Page 1

NAUSET REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 2015 - 2016 Program of Studies

Nauset believes ... every child matters

100 Cable Road North Eastham, MA 02651 www.nausetschools.org/nrhs

Administration Thomas Conrad, Principal Paul Markovich, Asst. Principal Eduardo MacDonald, Asst. Principal Dee Smith, Director of Guidance

NRHS Telephone Numbers Main Office: 508.255.1505 Main Office Fax: 508.255.9701 Guidance Office: 508.255.1510 Guidance Office Fax: 508.240.5417


2 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 29 39 56 77 86 87 96 100 101 107 117 121 137 139 140

NAUSET

Course Directory Mission Statement Non-Discrimination Policy NEASC Accreditation Guidance Department Services Grade Promotion and Graduation Course Selection Virtual High School / Edgenuity Academic Review Business / Technology English Fine and Applied Arts Music History and Social Sciences Leadership Mathematics Physical Education / Health School to Careers School Within a School (SWS) Science Theater and Acting World Languages International Travel Opportunities Sports Nauset Clubs

CONTENTS

Contents

1


DIRECTORY NAUSET

Course Directory BUSINESS and TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer Applications 24 Accounting I - BTBA17 17 BTBS21 Introduction To Programming in Accounting II -BTBA22 17 Python BTCS33 24 Consumer Math - MA35 17 Introduction To Programming in Developing A Business Plan Java BTCS32 24 BTBA26 18 Essentials of Computer Aided Intro To Business-A Level / Honors Design Using Solidworks 25 BTBA28 / BTBA28H 18 BTCS35 Personal Finance I 19 AP Computer Science 25 BTBA47 BTCS40 Personal Finance II 19 Working With Technology BTBA48 BTCS35 25 Advertising And Marketing 19 Introduction to Computer Hardware BTBA23 BTCS36 25

LAW

Consumer Law / A Level / Honors BTBA63 / BTBA63H 20 Contractual Law / A Level / Honors BTBA61 / BTBA61H 20 Intro To Law / A Level / Honors BTBA60 / BTBS60H 20 Criminology I - A Level / Honors BTBA62 / BTBA62H 21 Criminology II-A Level / Honors BTBA67 / BTBA67H 21

GRAPHIC DESIGN

VIDEO

Video And Electronic Portfolios BTBA75 26 Intro to Video Technology 26 BTBA81 Video Production -BTBA83 26 Advanced Video - BTBA82 27 Honors TV Production 27 BTBA91 Community Filming 27 BTBA25

Graphic Design - AR82 22 Advanced Graphic Design BTCD24 22 Web Site Design - BTCD17 22 Design For Social Media 23 BTCD18

Design for School and

Community Marketing 23 BTCD19 Logo Design / Digital Drawing BTCD20 23

2


FINE AND APPLIED ARTS

English 9 / Honors - EN11 29 STUDIO ARTS English 9A - EN12 29 Studio Art I - AR10 40 English 9B - EN13 29 Studio Art II - AR20 40 English 9 - N104 29 Art Enrichment- AR45 40 English 10 / Honors-EN21 30 AP Studio Art -APSTUDART41 English 10A - EN22 30 AP Art History-APARTHIST 41 English 10B - EN23 30 Honors Portfolio - AR40 42 English 10 - EN204 30 Fundamentals Of Drawing and AP English 11 - EN30 31 Design - AR44 42 English 11 / Honors-EN31 31 Advanced Drawing and Design AR46 42 English11A-EN32 31 Printmaking I --AR60 43 English 11B - EN33 32 Printmaking II - AR69 43 English 11 - N304 32 Sculpture AR50 44 American Studies 32 Art Therapy - AR29 44 SWS10E / SWS11E Ap Senior English-EN41 33 Painting - AR86 44 Essentials Of Modern Photography - AR91 45 English 12 / Honors-EN61 33 Advanced Photography English 12-N404 34 Techniques - AR93 45 Creative Writing Work Shop: Discovering Voice - EN49 34 Clay I - AR80 46 Journalism - EN62 34 Clay II AR88 46 Film As Literature - EN46 35 Wheelthrowing - AR96 47 Home And Away - EN58 35 Animals In Literature: Species Empathy - EN47 35 GRAPHIC DESIGN America’s Melting Pot-EN9136 Graphic Design - AR82 48 Shakespeare For Performance Advanced Graphic Design and Literary Analysis - TH30 37 BTCD24 48 Facing History And Ourselves Web Site Design - BTCD17 48 SWS40E 37 Design For Social Media 49 The Musical Journey Of America: BTCD18 From Ragtime To Rock-N-Roll Design for School and SWS33E 37 Community Marketing 49 Banned Books and the Stories BTCD19 Behind Them - SWS43 37 Logo Design / Digital Drawing BTCD20 49

NAUSET

ENGLISH

DIRECTORY

Course Directory

3


DIRECTORY NAUSET

Course Directory FASHION DESIGN

Introduction to Fashion Design AR68 50 Fashion Design - AR72 51 Advanced Fashion Design 51 AR83 Yearbook Production / Graphic Design - YRBK 52

LIVING ARTS Child Psychology - HE41 53

World Cultures - MU63 World Cultures II - MU68 Recreation Exploratory N29, EX29 Exploring and Respecting Differences - EX10 Exploring and Respecting Differences II - EX20 Exploring and Respecting Differences Honors - EX11

54 54 54

55 55 55

GENERAL MUSIC Beginning Guitar - MU83

56 Music Technology - MU35 56 Piano - MU82 57

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Concert Band - MU50 58 Concert Band Honors-MU51 58 Percussion Ensemble-MU50P 58 Orchestra - MU58 59 Orchestra Honors - MU71 59 Jazz Ensemble - MU67 60 Jazz Ensemble - Honors MU81 60

4

VOCAL MUSIC

Concert Chorus - MU60 Honors Chorus - MU61 Treble Chorus - MU65 Acafellas - MU62

61 61 62 62

ADVANCED MUSIC Music Theory and College Prep MU25 63

CULINARY ARTS Baking and Pastry Arts -

HE50 Culinary Arts I - HE91 Culinary Arts II - HE92

64 65 65

METALS AND JEWELRY Art Metal I - IA30

68 Art Metal II - IA32 68 Advanced Metal - IA36 69 Jewelry, Part I - IA37 70 Jewelry, Part II - IA39 70 Independent Jewelry / Metal IA44, IA44S1 71 Bicycle Frame Engineering IA48 72

WOOD FABRICATION Acoustic Guitar Building

IA55 Woodworking - Level 1 IA60 Woodworking - Level II IA73 Advanced Woodworking IA90

73 73 74 74


SO11 77 Western Civilization 1 / A Level SO12 77 Western Civilization I - N56 75 Intro to Civics and Government SO15, SO15H 77 Western Civilization II / Honors SO21 78 Western Civilization II / A Level SO22 78 Western Civilization II / B Level SO23 78 Western Civilization II N94 78 AP US Government and Politics SO99 79 AP European History-SO20 79 Intro to Civics and Government SO15, SO15H 79 AP US History - SO41 80 US History - A Level-SO32 80 US History - B Level-SO33 80 US History - N36 80 American Studies-SWS10S 80 AP Art History-APARTHIST 81 AP Economics - SO61 81 AP US Government and Politics SO99 81 Humanities - SO65 82 International Relations SO50 82 US Art History - SO45 82 Exploring Current Issues - SO57 82 America’s Melting Pot-SO91 83 The Musical Journey of America SWS33E 84 Facing History and Ourselves SWS40S 84

PSYCHOLOGY Psychology Part I - SO51 85

Psychology Part II - SO52 85 AP Psychology - SO60 85

LEADERSHIP Leadership - Leader

NAUSET

HISTORY and SOCIAL STUDIES Western Civilization I / Honors

DIRECTORY

Course Directory

86

MATHEMATICS

Algebra I / A Level MA12 87 Integrated Math I - MA15 87 Integrated Math II - MA17 88 Honors Geometry - MA21 89 Geometry - A Level - MA22 89 Geometry - B Level - MA23 90 Mathematics, Exploration and Design - MA26 90 Advanced Algebra - MA31 90 Advanced Algebra - A Level MA32 91 Advanced Algebra - B Level MA33 91 Financial Algebra - MA34 91 College and Preparatory Math MA45 92 Pre-Calculus I - MA42 92 Honors Pre-Calculus-MA51 93 Pre-Calculus II - MA52 93 AP Calculus (AB) - MA60 93 AP Calculus (BC) - MA61 94 AP Statistics - MA70 94 Probability and Statistics MA72 94

5


DIRECTORY NAUSET

Course Directory PHYSICAL EDUCATION Outdoor Adventure - PE01 95

PE / Wellness - PE02 PE / Health - PE03 96 Fitness Center Workout PE51 97 Outdoor Adventures-PE57 97 Rackets and Clubs - PE54 97 Fitness for Females - PE569 98 Intro to Athletic Training PE59 99 Advanced Athletic Training PE59A 99

SCHOOL to CAREERS Internship-INTERNS 1

100 Work Experience Program 100 WKEXP, WKEXP S1

SCHOOL WITHIN A SCHOOL (SWS) American Studies 102

SWS10E, SWS10S, SWS19 Facing History and Ourselves SWS40E, SWS40S 103 The Musical Journey of America SWS33E, SWS34S 104 Musical Journey Seminar SWS39 104 Banned Books and the Stories Behind Them-SWS43 105 Intro to Astronomy-SWS45 106 Astronomy II - SWS55 106

6

SCIENCE Freshmen Intro to Physics

SC10, SC10H 108 General Science - N18 108 Biology - A Level - SC22 109 Honors Biology - SC21 109 General Biology - N65 109 Modern Chemistry - SC32 110 Modern Chemistry Honors 110 SC31 AP Chemistry - SC30 110 Biotechnology _ SC58 111 AP Biology - SC41 111 AP Environmental Science SC60 111 AP Physics B Part I - SC51 112 AP Physics B Part II - SC61 112 College Prep Physics-SC52 112 Earth and Space Science SC57 112 Saltwater Ecosystems-SC70 113 Freshwater Ecosystems-SC75 113 Forensic Science - SC60 113 Vertebrate Zoology and Animal Behavior - SC59 114 Anatomy and Physiology SC42 114 Robotics, Engineering and Technology - SC65 115 Advanced Robotics, Engineering and Technology - SC85 115


117 Honors Acting - TH11 117 Shakespeare for Performance and Literary Analysis TH30, TH30H 118 Screenwriting, Playwriting and Creative Writing - TH40 118 Drama Production - TH70, TH70A 119

WORLD LANGUAGE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE American Sign I - ASL1 122

American Sign II - ASL2 122 American Sign III - ASL3 122 American Sign Honors - ASLH 122

ESL (English as a Second Language) ESL1 - ESL10 123 ESL2 - ESL20 123 ESLIII - ESL30 123 FRENCH French I - FR12

French II - FR22 French II Honors - FR21 French III - FR32 French III Honors - FR31 Frenceh IV - FR42 French IV Honors - FR41 French V - FR52 French V Honors - FR51 AP French - FR50

GERMAN German II - GE22

German III - GE32 German IV - GE42

LATIN Latin I - LT12

Latin II - LT22 Latin III / IV - LT32 / LT42 Latin III / IV Honors LT32H / LT42H Latin IV Honors - LT41 AP Latin - LT40

127 127 127

NAUSET

THEATER and ACTING Dramatic Acting - TH10

DIRECTORY

Course Directory

128 128 128 129 130 130

MANDARIN CHINESE Mandarin Chinese I - MC12 131 Mandarin Chinese II - MC22 131 Mandarin Chinese II Honors - MC21 131

SPANISH Spanish Conversation and

124 124 124 125 125 125 125 126 126 126

Culture SP15 Spanish Conversation and Culture II - SP25 Spanish I - SP12 Spanish II - SP22 Spanish II Honors - SP21 Spanish III - SP32 Spanish III Honors - SP31 Spanish IV - SP42 Spanish IV Honors - SP41 Spanish V - SP52 Spanish V Honors - SP51 AP Spanish - SP50

132 132 133 133 133 134 134 135 135 136 136 136

7


8

NAUSET


Nauset Regional High School, in partnership with its member communities, strives to develop responsible and educated citizens by providing an environment that expects and encourages respect for each other and the community.

NAUSET

MISSION STATEMENT / EXPECTATIONS “As they say on my own Cape Cod, a rising tide lifts all the boats. And a partnership, by definition, serves both partners without domination or unfair advantages.” ~President John F. Kennedy, 1963

MISSION

Mission Statement

We uphold rigorous academic standards through a variety of teaching and learning strategies so that all students may acquire the skills, the knowledge, and the work ethic to become contributing members of an evolving society. We provide diverse extra and co-curricula activities to complement the academics, creating a rich variety of valued and supported offerings. Academic Expectations: All students will engage in a variety of learning experiences to develop skills in: • Evaluating information • Critical thinking and problem solving • Reading comprehension • Oral communication • Written communication Social Expectations: • Students will develop self-worth and emotional maturity using positive interpersonal and intra-personal skills • Students will develop coping skills that promote self-advocacy and self-confidence in real-life situations Civic Expectations: • Students will have the opportunity to in knowledge and respect for the diversity on our campus, in our communities, and the world beyond. • Students will have the opportunity to be knowledgeable advocates of their civic obligations and privileges.

9


GENERAL NAUSET

General Information NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY 2560.11/4116.11/5150 The Nauset Public Schools do not discriminate in their educational programs or activities or in their admissions or employment policies on the basis or race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, sexual orientation or disability. Accordingly, employees of this district are required to comply with the provisions of this policy and the following federal and state laws: Title VI and Tible IX, Sections 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the American with Disabilities Act, and Chapters 151B and 622 of the Massachusetts General Laws. This policy will be distributed on an annual basis to all students, parents, and employees of the Nauset Public Schools. Complaints of violations of this policy will be handled in accordance with the procedure set forth in the Nauset Public Schools Discrimination and Harassment Complaint Procedure, which will also be distributed annually to all students, parents and employees. NEASC ACCREDITATION Nauset Regional High School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. (NEASC), a private, nationally-recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through graduate schools. Accreditation is voluntary. It represents an institution’s willingness to abide by the Standards and to open itself regularly to examination by outside evaluators familiar with higher education. As such, accreditation is recognized as a symbol of accountability to the public. Accreditation of an institution by NEASC indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria determined by a peer review process and has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs. Institutional integrity is indicated by accreditation. http://cihe.neasc.org/

10


The Guidance Department provides and assists in academic, social-emotional and career development for all students in collaboration with parents, teachers, and staff. Recognizing each student as a complex and unique individual, counselors use a holistic approach to help ALL students achieve excellence.

NAUSET

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT SERVICES

GENERAL

Guidance Department

Nauset’s school counseling program is aligned with the Massachusetts Model for Comprehensive School Counseling. Counselors deliver a standards-based curriculum to ALL students in Grades 9-12 through individual counseling and small group counseling. A major area of focus is guiding students toward greater independence in preparation for transition to college or the workforce. While students are the primary focus of counselors, positive relationships with families, teachers, and the community are also crucial to the success of the program.

11


GENERAL NAUSET

Grade Promotion and Graduation Seven credits must be taken each year. To graduate, the following subjects must be included in the student’s four-year program: • • • • •

Four (4) in English U.S. History and two (2) other Social Studies in grades 9,10,11 Four (4) in Math Four (4) in Science Four (4) in Physical Education / Health

Graduation requirement is 26 Credits. GRADE PROMOTION POLICY Freshmen: Students in Grade 9 must earn 6 Credits, including English 9 in order to be promoted to Grade 10. Sophomores: Students in Grade 10 must have earned 12 Credits including English 9 & 10 in order to be promoted to Grade 11. Juniors: In order to be promoted to senior status in the 4th year, students must complete the following requirements: 19 Credits including English 9, 10, 11 in addition to sufficient academic course work that insures graduation requirements as listed above.

12


This Program of Studies offers some of the information you will need to plan your high school program. It is best to evaluate your interests, aptitudes and abilities when selecting courses in rounding out your program. This should be done cooperatively with your parents, teachers and counselor.

NAUSET

COURSE SELECTION All students must select seven (7) full year courses or the equivalent.

GENERAL

Course Selection

The following pages contain descriptions of courses by department. The number below the course title is the computer course number. To the right of the course number is the unit credit for the course. If you select any semester electives for half credit, please make certain to sign up for two (2), one in each semester. AVAILABILITY OF COURSES DESCRIBED IN THE PROGRAM OF STUDIES The NRHS Program of Studies contains a wide variety of courses, some of which are limited in enrollment. Limited enrollment courses/sections may be closed before enrollments become too high. Preference will be given to seniors and juniors. Counselors will assist students in making alternative selections when courses are cancelled or closed. Actual class sizes typically reflect a range above and below the guidelines and may vary considerably among courses. Conflicts in the schedule of individual students may occur. It is, therefore, advisable to indicate and prioritize options when planning a your schedule. All students are guaranteed of being able to enroll in required courses and earn sufficient credits for graduation over the course of their four-year high school experience. COURSE SELECTION PROCESS When you have selected your courses for next year, enter the computer course number of the courses selected on the separate course selection sheet. Sign the form and have a parent sign where indicated and return only this form on pre-registration day.

13


GENERAL NAUSET

Virtual High School - Edgenuity VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL (VHS) Each year, up to 50 students (25 each semester) will have an opportunity to earn Nauset Regional High School credit by taking courses offered through Virtual High School (VHS). VHS offers a wide range of online courses in various disciplines. Some course examples include American Popular Music, Screenwriting Fundamentals, Preveterinary Medicine, Career Awareness for the New Millennium, Investing in the Stock Market, and Animation and Effects: Flash MX Basics. Through VHS, Nauset Regional High School can provide students with opportunities to take courses in these kinds of specialized topics. For a complete catalogue of courses, visit the Virtual High School website: http://thevhscollaborative.org/. VHS courses are open to juniors and seniors in good standing. There is an application process that includes a teacher recommendation and parent permission. Accepted students will be assigned to the library for one period every other day for their course requirements online. For more information, contact Ms. Endich, the high school librarian and VHS coordinator or your guidance counselor. EDGENUITY Edgenuity is a research-based video course curriculum that offers core and elective classes to students in a virtual setting. Edgenuity offers online blended learning programs in which videos are a part of traditionally structure of classes. The curriculum is designed to meet state curriculum benchmarks and guidelines. The computer based course allows students to work at their own pace. They can do their studies at school and at home. This also gives them the opportunity to take classes that are not offered at the high school, such as 3D Modeling and Animation, Marketing, Health Sciences, Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Career Planning, Human Geography and Sociology. Edgenuity has many prep courses as well such as MCAS Biology, Math and SAT Prep.

14


AP and HONORS Any student who receives a C or lower in AP or Honors at interims or at the end of the quarter must attend after-school help sessions a minimum of twice a week (student or teacher sessions) until the grade comes up at the end of the marking term. Failure to improve the grade may lead to a recommendation of placement in a lower level class.

NAUSET

ACADEMIC REVIEW

GENERAL

Academic Review

SWITCHING LEVELS No student will be allowed to drop a level without demonstrating a sincere effort to get help. The expectation is for a student to meet with their teacher in after-school help. If this effort is not enough, the student should take advantage of meeting with a tutor from the National Honor Society. HOMEWORK EXPECTATIONS Advanced Placement 2 hours or more Honors 1 ½ hours or more “A” Level 45 minutes “B” Level 30-45 minutes

15


16

NAUSET


ACCOUNTING I Grades 10 - 12 BTBA17 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year A full-year course recommended for college-bound students planning a career in any area of business and for students entering accounting, secretarial and general office occupations. Accounting I will acquaint students with the principles and practices of double-entry accounting. Students will examine the entire accounting cycle as applied to sole proprietorships and partnerships. The relationship of using the computer to do accounting functions will also be covered.

NAUSET

The Nauset Business Technology Department offers a wide variety of classes that are available to all students. The department is divided into six areas of concentration: the world of Business, Computer Science, Computer Graphic Design, Legal and Video. The courses offered allow students to choose their own focus and meet their particular interests and needs.

BUSINESS

Business / Technology

ACCOUNTING II Grades 11 - 12 BTBA22 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Accounting I Accounting II is a full-year course focusing on accounting concepts, theory and computerized accounting. This advanced accounting course introduces the student to corporate accounting, cost accounting, inventory accounting and payroll accounting. CONSUMER MATH Grades 11 - 12 MA35 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Students are introduced to such everyday life skills as balancing a checkbook, calculating net pay, budgeting expenses, making cost comparisons, buying and renting a home and finding the cost of operating a motor vehicle. The goal of this course is to enable students to make good decisions concerning matters of money and finance in their daily lives.

