinking of times gone by. Simpler times. Originated through collecting vintage clothing on the Brighton Lanes and drawings from the pier, this collection holds the desire to capture the dynasty of the 1980’s through the love of memorabilia, shapely prints and geometric cuts. With these influences the collection will capture a sense of nostalgia, whilst bringing a modern look for the label using digital print, innovative fabrics and inventive styling.


Melanie Gibb melanie.gibb@btopenworld.com

‘Under the Sea’

For my final year, I chose to create a girls wear collection based on an aquatic sea theme. Following previous research, I became very interested in the movement of tropical fish, which lead me to look at their scales and textures. I then used these textures to translate my interpretation of the patterns onto fabric, using different sewing techniques along with digital printing to achieve this. Children love to interact with objects and so creating these textures have helped make my collection fun and exciting and hopefully bring something different to the children’s wear sector.


Samantha Hair samantha.h.hair@googlemail.com 07854647094

‘Siren’

Both the character of the siren, a seductive woman who by her sweet singing lures mariners to destruction and the cyanea capillata jellyfish; soft and fluid in appearance, but with a hidden understructure, are my main sources of inspiration for this collection. Combining this with the influence of haute couture, my design process explores the balance of both structured and diaphanous fabrics and how they can cover yet reveal the body. My design aesthetic of clean silhouettes combined with hand-sewn embellishment techniques will bring these ideas together in my final collection.


Peter Hannaway peter.hannaway@hotmail.co.uk 07850430603

‘Cultures Unknown’

‘A woman arrives on a foreign planet. Walking the streets of an unknown city, towering structures with curved forms dominate the skyline – she is mesmerised by her surroundings’. Taking influence from a combination of cultures, ideas of the future and architecture, my collection will present an idea of an urban environment yet to occur. Development occurred through projecting architectural shapes directly onto the female form, the resulting images are the main inspiration for my garment silhouettes. With a combination of minimal and sculptural pieces, the clothing will be bold, forward thinking yet wearable.


Suilven Hotson suilven.hotson@hotmail.co.uk 07849005420 www.suilven.tumblr.com

‘Cut - Carat’

Opulent layered digital prints comprising panels of each singular look: a collection inspired by the chemical properties and structures of diamonds and other precious stones. Heavily based upon geometric constructed silhouettes; the influence of Japanese origami and the symmetrical patterns created by kaleidoscopes are also fundamental to the cut and finish of the collection as a whole. As a customer, she is influenced by this unusual perspective of femininity, powerful silhouette and elegance.


Lisa Junor www.imperfectlyperfectfashion.blogspot.com 07989656979 www.lisajunor.co.uk

‘Distorted Reality’

Surrealism distorts reality by releasing the subconscious mind and fashioning a dream-like composition. Free of the conscious control of reason and principle, media techniques and concepts of Surrealism are formed. My project is based upon these techniques and concepts. I have produced and developed these to illustrate my design aesthetic. From my researching automatic drawing, collage, scale, distortion and misplacement, all have been developed to inspire my design process. Inspirational fashion designers, especially Jill Sander and Shirin Guild have been instrumental throughout my research and have inspired my exaggerated oversized silhouette in a subdued autumnal colour palette.


Kirstie McKune kirstie_mckune@hotmail.co.uk 07960121773 www.kirstiemckune.co.uk

‘Utilize’

Deceptively simplistic with a utilitarian underbelly, my work is a play on the past and future. A by-product of my design is sharp elemental lines and a dramatic silhouette that combine with my obsession with panelling to create my overall style. World War II, military uniform and the general stylistic quality of the 1940s is a driving influence behind my work. The graphics and propaganda have drawn huge inspiration in style, colour and composition to my work. Ultimately I want my designs to reflect the uber-modernity of the 40s and portray my own interpretation of that era and the women that lived in.


Debbie McLeod d.mcleodstudio26@gmail.com 07757123571

‘Persimmon, A Selective Colour’

A sleek modern shaped collection with Op Art inspired block colouring using Black, White, Grey and Orange as key colours. Visually I will be taking inspiration from Modernist architecture for shape and cut, as well as capturing my own brand by focusing on key designers such as Céline and Stella McCartney. My ideal woman becomes confident through her clothes, she’s warm and inviting letting her modernist straight lined garments show her empowered side. Mohair textural knits are introduced to help soften and balance the strong modernist lines. The key market for my collection is the Swedish retailer COS, for A/W 2013.


