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PORTFOLIO I Robert Deacon 697 10th Ave, New York, NY 10036 I robert.p.deacon(at)gmail.com I 202.412.8937


Montauk Residence Location: Size: Year: Status:

with Robert Young Architects

Montauk, NY 7,500 sq.ft. Main House / 2,500 sq.ft. Guest House 2011 - Present Under Construction

Program: The Clients sought to create a relaxing family retreat that would take advantage of the site’s waterfront location and provide a respite from the bustle of NYC. The site contains both a Main house and Guest house.. Design Approach: Through its massing and and considerable application of glazing, the design seeks to both visually and physically connect the houses with the site. These architectural gestures are reinforced through various indoor/outdoor spaces that blur the line between exterior and interior. The massing reflects the programmatic separation of public and private spaces, meeting the needs of a social but reserved family. A vernacular language of metal gabled roofs, and wood board siding was adopted to integrate the house with its immediate and historical context, while its contemporary massing and architectural detailing help to distinguish it from becoming an anachronism. The combination of the application of materiality, the simple detailing of the interiors, and extensive use of glazing impart a relaxing atmosphere that vacation home needed. The project is technicially ambitious; utliizing Passive House counstruction standards and details. The design incorporates such sustainable details as geothermal, cellulose insulation, air tight envelope, and a rainscreen.

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exterior rendering 5


basswood and chipboard model

kitchen sketch

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great room sketch

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wall section detail WALL SECTION 1"=1'-0"

stair details

basswood and chipboard model

interior rendering

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Bldg 92 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

with workshop/apd

Location: Brooklyn, NY Size: 7,500 sq.ft. Main House Year: 2011 - Present Status: Built

Program: Building 92 serves as a visitor center and gateway to the new industrial park. The building will provide exhibition space showcasing the historical background of the Navy yYard, as well as office space and a multi use room. Design Approach: Throughout the project’s design a balance was sought between respect for the historical context and the creation of a contemporary node that demonstrated the site’s new future. While similar in massing, the new addition is starkly different in materiality and detailing. The dynamic relationship between the two masses created an interstitial space prime for the location of an entrance that fed off the open courtyard. The new addition utlized modular construction and local fabricators. From the corrugated siding to the Corten Steel panels, the materiality reflects the industrial nature of the site. The perforations of the steel sunscreen were created through modern CNC fabrication but displays an historical image of the Navy Yard; layering references to the site’s past and future. The project meets LEED Platinum status, and includes in the building’s design such features as a vegetated roof, geothermal heat exchange, and greywater recycling.

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view of entrance gate & courtyard

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entrance stairs and signage

entrance details

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view of entry

lobby

canopy detail

rear of building

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Re:Vision Dallas Competition

w/ workshop/apd

Location: Dallas, TX Size: 442,000 sq.ft. Year: 2009 Status: Un-built

Program: Develop an architectural and economical strategy for reurbanizing downtown Dallas through the various applications and definitions of sustainability. Design Approach: The proposal calls for a new neighborhood that would be a nexus between already existing hubs of activity and encourage circulation through and to the area. The site is embedded with several anchors that create destination points within the site. Through this action the site becomes an epicenter of activity, rather than a conduit of flow. A green “artery” links the site with its surroundings and creates an active interior street. The initial form of the city block evolved out of sustainable and economic drivers. The two issues are resolved through the carving the blocks into “microblocks,” creating communities, shade, and higher density. These blocks are then eroded further through an operational technique informed by the movement of the sun, allowing light to filter to the center courtyards. The final form originates from the introduction of modular construction, which pixelizes the massing. The modular construciton provides for a comprehensive language across the site while allowing for an economical phased development model.

rendering of overall siteplan view of highrise volume

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MICRO-BLOCK MORPHOLOGY

6 HOUR WINDOW DIRECT SUNLIGHT

MICRO-BLOCK EROSION DIAGRAM

SUMMER

programmed

FALL/SPRING WINTER

SUMMER FALL/SPRING

3 BEDROOM

2 BEDROOM

1 BEDROOM

SOLAR PANELS FALL/SPRING

GREEN LOOP

UNIT COUNT: 80 UNIT SF: 1440

WINTER

UNIT COUNT: 74 UNIT SF: 1150

UNIT COUNT: 120 UNIT SF: 725

STUDIO

UNIT COUNT: 148 UNIT SF: 380

LIVE/WORK UNIT COUNT: 96 UNIT SF: 550

partitioned

SUMMER GREEN SPACE ROOF GARDEN SF: 17936 WINTER GARDEN SF: 30467 ARABLE SF: 48303

contextualized

PANEL SF: 29557

FOURTH FLOOR

WINTER

SUMMER FALL/SPRING

eroded PARKING SPACES: 248

WINTER SOCIAL PROGRAM RETAIL / DINING COMMUNITY CENTER WELLNESS CENTER

DEVELOPMENT KEY unitized

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view of highrise volume

view of micro-block

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Educatorium Location: Philadelphia, PA Size: 7,500 sq.ft. Main House Year: 2006 Status: Unbuilt - Academic