17


BUSINESS NAUSET

Business DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN Grades 10 - 12 BTBA26 - ½ Elective Credit Prerequisite: Introduction to Business This course is an introduction to business plan development. Achieving success in business starts with a business plan. Using information from Introduction to Business, students will design a comprehensive business plan for a retail, wholesale or service type business. This course will tie content into real life situations. INTRO TO BUSINESS / INTRO BUSINESS HONORS Grades 9 - 12 BTBA28 / BTBA28H - A Level / Honors - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Are you thinking of pursuing a business/management career or maybe owning your own business someday? This course is designed to introduce students to the important role business plays in the lives of individuals as consumers and workers. College-bound students are encouraged to take this course to help strengthen management and leadership skills. The course covers different types of businesses, management and leadership theories, marketing and advertising and managing and operating a small business. Students will also learn how to develop commercials, provide publicity, design products, understand promotion techniques and develop pricing strategies. Additional class work is required for honors credit.

18


NAUSET

PERSONAL FINANCE I Grades 10 - 12 BTBA47 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Learn financial survival skills. You will discover how to efficiently handle personal finance and consumption expenditures. Topics will include budgeting, Credit cards, checking and savings accounts, risk management (property, life, health and auto insurance) and consumer rights.

BUSINESS

Business

PERSONAL FINANCE II Grades 10 - 12 BTBA48 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Personal Finance I Most people dream of becoming wealthy. The time to learn wealth-building strategies and to develop successful financial planning is now – while you are young. Students will study financing for the future, how to manage Credit and risk, how to make effective buying decisions, investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and real estate. ADVERTISING AND MARKETING Grades 10 - 12 BTBA23 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year The study of the components of advertising and its function within the total marketing functiuon. The course examines advertising campaigns and procedures dealing with planning, creation, production, media, management, research and budgeting. Students will explore how advertising is used to identify specific tasks to help promote business sales.

19


LAW NAUSET

Law CONSUMER LAW / CONSUMER LAW HONORS Grades 9 - 12 BTBA63 / BTBA63H - A Level / Honors - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year What are your rights and responsibilities as a consumer? An overview of consumer law for individuals and businesses. The course will tie content into real life situations, emphasize practical points to reduce legal risks and discuss alternative ways of resolving disputes. • Buying a car, insuring a car • Importance of warranties • Unfair and deceptive sales practices • Staying at a hotel • Flying, riding the train or bus Additional class work is required for honors credit. CONTRACTUAL LAW / CONTRACTUAL LAW HONORS Grades 10 - 12 BTBA61 / BTBA61H - A Level / Honors - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year What do you need to know before you sign your name? What is a contract? What are my rights? What are my responsibilities? What form must a contract be in? When does the contract end? This course will tie content into real life situations (contracts), and emphasize practical points to reduce your legal risks for individuals and businesses. • How do contracts come about? • What is legal and illegal in a contract? • What form must the contract be in? • How do I know when the contract is ended? Additional class work is required for honors credit. INTRODUCTION TO LAW / INTRODUCTION TO LAW HONORS Grades 9 - 12 BTBA60 / BTBS60H - Regular / Honors - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course helps students gain a practical understanding of the way the American legal system functions, while learning the details of trial processes and procedures. Students will develop important lifetime skills: critical analysis of problems, reasoning, listening, and oral presentation (argue cases). This course provides an active learning opportunity and requires cooperation among participants. This course will help you to get and overview of the substance of the law, understand the general procedures of law, and gain insight into the spirit of the law. Additional class work is required for honors credit.

20


LAW

Law NAUSET

CRIMINOLOGY I / CRIMINOLOGY I HONORS Grades 10 - 12 BTBA62 / BTBA62H - A Level / Honors - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year What do police officers really do and need to know? An introduction to criminal justice. What happens when the police arrive? This class will explore the methods used by police officers in solving crimes. • Search and seizure 4th amendment • Initial Investigation • Direct and circumstantial evidence • Basic leads and informatipon • Major investigative techniques Additional class work is required for honors credit. CRIMINOLOGY II / CRIMINOLOGY II HONORS Grades 10 - 12 BTBA67 / BTBA67H - A Level / Honors - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year The course provides students with background in basic knowledge of criminal law. Where do laws come from? What types of crimes are there? What happens at the crime scene? The course will tie content into real cases. Students will apply skills that will reinforce communication, writing, critical thinking and analysis. Students will solve problems as individuals and in groups, fostering cooperative learning. Those students who have an interest in a Criminal Justice and pursue an education and/or career in the area of Law. Cases include: Salem Witch Trials • JFK Assassination • New Jersey v. T.L.O. • Charles Manson • Christa Worthington murder case • Whitey Bulger Additional class work is required for honors credit.

21


DESIGN NAUSET

Graphic Design GRAPHIC DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 AR82 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year The Graphic Design course is designed to offer students a chance to develop an understanding of how to use technology to produce visual products such as magazine and book layouts, business cards, advertisements, and product labels. Students will be introduced to design elements and principles, color theory and typography as the foundations of good composition. Students will learn and use Adobe Creative Suite’s InDesign©, Photoshop© and Illustrator© as graphic design tools. ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN Grades 10 - 12 BTCD24 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Graphic Design What makes one product stand out from the others? Why is it more attractive, exciting and appealing to us? This course enhances and advances your skills learned in Graphic Design Design©, Photoshop© and Illustrator©. You will use them to consider large scale and product design and packaging. Components will cover seeing and designing in three dimensions, designing for target markets, product lines, mass markets, small markets and playful design. You’ll never look at a pizza box or milk carton the same way again! WEB SITE DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 BTCD17 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course introduces students to basic web site design. Students will first learn HTML code and apply it to web pages that they create and edit in class. Dreamweaver© is then introduced to provide students with the basic editing skills necessary to create and maintain an Internet web site.

22


DESIGN

Graphic Design NAUSET

DESIGN FOR SOCIAL MEDIA Grades 11 - 12 BTCD18 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year In today’s day and age, we rely on social media for everything from connecting with friends, checking the breaking news and current weather, to searching for a new recipe for dinner. This course will explore current trends to understand what makes these social media applications so appealing. Our task will be to create and then manage social media sites for Nauset. Learning and using Adobe Design Suite’s InDesign© and Photoshop©, students will create engaging and visually appealing banners and headers, edit photos and create postings to make sure that Nauset’s social media presence will educate, inform and engage the school and surrounding communities about what goes on here on campus. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram will be the primary focus. DESIGN FOR SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY MARKETING Grades 9 - 12 BTCD19 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year How do we look from the outside in? How about the inside out? Students in this class will examine different marketing tools and techniques that work for some businesses and organizations, but may not for others. Students will use the Adobe Design Suite© and iMovie© to create ads, commercials, brochures, posters and other marketing tools that exhibit the best of Nauset. LOGO DESIGN / DIGITAL DRAWING Grades 9 - 12 BTCD20 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Branding! Recognizable logos connect us to brands. How are logos created? This class will bring your ideas to your sketchbook and then drawings from your sketchbook to the computer screen using Adobe Illustrator©. Learning about different fonts, logo text positioning and color options, students will generate, on a variety of platforms, custom logos and complicated computer drawings.

23


COMPUTER SCIENCE

NAUSET

Computer Science COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Grades 9 - 12 BTCS21 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course is designed to teach students how to use the computer as a business and personal tool through the use of applications software. This is a project-oriented course that will allow students to explore a variety of computer applications. Appropriate software for database management, spreadsheet applications, presentation programs, multimedia software and basic programming skills will be used. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING IN PYTHON Grades 9 - 12 BTCS33 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year BTCS33A - 1/2 Elective Credit - 1/2 Year BTCS33B - 1/2 Elective Credit - 1/2 Year Prerequisite for BTCS33B: BTCS33A This course covers the fundamentals of programming with the introduction to the programming language of Python. If you are interested in how computers solve complicated problems then this is the course for you! Students will learn the fundamentals of variables, arithmetic operations and expressions, decision constructs, arrays, functions, data types, character strings, structures, and pointers. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING IN JAVA Grades 10 - 12 BTCS32 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year BTCS32A - 1/2 Elective Credit - 1/2 Year BTCS32B - 1/2 Elective Credit - 1/2 Year Prerequisite: BTCS31 Introduction to Programming with Python Prerequisite for BTCS32B: BTCS32A Students will gain experience with the object oriented programming language of Java. The course will emphasize the basic elements of programming including fundamental data types, variables, input and output, conditional branching, debugging, looping, operators, methods, and classes.

24


NAUSET

ESSENTIALS OF 3D COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN USING SOLIDWORKS Grades 9 - 12 BTCS35 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course covers the fundamentals of how to use the SOLIDWORKS mechanical design automation software to build parametric models of parts and assemblies, and how to make drawings of those parts and assemblies. Students will gain a preliminary understanding of the engineering and design process.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer Science

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE Grades 11 - 12 - offered through VHS only (Virtual High School) BTCS40 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Introduction to Programming in Java This course is designed to prepare the student to take the College Board Advanced Placement Computer Science Exam. This course will emphasize object-oriented programming methodology. Students will learn such sample topics of specification, design, implementation of programs type and constant definitions, abstractions, scope of variables, functions, arrays, and algorithms. All students enrolled will be expected to take the AP Computer Science exam in the spring for which there is a fee. WORKING WITH TECHNOLOGY Grades 9 – 12 BTCS35 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Students will gain an understanding of how modern technology functions and learn vital basic skills for using technology successfully to increase productivity. The course will emphasize technological hardware, networking, software, ethical issues, societal impact and usability. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER HARDWARE Grades 9 - 12 BTCS36 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Students will develop an understanding of how computer hardware functions. Emphasis will be on individual components in computers, tablets, cell phones and other technological devices. A brief overview of computer systems, tablet and cell phone trouble shooting and problem resolution is also covered.

25


VIDEO NAUSET

Video Technology VIDEO AND ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIOS Grades 10 - 12 BTBA75 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year A portfolio is a collection of student work that exhibits the student’s efforts, progress, interests and achievements in one or more areas. Students will create digital portfolios of their interest or prepare a video for possible college admissions. INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY Grades 9 - 12 BTBA81 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Want to learn invaluable lessons which can open doors in multiple career fields? Are you the next Katie Couric, Dick Vitale, or Steven Spielberg! Then get ready for some action! We’ll even supply the lights and cameras too. Learn how to “tell the story” like a pro, or frame a camera shot like a freelance videographer working for the PGA tour. There’s a niche for everyone. Whether you are the talent or the crew, writer or set designer – we will discover your best side. You might even show up on Nauset News. No make-up required! VIDEO PRODUCTION Grades 10 - 12 BTBA83 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Intro and Advanced Video or teacher permission. Think you’ve done it all? Not until you top it off with Video Production. A course geared toward the student with an amazing critical eye. Digital cameras and digital editing will be on hand to tap into your creative side. Routine filed trips will occur to capture unique outdoor and indoor footage such as surroundings of Salt Pond Visitors Center and the local beaches. Interesting stories that arise in the community will also be incorporated for the class to cover. School related events, advanced camera techniques, and script writing will all be incorporated into the class. Consider Video Production a journey. Whether you like to work alone or with a small multi-camera crew, we will cover the techniques and organization nvolved in transforming your ideas in your head into a persuasive presentation on the screen.

26


VIDEO

Video Technology NAUSET

ADVANCED VIDEO Grades 9 - 12 BTBA82 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Intro to Video Do you think 400 sound effects could shake up your movie making? Does the word “Director” mean anything to you? Your skills achieved in BU60 (intro to video) will help sort out the bells and whistles added to this class. Digital cameras, editing, voiceovers, music inserts, and creating action shots using shadows are only a mere sampling of the innovative techniques you will be introduced to. Come find the magic recipe for creating attractive and interesting programs. With some added “know-how” your productions will be as successful as you! HONORS TV PRODUCTION Grades 11 - 12 BTBA91 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Intro and Advanced Video Prepare for a career in television, cable TV, communications, sound recording, editing, and related video/film production industries. You’ll acquire technical and communication skills through “In the Classroom” course work, TV studio production skills training and hands on experience. Equipment and facilities include: HD TV Studio, HD Field Production equipment editing suite using Final Cut Pro, and audio work station. Students gain valuable experience producing programming for Lower Cape TV’s Community Access channel, developing story concepts and scripts, along with audio, lighting and camera fundamentals. Turn your raw footage into a complete program to be distributed on Lower Cape TV. This class is for the mature video student. COMMUNITY FILMING Grades 10 - 12 BTBA25 - ½ Year – ½ Elective Credit; Full Year – 1 Elective Credit Do you want to be in the film industry capturing the action on the fields and in the community? Film real life action and events! Receive Credit for your passion and gain experience for a future career in videography.

27


28

NAUSET


ENGLISH 9 / HONORS EN11 - 1 English Credit - Full Year As an enriched and accelerated introduction to literature, students will study Of Mice and Men, A Separate Peace, The Odyssey, Julius Caesar, and Crime and Punishment, as well as selections of short stories, poems, and myths. A primary emphasis will be on writing organized, well-developed literary analysis essays and developing critical and creative thinking. This course is recommended for highly motivated students with exceptional reading and writing skills. Enrollment is based on teacher recommendation.

NAUSET

ALL STUDENTS MUST PASS 4 YEARS OF ENGLISH. English is cumulative in its skill development; therefore, students who fail English for the year must attend summer school and receive a passing grade before they can continue at the next grade level.

ENGLISH

9th Grade English

ENGLISH 9A EN12 - 1 English Credit - Full Year As an introduction to literature, students will study Of Mice and Men, The Odyssey, and Julius Caesar, as well as selections of short stories, poems, and Greek and Roman myths. The primary emphasis will be on developing organized, well-developed literary analysis essays. This course is recommended for students with good reading and writing skills. Enrollment is based on teacher recommendation. ENGLISH 9B EN13 - 1 English Credit - Full Year As an introduction to literature, students will study Of Mice and Men, The Odyssey, Julius Caesar, as well as selections of short stories, poems, and Greek and Roman myths. The primary emphasis will be on developing essay-writing skills. This course is recommended for students with developing reading and writing skills. Enrollment is based on teacher recommendation. ENGLISH 9 N104 - 1 English Credit - Full Year As an introduction to literature, students will study a variety of literary works. The primary emphasis will be on developing reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon Special Education Team recommendation and student’s Individualized Educational Plan.

29


ENGLISH NAUSET

10th Grade English ENGLISH 10 / Honors EN21 - 1 English Credit - Full Year The l0th grade Honors curriculum is an introduction to World Literature and its universal themes. The reading and writing focus at this level is to promote close analysis of literature and the use of supporting details from primary or secondary sources. In addition to close reading and analytical writing, students are expected to produce projects and oral presentations for the class. Students will continue developing composition, vocabulary, and literary analysis skills. They will also prepare for MCAS. Enrollment is based upon the recommendations of the 9th grade English teachers. ENGLISH 10A EN22 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Sophomore English introduces students to World Literature and its universal themes. Students will explore a wide range of novels, short stories, essays, drama, and poetry. Students will develop essay writing techniques, vocabulary, and literary analysis skills. They will also prepare for MCAS. ENGLISH 10B EN23 - 1 English Credit - Full Year World Literature in the form of the novel, drama, short prose and poetry will be studied. The emphasis is on the reinforcement and development of reading, writing, critical thinking, and organizational skills. They will also focus on preparation for MCAS. Enrollment is based upon teacher recommendation. ENGLISH 10 N204 - 1 English Credit - Full Year World literature in the forms of the novel, drama, short prose and poetry will be studied. The emphasis is on the reinforcement and development of reading, writing, critical thinking, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon Special Education Team recommendation and student’s Individualized Educational Plan.

30


NAUSET

AP ENGLISH 11 EN30 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Completion of English 10 with a final grade of B or higher; recommendation of English 10 teacher and approval of department head and an interest in writing. Students must take an after school diagnostic writing test to familiarize them with academic expectations of an AP course.

ENGLISH

11th Grade English

Students in this accelerated course will study a variety of texts in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition. Using a number of American classics as a springboard, they will analyze and produce mature prose. Students will explore narrative, descriptive, and analytical modes of discourse, and consider audience and purpose. In addition, students will work on making their own writing more sophisticated. All students will take the AP Exam in May, which will serve as the final exam for the course. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee. Students who score 3 or higher on this exam may receive college credit or advanced college placement in English. ENGLISH 11 / Honors EN31 - 1 English Credit - Full Year What is our literary heritage? How does American literature embody the diverse voices of the American Experience? In English 11 Honors we will explore the major themes and trends in American literature, and develop an awareness of how the literature of the United States reflects the inherent complexities and paradoxes of the American culture and the American identity. The reading and writing focus of this course will be on making connections between literature in its historical and social context. All course work revolves around a rigorous reading syllabus; works studied include The Scarlet Letter, Moby Dick, My Antonia, The Grapes of Wrath, The Great Gatsby, Walden, The Color Purple, poetry, short stories, and non-fiction. Students will continue to develop literary analysis skills and essay writing techniques. Enrollment is based on the recommendation of 10th grade teachers. ENGLISH 11A EN32 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Junior English focuses on the literary trends of the United States from the l600’s to the present. Students will explore a range of novels, short stories, essays, drama and poetry. Students will continue to develop essay writing techniques and engage in literary analysis. They will study vocabulary and work on research skills. They will also prepare for SATs.

31


ENGLISH NAUSET

11th Grade English ENGLISH 11B EN33 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Junior English B focuses on the literary trends of the United States from the l600’s to the present time. Students will explore poetry, drama, short prose and novels. This course will emphasize strongly the development of those basic learning skills including reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is limited to 15. Recommendation by l0th grade English teacher is needed. ENGLISH 11 N304 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Junior English focuses on the literary trends of the United States from the l600’s to the present time. Students will explore poetry, drama, short prose and novels. This course will emphasize the development of those basic learning skills including reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education TEAM recommendation and student’s Individualized Educational Plan. AMERICAN STUDIES Grade 11 - Full Year - 3 Credits including: SWS10E / SWS11E - A Level / Honors 1 Credit English SWS10S / SWS11S - A Level / Honors 1 Credit History SWS19 – 1 Elective Credit - American Studies Humanities Seminar American Studies is a cooperatively taught, three credit integrated U.S. History and American Literature course. Through this interdisciplinary, project-based approach, students will study Apocalypse Then: Reconstruction, with Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; When Monopoly Wasn’t a Game: The Growing Empire from Wild West to World War I with Lakota Woman, The Sun Also Rises and The Jungle; Boom to Bust to Big Boom: From the Jazz Age and the Great Depression to Hiroshima with The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath; Commies, Containment, and Cold War: America in the Fifties and Vietnam with The Catcher in the Rye and The Things They Carried; From the Evil Empire to the Axis of Evil with research projects and current events. Students will have many opportunities to refine research and writing skills, and will also prepare for SAT’s. Enrollment in the Humanities Seminar is also required for this course.

32


AP SENIOR ENGLISH EN41 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: Completion of English 11 with a final grade of B or higher; recommendation of English 11 teacher and approval of department head. Students of AP English Literature and Composition will read a variety of literature, representing a diversity of time periods, cultures, and points of view. Through a comparative reading of literature, students will construct meaning in literature by being attentive to language, imagery, characterization, action, argument, and the various techniques and strategies authors use. Students are expected to write a literary analysis essay after each major work. Autobiographical essays will be written for college applications. Verbal language skills will be strengthened through prepared formal presentations, interactive discussions, student-taught lessons, and dramatic performance. All students will take the AP exam in May, which will serve as the final exam for the course. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee. Students who score 3 or higher on this exam may receive college credit or advanced college placement in English.

NAUSET

Seniors must take one half-year course each semester from the elective sections. The AP English, and Honors English are full year courses. All courses will assist students in preparing their college application essays. Note: Students will not be allowed to enroll in two (2) English classes in the same semester without the express permission of the English department head.

ENGLISH

12th Grade English

ENGLISH 12 / Honors EN61 - 1 English Credit - Full Year British Literature is a year long course that prepares college bound seniors for the work they will be assigned at the collegiate level, further developing each student’s reading, writing, speaking and analytical skills. The course provides an overview of the origins, history, and development of the English language and culture from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the Middle Ages, and from the Elizabethan Era, the Civil War and Restoration Periods, to the Romantic, Victorian and Modern Eras, focusing on representative and challenging selections of poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction from each period. Writing assignments include the college application narrative essay during Quarter One, and continue with literary analysis, a research paper that prepares students for college course final papers, research presentations, and creative projects. By the end of the year students will have a working knowledge of college level expectations and the ability to meet those expectations. Students will also have read, discussed, analyzed, and written about a variety of classic British works that they will undoubtedly draw upon and perhaps encounter again as they proceed to college and career.