Jennifer Rowand Jennifer.rowand@hotmail.co.uk 07519515681 www.jennyrowand.co.uk

‘A Second Skin’

In this project I have decided to look at the traditional body modifications of indigenous cultures such as the Polynesian tattoo, tribal lip stretching and Japanese tattoos. I am hoping to create a collection of tight fitting outfits that will reflect aspects of these different cultures using varied fabric techniques such as print, dye and cutting. The idea of tight fitting outfits reflects the idea of a second skin and plays on the idea of the permanency of these rites and rituals. I have decided to use mostly stretch fabrics to keep the silhouette very close to the body with small accents of leather to simulate skin.


Laura Sherriffs laurasherriffs224@gmail.com 07725322328 www.laurasherriffs.co.uk

‘Neo- Apokalupsis’

‘A lone woman stands in the remnants of a dilapidated world. Many years into the future, Earth as we know is no more. Among the decay of this ruined dystopia, an evolved human hybrid emerges from the ashes of the apocalyptic wasteland’. By visiting derelict buildings to gain an overall sense of apocalyptic desolation and inspired by science fiction, I have been exploring the idea of how an apocalyptic event would affect an advanced human race. Ideas are realised through innovative silhouette, cut & futuristic fabrics. A hypermodern collection, an eclectic fusion of apocalyptic devastation & futuristic vision for a strong, independent modern female.


Jessie White maa_a-tah@hotmail.co.uk 07758663118

‘She sometimes put her clothes on the wrong way - inside out, back to front, without appearing to notice.’ Oliver Sacks. When neurologist Oliver Sacks describes the ‘disjointed fashion’ of an autistic woman called Rebecca, he maintains that we often focus on an individual’s disability at the expense of what they are capable of. My collection addresses this motion of ‘getting it wrong’ and celebrates how interesting and elegant a garment can look when it is worn in a new way.


Jennifer Young j.young1@rgu.ac.uk 07810652646

‘Dark Wood Wonderland’

‘The Dark Wood Wonderland’ consists of the darker elements of nature and makes them the essence of beauty. Photography is used to record the natural decomposition of the forest floor by fungi, lichen and poisonous plantation found within Scottish woodlands. Silks have been laser cut into individual petal shapes, scattered and layered on the surface to create volume and drama, subverting the connotations usually associated with rose petals. Inspiration from the collections of Dior, McQueen and Comme des Garcon have influenced my silhouette, creating a rich and dramatic collection that combines femininity and elegance with a hint of darkness and drama.


Kate Benzie www.katebenzie.com contact@katebenzie.com 07411191048

I am fascinated by portraiture and how the image of an individual reads to the viewer. My garments are encoded with my drawing language, extracting shapes, textures, marks, repetitions, compositions, colour, line and collage to re-interpret and abstract the individual. I am trying to communicate a person(ality) as I have come to view them. I am interested in how the clothing of the individual can come to exemplify the person and the life, without the body. Using my drawings as a basis I experiment with new and traditional printing techniques to develop my point of view.


Sooz Chirino sooz.chirino@hotmail.co.uk 07899 835681

‘Tribal Anthropology’

My area of study investigated worldwide tribes, their lifestyle, social customs, cultural development, beliefs and traditions, body modifications and markings. Also studied was their clothing and accessories (where this comes from, how it is made) and how these can be protective (both physically and spiritually) as well as being symbolic. I questioned if these tribes have had any impact or influence on our culture in the western world. My work is inspired by seeking beauty in the overlooked. My collection was created by combining everyday unnoticed materials with mixed media, giving them a new sense of worth.


Lauren Clark laurenclark_x@live.co.uk 07896085883

‘Picturesque Railway’

Do you take in what is around you whilst on a train? My project is based on the railway interior. Exploring all ranges of train interior, I have focused on the silhouette of the train and on the materials used to produce such beautiful artistic interiors. Through my research I have linked the railway interior to Scandinavian prints; this took me in the direction of geometric shapes. Using wood, vinyl and leathers I have created bespoke designs that link both rail interiors and geometric pattern. These designs have been used to create surface decoration and interior furniture.