Program: An institution of higher learning composed of Culinary, Art and Business schools. Design Approach: The institution is based upon a work/learn environment that seeks to create a effective educational model by mimicking the experiences of the professional environment. This unique characteristic of the program, mixing of the public and academic contexts, permeates the principle of the building’s design. Theoretical Overview: This project explored the application of new spatial structures to familiar programs,with the intent of freeing the program from its traditonal relationships, and develop ingnew ideas about how a building successfully functions. New relationships are created by juxtapositions of different programs, further creating the potential for new relationships. The proposed design process is accomplished through the use of diagrams, providing the design process with a certain degree of freedom the rote application of typologies. In this new paradigm, adjacencies are not necessarly determined by similarity of function, but through considerartion of spatial, experiential, and contextual factors. These experiential needs can be reduced to a determination of potential interpersonal interactions.

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view of N 3rd St entrance

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BUILDING MORPHOLOGY PROGRAM CONCEPT DIAGRAM

main kitchen

BUILDING KEY DIAGRAM

restaurant SCHOOL

auditorium art

classroom RESTAURANT

culinary business bu sin es s culinary

GALLERY

art

RESTAURANT

Create Programmatic Anchors

art art

N 3rd Street

SCHOOL

culinary business

N 4th Street

Standard Program

gallery

bu sin e

site plan

ss

culinary

GALLERY

SCHOOL

Relink Program Anchors

classroom culinary business

art

RESTAURANT

bu sin e culinary

Reinforce Programmatic Overlap

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art

ss GALLERY

classroom studios instructional kitchen reading room/pinup space

plans

view from classroom

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Upper West Side Residence

w/ workshop/apd

Location: New York, NY Size: 1,200 sq.ft. Year: 2010 Status: Built

Program: The firm was commissioned to design a pied-a-terre that would serves as an urban vacation home for the clients. The main focus of the design was flexibility: the apartment had to successfully function as normal living space while capable of converting into a space that would allow for parties and show off their art collection. Design Approach: The project had two defining parameters that defined the design: a tight slab to slab ceiling condition, and a limited scope of work. The few walls that were removed maximized the apartment’s ability to expand its public areas in what was a limited space. This design approach coupled with pocketing doors and convertible furniture allowed the apartment to flow freely from space to space, accomodating the viewing of artwork and the mingling of guests. The project’s scope demanded the need for the high customization of millwork and specific detaling. Interlaced ceiling millwork panels allowed for the installation of lighting in a low ceiling while providing a sense of continuity and focus for the apartment.

entrance ceiling

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rendering of dining room

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custom doors

guest bathroom

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master bathroom

construction plan

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URBANbuild Macro Location: New Orleans, LA Size: N/A Year: 2006 Status: Unbuilt - Academic

LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

Program: To create a framework for the redevelopment of New Orleans post Hurricane Katrina. Theoretical Overview: In post Katrina New Orleans, hard lessons can be learned. Even though continuing the development patterns of the past 100 years is looked favorably upon by many, Katrina provided the opportunity to create a new model by relocating to higher, dryer, ground. In order to facilitate this, a strategy which adopts and adapts contextual artifacts as means for future design is implemented. These artifacts affirm the city’s relationship with its geographical, cultural, and historical roots while allowing for a sustainable future. The new framework centers around a “cut and fill” strategy that relocates the population from low lying areas to higher ground while maintaining overall density levels. This shift requires higher density on the remaining lots, forcing the creation of a new typology. These new city blocks are structured around the historical lot sizes and existing urban fabric, infusing them with immediate relevance. The resulting neighborhood model has the capability of rolling out city wide.

CENTRAL CITY MISSISSIPPI RIVER

map of New Orleans showing flooding during Katrina

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TOPOGRAPHICAL LAYERS

60% 40% 0%

CONTEXTUAL MAPPINGS

Nexus Circumferential Radial Transitional Residential

block key

Industrial Commercial Transitional Residential

generated block development key

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Explorations Location: Varies Size: Varies Year: Ongoing Status: Varies

Overview: These exercises provide an outlet for creative pursuit while informing on my own architectural understanding. Whether it is at the scale of product design or building a house, these explorations have greatly impacted my architecture persective and knowledge craft. Through my own development of craft, I can hope to create gesamkunstwerks, where a project is integrated at all levels of design.

2. Prototype 1 for URBANbuild, student design/build program

1. Chair Design - completed during Cornell Study Abroad. Involved abetter understanding of human proportions and resolution with constructability. 2. URBANbuild Prototype 1 - Post Katrina student design/build program developing affordable housing solutions for the Gulf coast area. Involved in construction, from foundation to trim out. 3. Coffee Table - creative exercise to create an object that pairs masculine materiality with feminine imagery through the means of 3d software and fabrication. 4. Vase - creative exercise to create a vase whose form gives it flexibility to be used as both a singular flower vase or mutliple.

1. chair design

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3. Cherry Blossom Steel Coffee Table

4. vase design

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Architecture Portfolio  

Professional and Academic Architecture portfolio

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