33


ENGLISH NAUSET

English Electives ENGLISH 12 N404 - 1 English Credit - Full Year This course focuses on improving literacy in the reading and written language areas. Course content includes compensatory reading and writing strategies and remediating basic skills such as spelling, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary. Enrollment is based upon special education TEAM recommendation and the students’ Individualized Educational Plan. CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: DISCOVERING VOICE EN49 - ½ English Credit - ½ Year Creative Writing is workshop format, a place where we do a lot of in-class writing and sharing out loud. We may write six-word stories, 100-word stories, and 1,000-word stories. We will write poems and more poems. Poems about objects (maybe a toaster), poems about lunch (the café haiku), goofy love poems and hate poems, poems about the past and future, poems about cartoons and fairytales, poems about paintings and photographs. And maybe a poem about Uncle Louie. We may paint poems and “poem” paintings. We might write one-act plays. We will read and respond to writing as well. And we will write personal essays about what we sincerely believe in (calling them “This I Believe” essays. We will find out that even those of us who have tiny voices have something very important to say. Requirement for course: a positive attitude, a serious work ethic, and the belief that writing can unlock great ideas that have been hiding within us. JOURNALISM Grades 10 - 12 Seniors: counts as English class; Sophomores and Juniors: counts as elective EN62 - 1 English Credit – Full year Are you an aspiring photojournalist, reporter, graphic artist, writer, blog designer, or business manager? Then become a staff member of the newspaper of NRHS, Nauset Horizons. You will learn the craft of journalistic writing and news production. All facts of student and school life, including investigative news, features, arts & entertainment, sports, editorials & opinions, reviews and classified will be reported with fair and objective coverage. Attention will also be paid to civic, political and global issues in order to promote awareness and discussion with the Nauset regional community. Students may sign up for both semesters. Parental permission will be required for Internet publication.

34


NAUSET

FILM AS LITERATURE EN46 - ½ English Credit - ½ Year This course explores the history of cinema and the relationship between cinema and literature. Emphasis is placed on learning the basic vocabulary of film, writing about cinematic works, and understanding the similarities and differences between literature and films as texts and as narratives. The goal of the course is that students will become more knowledgeable and informed about film as an art form, and more able to think critically about the films and other visual media they view.

ENGLISH

English Electives

HOME AND AWAY EN50 - ½ English Credit - ½ Year Home and Away is a senior elective designed around the study of Cape Cod literature and American travel novels. In this course, students will rediscover their local surroundings, studying selections written by and about Cape Codders. After studying about our home, students will embark on a series of adventures around America. Two novels of adventure and self-discovery by Steinbeck and Kerouac will provide the backbone for our trips across the country. If you are interested in learning about your community, your country, and yourself, this course is for you. Students will be required to complete reading assignments, essays, projects, and a journal-based final project. ANIMALS IN LITERATURE: SPECIES EMPATHY EN47 - ½ English Credit - ½ Year The classic novel Black Beauty was written in response to the plight of the working horse in Victorian England and was an argument for the humane treatment of animals. Many writers believe we can understand our own human nature by looking at our connection with the animal world. This elective English course will explore the use of animals as pivotal characters in literature. The course will address both fiction and nonfiction, including novels, the work of various philosophers and naturalists, short stories, poetry and film. Students will write literary analysis, responses to writing and film, and articulate their own arguments and ideas about the animal/human relationship. There will also be an opportunity to write original poetry and experiment with memoir. Come ready to read and partake in lively discussion.

35


ENGLISH NAUSET

English Electives AMERICA’S MELTING POT EN91 - ½ English Credit - ½ Year SO91 - ½ History Credit - ½ Year Some of us can trace family to the Mayflower, while others arrived here just last week. Circumstances may differ, but the story remains true…we are all immigrants living in a nation of immigrants. Welcome to America’s Melting Pot, an oral history, project-based collaboration sponsored by the English and History Departments. This semester-long course will allow students to contribute to the America’s Melting Pot project, an online collection recalling the story of local immigrants and their trek to America. Students will locate, research, interview, and honor immigrants, while exploring fiction and non-fiction works through the English component to add context to this rich oral history experience. Students must sign up for the History and the English class. This course can be taken alone or with its companion Witness to War. Course credit can be applied to satisfy English and history requirements. Also available to students in grade 10, 11, 12. SHAKESPEARE FOR PERFORMANCE AND LITERARY ANALYSIS TH30 / TH30H – A Level / Honors - 1 English Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Acting I and Teacher Approval Seniors: This is an English elective. This class will concentrate on learning to perform Shakespearean drama. The stance, the voice, the rhythms, the rhymes, and the worlds of Shakespeare’s plays will be studied and performed. Characters, plots and themes will be analyzed and discussed. The class will read plays and perform monologues and scenes along with each of t hem. The senior English students in the class will, in addition, be assigned an informal and a formal essay for each unit in order to engage in a deeper analysis of each play.

36


NAUSET

FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES Grade 12 - Full Year – 2 Credits including: SWS40E / SWSH40E – A Level / Honors - 1 English Credit SWS40S / SWSH40S – A Level / Honors - 1 History Credit A cooperatively taught two credit integrated history and English course. This project-based, interdisciplinary class looks at the rise of Hitler through the lens of psychology, propaganda, film, art, and novels. Students will also complete college essays and scholarship letters. For full description, see SWS section, page 99.

ENGLISH

English Electives

THE MUSICAL JOURNEY OF AMERICA: FROM RAGTIME TO ROCK-N-ROLL Grade 12 - Full Year - 3 Credits including: SWS33E / SWSH33E - A Level / Honors - 1 English Credit SWS34S / SWSH34S - A Level / Honors - 1 History Credit SWS39 - 1 Elective Credit - Humanities Seminar This integrated, project based 3 credit history and English course will explore the unique art form of American music and its powerful influence on the culture and history of America. Students will complete college essays, and have many other opportunities to refine research and writing skills. Enrollment in Humanities Seminar is also required for this course. BANNED BOOKS AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM Grade 12 SWS43 / SWSH43 - A Level / Honors - 1 English Credit Each year the American Library Association’s list of banned books increases. The Library of Congress states that these banned books “have had a profound effect on American life.” This course will explore the reasons behind the banning of books, and the possible legal ramifications of doing so. Books on the list such as Fahrenheit 451, Slaughterhouse Five, Monster, and The Absolutely True Story of a Part Time Indian will be read and analyzed, and positions on censorship will be debated. Students will complete college essays, and have many other opportunities to refine research and writing skills.

37


38

NAUSET


FINE ARTS

Fine and Applied Arts

NAUSET 39


STUDIO ARTS

NAUSET

Studio Arts The prerequisite for taking a Level II course in the Fine and Applied Arts is a grade of C+ or better in the previous level. STUDIO ART I Grades 9 - 12 AR10 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Studio Art I is a full year course offered to students in grade 9-12. It is an introduction to a wide variety of media, with a focus on good studio habits and appropriate vocabulary. Projects concentrate on developing the skill and technique to create art with impact. Studio students will be given opportunities to experience a variety of media (pencil, pen, ink, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, and paint) while developing individual style and creative problem solving skills. Students will demonstrate their ability to respond, analyze and interpret their own artwork and the work of others through discussions, critiques, and writing. This course may not be repeated; interested students should continue on to Studio Art II. STUDIO ART II Grades 10 - 12 AR20 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Studio Art II is a full year course open to students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed the Studio Art I course. Students will work in media similar to that covered in the Studio Art I class but on a more sophisticated level. Emphasis will be on the development of a personal style of artistic expression. Appropriate presentation of work and critiques are important aspects of this course. Students will study art works of historical importance as well as work by contemporary artists and art from a variety of cultures. Course requirements include research projects and homework. This course may not be repeated. ART ENRICHMENT

40

Grade 9 - 12 AR45 – ½ Elective Credit This is a one semester course for students wanting to get back into the art classroom and may only have room for a one semester course. Students will work creating projects that appeal to them in their choice of different media. Students may create projects through drawing, painting, screening, mixed media and more. This course is for students who miss having time in the art room, but may not be interested in a full-year concentration course.


NAUSET

AP STUDIO ART Grade 12 APSTUDART - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year AP Studio Art is a course open to students in Grades 12 who have had previous art courses that they have successfully completed with a grade of B or better. Students should exhibit a high level of skill, good work habits, and a commitment to art. AP students will be in the Honors Portfolio class and must meet all the regular class requirements including a general portfolio of artwork. In addition, advanced placement students must complete either a drawing portfolio, a 2-D design portfolio or a 3-D design portfolio that includes a series of works reflecting an area of concentration. Students should be prepared for extensive homework and study outside of school (including summer projects). Admission to class is based on teacher recommendation and a review of previous artwork. A fee is required when the portfolio is submitted.

STUDIO ARTS

Studio Arts

AP ART HISTORY APARTHIST – 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This class will include a full survey of Western art with a significant component devoted to non-Western styles and themes. Focused on visual understanding and analysis, this class is intended for seniors who are both first time and experienced AP students. The required course work will demand significant work outside of class, while in-class work will focus on discussion, student presentations, virtual tours of museums, comparative writing and analysis. All students will take the spring AP exam and payment of a fee is required.

41


STUDIO ARTS

NAUSET

Studio Arts HONORS PORTFOLIO Grade 12 AR40 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Honors Portfolio is a full year course offered to students in Grades 11 and 12 who have completed previous art courses with a grade of B or better. Students must have the instructor’s permission to take this course. They must demonstrate strong basic skills in artwork submitted for review. This course is designed for the student with a strong commitment to art that may want to prepare for post-high school art education. A strong emphasis is put on observational drawing, painting, and sculpting. Homework designed to improve composition and drawing skills will be assigned. While working in a variety of media, students are encouraged to develop a personal style, self-evaluate their work, participate in critiques, and ultimately prepare a portfolio. FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING AND DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 AR44 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This one semester course is offered to all students interested in developing their drawing skills. Students will work from direct observation as well as their imagination in subjects such as still life, portraits and figure drawing, landscapes and abstract art. Focus will be on understanding and applying the elements and principles of design as well as an introduction to art history and analysis. Media includes graphite, colored, pencil, oil and soft pastel, ink and charcoal. Fundamentals of Drawing and Design is a course designed to foster emerging artists, giving them the skills to take their art to the next level. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should move on to Advanced Drawing and Design.

42

ADVANCED DRAWING AND DESIGN Grades 10 - 12 AR46 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Fundamentals of Drawing and Design with a C+ or better This half-year course is offered to students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed Fundamentals of Drawing and Design. This course is suggested for the serious artist who wishes to deepen their skill, technique and understanding of the drawing process. Students will work from direct observation as well as their imagination in subjects such as still life, portraits and figure drawing, landscapes and abstract art. Students will be encouraged to use art as nonverbal tool for communication and developing a personal artistic style. Students will also be required to maintain a sketchbook.


NAUSET

PRINTMAKING I Grades 9 - 12 AR60 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Printmaking I is a one-semester course offered to all grade levels 9-12. Students will learn the techniques involved in a variety of printmaking methods. Included will be work in mono-printing, stencil and relief print processes, linoleum and woodblock work, and dry point etching. While the emphasis is on the production of prints, students will also be introduced to the history of printmaking, study prints by the world’s great artists, and consider the place of printmaking in the art of different cultures. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should go on to Printmaking II.

STUDIO ARTS

Studio Arts

PRINTMAKING II Grades 9 - 12 AR69 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Printmaking II is a one-semester course offered to Grades 9-12. Students must have successfully completed Printmaking I and be ready to move on to more advanced work. While working in a larger format, students will build on knowledge and techniques learned in level I. Additional printmaking methods will include reduction linoleum prints, collagraph, and silkscreen printing. This course may not be repeated. SCULPTURE Grades 9 - 12 AR50 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year What makes a sculpture successful? This course strives to answer this question by looking at and engineering sculpture. Basic 3d design principles are individually introduced to help students develop the vocabulary and skills necessary to make sculpture with a point of view. Starting with abstraction and working towards representation, students create and critique work individually and together. Skill building exercises are coupled with independent projects to help students develop confidence, resulting in an understanding of formal ideas, subject matter and personal style. This course may be repeated.

43


STUDIO ARTS

NAUSET

Studio Arts ART THERAPY AR29 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Art Therapy is designed for a student interested in a career in art therapy and/or special education. Each student will be required to work in a partnership with and/or assist developmentally delayed students. Students will learn to be acquainted with a variety of theories and explanations for various disabilities. In this creative and highly interactive process, students will experience, generate and encourage mutual respect and equality. The course will include, but not be limited to, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Each student will be required to assist and write lesson plans and present short lessons. Homework, research and a written journal will be required. PAINTING Grades 9 - 12 AR86 - Fall or Spring - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Before we can paint we must learn how to see. This class will teach students identify and recreate the colors they see in a painting. They will learn how light affects shadows and how color changes across form. Students will be taught color mixing from primary colors and brush application through a series of observational studies. As skills are acquired, students will be asked to develop subject matter of their own. Students will be developing a visual vocabulary through collage to collect imagery that speaks for them. When weather permits, we may be taking our paints outside. This class is open to all students and may be repeated.

44


NAUSET

ESSENTIALS OF MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Grades 10 - 12 AR91 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year In this half-year course, students will learn the fundamentals of the digital photography process and its role in modern society. Focus will be on how the camera operates, how to create stronger, more interesting images, lighting and an introduction to digital editing. Students will explore the Elements and Principles of art and design while investigating photography genres including landscapes, architecture, still life, portraiture, documentaries and photo journalism. Contemporary devices and applications will be utilized and students will be introduced to analog photography. A DSLR camera is helpful, but not necessary. This course requires a significant amount of shooting to be done outside of class, while class time is focused on instruction and editing. This course may not be repeated.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Photography

ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY TECHNIQUES Grades 11 - 12 AR93 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year In this one semester course, students will focus on extending and refining their skills in photography. Traditional techniques will be emphasized, with a significant amount of time spent on analog (film) photography, developing and printing your own images in the darkroom. A 35mm film camera is useful but not necessary. This course requires a significant amount of shooting to be done outside of class, while class time is focused on instruction, developing and printing.

45


CLAY

NAUSET

Clay CLAY I Grades 9 - 12 AR80 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This half year introductory course will give you all the skills you need to feel confident using clay to express yourself. Each method of building is individually addressed through making a series of functional and expressive ceramics for your home. A wide variety of decorative surfaces are explored, ranging from painting with underglaze to the use of wax resist. Students take their pots home to eat and drink from. Although hand building is the focus, wheel throwing is a unit fully explored. Sculptural forms are introduced through the pinching unit and encouraged to give functional work a personal flair. Interested students should move on to Sculpture, Wheel Throwing or Clay II. CLAY II Grades 10 - 12 AR88 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Completion of Clay I with a C+ or better Clay II is a one semester class, open to students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed the Clay I class. Entrance into this course is with the permission of the instructor and is based on a review of the student’s previous ceramic work. Students will further develop the techniques and procedures learned in Clay I, taking them to a more advanced level of design and craftsmanship in the field of ceramics This course may be repeated.

46


CLAY

Clay NAUSET

WHEELTHROWING Grades 10 - 12 AR 96 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Learn a new skill! This class is for the beginner as well as the advanced wheelthrowing student. As your skills advance, you may take the class again. If you love the feeling of wet clay on your hands, this is the class for you. With thirteen electric wheels, students calmly tame the spinning clay into tableware. Starting with the cylinder and ending with the teapot, students amaze themselves at what they are capable of. You will need to bring your own apron. This is a half-year class open to all grades. Seats are limited. This class may be repeated.

47


GRAPHIC DESIGN

NAUSET

Graphic Design GRAPHIC DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 AR82 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year The Graphic Design course is designed to offer students a chance to develop an understanding of how to use technology to produce visual products such as magazine and book layouts, business cards, advertisements, and product labels. Students will be introduced to design elements and principles, color theory and typography as the foundations of good composition. Students will learn and use Adobe Creative Suite’s InDesign©, Photoshop© and Illustrator© as graphic design tools. ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN Grades 10 - 12 BTCD24 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Graphic Design What makes one product stand out from the others? Why is it more attractive, exciting and appealing to us? This course enhances and advances your skills learned in Graphic Design Design©, Photoshop© and Illustrator©. You will use them to consider large scale and product design and packaging. Components will cover seeing and designing in three dimensions, designing for target markets, product lines, mass markets, small markets and playful design. You’ll never look at a pizza box or milk carton the same way again! WEB SITE DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 BTCD17 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course introduces students to basic web site design. Students will first learn HTML code and apply it to web pages that they create and edit in class. Dreamweaver© is then introduced to provide students with the basic editing skills necessary to create and maintain an Internet web site.

48


NAUSET

DESIGN FOR SOCIAL MEDIA Grades 11 - 12 BTCD18 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year In today’s day and age, we rely on social media for everything from connecting with friends, checking the breaking news and current weather, to searching for a new recipe for dinner. This course will explore current trends to understand what makes these social media applications so appealing. Our task will be to create and then manage social media sites for Nauset. Learning and using Adobe Design Suite’s InDesign© and Photoshop©, students will create engaging and visually appealing banners and headers, edit photos and create postings to make sure that Nauset’s social media presence will educate, inform and engage the school and surrounding communities about what goes on here on campus. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram will be the primary focus.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Graphic Design

DESIGN FOR SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY MARKETING Grades 9 - 12 BTCD19 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year How do we look from the outside in? How about the inside out? Students in this class will examine different marketing tools and techniques that work for some businesses and organizations, but may not for others. Students will use the Adobe Design Suite© and iMovie© to create ads, commercials, brochures, posters and other marketing tools that exhibit the best of Nauset. LOGO DESIGN / DIGITAL DRAWING Grades 9 - 12 BTCD20 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Branding! Recognizable logos connect us to brands. How are logos created? This class will bring your ideas to your sketchbook and then drawings from your sketchbook to the computer screen using Adobe Illustrator©. Learning about different fonts, logo text positioning and color options, students will generate, on a variety of platforms, custom logos and complicated computer drawings.

49


FASHION NAUSET 50

Fashion Design INTRODUCTION TO FASHION DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 AR68 – 1/2 Elective Credit - 1/2 Year This one semester fashion design course offers students a chance to use their creativeness and eye for style by introducing them to apparel design. Students will learn the basics of fashion sketching, principles of design, clothing construction (sewing) A sketchbook of fashion illustrations will be created by the student and used to complete class projects. Innovation and creativity is emphasized in this class, however, students do not need prior knowledge or experience in sketching or clothing construction to succeed.


FASHION

Fashion Design NAUSET

FASHION DESIGN Grades 9 - 12 AR72 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This full year course is a comprehensive study of apparel design. Students will be introduced to the basic skills of clothing construction (sewing) and basic principles of design, history of fashion and textiles. A sketchbook of fashion illustrations will be created by the student and used to create a finished garment. Class projects incorporate selection and preparation of fabric, machine work, and fine hand finishes. Students do not need prior knowledge or experience in sketching or clothing construction to succeed in this class. Students will also be involved in Nauset’s annual fashion show. This class may not be repeated. Interested students should proceed to Advanced Fashion Design.

ADVANCED FASHION DESIGN Grades 10 - 12 AR83 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: C or higher in Fashion Design I and II. This challenging course will provide the student with advanced knowledge and skills used in the Fashion Design field. Emphasis will be placed on individual design development. Concepts to be studied: draping and pattern development, advanced fashion illustration, custom fitting, couture details, fabric analysis and identification. Students in this class will be responsible for the planning and execution of Nauset’s Annual Fashion Show. Experiential learning will take place through trips to Boston School of Design and NYC.

51


YEARBOOK NAUSET 52

Yearbook YEARBOOK PRODUCTION / GRAPHIC DESIGN YRBK - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This full year course is offered to students seriously interested in the production of the school’s yearbook, Nauset Tides. Emphasis is placed on page layout and design, graphics, digital photography and the use of Adobe In-Design© (desktop publishing). This class may be repeated for credit.


NAUSET

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Grades 9 - 12 HE41 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This course offers students an opportunity to learn about children. Students will study the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of the child from conception to school age. Topics include the brain, motor skills, language development, gender roles, play, special needs, and theories of development. Students will participate in the simulated baby program (Realityworks) providing a hands-on newborn experience.

LIVING ARTS

Child Psychology

53


LIVING ARTS NAUSET

Living Arts WORLD CULTURES I Grades 9 - 12 MU63 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Understand and experiment with musical forms from the world’s primal cultures. Learn how cultural and geographical issues impact the world’s music and arts. Discover what part music, the arts and expression plays in mysticism, meditation and metaphysics. Experiment with instruments from Africa, India, Australia and the Middle East. Build some instruments of your own! This is project-based. WORLD CULTURES II Grades 9 - 12 MU68 - 1/2 Elective Credit - ½ Year In this class, students will gain exposure to many of the peoples from around the world. What are some of their cultural, social and philosophical issues? How do they express these issues through the arts and music? How have the arts affected their political views and ramifications? Let’s take a look at the world from a world’s view…and our place in the mix. This is a project-based class. RECREATION EXPLORATORY Grades 9 - 12 - Full Year N29 - 1 Elective Credit - Special Needs Students EX29 - 1 Elective Credit - General Education Students This full year course explores hands-on music, instrument making, performance, cultural exploration and collaboration between developmentally delayed students and general education students. People interested in working with students with special needs and pursuing a career in Special Education are encouraged to sign up for this class.