Stephanie Davidson stephaniedavidson@sky.com 07837779073 www.stephaniedavidsontextiles.com

‘The Wanderer’

“The Wanderer” is based on my Great Uncle Bernard Newman who was an author of travel and espionage novels. I have based my research and development work on his personality as translated through the objects that he collected as well as the novels: American Journey, South African Journey and Far Eastern Journey. These novels are key within my historical investigation of traditional crafts and this project acts as a memory bank of the past with a contemporary output. “All good stories endure embellishment”, therefore through the development of mixed media textiles I shall incorporate the essence of Newman’s collectable items and novels, whilst combining traditional indigenous cultural identities with a contemporary fashion and accessories outcome.


Kathryn Fuller kathryn-fuller@hotmail.com 07854862232

‘Point, Line, Surface, Solid’

‘Point, Line, Surface, and Solid’ explores my passion towards modern architectural structures, materials and surfaces and its connection with contemporary fashion and textile design. Precision and attention to detail is a primary focus. To draw inspiration I have focused on geometric and graphic images to create contemporary patterns and screen-printed designs. Origami and paper manipulation was also key in the development stages of ‘Point’, ‘Line’, ‘Surface’, and ‘Solid’ and allowed an exploration of more three dimensional structures which produced interesting and fashionable digital prints. Presented is a fresh and current range of fashion fabrics for the commercial fashion market.


Sara Kindness sarakindness@hotmail.co.uk 07841818029 sarakindness.co.uk

‘A Temporary Environment’

As I felt submerged in a lake, under the water I could see no further than my hand. As I emerged to take a breath I could hear nothing just the trees. My body surrounded by the water and anchored in life, the water embraced me, leaving my mind free to explore. My work is a cross-boundary exploration. Using playfulness I wish to explore whether tactile materials have the ability to engage physically to the point of connecting the human spirit to an impermanent, abstracted and constructed place.


Emma Mackenzie contact@emmamackenzie.co.uk 07976790285 www.emmamackenzie.co.uk

‘Artificial Artilect’

“Automata are mechanical objects endowed with life by ingenious means.” - Levi Van Veluw A flourishing curiosity in automatons lead to the discovery of the Sharmanka Kinetic Theatre, a museum of moving sculptures that light up in an array of exotic colours, forming intricate and ghostly shadows. This research will enable the exploration of low and hi-tech processes to construct printed and knitted textiles for fashion, utilizing bold colours and creating ghostly, graphic, and multi-dimensional designs with an unreal digital aesthetic. I aspire to design textiles for the young, confident individual who seeks a more distinct style as globalization becomes an issue for individuality.


Clara Mennie cmennie26@hotmail.co.uk 07578907320

‘This House is Haunted’

“It is simply a case of really looking, being open-minded, and developing an awareness of your surroundings. Once this happens, it is astonishing to discover the fascinating, haunting beauty which is there for all to see”. - Polly O’Neil My textiles are influenced by the theme of the desolate ‘haunted house’. I capture the close up textures of the decayed and eroded surfaces that have been analysed. I believe that the beauty of imperfection is a philosophy I will always follow. These interiors have a history, like peeling layers of old wallpaper and discovering what is underneath. These surfaces have a story to tell.


Carolyn Murdoch cari@cariandco.com 07729508007 www.cariandco.com

‘The Victorian Garden’

The Victorian Garden has inspired my honour’s year collection; it has a focus on hollyhocks, tulips and roses. With preservation and conservation in mind, I have sought to create surface designs of days gone by, as seen in the embossed wallpapers of the Aesthetic period depicting flowers and fauna. I have created my own contemporary but nostalgic compositions using old forgotten techniques. Like the Victorians, influenced by Japanese Art, I, myself on a recent research visit to Japan, was inspired by their embossed faux paper leathers. Using a combination of photography, embroidery, painting, porcelain and embossing applications, my collection is suitable for both Fashion and Interiors.


Kim Norrie Kimnorrie.co.uk@gmail.com 07931471891 www.Kimnorrie.co.uk

‘“Space.” (in association with place)’

My work has been inspired by places and the emotions we associate with them. This has varied from the comfort of my grandfather’s home to newly found places in Aberdeen to ‘non-places’ such as airports and train stations. Originally I began looking at the Stockholm underground, which got me thinking of colours and shapes. I then looked into the textures and surfaces I found closer to home to develop my choice of fabrics and materials to work with. It is this combination of mixing the old and familiar, with new ideas, colours and concepts that have been the inspiration for my entire collection.