54


NAUSET

EXPLORING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES I Grades 9 - 12 EX10 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This is a one-semester course that provides an in-depth look at differences in society and how they develop. What makes hate groups do what they do? Can activism really make a difference? What fuels the formation of cults and extremists? How can we effectively mediate conflicts in our own lives and in our society at large? The course targets these topics, gender issues and current events of student interest. This is a discussion and project- based class.

LIVING ARTS

Living Arts

EXPLORING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES II Grades 9 - 12 EX20 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course is built on the exploration of civil rights groups, humanitarian organizations, NGOs, and global activism movements and their impact on the world. This course looks at what YOU can do to become more active in your local, regional community. The class is based on current events, documentary film and guest speakers. An interactive media project will be counted as the final grade, along with in-depth discussion. EXPLORING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES – HONORS Grades 10 – 12 EX11- ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: E.A.R.D. I or E.A.R.D. II In this class we learn how to become an activist and mobilize for change. Small groups, and indeed, even just one person can help to change the world. In this course you will learn how to organize, fund, and implement the changes you want. We will start school-wide and branch out into the community with an outreach philosophy, understanding that through education, dedication, and living by example, we can make great things happen. Mass movements start when enough consciousness is raised to change the actual paradigm of how we live, and in what context. The honors designation for this course constitutes your active engagement and implementation in projects in our school and community. This is a half-year course and may be repeated.

55


MUSIC NAUSET

General Music BEGINNING GUITAR Grade 9 - 12 MU83 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This guitar elective class is geared primarily for beginning guitar players. In this class, you will learn basic chords and be able to play simple melody. Standard guitar tab and basic music reading will also be covered. A focus of this class is to learn songs that are not only accessible to students, but songs that students know and would like to play. Guitars in school are provided however, students would be more successful if they also had access to a guitar at home. The course may be repeated.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY Grades 9 - 12 MU35 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This is a half-year course for any students in grades 9-12 who wishes to further explore creating music. No previous musical experience is required. This course is designed for students who wish to know more about music production and multi-media in the digital world. This is a project-based class with subjects to include: GarageBand©, iMovie©, computer music notation, computer music sequencing, and an introduction to sound design, Foley and film scoring. In addition, students will be given instruction on basic piano skills, MIDI implementation and synthesizers. Students will create a digital portfolio by the conclusion of the class. Previous musical experience and music reading is helpful for this course but is not required. This course may be repeated for credit.

56


MUSIC

General Music NAUSET

PIANO Grades 9-12 MU82 – 1/2 Credit, Spring and Fall Learn to play piano and keyboards at your own pace! Whether a beginner or advanced, all students will receive instruction to become a better pianist. Learn to read music and play by ear. Learn to write your own songs. Enjoy playing duets with your friends or even with many friends in a larger piano ensemble. There will also be time spent in group instruction on notation, music appreciation and theory. No public performance is required. Practice can be done in class - you do not need to have a piano at home. This course may be repeated.

57


MUSIC NAUSET

Instrumental Music CONCERT BAND Grades 9 - 12 MU50 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Prior scholastic instrumental experience or director’s approval This is a full-credit course for experienced brass and woodwind players. Band music spanning the past 400 years will be experienced and performed. Students will hone their performance skills through the practice and rehearsal of contemporary band literature. In addition, students will learn the background of composers, musicians as well as the genre and performance techniques of various musical selections throughout the year. In addition, students will learn the importance of democracy, teamwork and leadership. Four evening concerts per year are generally performed. Home practice is required for this course. CONCERT BAND / HONORS MU51 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful audition similar to those of area music festivals. In addition to the requirements for Concert Band, Honors students selected for honors level must meet additional requirements including but not limited to: weekly private lessons on their instrument, auditions for All Cape and Islands Music Festival, and those at the district level. Students in this course will be expected to demonstrate leadership roles in the larger ensemble.

58

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE Grades 9 - 12 MU50P – 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prequisite: prior scholastic experience or Director’s approval. This is a full-credit course designed to challenge students at the intermediate and advanced level of percussion performance. Students will rehearse and perform music from Grade III level (ABD Manual and State Lists). Students will experience performance in many areas of percussion including, but not limited to: snare drum, timpani, mallets and hand percussion. In addition, students experience playing drum line music for snare, tenors and bass drum lines. Students in this class act as the battery for the concert band as well.


MUSIC

Instrumental Music NAUSET

ORCHESTRA Grades 9 - 12 MU58 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Orchestra is a full year full credit course for players of stringed instruments (violin, viola, cello and bass). Literature is drawn from various styles and genre written for stringed orchestra. Requirements include home practice, written assignments and projects. In addition, students are required to attend and perform in concerts and performances throughout the year. Many of these are night and weekend commitments. Students enrolled in this ensemble may choose to audition for outside ensembles as well. To include: All Cape and Islands Music Festival, as well as District and State music festivals. This course may be repeated for credit. ORCHESTRA / HONORS MU71 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Students accepted into Honors Orchestra must meet the requirements of Orchestra (MU58) plus a series of additional requirements that include: solo and ensemble recitals, community performances, regional competitive festival auditions (District and All-Cape), and leadership positions in Orchestra. This course may be repeated for credit.

59


MUSIC NAUSET

Jazz Ensemble JAZZ ENSEMBLE Grades 10 - 12 MU67 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful Audition to the ensemble

Enrollment in this class is by audition only. The First Encounter Jazz Ensemble is a highly respected performance ensemble at Nauset High school. Students in this course study jazz literature from the last century. Styles include: swing, be-bop, funk and rock. Students in this class are expected to practice outside of the school day. Many students take private instrumental lessons outside the school day. Improvisation skills, performance techniques and ensemble playing are emphasized. Students in this group are required to participate in concerts (many nights and weekend events) throughout the year as well as participation in other outside ensembles. This course may be repeated for credit. JAZZ ENSEMBLE / HONORS MU81 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Audition in which student demonstrates playing ability in many styles of music. In addition to meeting the requirements for Jazz Ensemble (MU67), students enrolled in Honors Jazz Band must complete a series of additional requirements including, but not limited to: weekly private lessons, auditioning/ participation in All Cape Jazz, Senior District Jazz and MAJE. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in monthly recitals and performances. This course may be repeated for credit.

60


MUSIC

Vocal Music

HONORS CHORUS Grades 10 - 12 MU61 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful Audition or teacher approval Enrollment in this course is through audition of upon teacher approval. Traditional choral compositions and jazz selections requiring fewer voices will be studied. Advanced vocal training will be included in each class period. Compositions requiring as many as eight parts will be performed. Students participating will be required to sing alone on a part within the ensemble. Sight reading, memorization and foreign language diction will be studied. Public performances will be required, including competitions, some in the evening and weekends. Overnight travel is also frequently required. Students may elect to audition for more select ensembles including: All Cape, Districts, and All State. Enrollment in this course includes the option of participating in Music Department trips and events. This course may be repeated for credit.

NAUSET

CONCERT CHORUS Grades 9 -12 MU60 - 1 Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Concert Chorus is a full-credit performance group open to all male and female students in grades 9-12. Chorus studies a variety of music styles, covering Classical to Rock. Vocal training in incorporated into each class. Opportunities for solo, small ensemble and 2, 3, & 4 part music study are provided. Course requirements include public performances, some in the evening. Practice outside of school is expected. This course may be repeated for credit each year. No prior experience is required. This course is designed for inexperienced singers as well as experienced singers. Students may elect to audition for more selected ensembles including: All Cape, District and All State. Students must be enrolled in this class, Treble Chorus or Honors Chorus in order to participate in these select ensembles. Enrollment in this class includes the option of participating in overnight music department trips. Acafellas is a sub-group of this class.

61


MUSIC NAUSET

Vocal Music

62

Acafellas is a sub-group of this chorus. TREBLE CHORUS Grades 9 - 12 MU65 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful Audition or teacher approval Enrollment in this course is through audition of upon teacher approval. All styles of choral compositions written for the female voice will be studied. Vocal training will be included in each class period. Course requirements include public performances (some nights and weekends), written assignments and private practice. Enrollment in this class includes the option of participating in overnight Music Department trips and events. Students may elect to audition for more select ensembles including: All Cape, District and All State. This course may be repeated for credit.

ACAFELLAS Grade 9 - 12 MU62 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Acafellas is a full-credit course for male singers. No prior experience is required. Music covered will be current men’s acapella songs found in mainstream media. Acafellas typically performs four times a year. Enrollment in this course entitles students to participate in Music Department trips and events. In addition, Concert Chorus students are eligible to audition for select choruses including All-Cape, District and All-State. This may be repeated.


MUSIC

Advanced Music NAUSET

MUSIC THEORY AND COLLEGE PREP Grade 11 - 12 MU25 - 1 Elective Credit 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This is a full year course for musicians who wish to advance their knowledge of all aspects of music. For those students wishing to pursue music studies in college, preparation for placement exams will be emphasized. Skills including composing music, theory, ear-training, piano and guitar will be developed at an individualized pace. Music appreciation and history are also included. Students do not need to be a member of Band or Chorus to take this class. All musicians at NRHS are encouraged to enroll. Students not pursuing college studies will find this class beneficial to their own musicianship. This class may be repeated for credit. .

63


CULINARY NAUSET 64

Culinary Arts BAKING AND PASTRY ARTS Grades 10 - 12 HE50 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Culinary Arts I. In this year-long course, we will bake everything from cookies to cakes, quickbreads and pies, tarts, crostatas and tortes, bagels and profiteroles. We will be baking both sweet and savory specialties from France, Italy, Greece, South America, Asia and more. Of course, some American favorites will be included! There is a lot of science involved in baking all of those delicious treats you love to indulge in! Students will learn what techniques work and why. We will also be including many lower fat, healthy versions of some of your favorite sweet treats. Guest chefs and food professionals will visit from time to time, a field trip or two will be scheduled and students will also bake on occasion for school functions.


NAUSET

CULINARY ARTS I Grades 9 - 12 HE91 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This one semester, introductory foods course is designed to explore food as it relates to daily living, personal and family health and ways to eat healthy on a tight budget. Kitchen and food safety, as well as the proper use of kitchen tools, equipment and gadgets will be covered. Basic cooking skills and techniques will be introduced as students create delicious foods from around the globe! Cooking is a creative endeavor and should be fun; students will be encouraged to enjoy the process! Students will plan menus, generate shopping lists and prepare meals and individual dishes. Students will also explore a little food science as we discuss the functions of certain ingredients and how they interact. Good nutrition will be a part of our recipe selection process as we focus on fabulous tasting, fresh and nutritious foods! We will create from scratch as much as time allows. During the semester, Culinary 1 students will participate in an Iron Chef style team “Challenge”. Each team will create and prepare a menu for our guest judges and the winning team receives donated gift certificates from local businesses. Possible food service related career choices will be discussed and we and we will schedule 1 or 2 visits from local food professionals who will share their expertise with students.

CULINARY

Culinary Arts

CULINARY ARTS II Grades 9 - 12 HE92 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Culinary Arts I In this one semester course, students will explore food from around the world; Italy, France, Greece, Spain, North Africa, Mexico and the Caribbean, South America, Asia and the US. The focus will be on appetizers, main dishes, soups, salads, other side dishes (and the occasional sweet treat). With each regional cuisine that we explore, the class will discuss how culture and history have influenced the cuisine. Each region will introduce new cooking techniques, culinary tools, foods and spices. The course will include videos, worksheets, food labs, visiting food professionals and hopefully a field trip. The goal is to have students cooking as often as possible.

65


66

NAUSET


The studio is well equipped with over 20 workstations with the capacity to accommodate large and small-scale projects. There are six dedicated acetylene torch annealing/soldering stations and two oxy/acetylene mini-torch stations. A large oxy/acetylene torch system for melting metals for casting and pouring ingots is also available. A ventilation system keeps fumes away from the work area. The studio is equipped with: two rolling mills, several corrugation mills, bending break, jump shear, Beverly Shear polishing machines, rotary tumbler, pickle pots, ultrasonics, etching tank, drill presses, mini milling machine, belt sanders, grinders, 8 flex shafts, and an anodizer. There is a 3-d printer that can be used for direct printing of projects or 3-d models can be burnt out and casted in metal. We also have multiple welders, a hydraulic press with forming tools and a wide assortment of hand tools.

NAUSET

JEWELRY AND METALS STUDIO FACILITIES

METALS & JEWELRY

Metals and Jewelry

67


METALS & JEWELRY

NAUSET

Metals and Jewelry ART METAL I Grades 9 - 12 IA30 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This course is designed for students interested in exploring metal crafts as an art form. Students will be exposed to making basic designs with copper, brass, tinwork and techniques in soldering and brazing. The use of appropriate tools will be explored. Students at all levels of ability and interest may apply. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should continue to Art Metal II.

ART METAL II Grades 9 - 12 IA32 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art Metal I with a C or better This course is a one-semester course where students will further develop the techniques and procedures learned in Art Metal I, taking them to a more advanced level of design and craftsmanship in the field of metal work. Technique in artistic casting, welding, brazing, and forming will be explored. This course may not be repeated. Interested students should continue to Advanced Art Metal.

68


METALS & JEWELRY

Metals and Jewelry

NAUSET

ADVANCED METAL Grades 10 - 12 IA36 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art Metal I and II Advanced Metal is an advanced course for students who have met the prerequisites. This is a ½ year course where entrance is based on a review of students’ previous work in metal and the approval of the instructor. Students will be expected to work at a sophisticated level where an emphasis will be placed on individual design and techniques. Topics of instruction will be lost wax casting, hallow fabrication, fold forming, etching, metal patinas, and advanced instruction in welded structure. This course may be repeated.

69


METALS & JEWELRY

NAUSET

Metals & Jewelry JEWELRY - PART I Grades 10 - 12 IA37 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year This class introduces basic issues and techniques that are unique to jewelry making as a creative and expressive medium. Traditional and contemporary designs will be explored. Techniques covered: basic fabrication (cold connections, sawing, forging, soldering and finishing), casting and stone setting. Safety and proper use of tools will be covered in all areas. This course may not be repeated.

JEWELRY – PART II Grades 10 - 12 IA39 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Jewelry I and instructor’s approval. This course is designed for those students who want to continue their study of jewelry making. Students will be expected to further explore the techniques learned in Jewelry I. Emphasis will be placed on individual projects that integrate all the skills learned in Jewelry I. Students will also be required to research a new technique and complete a project that employs this technique. Possible areas of study: casting, repouse/chasing, Makume Gane, mechanisms, chain making, faceted stone setting.

70


INDEPENDENT JEWELRY / METAL: One Semester Only Grades 10 - 12 IA44S1 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year In this full or half year course, students with previous metal experience will have the opportunity to work independently where an emphasis will be placed on researching new techniques in the metal medium. Special requirements include: • Approval of the instructor • A minimum of two completed metals classes • Completed sample(s), project(s) utilizing techniques researched during Independent Study • Completed brochure of your work describing techniques and projects covered with images As an independent study student, you will also be expected to act as a peer tutor and roll model to more novice students.

NAUSET

INDEPENDENT JEWELRY / METAL: Full Year Grades 10 - 12 IA44 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year See below

METALS & JEWELRY

Metals and Jewelry

71


METALS & JEWELRY

NAUSET 72

Metals & Jewelry BICYCLE FRAME ENGINEERING This class is not offered for the 2015-2016 school year. Grades 10 - 12 IA48 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year In this year long class students will design, jig, and fabricate a single speed lugged bicycle frame. Frames will be built from chromoloy steel with an emphasis on custom design and finishing. If time permits, students will also have the opportunity to build custom racks and fenders for his or her frame. Materials Fee: Dependent upon design: $200 - $400 Note: Materials cost does not include components and wheels for a complete bike.


NAUSET

ACOUSTIC GUITAR BUILDING Grades 10 - 12 IA55 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year In Acoustic Guitar Building, students will build an acoustic guitar or acoustic bass guitar entirely from raw materials. The process of building an acoustic guitar incorporates many skills: basic woodworking, working from blueprints, calculations, attention to detail, design, and even a little physics and chemistry. Students must have good patience and listening skills as well as the ability to work cooperatively. These skills are much more important than woodworking skills, which will be taught as the school year progresses.

WOOD ART

Wood Fabrication

WOODWORKING: Level I Grades 9 - 10 IA60 -½ Elective Credit - ½ Year The goal of Woodworking: Level I is expose students to the basic techniques necessary to build beautiful and useful items out of wood. A strong emphasis is put on using safe practices when operating woodworking machinery and hand tools. For our first project, students will design and build a small box. This project utilizes all of the basic woodworking joinery, exposes the student to technical drawing, as well as how to coax the best finish out of their project. Our second project expands on the skills learned as well as the range of available machinery. We are very proud to add a CNC router to our arsenal of machinery. With this, students can design parts or whole projects on a computerized design program (CAD) , and then cut those parts using the CNC (computerized numerically controlled) router. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competence in all aspects of basic woodworking, from design to working with hand and power tools, and application of a fine finish.

73


WOOD ART NAUSET

Wood Fabrication WOODWORKING: Level II Grades 11 - 12 IA73 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year In Wood II students will take the skills learned in Woodworking: Level I and put them to use in projects of their own choosing. New concepts and techniques are introduced throughout the semester including : dovetail and box joint joinery, CAD/CAM projects made entirely on the CNC machine, signs, lathe turned objects, veneering, and projects built with hand tools only. The milling machine, the lathe and the CNC machine are prominent features in the shop. These tools give us the flexibility to create such diverse projects as jewelry boxes, natural edged coffee tables, small boats, carvings, dining room tables, bedside stands, objects made from found or repurposed wood, and folk instruments, just to name a few. Students are also highly encouraged to take on the many community service projects that find their way into the wood shop. Woodworking: Level II can be repeated numerous times since the students’ classwork is in entirely individualized.

ADVANCED WOODWORKING IA90 - Fall and Spring semesters, ½ credit Grades 10 - 12 Students who are serious about honing their woodworking skills and have completed wood I and wood II may apply for admission into the Advanced Woodworking class. In this semester-long class, students will be exposed to the highest levels of the craft of woodworking. Topics include: using hand tools to perform intricate joinery, Working from blueprints to build sophisticated projects, Marquetry and veneering, Inlaying, cabinet making, machinery repair and maintenance, and many other high skill techniques. In addition to individual projects, the class will take on a community service project and build it as a group. This may include display cases, classroom furniture, projects for community members, etc. Students must have completed Wood I and Wood II and have the permission of the instructor to be considered for admission to Advanced Woodworking. Class size is limited to 14 students.

74


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I : A project-based critical thinking course Grades 9-12 IA75 - 1/2 credit - 1/2 Year Through design exercises, discussions, and hands-on projects, students will develop an understanding of the design process and how we, as individuals and designers, shape our environment. This class gives students the opportunity to formulate and refine design ideas, and then develop those ideas into tangible, finished products. Projects will include building programs, bubble diagrams, site plans, design drawings and design models. Past projects have included tree houses, shipping container houses, floating homes and micro-houses. Learning goals - Understanding the design process - Expanded awareness of the built environment - Understanding the ways in which we shape our environment - Understanding design concepts - Develop design drawing and model making skills

NAUSET

Architecture is defined as the art and science of creating spaces. Architectural Design will offer a unique opportunity for students to engage both their analytical and creative minds with the physical activities of drawing and model building.

Architectural Design

Architectural Design

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II Grade levels 11-12 IA76 - 1/2 credit - 1/2 Year Prerequisite: Completion of Architectural Design I or instructor approval. A project-based design course building on knowledge and skills developed in Architectural Design I. This course will have a greater emphasis on design theory and concepts. Students will develop a familiarity with and understanding of various architectural styles and the ability to utilize that understanding to create design projects. This course will provide a strong foundation for students considering a career in the design field.

75


76

NAUSET


All Freshmen must take one of the following:

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I / HONORS SO11 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course is an accelerated and comprehensive introduction to some of the great civilizations of the past and their achievements. Extensive readings of primary sources and frequent essays are required. This section is open to highly motivated students who have exceptional language arts and reading comprehension skills. Enrollment based on teacher recommendation.

NAUSET

All students are required to take and pass three (3) full year courses, one of which must be US History.

HISTORY

9th Grade History

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I / A Level SO12 - 1 History Credit - Full Year The course begins with the Renaissance and ends with the implications of Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna and the Industrial Revolution, roughly 1250-1870. This course is recommended for students with very good reading and writing skills. Enrollment based upon teacher recommendations, but the vast majority of students can work at this level. INTRODUCTION TO CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT / Honors and A Level SO15 - 1 History Credit - Full Year - A Level SO15H – 1 History Credit - Full Year- Honors Level What’s the difference between a Democrat and Republican? Who really elects the President? How is the State House different from the White House? Introduction to Civics and Government offers civic-minded freshmen the chance to explore the structure, function, and role of government in the United States. Students examine the Constitution, the three branches of government, politics in America, and the responsibility of citizenship. Like Western Civilization I, this rigorous course satisfies the first-year history requirement. It’s recommended for students with strong reading and writing skills and an interest in changing the world. This course can be taken for A Level or Honors credit depending upon teacher recommendation. WESTERN CIVILIZATION I N56 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course follows the SO12 curriculum with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education team recommendation and the student’s

77


HISTORY

10th Grade History

NAUSET

All sophomores must take one of the following:

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II / HONORS SO21 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course offers an accelerated and comprehensive study of European History from the Industrial Revolution to the present in the first semester. The second semester will focus on the settlement of the Americas, the founding documents of our country, and US history through the Civil War. Extensive reading of primary sources and frequent essays are required. This section is open to highly motivated students who have exceptional language arts and reading comprehension skills. Enrollment based upon freshman year history teacher’s recommendations. WESTERN CIVILIZATION II / A Level SO22 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course offers a study of European History from the Industrial Revolution to the present in the first semester. The second semester will focus on the settlement of the Americas, the founding documents of our country, and US history through the Civil War. This course is recommended for students with very good reading and writing skills. Enrollment based upon freshman year history teacher’s recommendations. WESTERN CIVILIZATION II / B Level SO23 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course focuses on the study of European History from the Industrial Revolution to the present in the first semester. The second semester will focus on the settlement of the Americas, the founding documents of our country, and US history through the Civil War. This course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment based upon freshman year history teacher’s recommendations. WESTERN CIVILIZATION II N94 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course follows the SO23 curriculum with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education team recommendation and the student’s Individualized Education Plan.

78


NAUSET

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT and POLITICS Grades 10 - 12 SO99 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course offers an intensive study of the formal and informal structures of government and the processes of the American political system. The objectives of the course go beyond a basic analysis of how our government works. Students will develop a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the American political system as well as their rights and responsibilities as citizens. This is a college-level course that requires a substantial amount of daily reading and preparation. There is a heavy emphasis on writing, debate, and discussion. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee.

HISTORY

10th Grade History

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY SO20 - 1½ History Credits - Full Year Also available for Juniors and Seniors Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and an A- or better in previous course. This college level course examines European history from about 1450 to the present. The course work provides a narrative of events and movements to help students develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history; (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence; and (c) an ability to analyze and to express historical understanding in writing. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee. INTRODUCTION TO CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT / Honors and A Level Grades 9 - 10 SO15 - 1 History Credit - Full Year - A Level SO15H – 1 History Credit - Full Year - Honors Level What’s the difference between a Democrat and Republican? Who really elects the President? How is the State House different from the White House? Introduction to Civics and Government offers civic-minded freshmen the chance to explore the structure, function, and role of government in the United States. Students examine the Constitution, the three branches of government, politics in America, and the responsibility of citizenship. Like Western Civilization I, this rigorous course satisfies the first-year history requirement. It’s recommended for students with strong reading and writing skills and an interest in changing the world. This course can be taken for A Level or Honors credit depending upon teacher recommendation.

79


HISTORY

11th Grade History

NAUSET

All juniors must take one of the following:

AP US HISTORY SO41 - 1½ History Credits - Full Year Teacher recommendation is required. AP US History is an in-depth study of American history from colonization to the present. Students will develop skills in advanced methods of historical analysis through extensive writing and research assignments using primary source materials. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee. US HISTORY / A Level SO32 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course is a study of US history from Reconstruction to the present, with an emphasis on the 20th century. Students will polish research skills by writing a lengthy essay. Enrollment is based upon 10th grade history teacher’s recommendation. US HISTORY / B Level SO33 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course is a study of US History with an emphasis on the 20th century. This course will emphasize reading, writing and organizational skills. Enrollment is limited to 18. Enrollment is based upon 10th grade history teacher and Department Head recommendation. US HISTORY N36 - 1 History Credit - Full Year This course follows the SO33 curriculum with an emphasis on reading, writing, and organizational skills. Enrollment is based upon special education team recommendation and the student’s Individual Educational Plan. AMERICAN STUDIES - Full Year - 3 Credits: SWS10S / SWS11S- A Level / Honors - 1 History Credit SWS10E / SWS11E - A Level / Honors - 1 English Credit SWS19 – 1 Elective Credit American Studies is a cooperatively taught, three credit integrated U.S. History and American Literature course. Through this interdisciplinary, project-based approach, students will study Reconstruction throuth the Vietnan War with research projects and current events. Students will have many opportunities to refine research and writing skills, and will also prepare for SAT’s. Enrollment in the Humanities Seminar is also required for this course. For full description of content, see listing under SWS on page 98.

80


NAUSET

AP ART HISTORY APARTHIST – 1 History Credit - Full Year This class will include a full survey of Western art with a significant component devoted to non-Western styles and themes. Focused on visual understanding and analysis, this class is intended for seniors who are both first time and experienced AP students. The required course work will demand significant work outside of class, while in-class work will focus on discussion, student presentations, virtual tours of museums, and comparative writing and analysis. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee.

HISTORY

History Electives

AP ECONOMICS SO61 – 1 History Credit - Full Year This course offers a broad examination of the principles of microeconomic theory. After introducing opportunity costs, the concepts of scarcity and the law of comparative advantage, the course focuses on marginal utility analysis, the laws of supply and demand, the law of diminishing return, the costs of production, profit maximization, the theory of the firm in perfect and imperfect competition, the factor markets, and finally international trade. Selected topics in macroeconomics will also be covered. This college level course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement examination in microeconomics. It is expected that all course members will take the AP Exam. Enrollment is limited to students who have achieved a B or better in US History. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee. AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT and POLITICS SO99 - 1 History Credit - Full Year - Also available for Sophomores and Juniors This course offers an intensive study of the formal and informal structures of government and the processes of the American political system. The objectives of the course go beyond a basic analysis of how our government works. Students will develop a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the American political system as well as their rights and responsibilities as citizens. This is a college-level course that requires a substantial amount of daily reading and preparation. There is a heavy emphasis on writing, debate, and discussion. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee.

81


HISTORY NAUSET

History Electives HUMANITIES SO65 – ½ History Credit - ½ Year This course examines selected events, landmark ideas, creativity and human interaction through the perspective of the humanities. Photography, literature, sculpture, architecture, music, painting, poetry and cinema reveal what people think and do. Library research, analysis, discussion and interviews are complemented by field trips, especially to meet members of the Cape’s diverse art community. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS / POLITICAL SCIENCE SO50 - 1 History Credit - Full Year Available as an Honors, A, and B Level class. This class will include an examination of the political, economic and social issues shaping our world today. National and international current issues will be examined and four major units focusing on areas such as Electoral politics, Middle East including Israel and the Persian Gulf, genocide including the Holocaust and contemporary Africa, and the rise of China may be taught each year. A foundation in basic theoretical principles will be provided. Course work includes: active discussion, research and presentation of individual and group projects, and consistent reading and viewing of media sources in addition to those provided in class. The course can be taken as either an Honors section or an A-level. B-level students are encouraged to enroll. US ART HISTORY S045 - ½ History Credit - ½ Year This course will examine painting, sculpture, photography and architecture as students trace US History through the prism of art. Students will research, analyze and present on a series of pieces from time periods chosen throughout the year. We will do a wide variety of virtual field trips to museums and, space permitting, visit the MFA in the spring. EXPLORING CURRENT ISSUES SO57 - 1/2 Credit - 1/2 Year This course will help students to develop the skills to be truly well-informed on the most important contemporary issues. Students will explore the background behind the headlines, compare sources, and learn to read critically to reach their own conclusions on the issues that face our country today.

82


NAUSET

AMERICA’S MELTING POT SO91 - ½ History Credit - ½ Year EN91 - ½ English Credit - ½ Year Some of us can trace family to the Mayflower, while others arrived here just last week. Circumstances may differ, but the story remains true…we are all immigrants living in a nation of immigrants. Welcome to America’s Melting Pot, an oral history, project-based collaboration sponsored by the English and History Departments. This semester-long course will allow students to contribute to the America’s Melting Pot project, an online collection recalling the story of local immigrants and their trek to America. Students will locate, research, interview, and honor immigrants, while exploring fiction and non-fiction works through the English component to add context to this rich oral history experience. Students must sign up for the History and the English class. This course can be taken alone or with its companion Witness to War. Course credit can be applied to satisfy English and history requirements. Available to students in grade 10, 11, 12.

HISTORY

History Electives

83


HISTORY NAUSET

History Electives THE MUSICAL JOURNEY OF AMERICA: FROM RAGTIME TO ROCK-N-ROLL Grade 12 - Full Year - 3 Credits Including: SWS34S / SWSH34S - 1 History Credit Regular / Honors SWS33E / SSWH33E - 1 English Credit Regular / Honors This integrated, project based 3 credit history and English course will explore the unique art form of American music and its powerful influence on the culture and history of America. Historical eras include Slavery, Racism, WWI, Roaring 20’s, Great Depression, World War II, Vietnam, Peace Movement and the Civil Rights Movement. Literature/authors include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Martin Luther King. Students will complete college essays, and have many other opportunities to refine research and writing skills. Enrollment in Humanities Seminar is also required for this course. FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES Grade 12 – Full Year - 2 Credits including: SWS40E / SWSH40E – 1 English Credit Regular / Honors SWS40S / SWSH40S – 1 History Credit Regular / Honors A cooperatively taught two credit integrated history and English course. This project-based, interdisciplinary class looks at the rise of Hitler through the lens of psychology, propaganda, film, art, and novels. For full description, see listing in SWS section, page 99.

84


These psychology courses may be taken separately or together as a full-year psychology course:

NAUSET

PSYCHOLOGY – Part I Grades 11 & 12 SO51 - ½ History Credit - ½ Year This 1/2 credit semester course is designed to introduce students to the field of psychology, and foster a deeper understanding of themselves and others. The course will focus on topics like development from infancy through adolescence, memory and its application to effective studying, eyewitness testimony, an exploration of sleep, dreams, and the neurological effect of drugs, and the psychological basis of stress and wellness. Class time is divided between lecture, films, discussions, and demonstrations. Each unit will include readings, application activities, and a knowledge test or project. Psychology courses may not be repeated.

PSCHOLOGY

Psychology

PSYCHOLOGY – Part II Grades 11 & 12 SO52 - ½ History Credit - ½ Year This 1/2 credit semester course continues the exploration of psychology. Topics include how individuals’ behavior is impacted by the environment and others, current diagnostic guides to psychological disorders, contemporary treatments, including talk therapy and psychiatric medications, and the emerging discipline of positive psychology. Class time is divided between lecture, films, discussions, and demonstrations. Each unit will include readings, application activities, and a knowledge test or project. Psychology courses may not be repeated. AP PSYCHOLOGY SO60 - 1 History Credit – Full year This rigorous course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students will investigate the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. This broad survey course emphasizes critical thinking, reading and writing within the context of scientific methodology and questioning. There is a significant amount of independent work required. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam administered in May. It is expected that all course members will take this exam. Psychology courses may not be repeated. Payment of a fee for the exam is required.

85


LEADERSHIP NAUSET

Leadership LEADERSHIP Grades 9 - 12 LEADER - ½ History Credit - ½ Year This course is offered to all potential or existing class officers, team captains, members of school leadership groups and any student(s) who perceive themselves as assuming leadership roles within the student body. The course will offer the student the opportunity to develop basic leadership skills as well as the opportunity to understand the importance of making appropriate decisions. Students will be required to generate various examples of real life leadership issues and resolve them in the appropriate manner. The course will be designed to accommodate those students who anticipate leadership as being an integral part of their school.

86


MATH

Mathematics NAUSET

Mathematics education at Nauset Regional High School is determined by the new Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the College Board Advanced Placement Testing Program. Placement into Integrated I, Algebra I, and Geometry will be determined by pre-assessment for incoming freshmen. Calculators may be used for selected topics in Geometry. A TI-83 or TI-84 will be required for all other courses beyond Geometry.

ALGEBRA I / LEVEL A MA12 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year This course is designed to deliver a full Algebra I curriculum as mandated by the Massachusetts Frameworks. Students will be expected to be competent in pre-algebra topics and will be expected to routinely complete independent text reading in preparation for each class. The main objective of Algebra I is to develop fluency in working with linear equations. Students will further their knowledge with tables, graphs, absolute value equations, solve linear equations, solve inequalities, solve systems of linear equations/ inequalities, extend their comprehension of the number system to include irrational numbers, generate equivalent expressions, manipulate and use formulas, simplify polynomials and begin to study quadratic relationships. Functions and relations of ordered pairs will include: domain and range, graphing operations and inverse operations. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Honors Geometry (MA21), Geometry Level A (MA22) or Geometry Level B (MA23). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student’s performance and skill level in this course.

87


MATH NAUSET

Mathematics INTEGRATED MATH I and II (not approved by NCAA I & II) MA15 and MA17 - 2 Math Credits Integrated Math I & II is a 2 year course covering necessary skills from Pre-Algebra, Algebra I and Geometry. Students taking the Integrated program would have to make the commitment for 2 years. INTEGRATED MATH I (not approved by NCAA I & II) MA15 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year The first year of Integrated Math will cover basic skills ultimately needed to prepare for the MCAS examination. Students will explore basic signed numbers, order of operations, basic equation solving, ratio and proportion, basic geometry skills and basic probability and statistics. Students completing Integrated Math I will be required to take Integrated Math II. INTEGRATED MATH II (not approved by NCAA I & II) MA17 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Integrated Math II is a continuation of Integrated Math I. Students will continue their study of basic math topics with advanced factoring, solving of equations and inequalities, surface area and volume, quadrilaterals, and special angles. In the second semester, students will do a concentrated unit on MCAS review. Upon successful completion of this course, students may be recommended for Advanced Algebra A-level (MA32) or Advanced Algebra B-level (MA33). The recommendation will be based on the teacher’s assessment of the student’s performance and skill level in this course.

88


MATH

Mathematics NAUSET

HONORS GEOMETRY MA21 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: A- or better in Algebra I and teacher recommendation. This is an accelerated and in depth course that is designed for the student whose goal is to complete the Advanced Placement Calculus course in high school. The curriculum for this course is driven by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Geometry with an emphasis on the development of deductive reasoning through the completion of geometric proofs. Students will be expected to have previously mastered all topics in Algebra I. The topics mastered in algebra will be coupled with topics in geometry to develop solutions to problems presented throughout the course. Additionally, students must be able to understand, apply and expand upon all geometric theorems, postulates and definitions that are presented in this course. The honors geometry student should be self-motivated, have a strong work ethic, be able to work independently and have an innate desire for mathematics. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Honors Advanced Algebra (MA31) or Advanced Algebra A-level (MA32). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student’s performance and skill level in this course. GEOMETRY / LEVEL A MA22 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Algebra I and teacher recommendation. This is a course designed for the college-bound student. The curriculum for this course is driven by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Geometry. The emphasis for this level course is in the application of geometric concepts versus the theoretical approach. Students are expected to have a thorough working knowledge of Algebra I and should be able to develop solutions to problems that combine Algebra with topics in Geometry. This course will include the study of angles, parallel lines, similarity and congruence of triangles, polygons, surface area and volume of solids, circles, introduction to trigonometry of the right triangle, proofs, and coordinate geometry. It is expected that students independently read from their textbook and take notes from those readings along with using their class notes and textbooks when completing homework assignments. Upon successful completion of the course, the teacher will recommend the student for either Honors Advanced Algebra (MA31), Advanced Algebra A-level (MA32) or Advanced Algebra B-level (MA33). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student’s performance and skill level in this course.

89


MATH NAUSET

Mathematics GEOMETRY / LEVEL B (not approved by NCAA I & II) MA23 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation. This course presents basic foundations of geometric topics as mandated by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, incorporating and reviewing prior topics from courses in Algebra I and Pre-Algebra. This course contains the same concepts and topics in Geometry A-level, but with a variation in delivery that presents ideas in a less theoretical manner. Activities to prepare students for the 10th Grade MCAS Test in Mathematics will be performed throughout the course. The course is designed to accommodate students who may require reinforcement of topics covered in prior math courses. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be recommended for Advanced Algebra B-level (MA33). The recommendation will be made based on the assessment of the student’s performance and skill level in this course. MATHEMATICS, EXPLORATION AND DESIGN Grades 10 – 12 MA26 - ½ Math Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Geometry Course This is an introductory course which will incorporate The Geometer’s Sketchpad software. We will explore several areas of geometry including triangles, quadrilaterals, transformations, and area by constructing geometric shapes. This is a computer-lab course using “dynamic” geometry which allows you to see cause and effect right in front of your eyes. Students will create sketches, present findings of conjectures, and work on projects with Sketchpad. ADVANCED ALGEBRA / HONORS MA31 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced proficiency in both Algebra I and Geometry with teacher recommendation. This course focuses on the analysis and synthesis of functions and equations continuing a rigorous approach from Honors Geometry of applying new concepts to various models. Advanced Algebra teaches concepts through their applications, emphasizing the reading and writing of mathematics, providing a wide variety of meaningful problem-solving opportunities, and incorporating the graphing calculator. The content of this course integrates geometry, discrete mathematics, and statistics together with algebra. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required at the start of the course.

90


MATH

Mathematics NAUSET

ADVANCED ALGEBRA / LEVEL A MA32 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in both Algebra I and Geometry with teacher recommendation. This course expands on the topics of Algebra I and integrates them with topics from Geometry, and provides further development of the concept of functions. Topics include, but are not limited to, quadratic functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions and trigonometric functions, variations and their graphs, and systems of equations and inequalities. Students are expected to complete independent text readings in preparation for each class. This course is geared toward students who plan to eventually take Pre-Calculus. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required at the start of the course. ADVANCED ALGEBRA / LEVEL B (not approved by NCAA I & II) MA33 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I (MA12) and Geometry (MA22 or MA23). This is a continuation of a first year algebra course. Emphasis, especially in the first semester, is placed on remediation and expansion of earlier skills and topics including operations of real numbers and of polynomials, methods of solving linear and quadratic equations, methods of solving linear systems, and the applications of these skills in geometry and other problem solving situations. Algebra skills are also advanced by introduction of newer topics including operations of rational expressions and radical expressions, right triangle trigonometry with applications, functions as graphs and as formulae, and exponential and logarithmic expressions. Use of a graphing calculator, TI-83 is also introduced. For students planning to enroll in succeeding courses to Algebra II (ie: College Prep Math and Pre-Calculus), use of a suitable graphing calculator is required. FINANCIAL ALGEBRA (not approved by NCAA I & II) MA34 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Passing grade in Advanced Algebra and teacher recommendation. By building on prior knowledge of math concepts from other courses, Financial Algebra will take you step-by-step through strategies to help you learn the time value of money, how to evaluate the best cell phone contract, how to build a business plan by knowing costs, profits, and breakeven points. Applications-based practice problems use real-life scenarios to connect algebra to what’s going on in your life. While learning about investing, banking, credit, income taxes, insurance, and household budgeting, you will also be introduced to piecewise functions, regression, limits, exponential functions, and linear/ quadratic systems.

91


MATH NAUSET

Mathematics COLLEGE PREPARATORY MATHEMATICS MA45 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Advanced Algebra and teacher recommendation. This course is a continuation of a course in Advanced Algebra designed to prepare students for placement into a credit bearing college math course. Topics include rational expressions, factoring, rational exponents and roots, quadratic equations and inequalities, direct and indirect variation, relations and functions, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and analysis and solution to open ended problems in mathematics. Preparation for the SAT exam is included. A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required.

PRE-CALCULUS I MA42 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency (C- or better) in Advanced Algebra and teacher recommendation. This course integrates algebraic concepts and previews calculus. It has three major components: statistics, functions, and trigonometry. Graphing calculators will be used primarily as they learn to explore data in various and meaningful ways as well as investigate probability and simulation of real-life experiments. Students will expand their knowledge and deepen their understanding of quadratic, exponential, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions as they explore transformations of graphs, function composition, and inverse function relationships. Other topics include polynomial functions, sequences, series, combinations, and binomial distribution. Students will apply all of these skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. Independent reading and work on assigned material is required prior to each class. This course is recommended for students who plan to continue their education beyond high school and who wish to be involved in a rigorous mathematical program. Juniors who successfully complete this course may be recommended for Pre-Calculus II (MA 52) or another upper level math course for their senior year, depending on the assessment of their performance and skill level. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

92


MATH

Mathematics NAUSET

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS MA51 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced proficiency in Honors Geometry (MA21) and Honors Advanced Algebra (MA31) or by teacher recommendation. This course includes a rigorous study of plane trigonometry, analytic geometry, analysis of functions, and topics in Algebra. The course is designed to help prepare the high school student for a course in Calculus. A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required.

PRE-CALCULUS II MA52 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: B- or better in MA42. This course includes a study of topics in analytic geometry, plane trigonometry, analysis of functions, and topics in Algebra. The course is designed to prepare high school students for a course in Calculus and is strongly recommended for all students planning to take Calculus at the college level. A TI-83 or TI-84 calculator is required.