Matthew Russell matt@artnthat.com 07837778693 www.artnthat.com

‘Perspective’

My final year collection is  the result of detailed research and development into the topic of place.    
I developed my own in depth interpretations of landscape, mapping and my own experience of travel. Using Aboriginal Songlines, Gilbert & George, and Keith Haring as my inspiration, I constructed my own abstract vision for the contemporary fashion and interiors market - pushing the constraints of scale and perspective.


Rebecca Sirinides r.sirinides@gmail.com

With the use of crochet and other mediums in the decorative display of lamps and light fixtures, this collection highlights the interplay between texture and aesthetics by using light to enhance the decorative textile displays.


Nicola Stewart nik.stewart@hotmail.co.uk 07798802438

‘Found Objects’

My project is based on ‘Found objects’; the idea behind my project first came from family heirlooms; objects people treasure. I like the idea of objects having a past; someone could have had a connection to these objects. When looking for the objects I had three key words; texture, pattern and colour. I visited an antiques and collectables centre for most of my research and took amazing photography of ‘found objects’ there.I have developed these photographs into drawings, printed textiles and embroidered samples to create textural and patterned surfaces.


Karyn Stitchell karynstitchell@hotmail.com 07793739894

‘Frequent Hertz’

Stepping into colour with a modern twist, abstracting musical forms produced through computer programs and taking inspiration for colour and pattern from the 60’s. This looks at the connection music and fashion has with style. Innovative textile pieces interacting with shapes formed from sound waves creating bold, graphic, colourful designs.


Emma Walker emma170590@hotmail.co.uk 07952845698

‘Knit-Scapes’

My pieces are inspired by the architecture of the industrial offshore oil industry, looking at offshore installations including platforms, pipe lines and pallets of an industrial scale. My work focuses on particular aspects of interest; I select particular colors to project into my pieces and reduce the scale of large objects to more workable sizes I am creating physical, sculptural textiles with raw structures and chunky surfaces using hand and machine knitting. I form unfamiliar combinations of woven knit structures to create three-dimensional fabrics that can be applied in menswear.


Clare Williams clare.williams102@googlemail.com 07979027126

‘Stripes’

Initially based on the way that different colours juxtapose each other in the Italian town of Burano, my work contrasts dull blues and grays to accentuate bolder colours like reds and greens. Using different techniques and approaches including the use of chevrons and tucking, and changing thicknesses of yarn, the stripes produced in the work are broken and distorted. Different colour ways work well together or separately; these create fresh ideas and colour combinations. My work is a contemporary take on the fashion favourite.


Clare Bevis clare_bevis@hotmail.co.uk 07713177214 www.lookallaroundtown.wordpress.com

Researching and exploring the boundaries of personal space in a public place, I have come to the conclusion that the design of the environments around us, and the products we use on a daily basis, affect the size of our ‘personal bubble’. Products affect how we manage the space around us, the less flexible these are to accommodate different needs, the more uncomfortable they can make the individual feel. My design explores the comfort and the interaction of strangers within a public space by negotiating new forms of interaction.


Gemma Morrison gemz.morrison@virgin.net 07977852820 www.gemmamay.wordpress.com

‘Contemporary Notions of Lending and Borrowing’

How many people do you really know in your community? Community encompasses all of us on a daily basis. I am interested in what this word means to people and how we physically connect to each other in a progressively virtual world. When two or more ‘strangers’ share a city/village do we still make the effort to get to know our neighbours? My design focuses on the notion of lending and borrowing, thereby encouraging members of a community to come together and share through playful interaction.


Thomas Rae trae678@gmail.com 07530413455 www.tomrae.wordpress.com ‘How can design encourage people within the the urban environment to grow more of their own fruits and vegetables?’

Restrictions on physical space and the time available are creating barriers for a lot of young people living in urban enviroments who want to be able to grow their own produce at home. This design reduces reliance on shop bought produce within the UK and increases our propensity for self sufficiency. By utilising hydroponic technology (soil-less growing), to help deliver a well designed urban indoor garden, we can redefine the experience of growing our own food.


Oliver Watson o.watson@rgu.ac.uk 07411227886 www.instagram.com/ojwatsondesign

My project explores how design can enable the elderly to exercise through everyday routines. Exercise that builds balance and strength is proven to improve all round quality of life from a reduction in likelihood of falling, help cure depression and slow the onset of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Exercising in short spells throughout the day is easier to achieve and more beneficial than undertaking one long session a week. By reconfiguring familiar objects, this project creates the opportunity for new ‘exercise activities’ for the elderly as part of their everyday routine.