AP CALCULUS (AB) Grades 11 - 12 MA60 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of MA41 or MA52, or concurrent enrollment in MA51 with approval. This full year course focuses on skills and applications of differential calculus, as well as, an introduction to the skills and modeling of integral calculus. Students are obligated to take the AP Calculus exam in May. Students are required to pay a fee for the Advanced Placement test during the first quarter of the course.

93


MATH NAUSET

Mathematics AP CALCULUS (BC) Grade 12 MA61 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of MA60 This course, a continuation of MA60, fully develops skills and models of integral calculus, the applications of power series, as well as the calculus of vectors. Students are obligated to take an AP Calculus exam in May. Students are required to pay a fee for the Advanced Placement test during the first quarter of the course. AP STATISTICS MA70 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: B average in Honors Pre-Calculus (MA 41) or Pre-Calculus (MA42) This college level course is a study of the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. It will include an in-depth and rigorous study of exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Topics will include methods of data collection, analysis, and presentation, measures of center and spread, regression analysis, basic probability models, random variables, probability distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. A TI 83 or TI 84 graphing calculator is required and students must be willing to do independent reading and written assignments. Students are obligated to take the AP Statistics Exam in May and to pay a fee for the Advanced Placement test during the first quarter of the course. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS MA72 - 1 Math Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: B average in Advanced Algebra (MA 32) or Pre-Calculus (MA 42) This course is a study of elementary concepts in statistics and probability. The aim is to give students an understanding of the main ideas of statistics and useful skills for working with data. Topics will include exploratory data analysis, probability models, random variables, probability distributions, and statistical inference. A TI 83 or TI 84 graphing calculator is required.

94


PE

9th Grade Physical Education

*10th grade must take an additional term of PE for 1/4 credit.

FRESHMAN YEAR OUTDOOR EDUCATION / HEALTH PE01 - ½ Credit - ½ Year

NAUSET

All Nauset students are required to pass one-semester of Physical Education / Health Education during their 9th, 10th* and 11th grades. There are three health components and three P.E. components included in graduation requirements. Each semester of passing work receives ½ credit. Students are also offered various fitness based elective P.E. courses.

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE EDUCATION / FITNESS CENTER ORIENTATION 1 Term Students taking Adventure Education will participate in group challenges based on trust and team building. A progression of individual and group initiatives will prepare the student for using the Outdoor Challenge Course made of logs, ropes, and cables. Students will learn spotting techniques and safety procedures for climbing. All classes are held outside – weather permitting. The fitness center orientation course will train students to safely use the various exercise equipment and stations in the fitness center. Successful completion of certification classes will allow students access to the fitness center after school. HEALTH – 1 Term The ninth grade health curriculum includes alcohol, tobacco, drugs, addiction, nutrition, body systems, STIs, HIV/AIDS, responsible relationships, and the components of health. There are a variety of student assessments that include guided discovery, small group presentations, and class discussions. Classes will also have guest speakers on different health issues.

95


PE NAUSET

10th Grade Physical Education PE / WELLNESS PE02 - ½ Credit - ½ Year NUTRITION, FITNESS & YOU This course is designed for students to evaluate their personal fitness and habits. The following topics are discussed and studied: Cardiovascular training, nutrition, stress reduction and well being, and other relevant health topics. INTRODUCTION TO FITNESS TRAINING The main purpose of this course is to train students to safely use the various exercise equipment and stations in the Fitness Center. Successful completion of certification classes will allow student access to the Fitness Center during and after school. Instruction will focus on the components of fitness and how they contribute to optimal health. Principles of strength training, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness, and formulation of a personal fitness plan are topics covered during this course. ADVANCED OUTDOOR EDUCATION The focus is on the high and more challenging elements of the Outdoor Challenge Course. Students will participate in personal challenges based on group support. Off campus activities include kayaking, stand up paddle boarding, and mountain biking through the National Seashore.

96


PE

11th Grade Physical Education NAUSET

PE / HEALTH PE03 - ½ Credit - ½ Year PE – 1 Term Junior students participate in Lifetime Fitness activities which may include fitness training, badminton, basketball, volleyball, spinning, core training, and active games. A recurring theme in all classes is a commitment to fitness and healthy lifestyles. Health – 1 Term Students enrolled in junior health classes will be educated in the proper techniques for CPR, Heimlich, First Aid and the use of an Automatic External Defribrillator (AED). Other topics will include personality traits, understanding mental disorders, defense mechanisms, suicide prevention and grief, advertising techniques, how sleep and stress can effect your health, marriage/family health, sexual abuse, diseases and how they affect the immune system.

97


PE NAUSET

Physical Education Electives FITNESS CENTER WORKOUT PE51 - ½ Credit - ½ Year This course is designed for the motivated student who is interested in improving their fitness. A personal fitness plan will be designed with input from the Polar Tri Fit Fitness Testing computer program. Students are able to work out for the entire class. Fitness workouts will be customized for each students needs: overall conditioning for health, weight management and sports specific training. OUTDOOR ADVENTURES PE57 - ½ Credit - ½ Year Do you like to be active outside? If so, this is the class for you! This is a semester-long course that will take place outside every day possible. Activities include: Outdoor Adventure High Challenge Course, mountain biking, kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding, orienteering with map and compass, and hiking. Students are transported in a school van to various local hiking trails in the National Seashore and Welllfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. Indoor activities in inclement weather will include indoor climbing walls and various aerobic games. The course will culminate with a field trip to an indoor rock gym in New Bedford. This course is active, create and fun. If you like adventure, this is for you! RACKETS AND CLUBS PE54 - ½ Credit - ½ Year Rackets and Clubs: Golf, Ultimate Frisbee, Softball, Flag Football, Soccer These activities are often a choice for lifetime physical activity. During this course, students will learn the components of skill development, participation, fitness, specific training guidelines, singles and doubles strategy, game strategies, golf fundamentals and rules of play. Tournament play will be included. Volleyball, Basketball, Badminton, Indoor Soccer Skills, rules and strategy will be taught; competitions and tournaments will be incorporated.

98


PE

Physical Education Electives

Fitness Training The training will focus on goal setting, positive self image and overall fitness. The use of cable and cardio machines, free weights, medicine balls, physio balls, and strength training bands will all be incorporated in this class. This course may be repeated.

NAUSET

FITNESS FOR FEMALES PE56 - ½ Credit - ½ Year This class is designed for all levels of fitness. A variety of activities are included to make fitness fun!!

INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING: PREVENTION and CARE (not approved by NCAA I & II) PE59 - ½ Credit - ½ Year - Spring Prerequisite: First Aid & CPR Certification This class is designed for junior and senior students interested in studying allied health professions such as athletic training, physical and occupational therapy, nursing, and emergency medical services. Instruction will be based on an overview of the six domains of athletic training which include prevention, treatment, evaluation and rehabilitation of injuries in conjunction with health care administration and professional responsibility. The primary focus will involve prevention and treatment of athletic injuries through class lectures, labs, and ten observation hours after school. ADVANCED ATHLETIC TRAINING: EVALUATION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES (not approved by NCAA I & II) PE59A - ½ Credit - ½ Year - Fall Prerequisites: Introduction to Athletic Training; First Aid & CPR Certification This class is designed for senior students interested in studying the fields of athletic training, physical therapy, or occupational therapy. Instruction will be a full year that focuses on the evaluation process of athletic injuries. Objectives include taping and bracing, clinical and on the field evaluation procedures, CPR and AED recertification in addition to an overview of upper and lower extremity injuries. Coursework will include in class lectures, labs, and 20 observation hours after school.

99


CAREERS NAUSET

School to Careers INTERNSHIP PROGRAM INTERNS I: ½ Year - ½ Credit; Full Year - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Interview with Guidance Counselor to determine internship site. Students must provide their own transportation. Students must be l6 years or older to participate. This course will offer a community based learning experience for students that wish to gain skills in a particular career pathway . Students are paired with a mentor who will supervise their internship of a minimum of four (4) hours. The internship is unpaid. The mentor and Guidance Counselor will develop a Work Based learning Plan that evaluates the student’s performance. This evaluation and weekly time sheets make up the bulk of the student’s grade. This course may be taken for a full year for l credit or a half-year for ½ credit. WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM WKEXP - 1 Credit – Full year WKEXP- S1 - ½ Credit – Half year Prerequisite: Interview with the Guidance Counselor to determine work site. Students must provide their own transportation. Work permit is necessary if student is under 18 years of age. Students must be 16 years of older to participate. Students in this program will learn the basic skills and training needed to succeed in a chosen work environment. They will work with an adult supervisor who will provide the necessary support to work at least four (4) hours in a community based work site. This is a paid work experience. The supervisor and the Guidance Counselor develop a Work Based learning Plan that evaluates the student’s performance. This evaluation, with weekly time sheets, make up the bulk of the student’s grade. Participation in these community based programs is open to enrolled students of Nauset Regional High School regardless of race, color, sex, religion or natural origin.

100


SWS

School Within a School NAUSET

The School Within a School began in 1973 as the Alternative Learning Group (ALG) through the efforts of students, parents, staff, community and school committee members. SWS has always believed that students are more enthusiastic and engaged in learning in a more personalized environment. The SWS program focuses on projects in which students teach and learn from each other, in addition to the use of traditional assessments. SWS continues to emphasize humanistic, student centered learning in a creative, supportive atmosphere that accommodates both a broad academic spectrum and individual learning styles. Confident in the knowledge that education is not something that takes place only inside school buildings, SWS courses extend learning to the surrounding community and beyond, requiring a high level of commitment and integrity.

101


SWS NAUSET

School Within a School

102

AMERICAN STUDIES Grade 11 - Full Year 3 Credits including: SWS10E / SWS11E - A Level / Honors - 1 English Credit SWS10S / SWS11S - A Level / Honors - 1 History Credit American Studies is a cooperatively taught, three credit integrated U.S. History and American Literature course. Through this interdisciplinary, project-based approach, students will study Apocalypse Then: Reconstruction, with Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; When Monopoly Wasn’t a Game: The Growing Empire from Wild West to World War I with Lakota Woman, The Sun Also Rises and The Jungle; Boom to Bust to Big Boom: From the Jazz Age and the Great Depression to Hiroshima with The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath; Commies, Containment, and Cold War: America in the Fifties and Vietnam with The Catcher in the Rye and The Things They Carried; From the Evil Empire to the Axis of Evil with research projects and current events. Students will have many opportunities to refine research and writing skills, and will also prepare for SAT’s. Enrollment in the Humanities Seminar is also required for this course (below). Honors students will complete the American Studies curriculum, with the addition of reading and writing assignments, research projects and class presentations.

AMERICAN STUDIES HUMANITIES SEMINAR SWS19 – 1 Credit - Full Year American Studies Humanities Seminar meets twice monthly on Thursday evenings, and further integrates the SWS English and History curriculum. The course begins with a required camping trip to the White Mountains of New Hampshire to promote cooperation, self-confidence and team building skills. Throughout the year there are field experiences to Boston, Newport, Rhode Island, Provincetown, and others. In addition, there will be a guest speaker series including politicians, poets, journalists, and activists. The year ends with a visit to Philadelphia.


SWS

School Within a School NAUSET

FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES Grade 12 – Full Year 2 Credits including: SWS40E – 1 English Credit SWS40S – 1 History Credit Prerequisite: U.S. History A cooperatively taught two credit integrated history and English course. This project-based, interdisciplinary class looks at the rise of Hitler through the lens of psychology, propaganda, film, art, and novels, including Stones from the River, Maus, and Man’s Search for Meaning. Why did the perpetrators kill? Learn stories of courage and compassion, and visit Boston to view German “degenerate” art, Holocaust survivor Samuel Bak’s work, and the New England Holocaust Memorial. We also look at the origins of “race” and the history and legacy of racism in our culture through science fiction, advertising, children’s literature, Hollywood film, Disney, television, and novels, including The Giver, Warriors Don’t Cry, A Gathering of Heroes and Their Eyes Were Watching God. Students will also complete college essays and scholarship letters. This course, as former students have said, “had an amazing impact” on them, one that has continued to affect them long after graduation.

FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES – HONORS Grade 12 - Full Year Available for English, History or both SWS41E – 1 English Credit SWS41S – 1 History Credit Honors students will complete the Facing History curriculum above, with the addition of reading and writing assignments, research projects and class presentations.

103


SWS NAUSET

School Within a School THE MUSICAL JOURNEY OF AMERICA: FROM RAGTIME TO ROCK-N-ROLL Grade 12 - Full Year 3 Credits Including: SWS33E / SWSH33E - 1 English Credit - A Level / Honors SWS34S / SWSH34S - 1 History Credit - A Level / Honors This integrated, project based 3 credit history and English course will explore the unique art form of American music and its powerful influence on the culture and history of America. Historical eras include Slavery, Racism, WWI, Roaring 20’s, Great Depression, World War II, Vietnam, Peace Movement and the Civil Rights Movement. Literature/authors include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Martin Luther King. Students will complete college essays, and have many other opportunities to refine research and writing skills. Enrollment in Humanities Seminar (below) is also required for this course.

THE MUSICAL JOURNEY OF AMERICA HUMANITIES SEMINAR SWS39 - 1 Credit - Full Year As an extension of classroom learning, this required humanities seminar provides further academic integration of the SWS history and English curriculum. Humanities Seminar meets twice monthly and enhances the classroom experience with community involvement. Activities include guest speakers, musicians, and performances both locally and in Boston.

104


SWS

School Within a School NAUSET

BANNED BOOKS AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM Grade 12 SWS43 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Each year the American Library Association’s list of banned books increases. The Library of Congress states that these banned books “have had a profound effect on American life.” This course will explore the reasons behind the banning of books, and the possible legal ramifications of doing so. Books on the list such as Fahrenheit 451, Slaughterhouse Five, Monster, and The Absolutely True Story of a Part Time Indian will be read and analyzed, and positions on censorship will be debated. Students will complete college essays, and have many other opportunities to refine research and writing skills. BANNED BOOKS AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM - HONORS Grade 12 SWSH43 - 1 English Credit - Full Year Honors students will complete the curriculum above, with the addition of reading and writing assignments, research projects and class presentations.

105


SWS NAUSET

School Within a School INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY Grades 11 and 12 SWS45 - Fall - ½ Science Credit Introduction to Astronomy provides insight into the processes at work in the Cosmos. We will begin to comprehend the various marvels of the Universe while attempting to unlock the mysteries that have baffled humankind for eons. We will probe the very origin of origins, and discern the fate of the Universe. As Carl Sagan said, “We are star stuff,” and so to understand the Universe is, ultimately, to understand ourselves. ASTRONOMY II Grades 11 and 12 SWS 55 – Spring - ½ Science Credit Prerequisite: Introduction to Astronomy In Astronomy II we will deepen our understanding of the forces at work in the Universe. new age of understanding, we will examine not only the larger structures of the Universe but also the microscopic world of quantum physics and the particle zoo, so as to be prepared to appreciate the amazing discoveries just around the corner.

106


Students taking Introductory Physics in the 9th grade will take the Introductory Physics MCAS test at the end of their freshman year. Beyond the required science courses, students may choose from a variety of electives which include the traditional college-preparatory courses and a number of pre-vocational and personal interest subjects.

NAUSET

All Nauset students must take a subject specific MCAS in Science.

SCIENCE

Science

Note: To insure appropriate placement in science courses, all students must have course selections approved and initialed by their current or previous science teacher. The majority of courses offered within the Science Department qualify as laboratory science courses for college admissions.

107


SCIENCE

9th Grade Science

NAUSET

All freshmen must take one of the following: FRESHMEN INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS (A Level) SC10 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Students of Introductory Physics learn about the relationship between motion and forces through Newton’s Laws of Motion and will examine forces, motion, electricity, magnetism, waves, light, sound and heat. Students will learn about science related skills including experimental design, accurate measuring techniques, quantitative and qualitative observations, construction and interpretation of data tables & graphs, dimensional analysis, application of algebra to science problems, and applications of science concepts to the real world. At the end of this program students will take the MCAS test in Introductory Physics. FRESHMEN INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS (Honors Level) SC10H - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Students of Introductory Physics learn about the relationship between motion and forces through Newton’s Laws of Motion and will examine forces, motion, electricity, magnetism, waves, light, sound and heat. Students will learn about science related skills including experimental design, accurate measuring techniques, quantitative and qualitative observations, construction and interpretation of data tables & graphs, dimensional analysis, application of algebra to science problems, and applications of science concepts to the real world. Students enrolled in the honors level are expected to be self motivated and be able to work independently developing, designing, and implementing projects that will lead to a deeper understanding of physics as a whole. Students successful in this program will be encouraged to take an Advanced Placement (AP) Physics course. At the end of this program students will take the MCAS test in Introductory Physics. GENERAL SCIENCE N18 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year This course is a project based science course that integrates the study of the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Topics covered include: geology, ecology, taxonomy, classification, basic chemistry and experimental design. Enrollment is based on special education TEAM recommendation and the student's Individualized Education Plan.

108


NAUSET

BIOLOGY: A LEVEL SC22 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year This course is a basic introduction to the molecular study of living things, their structure, function and ability to maintain homeostasis in a changing environment. Lab experiences will be used to reinforce abstract concepts in a concrete format. The course explores: - The world from molecules to organisms: structure and processes - The interactions, energy, and dynamics of ecosystems - Heredity, inheritance and variation of traits - Biological evolution in terms of unity and diversity.

SCIENCE

10th Grade Science

HONORS BIOLOGY SC21 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year This course is an introduction to the study of living organisms, their structure, functions and relationships to the biotic and abiotic environment. The course includes units covering biochemistry, cell biology, flow of energy through ecosystems, nucleic acids and proteins, genetics, evolution, and a survey of the human body systems. Each concept is supported by multiple lab experiences in which students will make observations, raise questions, and formulate hypotheses. Students are expected to design and conduct scientific investigations, analyze and interpret results of scientific investigations, and communicate and apply the results of scientific investigations. Students are expected to be responsible, interactive and motivated learners. GENERAL BIOLOGY N65 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year A project based introduction to the study of living things, their structure, function, and ability to maintain homeostasis in a changing environment. Projects and lab experiences will be used to reinforce concepts in a concrete format. Topics include: biochemistry, plant and animal cell biology, genetics, evolution, human systems, and the flow of energy through a living world. Enrollment is based on special education TEAM recommendation and the student's Individualized Education Plan.

109


SCIENCE NAUSET

Science Electives MODERN CHEMISTRY SC32 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Modern Chemistry is a traditional laboratory course in general chemistry, emphasizing the study of matter and its changes as understood within the framework of the Atomic Theory. Full block laboratory exercises are problem solving in nature and require student participation in experimental design, data reduction, and report preparation. Juniors should note that this course is a pre-requisite for some senior electives. MODERN CHEMISTRY / HONORS SC31 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Modern Chemistry Honors is an accelerated laboratory course in pre-college chemistry for the high ability science student. While the course content centers on the Atomic Theory as an explanation for the changes in matter, special emphasis is placed on development of critical thinking skills in applying the scientific method. Enrollment based on teacher recommendation and placement testing. AP CHEMISTRY SC30 - 1½ Science Credits - Full Year Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry and/or teacher recommendation. The AP Chemistry model of instruction promotes enduring, conceptual understandings and the content that supports them. This approach enables students to spend less time on factual recall and more time on inquiry-based learning of essential concepts, and helps them develop the reasoning skills necessary to engage in the science practices used throughout their study of AP Chemistry. Students who take AP Chemistry will develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, in their first year, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. All students are required to take the AP exam in May for which there is a fee.

110


NAUSET

BIOTECHNOLOGY SC58 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Prerequisite – Completed biology and currently enrolled in or completed chemistry. This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific principles and techniques of molecular biology, biotechnology, and biotechnology applications in the medical, pharmaceutical, and agricultural industries. Students should have a strong understanding of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and genetics. Course topics may include recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy to treat genetic disorders, genetically modified organisms, genome research, cloning, stem cells, drug discovery and bioethics. Discussions of technical, ethical and safety concerns presented by medical, agricultural, pharmaceutical, and forensic application of biotechnology will also be included. This lab course incorporates hands-on work using different instruments in the field of biotechnology. Students will be exposed to various biotechnology-related careers through guest-speakers and field trips.

SCIENCE

Grades 10 -12 Science Electives

AP BIOLOGY SC41 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry and teacher recommendation. Advanced Placement Biology is a college-level course open to students who have successfully completed high school biology and chemistry. It is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college biology course requiring commitment of time and effort on the part of the student. An AP Biology student must be willing to work independently beyond the classroom in order to be successful in this course. The course is for students interested in pursuing a field in the sciences and/or those students who wish to elect a course that is informative and challenging. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee. AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SC80 – 1 Science Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to • understand the interrelationships of the natural world • identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and human-made • evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems • examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Some topics are renewable energy, ecology, earth science and conservation. This course meets every other day for the entire year. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee.

111


SCIENCE NAUSET

Science Electives AP PHYSICS B Part 1 Grades 11 - 12 SC51 – 1 Science Credits - Meets once every other day for a full year AP Physics 1 is a year-long, algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquirybased learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. All students are required to take the AP exam in May for which there is a fee. AP PHYSICS B Part 2 Grades: 11 - 12 SC61 - 1 Science Credit - Meets once every other day for a full year AP Physics 2 is a year-long, algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. All students are required to take the AP exam in May for which there is a fee. COLLEGE PREP PHYSICS Grades 11-12 SC52 – 1 Science Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Students must have taken Introductory Freshmen Physics. The selected topics explored will provide you with an insight into some of the many applications of the physical phenomena that guide our universe and influence our existence. The fundamentals of motion are investigated more deeply and serve as a base from which other areas of physics are investigated. Among the other areas studied are the laws of thermal energy, the principles of sound and light, and the concepts of electricity and magnetism. EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE SC57 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: Freshman Introductory Physics, Biology, and Chemistry This course provides students with an opportunity to study Earth systems and astronomy while building on knowledge and skills gained in the prerequisite classes. Topics include geology, the oceans, the atmosphere, weather, and climate, the solar system and steller and galactic evolution.

112


NAUSET

SALTWATER ECOSYSTEMS SC70 - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year Term 1 students will study local saltwater ecosystems like beaches and marshes. They will learn how these ecosystems function. Topics include tides, waves, properties of seawater and coastal change. Students will also study how people interact with these ecosystems. Topics include erosion and the effects of climate change on these ecosystems.

SCIENCE

Science Electives

Term 2 students will study marine biology. Students will study how organisms are adapted to life in the ocean. Organisms include clams, squid, sharks and sea turtles. Dissections are required. There are no pre-requisites for this class. FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS SC75 - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year Term 1 students will study the earth’s freshwater ecosystems focusing on local resources. Topics include kettle ponds, rivers, reservoirs, ground water and vernal pools. Term 2 students will study a local watershed. They will learn how watersheds are affected by human activity within the watershed. Students will learn water testing methods and will test the water in a local watershed. Students will also learn how to collect and analyze macroinvertebrates from local rivers and use them to determine water quality. Students will also study wastewater management and its effects on Cape Cod water quality. There are no pre-requisites for this class. FORENSIC SCIENCE SC60 - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Students must have completed biology and are taking or have taken chemistry. This course is designed to introduce students to the scientific aspect of criminal justice. Students will learn about the many careers in Forensic Science including first responding officers, crime scene technicians and forensic scientists. Warrants, searches, seizures and the fourth amendment will be covered. Along with crime scene processing, evidence collection and preservation, and the processing of collected evidence. Evidence topics include: fingerprints, hair and fibers, blood typing and splatter, DNA, entomology, document analysis, psychological profiling, tool mark impressions and arson.

113


SCIENCE NAUSET

Science Electives VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY AND ANIMAL BEHAVIOR GRADES 10 - 12 SC59 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Biology This course explores the fascinating world of Vertebrates and their behavior. It is a world that helps us understand our own human interactions and neurobiology. Throughout the course, the behavior, anatomy and physiology of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals will be traced. Within each of these animal classes habitat selection (territoriality and migration), feeding (foraging or stalking, prey capture, storage/hoarding), antipredator behavior (detection, tricking the predator, defenses), mating and reproduction (advantages of genetic variation and evolution), animal communication, social organization, cooperation, and tool use will be studied. By understanding vertebrate behavior, we are able to understand our own. In that vein, we will look at studies involving classical conditioning, operant conditioning, mimicry, imprinting, brain development and much more! Experiments that involve behavioral topics may be individually designed based upon topics of high interest. Dissections of fish, reptiles, birds and mammals will allow for analyzing the form and function of anatomy. This topic also introduces contemporary advances in biomimicry; the budding field of technology that emulates nature’s successes and applies it to human innovation. Field studies, experimentation design, and dissections allow for a hands-on and project based approach. Activities may include observing Terrapin’s hatching in the fall, tracking local mammals in the winter, or designing field experiments to observe amphibians of the Outer Cape in the springtime. The animal world is an incredible one that intersects with ours in so many fascinating ways. ANATOMY and PHYSIOLOGY SC42 - 1 Science Credit - Full Year This is a college prep course which comprises a detailed study of major organ systems of the human body with an emphasis on their structure (anatomy) and function. Topics include: skeletal, muscular, nervous, integumentary, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and excretory systems. Related units include the eye and vision, the ear and hearing/equilibrium, food and nutrition, as well as a review of cellular structure, function and organization. Laboratory experiences will culminate in an opportunity to participate in dissection of mammalian systems. Virtual dissections may substitute for hands-on dissection. A previous course in biology is essential.

114


NAUSET

ROBOTICS ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY GRADES 9 - 12 SC65 - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year Do you like to design and build things? In a project-based, team environment, you’ll have the opportunity to develop and practice valuable coding skills to control your robot. The LabVIEW programming language that you’ll learn is used by professional engineers all over the world! As an example of some of the interesting projects in this course, you’ll make and program a Hot-Wire Anemometer to measure, record, and analyze wind speed. And this anemometer doesn’t even have to spin! Also, you can build and program an EKG instrument that will record and analyze your own heartbeat! You’ll even have the opportunity to pilot a drone from your laptop, iPad, or cell phone!

SCIENCE

Science Electives

ADVANCED ROBOTICS ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY SC85 - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year This semester-long course builds on the idea that programming can be fun. You’ll learn how to write code for controlling your robots using RobotC, which is in the C++ family of programming languages. You’ll also be using your programming skills to write code to control your virtual robot in a virtual gaming environment. Finally, you’ll try your skills at piloting your own drone from your laptop, iPad, or cell phone! This course prepares you today for tomorrow’s expanding career opportunities!

115


SCIENCE NAUSET

Science Electives INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY Grades 11 and 12 SWS45 - Fall - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year Introduction to Astronomy provides insight into the processes at work in the Cosmos. We will begin to comprehend the various marvels of the Universe while attempting to unlock the mysteries that have baffled humankind for eons. We will probe the very origin of origins, and discern the fate of the Universe. As Carl Sagan said, “We are star stuff,” and so to understand the Universe is, ultimately, to understand ourselves. ASTRONOMY II Grades 11 and 12 SWS 55 – Spring - ½ Science Credit - ½ Year Prerequisite: Introduction to Astronomy In Astronomy II we will deepen our understanding of the forces at work in the Universe. new age of understanding, we will examine not only the larger structures of the Universe but also the microscopic world of quantum physics and the particle zoo, so as to be prepared to appreciate the amazing discoveries just around the corner.

116


DRAMA

Theater and Acting NAUSET

DRAMATIC ACTING TH10 -1 Elective Credit - Full Year This is a full year course designed as an introduction to the fundamental basics of acting. Students will learn memorization, character development, stage movement, voice projection and play analysis. Students will memorize a monologue and a scene to perform in front of classmates. This is a great class for those interested in getting help for public speaking too!

HONORS ACTING TH11 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Acting I, Audition This class will be focused on performance for a variety of audiences. The first two semesters, the class will be working on a play for the Massachusetts High School Drama Guild Festival Competition. Rehearsals outside of class time will be required for this class. The second half of the year will be focused on performing short plays for local schools and organizations in the area. Students must audition for this class. Auditions will be held before students register for classes this year.

117


DRAMA NAUSET

Theater and Acting SHAKESPEARE for PERFORMANCE and LITERARY ANALYSIS TH30 – A Level - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year TH30H – Honors Level – 1 Elective Credit Prerequisite: Acting I and Teacher Approval Seniors: This is an English elective. This class will concentrate on learning to perform Shakespearean drama. The stance, the voice, the rhythms, the rhymes, and the worlds of Shakespeare’s plays will be studied and performed. Characters, plots and themes will be analyzed and discussed. The class will read plays and performmonologues and scenes along with each of t hem. The senior English students in the class will, in addition, be assigned an informal and a formal essay for each unit in order to engage in a deeper analysis of each play. SCREENWRITING, PLAYWRITING, and CREATIVE WRITING TH40 - ½ Elective Credit - ½ Year Seniors: This is an English elective This is a half year course designed as a writing workshop where students will learn the basic principles of writing screenplays, stage plays and short stories. Then they will use those principles to write their own works. As they work on their writings, they will share them with their classmates and critique one another. Students will then use the critiques to edit their work. The goal will be to have one or two finished works depending on their length.

118


DRAMA

Theater and Acting NAUSET

DRAMA PRODUCTION CLASS Grades 9 - 12 TH70 - 1 Elective Credit – Full Year TH70A – ½ Elective Credit – ½ Year This class will be aimed at learning all aspects of theater: from writing a script to building a set, lighting the stage and performing the play. Students will work together to write and produce a play. The goal will be to produce two plays during the course of the year.

ADDENDUM - REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE (See below for credits): Rehearsal and Performance is designed as a workshop class where students learn to "put on a play" as they actually do so. The students will be either learning to act in a play or they will be learning to build sets, design lights, create sound or to manage a stage production. This is a "hands on" experience in every sense of the phrase and students will be expected to put energy and effort into making the production successful for the entire group. Course sign up: After audition, the names of those students who make the cast of each play and those who will be involved in the backstage crew will be sent to Guidance Credit: Each play will count as 1/4 credit and lasts one marking period.

119


120

NAUSET


NAUSET

The World Language Department at Nauset Regional High School is based on a proficiency curriculum designed by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Language (ACTFL). This curriculum conforms to expectations put forward in the National Standards, the Massachusetts Framework for Education Reform and the Massachusetts Common Core of Learning which states that all students should “converse, read, and write in at least one language in addition to standard English�. Our purpose is to promote purposeful, communicative proficiency and an appreciation for other cultures and peoples. Students need to achieve linguistic competence in one or two foreign languages in order to function not only economically, socially, and politically in the international community, but also to enhance local tourism and the economy being created in the region by advanced technologies and telecommunications.

LANGUAGE

World Language

A minimum of 3 years of a high school world language sequence is a pre-requisite for students applying to most competitive colleges, but 4-5 years of the same language are recommended for optimum opportunity. Students progress through the various levels depending on their levels of proficiency, teacher recommendations and placement or final exam. In some cases, students may need more time to develop proficiency which may require repeating a certain level. Credit may be given upon repeating a course if a full grade improvement is made (10 points). Only one repeat is allowed, including Middle School sequence.

121


ASL NAUSET

World Language - American Sign AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I ASL1 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year ASL is a visual/spatial language with its own grammar and syntax rules. It is used to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States and is a major part of their cultural heritage. This is a one-year course designed to develop expressive and receptive ASL skills and communication strategies. Students will study the language, grammar and cultural behaviors. They will also be introduced to the history of the deaf as well as the history of American Sign Language. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II ASL2 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: B- average in ASL I. This is a one-year course designed to further develop expressive and receptive ASL skills and communication strategies. Students are able to understand instructions given in ASL and to communicate effectively in ASL. Students will continue the study of the language, grammar and cultural behaviors. They will continue the study of the history of the deaf as well as the history of American Sign Language and deaf culture. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III ASL3 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: B- average minimum in ASL II This is a one-year course designed to further improve receptive and expressive communication skills in ASL. Students will explore more complex language models of the language. They will explore the comparison of English and ASL and conceptual interpretations. Students will study deaf culture, deaf history and literary works of deaf authors. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE / Honors ASLH - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: B- average minimum in ASL III This is a one-year course designed for the student who is capable of comprehending class instruction presented in ASL with no verbal reinforcement. The class is designed to further improve receptive and expressive communication skills in ASL and apply complex language structure. The students will compare English and ASL language structures and conceptual interpretations. Students will study and discuss deaf culture, history and literary works of deaf authors.

122


ESL

World Language - ESL NAUSET

ESL I Grades 9 - 12 ESL 10 Prerequisite: A score of 1-2 on the WAP-T English placement test or a 1-2 on the previous year’s ACCESS for ELLs state test. This course is for students new to the United States and just beginning the study of English. Thematic units of study introduce the student to the basics of English, beginning with listening and speaking, and gradually adding reading and writing. The emphasis of ESL I is social English, listening skills, and local American social norms at school and at home. Students make comparisons and analyze cultural similarities and differences between the US and their home countries. The beginning nature of this course and the discipline needed in the process of language acquisition requires dedication and effort on the part of the student. There are written and memorization homework assignments, regular quizzes and bi-weekly vocabulary and dictation tests as well as a mid-term and a final exam. ESL II Grades 9 - 12 ESL 20 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and score of 3-4.5 on WAP-T or ACCESS test. This course reinforces and expands upon the basic second language skills acquired in ESL I and adds the essential component of academic language. Students are expected to participate in a variety of language activities appropriate to both social and academic situations. They will expand upon basic vocabulary with both general and specific vocabulary for their various areas of study: mathematics, science, ELA, and social studies. The different styles of discourse of these disciplines are discussed, and beginning formal writing is emphasized. Role play, dialogues, and oral presentations will be performed in class, and students will depend less on translation and begin to rely on English only explanations. Expect bi-weekly academic vocabulary quizzes, written homework, and a mid-year and a final exam. ESL III Grades 9 - 12 ESL 30 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and score of 4.5 or higher on WAP-T or ACCESS test. This course is a continuation of the academic English skills introduced in ESL II or in the student’s home country. The class is taught in English and the students are expected to use only English in class. Role play, dialogues, and oral presentations will be performed in class, and there will be further exploration of cultural topics. There is peer and teacher support for academic work in content classes. Expect bi-weekly academic vocabulary quizzes, dictation quizzes, note-taking, written homework, and a mid-year and a final exam.

123


FRENCH NAUSET

World Language - French FRENCH I FR12 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This course is for students beginning the study of French. Centered on thematic units of study, the class evolves over the year with emphasis on communication. Listening skills, speaking, and, with the acquisition of basic grammar concepts, writing skills will be developed. Students will learn cultural similarities and differences between the US and the Francophone world. The beginning nature of this course and the discipline needed in the process of language acquisition requires dedication and effort on the part of the student. Students can anticipate daily written homework assignments, regular quizzes and at minimum two exams per quarter as well as a mid term and final exam. FRENCH II FR22 – 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course reinforces and expands upon the basic second language skills acquired in French I. Students are expected to participate in a variety of communicative based activities such as role play, dialogues, and presentations. Writing skills will be further developed with the acquisition of more grammar concepts, and students will be expected to use their French as much as possible in class. French readings, songs and poetry will be studied. There will be further exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons. Students can anticipate daily written homework assignments, regular quizzes and at minimum two exams per quarter as well as a mid term and final exam. FRENCH II / Honors FR21 – 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course is for highly motivated students who have the dedication and discipline to succeed in this fast paced Honors French class. The class is taught in French and the students are expected to use the French language in class. Students are expected to participate in a variety of communicative based activities such as role play, dialogues, and several presentations involving research. French readings, songs and poetry will be studied. There will be further exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons especially with the wide variety of Francophone countries.

124


NAUSET

FRENCH III FR32 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: Recommend C minimum in French II This course reinforces and expands upon the second language skills acquired in French II. The class will be taught in French and the students are expected to participate in a variety of communicative based activities such as role play, dialogues, and some presentations in French. Writing skills will be further developed with the expansion of grammar skills to include all tenses. French readings, songs, and poetry will be studied. Some aspects of French history will be studied through authentic text and film. There will be further exploration of cultural topics involving cross cultural comparisons with the emphasis on topics of interest in France today.

FRENCH

World Language - French

FRENCH III / Honors FR31 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisites: Recommend B+ minimum in French II Honors The student can understand and communicate in several tenses at a higher level of proficiency, can produce lengthier communications, and work more independently. Vocabulary development, cultural topics, reading, writing and speaking are augmented, and special projects will be assigned. FRENCH IV FR42 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend C in French III This course reinforces and expands upon the second language skills acquired in French IV. The class will be taught in French and students are expected to use the French language in the classroom. Students will participate in a variety of communicative activities such as roleplay, dialogues and presentations in French. Writing will build on skills acquired in French III and will be lengthier. The French subjunctive will be introduced and practiced. Students will gain skills in understanding a native speaker through listening activities and class visitors. The different regions of France with their culinary specialties and customs will be explored. FRENCH IV / Honors FR41 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommended A- in French III Honors The student can understand and communicate at an intermediate level of proficiency, produce lengthier communications, and work more independently and more in-depth in all skill areas. Some literary works are included. This course is Part I of the Advanced Placement Program. There is an intense grammar review, as well as challenging listening, and speaking practice in preparation for the AP exam which is given at the end of level French V AP. This is an HONORS level course and will require dedication and great effort. The entire class is conducted in French.

125


FRENCH NAUSET

World Language - French FRENCH V FR52 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend C+ in French IV Building on the skills acquired in French IV, this course continues to focus on the acquisition of the French language with the emphasis on communicative skills such as speaking, listening, and reading skills, using a greater variety of texts and further exploration of cultural topics, including current events. Writing skills will be developed with the mastery of the subjunctive, and more emphasis on creative writing. The class will be taught in French and students are expected to use their French in class. FRENCH V / Honors FR51 – 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or B in French IV Honors This course continues to focus in depth on the acquisition of the French language, which enables the student to converse, debate, compare and contrast real life situations. Throughout the school year in French V Honors, there will be continued intensive periods of preparation specifically for the AP exam. These sections of preparation will be woven into the established curriculum. Early in the academic year, all students are re-exposed to the format of the exam and the language processes required as presented in French IV Honors. French V Honor students will not take the AP exam. Although the class focuses on preparation for the exam, French V Honor students will use the AP practice as a method to perfect their language skills. Grades will be adjusted to reflect an Honors course. FRENCH V AP FR50 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend B in French IV HONORS This course has a very challenging curriculum. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading, and writing at an advanced level. All of the material studied is authentic, encompassing the entire Francophone world. Throughout the school year, there will be continued intense periods of preparation for the AP exam. Students are required to speak French at all times. All students enrolled in the AP French V course are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee.

126


NAUSET

GERMAN I GE12 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year As with the current German II, III, and IV courses, the grammar curriculum will be based on the existing Deutsch Aktuell textbook series, with the SmartBoard and student-issued iPads acting as a technological supplement to the curriculum. As an introduction to German, this course will focus heavily on conversation and basic grammar concepts.

GERMAN

World Language - German

GERMAN II GE22 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation After completing the text from German I, students will move into the level 2 book, continuing to develop the four strands of communication (listening, reading, speaking and writing). The greatest shift from the previous level will be in the creation of more complex essays and narratives. Creativity and entertainment value will be encouraged and rewarded. Increasingly advanced grammatical structures will be incorporated into each new task list. Students will be able to apply at least four tenses and manipulate compound sentences with word order that differs from that of English. Units and subunits will concentrate on more diverse and culturally specific themes. Morphology of German words will continue to be examined. GERMAN III GE32 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Using the same text as in German II, students will continue to deepen their cultural knowledge and expand their communication skills. Their progress will culminate in a final assessment in which they apply higher thinking skills (such as evaluating and presenting a culturally relevant fictional story). As in previous levels, each summative communication task will require incorporation of newly learned structural skills. Creativity and entertainment value will continue to be encouraged and rewarded. By the end of the course, most of the grammatical structures needed for advanced communication will have been introduced, practiced and applied. GERMAN IV GE42 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Completing the text from German III, students will continue to deepen their cultural knowledge and expand their communication skills. Upon completion of this text, the focus will shift to advanced communication through the use of outside literary sources of authentic German stories and grammatically relevant text.

127


LATIN NAUSET

World Language - Latin LATIN I LT12 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Latin is a wonderfully ancient language that informs every western language of the modern world. The ancient Romans dominated all of Europe and parts of Asia and Africa for about 1,000 years. All the romance languages and other languages such as English have been heavily influenced by the vocabulary and grammar of Latin. Roman law, art, architecture, government, literature, and philosophy helped to shape the western world into what it is today. The study of Latin and the ancient Romans ultimately becomes a study of our own language, who we are, and why we are the way we are. We will use short reading passages in our Ecce Romani text book to develop a sense of Latin sentence structure, grammar, and vocabulary. The stories in Ecce Romani I follow the life of a first century CE family making a journey from Baia (near Naples) to Rome. In the course of those stories you will learn about ancient family life, fashion, slavery, housing, transportation, engineering, and basic Roman social and political life. LATIN II LT22 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend C- in Latin I In this course students will solidify their knowledge of Latin and start to develop a firm understanding of basic ancient history and culture. They will continue to practice the language especially its verbs in a range of tenses and its nouns in various cases. Students will add to their knowledge of verbs by learning the participle, the subjunctive mood, and the passive voice. To their knowledge of nouns they will add the versatile and dynamic ablative case. Students will learn to transition from treating a Latin sentence as an algorithm to be decoded to reading in sense units that together yield meaning that can be sometimes obvious and sometimes subtle. Ecce Romani II follows the Cornelii family as they experience the conveniences and complexities of urban life in first century CE Rome. In the course of those stories students will learn about ancient urban dwellings, cuisine and culinary art, education, writing and publication, piracy, crime, entertainment, and recreation. Moreover, students will study some of the political and social history of the first century that gave rise to some of the most memorable literature in the western world and help to set the course for the rest of western civilization.