Jessica Barr missbarr115@hotmail.co.uk

Being away from a specific place for a long period of time can completely change how you view it. For me this place is my hometown of Jedburgh, a historic town in the Scottish Borders. Walking past the Castle, the Abbey and the Church, was part of my every day life. Moving away resulted in a more in depth period of time to reflect resulting in a further appreciation of their beauty and curiosity about their history and secrets. This body of work focuses on getting under the skin of these structures, creating new forms that are distilled from both my nostalgic childhood memories and how I perceive them today.


Glen L R Clydesdale glen.clydesdale@gmail.com

‘Domestic Introspection’

My work questions the domestic aesthetic whilst set within the constraints of the notion of man versus nature. The exploration of the domestic object is focused around simple forms for function; the cup for instance and how it can be altered and abstracted through a change in varying media and chosen setting. My interest also lies in the narrative evoked through the chosen materials - ceramics, metals and plastics - all manipulated by man yet all derived from the land. There are inherent comparisons drawn between aspects of the compositions, thus furthering the discussion of materiality and accepted form.


Kathryn Duncan kathrynduncan@live.com www.kathrynduncandesign.wordpress.com

My work is inspired by broken bones in the human body, in parallel to the physical and emotional effects as a result of a bone break. I have created a collection of work that has an aspect of educational outreach, rather than just the personal visual response to my topic of interest. This work intends to highlight and build awareness of the effects bone injuries can have on an individual, encouraging the wearer to empathise with that individual. Jewellery informed by the close connection to the body is something I have always been passionate about and wanted to incorporate within my own work.


Marina Georgopoulou mg-marina@hotmail.com 07816790669 www.marinageorgopoulou.wordpress.com

‘An eye over Greece’

My biggest influence is the Greek culture and the crisis it finds itself in throughout the past few years. I have been looking at how people react to the crisis through art, and how art is being used as a form of protest. My work focuses on everyday household items, such as the plate. The patterns on them reflect my own personal protest to the crisis. The intention is to trigger dialogue that may promote awareness to an audience. I mostly work with ceramics, an earthy material symbolising humanity. By utilising the colours blue, white and black, I can also reflect the Greek culture.


Debbie Joan Hall djhall25@hotmail.co.uk

‘Home’ is the main inspiration for my 4th year project as it has always provided me with rich and diverse layers of inspiration. My ‘home’ has recently changed from a rural location in Scotland to a built up residential area in Bristol due to relocation of family. I have taken this opportunity to look at how these two very different places can provide me with a variety of contrasting outcomes in the domestic context. I will explore how their textures, colour, pattern and shape differ using primarily the medium of porcelain.


Yvette Estelle Jeffrey yvette91estelle@gmail.com 07810728937

‘Nkondi’

I like to push the boundaries of fashion and body adornment. I strive for my work to be “aesthetically misleading” but overall, impressive. My strength is in the exploration and innovation of alternative or unusual combinations of materials. Common materials and objects are distressed to create textures, forms and patterns elevating their presence and context. My degree show collection has a focus upon a diverse range of products from large couture fashion pieces; to smaller pieces of jewellery and printed T-shirts, all inspired by the spiritual and highly decorated figurines known as African fetish dolls.


Alexie Macleod alexa.macleod@hotmail.com

“I sometimes feel that I have grown up in a faerie tale, dancing around a world filled to the brim with art, music, drama, books and travelling storytellers; the narrative nature of my work reflects this. I repeatedly find that I strive to try and meld new techniques and media; this allows me to be freely expressive and not constrained to one specific form. Paper and ink are commonly used as a creative source to express ideas allowing work to naturally and organically evolve and grow. The incorporation of a diverse range of influences guide me towards a unique odyssey ultimately in search of a personal contentment�.


Tina McGregor-Robertson tinamcg-r@hotmail.co.uk

‘Hell Hath No Fury’

Over the past couple of years I have developed a strong interest in the narratives of Scottish folklore, translating aspects of these stories into pieces of jewellery. This new series of pieces are based upon a local legend from the Black Isle, the Legend of the Brahan Seer. The raven is a reoccurring theme in Scottish folklore as a death omen. By using repeat pattern and alternative materials to capture a sense of movement, the intention is to create my own wearable ‘omens’ for the body.


Jamie Louise McIntosh jamielouisem@gmail.com 07500056561 www.jamielouisem.wordpress.com

Inspired by the tales of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, written by Lewis Carroll, I have created a range of work influenced by the ‘unexpected’ and the nonsense of the Alice tales. The work is informed by the tea party and the looking glass insects’ chapters, where things are not what they initially appear to be. Through this work I intend to evoke a sense of curiosity in an audience. Colour consistently plays a strong part in the composing of my work, linking well with the bright and colourful chapters within the story of Alice in Wonderland.


Josephine O’Neil jo.mary1@hotmail.com 07732388527

Through my work I aim to create pieces of wearable jewellery while considering how they may also be displayed as ornamental features. Interested in man’s interaction with the natural world, I seek to highlight the differences and similarities between natural and man-made environments, exploring different perspectives and magnification within these surroundings, and using natural and synthetic materials within my designs. Comparing patterns and shapes that recur throughout the fundamental structure of nature, with similar shapes that appear in synthetic fibres and plastics. My jewellery serves to remind the audience of natural environments, in our increasingly nature deprived, metropolis lifestyles.


Anna Patterson anna_patterson@hotmail.co.uk 07702242236

My interest lies within a process of the reinvention of the archetypal vase. The Greek Amphora vase with its body, shoulder and neck alludes to the female form. The intent is to focus upon materiality in the reinterpretation of its composition using different combinations of materials-ceramics, metal and glass. Working methods include the dissection and deconstruction of this traditional form, reassembling into new forms that challenge function and context. Investigations have led me to consider economising the traditional form’s surface area highlighting for example the elegance within its negative spaces.


Fiona Robertson fionahrob@gmail.com

In my honours project I have examined the area around the River Dee, exploring the way that the river has shaped, and continues to manipulate the landscape. In exploring the constructive and deconstructive forces of the River Dee I have been able to challenge clay as my chosen medium. My work is very much material led, in that although I essentially strive to create functional ceramics, I am not restricted by the materials and I allow the clay in many ways to dictate the form and/or function of my pieces.


Yasmin Ross yasminrossjewellery@hotmail.com 07712599388

I have a strong interest in what makes jewellery precious and I explore and challenge the ideas of preciousness and value in my work. By combining precious and semi-precious metals with materials considered ‘less valuable’, cast glass, stone and resin, I question whether material is the controlling factor in the perceived preciousness of jewellery. Crystals have been my primary inspiration for form and colour in creating bold and eye-catching yet wearable and fashionable jewellery. Intrigued by the way we facet gemstones to ‘add value’, I am influenced by the faceted form which is a key element in this collection.


Vicki Shennan www.cargocollective.com/victoriashennan

‘Arterial’

“We are estranged from that with which we are most familiar” A sense of the uncanny is entwined with contemporary life as both the human body and our environment is becoming increasingly mediated and artificial. This is epitomised in the food industry. By obscuring and transforming everyday items, I reflect on the manipulation of processed food and speculate about the effect of the synthetic on the body. Blurring the boundary between familiar and unfamiliar, a sense of the uncanny prevails. This fissure in the veneer of the everyday leads to the realisation that our perception of reality is formed on permeable boundaries. Heraclitus 5th Century BC


Laura Williams lrw_20@hotmail.co.uk

My interest in form and how we interpret it, has played a key role in the making of both my past and current work. While working in the field of ceramics, I have embraced methods of questioning and challenging form through direct making. This year my main focus has centred on perfecting slip-cast techniques and challenging traditional glaze recipes with the addition of food and household substances. My aim is to explore everyday objects through various methods of appropriation and manipulation, investigating everyday forms that are taken out of context and testing our sensory perception of everyday things.


Disclaimer The material exhibited in the show represents the talents and skills of students of Gray’s School of Art, Robert Gordon Univeristy and the show is supported by a grant from BP Exploration and Production North Sea. Gray’s Degree Show is an annual event and is managed by Gray’s School of Art. The views and conclusions contained or represented in any of the work exhibited at the show or within this exhibition catalogue are those of the students and do not represent the official policies, either expressed or implied , of BP Exploration and Production North Sea.


GRAY’S SCHOOL OF ART

GRAY’S SCHOOL OF ART

Photography by: Abigaile Fraser

Produced by The Gatehouse Design and Print Consultancy in association with Stage 3 Graphic Design placement students: Manvir Mangat and Lewis Allen


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Gray's School of Art Degree Show 2014 - Design  
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