128


LATIN

World Language - Latin NAUSET

LATIN III / IV LT32 / LT42 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend C- in Latin II This course hopes to pay the dividend on the investment of effort in learning of Latin morphology, syntax, and vocabulary in Latin I - II. Most of the course will be conducted seminar style and will feature authentic readings from the golden age of Roman literature, including such authors as Cicero, Julius Caesar, Augustus Caesar, Pliny, and Petronius. We will explore a variety of historic and cultural and literary topics including the fall of the Roman republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, Roman law, managing the military, political invective, the Pax Romana, and social satire. In the spring of this course will feature a unit on ancient philosophy, especially ancient Greek philosophy. We’ll read some excerpts from Plato and Aristotle and reflect on some of the questions they posed two thousand years ago and with which we are still wrestling today. LATIN III / IV Honors LT32H / LTH42 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend B in Latin II This course hopes to pay the dividend on the investment of effort in learning of Latin morphology, syntax, and vocabulary in Latin I - II. Most of the course will be conducted seminar style and will feature authentic readings from the golden age of Roman literature, including such authors as Cicero, Julius Caesar, Pliny, and Vergil. We will explore a variety of historic and cultural and literary topics including the fall of the Roman republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, Roman law, managing the military, political invective, the Pax Romana, and social satire. The second semester of this course will be aimed at preparing students for reading the sections of Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic Wars in the Advanced Placement course.

129


LATIN NAUSET

World Language - Latin

130

LATIN IV Honors / AP Latin LT41 / LT40 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend B in Latin III The course is structured to enable students to complete the entire required reading list as delineated in the AP® Latin Course Description. In December, students are encouraged to take the Latin SAT II subject test. At the end of this course students will be able to: • read and translate as literally as possible from Latin into English the required Latin passages from Vergil’s Aeneid • write analyses and critical interpretations of the required Latin passages of the Aeneid, with appropriate references to the use of stylistic and metrical techniques used by Vergil • read sight passages in Latin to prepare for the multiple-choice section of the AP exams • read, examine, and practice written critical interpretation of the entire Aeneid in English • examine the historical, social, cultural, and political context of Vergil’s Aeneid • recognize the influence of Latin literature on the artistic achievements of the modern world and compare the themes and the heroes of the Aeneid with those of their own culture


NAUSET

MANDARIN CHINESE I MC12 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Mandarin Chinese 1 focuses on fundamental learning skills and core language ability. The course takes a comprehensive approach which teaches students the basics of listening, speaking, reading and writing in the Chinese language. Fundamental skills include pinyin mastery, Mandarin tones and proper pronunciation, reading comprehension of Chinese characters, and character writing. In addition, students will have a firm understanding of Chinese culture and customs. 

MANDARIN

World Language - Mandarin Chinese

MANDARIN CHINESE II MC-22 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Mandarin Chinese 2 is designed to build upon the fundamental language abilities acquired in Mandarin Chinese 1. This course aims to improve students' communication ability through increased language immersion and interaction. Fundamental language skills will expand to include various forms of written expression, intermediate reading comprehension, spoken language expression, and advanced listening comprehension with respect to tones.

MANDARIN CHINESE II HONORS MC21 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Mandarin Chinese 2 Honors is an accelerated course for those who have taken and excelled at Mandarin Chinese 1. This course aims to improve students' communication ability through increased language immersion and interaction. Fundamental language skills will expand to include various forms of written expression, intermediate reading comprehension, spoken language expression, advanced listening comprehension with respect to tones, and increased interaction with native Chinese speakers. Students will be expected to pass the HSK level 2 exam after the completion of the course. 

131


SPANISH NAUSET

World Language - Spanish SPANISH CONVERSATION AND CULTURE I SP15 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite – NONE (Grade 9 only) This course will include cultural highlights such as geography, art, history and current events, for various Spanish speaking countries. The direction of study will differ year to year depending on the current global situation. Emphasis is given to building a practical vocabulary and to learning the foundation of basic grammatical concepts. Listening, reading, writing, and speaking exercises fortify students’ basic level language skills. The focus will be on communicating and making connections and comparisons between their native language and culture and those of the Spanish speaking world. This course is aimed at students with absolutely no prior knowledge of Spanish. It is the first of a two part sequence designed for students to meet the minimal college application requirements. Should students wish to continue in their Spanish studies, after the 2 year sequence, they may sign up for Spanish II. SPANISH CONVERSATION AND CULTURE II SP-25 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite - Spanish communication and culture 1 OR Teacher recommendation (Grades 9 or 10 only). This course will include cultural highlights such as geography, art, history and current events, for various Spanish speaking countries. The direction of study will differ year to year depending on the current global situation. Emphasis is given to building a practical vocabulary and to learning the foundation of basic grammatical concepts. Listening, reading, writing, and speaking exercises fortify students’ basic level language skills. The focus will be on communicating and making connections and comparisons between their native language and culture and those of the Spanish speaking world. This course is aimed at students with basic but limited knowledge of Spanish. It is the second of a two part sequence designed for students to meet the minimal college application requirements. Should students wish to continue in their Spanish studies, after the 2 year sequence, they may sign up for Spanish II.

132


NAUSET

SPANISH I SP12 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year This course is an introduction to Spanish with a focus on knowledge and appreciation of the language and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis is given to building a practical vocabulary and to learning the foundation of basic grammatical concepts. Listening, reading, writing, and speaking exercises fortify students’ basic level language skills and help them to move towards proficiency. Students produce basic oral and written projects, reports, and presentations in the target language as well as complete unit exams, a midterm exam, and a final exam. Students will learn about the people, places, communities, and practices of the target culture. The focus will be on communicating and making connections and comparisons between their native language and culture and those of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPANISH

World Language - Spanish

SPANISH II SP22 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course continues the cultural thematic approach of Spanish I with more advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures. Understanding and communicating at a higher level of proficiency, the student can produce lengthier assignments with success in conversation, composition, and reading. Students will develop a command of the present, preterite and present progressive tenses and of advanced grammatical structures. Thematic units of study include movies, the environment, parties, food, school, daily routines, sports, community, SPANISH II / Honors SP21 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend A- minimum in Spanish I, Teacher Recommendation. (This course is for all students who complete the Middle School 7th and 8th grade program with very high grades.) Students in Spanish II Honors will communicate at a higher level of proficiency, produce lengthier assignments and work more independently in all skill areas. Students will speak, read, and write in the present, preterite, imperfect, future and all progressive tenses. The imperative will also be taught. A large amount of content is covered due to the depth of study. Students should be prepared to significantly increase their self-study, risk taking, and participation. Students must be dedicated to the study of Spanish and the time commitment that it takes to actively participate in this course. Students will have daily homework assignments and frequent assessments.

133


SPANISH NAUSET

World Language - Spanish SPANISH III SP32 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course continues the cultural thematic approach of Spanish II with more advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures at a faster pace. Understanding and communicating at a high level of proficiency, the student can produce lengthy assignments with success in conversation, composition, and reading. Students will develop a command of the present, preterite, present progressive, imperfect, imperfect progressive, imperative, future and present subjunctive tenses and of advanced grammatical structures. Thematic units of study include childhood, celebrations, luxuries and necessities, shopping, accidents, movies, professions, travel, food, and the environment. Language study at this level requires great effort and disciplined self-study. Participation and commitment to the language are essential to succeed at this level. SPANISH III / Honors SP31 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Recommend A- minimum in Spanish IIH, Teacher Recommendation This course includes practice in conversation, composition, reading and listening skills. There is a review of grammar and advanced grammar. The subjunctive mood is a key component to this level. Vocabulary development is through thematic units of study. The major thematic units will be travel, food, environment, city life, country life, art and legends. Students will immerse themselves in the culture of Mexico as they undertake a major unit of review with “La Catrina�. A high level of proficiency, written and oral, is expected. Students are independently motivated to delve beyond the surface.

134


NAUSET

SPANISH IV SP42 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course includes practice in conversation, composition, reading and listening skills. There is a review of grammar and advanced grammar. The subjunctive mood is a key component to this level. Vocabulary development is through thematic units of study. The major thematic units will be city life, country life, art, and legends. Students will immerse themselves in the culture of Mexico as they undertake a major unit of review with “La Catrina�.

SPANISH

World Language - Spanish

SPANISH IV / Honors SP41 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or B in Spanish III Honors This course focuses in depth on the acquisition of the Spanish language and is primarily ORAL, building upon the work of all previous years in Spanish. It evolves over the year with major emphasis on communication, rounded out by intensive grammar review. This course also contains the AP Prep component. The emphasis of this preparation is on Spanish Language and the AP test. The core of the preparation will take place during classtime as required and as is practicable. These sections of preparation will be woven into the established curriculum. The review of and preparation for the exam is done in an evolving diagnostic mode based on the specific needs of the students in the class. The AP Exam will be taken at the end of the 2 year sequence in SPV AP. This is an HONORS level course and will require dedication and great effort. SPANISH V SP52 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course consists of various interdisciplinary units. Recycling and review is a key component of this class with new concepts introduced via authentic realia. Hispanic / Spanish culture is explored in depth via reading, film and music. Thematic units consist of but are not limited to the following: Cuba, La Catrina 2, Migrant Workers, and Don Quijote.

135


SPANISH NAUSET

World Language - Spanish SPANISH V / Honors SP51 – 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or B in Spanish IV Honors This course focuses in depth on the acquisition of the Spanish language, exploring a variety of genres, from classic literature to modern cinema. Throughout the school year there will be continued intensive preparation for the AP exam. This preparation will be woven into the established curriculum. The review of, and preparation for the exam is designed to meet the specific needs of the students in the class. Early in the academic year, all students are re-exposed to the format of the exam and the language processes required as presented in Spanish IV Honors. From that point individual students’ needs are met to enable each student to acquire a level of familiarity, comfort and practice in the exam process. Spanish V Honor students will not take the AP exam. Although the class focuses on preparation for the exam, V Honor students will use the AP practice as a method to perfect their language skills. Grades will be adjusted to reflect an Honors course. AP SPANISH V SP50 - 1 Elective Credit - Full Year Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or B in Spanish IV Honors This course focuses in depth on the acquisition of the Spanish language and culture, exploring a variety of authentic sources. The AP Spanish Language and Culture curriculum is centered around six themes: Beauty and aesthetics, Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, and Families and Communities. Discussion, analysis, commentary and review of grammar are integral parts of this course. Throughout the school year, in AP Spanish V, there will be continued intensive periods of preparation for the AP exam. The review of, and preparation for the exam continues in an evolving diagnostic mode based on the specific needs of the students in class. Early in the academic year, all students are re-exposed to the format of the exam and the required language processes as presented in Spanish IV Honors. From that point on, individual students’ needs are addressed in all of the specific areas, in order to enable each of them to acquire a level of familiarity, comfort and practice in the exam. All students are required to take the AP test in May for which there is a fee.

136


TRAVEL

International Travel Opportunities

Here are some amazing trips around the world offered by NRHS:

NAUSET

TNauset Travels 2015-2016! “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the things you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” ~ Mark Twain

SOUTH AFRICA! April 13-23, 2016 An 11-day itinerary includes Johannesburg and a visit to the Mandela’s house, Soweto and the Apartheid Museum, a 2-day safari in Kruger National Park, flight to Cape Town to visit Table Mountain, Robben Island, African penguin colony, and Cape of Good Hope. Trip Leaders: Ms. McMillin and Ms. Smith Cost: $4365 (subtract $95 enrollment fee and $500 deposit paid 30 days later, that leaves $3770 due by Feb., 2016- or monthly installments of $314 per month) Student/Parent Informational Meeting: Monday, Dec. 15 @ 5:30 in room A101 Contact: mcmillinm@nausetschools.org

137


TRAVEL NAUSET

International Travel Opportunities ROME, ITALY! February 10-19, 2016 A 10-day itinerary includes the highlights of Rome, the Colosseum, Vatican, Pantheon, Pompeii, Naples National Museum, and more great sites! Trip Leader: Mr. Mulholland Cost: $2200 Student/Parent Informational Meeting: May 5, 2015 @3 pm in room N203 Contact: mulhollands@nausetschools.org PORTUGAL & SPAIN: LISBON, SEVILLE, AND MADRID! February 11-16, 2016 A 9-day itinerary that includes Torre de Belen, Castelo de Sao Jorge, a flamenco show, Cordoba, and the Prado! Trip Leader: Ms. Kmiec Cost: $2750 (or $205/month) Student/Parent Informational Meeting: Wednesday, Dec. 17 @ 5:30 in room N204 Contact: kmieca@nausetschools.org FRANCE! APRIL VACATION, 2016 A 9-day itinerary includes tours of Paris and locales in the south of France. Trip Leader: Madame Keavy Cost: Around $3300 Contact: keavyd@nausetschools.org GERMAN EXCHANGE! German exchange students will be visiting our school next fall, and Nauset students will travel to Germany Spring of 2016. Trip Leader: Tom Allen- allent@nausetschools.org HAITI! April 18-26, 2015 A remarkable home-stay and community service travel opportunity! Trip Leaders: Lisa Brown and Paul Davies Cost: $800 plus 4 Students only Contact: brownl@nausetschools.org

138


SPORTS

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Boys’ Golf Boys’ Cross Country Boys’ Soccer Field Hockey Football Football Cheerleading Girls’ Cross Country Girls’ Soccer Girls’ Volleyball

WINTER SPORTS

SPRING SPORTS

Boys’ Basketball Boys’ Swimming Girls’ Basketball Girls’ Swimming Ice Hockey Wrestling

Baseball Boys’ Lacrosse Boys’ Tennis Boys’ Track and Field Girls’ Golf Girls’ Lacrosse Girls’ Tennis Girls’ Track and Field Sailing Softball

NAUSET

SPORTS / ATHLETICS FALL SPORTS

139


CLUBS NAUSET

Nauset Clubs Best Buddies: - Kristin VanTassel D026 Wednesdays after school Some students are matched with students who have disabilities and some plan and enjoy activities every Wednesday and dances at other schools with their Best Buddies. Breakfast Club: Stephanie VanWinkle and Sarah Stewart Tuesdays 8-8:30 Guidance Conference Room Learn relaxation-response-based stress reduction techniques that the students will experience, understand, and practice to enhance their own lives at home and in the classroom. Chinese Culture Club: Taidje Tang Wednesdays 3-4:00 Room N211 Learn about Chinese language and culture with Mandarin teacher and our Chinese International students. We will play fun games, plan holiday activities and will hopefully go on a field trip to Boston. Culinary Club: Norma Jean Anderson Thursdays, 3-4:45, D205 Acquire some ‘mad’ cooking skills, See professional chefs in action, Enjoy fun food field trips Make awesome food from around the world with friends and classmates: chili, soups, chowders, breads, pasta & pizza from scratch, make your own tortillas and “Super-Nachos”, crepes and crostatas, yakitori and sukiyaki, pad Thai and fresh rolls, superfood snacks, make your own sodas and so much more! Create signature recipes of your own and compete in exciting team challenges, one may be held on location at a restaurant!

Culture Club: Andrew Clark Wednesdays, 3:00, Room A206 Activities involving students from all cultures and backgrounds

140


CLUBS

Nauset Clubs NAUSET

Drifter Club: Val Bell Thursdays, 3 pm, E101 We work with Wellfleet Audubon and The Gulf of Maine Institute. Students build devices that are launched into Cape Cod Bay. They drift with the currents. Each one had a GPS unit so the students can track where the drifters are going and learn about currents in Cape Cod Bay. We then use that information to help track where cold stunned sea turtles might wash up on our local beaches. Students learn about sea turtles, go on turtle walks to look for cold stunned sea turtles and help perform necropsies on dead turtles. Fellowship of Christian Athletes: Tracy DeStefano Bi monthly Wednesdays, N209 at 7:45 am We are a group of Christian believers who are not necessarily athletes or church-goers. We meet to encourage each other to live clean (substance-free) lives. Gender Equity and Social Justice Club: Deb Keavy Mondays, 8 AM, N202 Student led discussions with Lucy Wingard and Brian O’Sullivan. Issues include awareness of gender issues, women’s issues, equality. Haiti Club: Lisa Brown and Val Bell The Haiti Club follows the progress of the programs put in place in collaboration with the community of Matenwa, Haiti. Selected Nauset students travel to the Island of LaGonave, live with host families, and experience complete immersion in a small mountain village. Often fundraising is a key component here to support new start-up programs and projects initiated there. Check in with Mrs. Bell or Lisa Brown for meeting schedule.

141


CLUBS NAUSET

Nauset Clubs Human Rights Academy: Lisa Brown Tuesdays, 3:00, Room A200 The Human Rights Academy is the student representative arm of the Barnstable County Human Rights Commission. There are 17 high schools represented and 2 middle schools, Cape-wide. We here at the high school currently are mentoring the newly formed HRA at NRMS. All schools get together 2 times a year to discuss social justice, human rights and related issues. We also engage in activities and projects that are relevant to human rights on and off campus. Our thing this year is Get Empathy Now training through the Relational Movement, and anti-bullying workshops/seminars, student led, at NRMS, 6-8 grades, and all region elementary schools 1-3,4 & 5 group activities in empathy building/anti-bullying. Interact Club: Jane McGown Tuesdays, 8-8:30 AM, Room B201 Students will meet to plan community service projects Key Club: Sharon Richards Wednesdays, 3 pm, N107 Key Club is an international service organization. We are sponsored by the local Kiwanis Club. We plan and take part in local community service projects and fundraising activities, as well as some international projects. Men’s Acapella Club: Allison Beavan Meets B days, first lunch, 11:45 pm, Room B207 Literary Magazine - David Donovan and Noelle Smith The Nauset Literary Magazine is a faculty-student organization providing student writers the opportunity to showcase their quality works, primarily poetry and short fiction, in an online magazine format. Miles Tibbetts Chess Club: Sean Mulholland Wednesdays, 3 pm, N203, beginning in November Honor Miles’ interest in chess by sharing the game with other students as well as encouraging students to engage face to face in friendly board game competition.

142


CLUBS

Nauset Clubs NAUSET

Mock Trial Team: Dee Smith and Mae Timmons & Attorney coaches Weekly meeting on Tuesdays, 4-6 pm, Room N211 To further your understanding of the law, court procedures, civil liberties and our legal system; To increase your proficiency in basic life skills, such as listening, speaking, reading and reasoning; To develop your advocacy skills regardless of which side of the case is being represented and irrespective of the party with which you most identify; To promote better communication and cooperation between you, the schools and the legal profession; To heighten your consciousness of law-related professions and the academic studies, which lead to those professions. Model UN Club: Henry Evans Tuesdays, Room Learn about international affairs in order to prepare for one or two Model UN simulations. These conferences are organized by college Model UN clubs, and provide an opportunity to meet and debate with other interested high school students from around the world. Anybody interested in politics, international issues or solving the world’s problems is welcome. Nauset Green Club: Val Bell E101, Wednesdays, 8 AM We deal with issues of sustainability on campus and in the community Nauset Players Drama Club: Judy Hamer Auditorium The Nauset Players produce two plays a year. Usually featuring a straight play in the fall, often a Shakespeare play, and a musical in the Spring. Students can audition in September for the fall play and in March for the musical. All auditions are open to the entire school. Students can also choose to participate in working backstage; building, paiting, making costumes, or doing lights and sound. Students also can get Ÿ credit for each play they participate in.

143


CLUBS NAUSET

Nauset Clubs Nauset Student Council: Ariana Kmiec & Courtney Miville Various Wednesdays throughout the year in N204 or N205 This organization shall be designed to develop qualities of leadership and responsibility in the students of Nauset Regional High School, to promote school spirit, to encourage co-operation among the classes. In addition, in order to form a closer relationship between students, faculty, administration, and the community of Nauset Regional School District, the Nauset Student Council members will work to establish understanding between the student body, faculty and administration, to initiate service projects and other activities for the betterment of the school and will give organized support to educational, recreational, social, and charitable activities initiated and sponsored by the school. Ski/Snowboard Club: Lise Nielsen Monthly meeting in CafĂŠ Sunday River 3 day trip in January Social Club: Mae Timmons, Dee Smith and Amanda Citrone Tuesdays, 3-4 pm, Guidance Conference Room Our group is designed to practice and teach social skills strategies to students with social communication challenges. The group promotes and practices social thinking skills that support the development of authentic friendships, and positive interpersonal skills.

144


NAUSET

145

NRHS 2015-2016 Program of Studies  

List of class offerings and some extra curricular activities

Advertisement