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VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — A3

VictoriaAdvocate.com

N AT I O N / W O R L D

PAGE DESIGNER: JESSICA RODRIGO, JRODRIGO@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

IN BRIEF Egypt’s president to visit Iran, a first in decades CAIRO – Egypt’s President Mohammed Morsi will attend a summit in Iran later this month, a presidential official said on Saturday, the first such trip for an Egyptian leader since relations with Tehran deteriorated decades ago. The visit could mark a thaw between the two countries after years of enmity, especially since Egypt signed its 1979 peace treaty with Israel and Iran underwent its Islamic revolution. Under Morsi’s predecessor Hosni Mubarak, Egypt, predominantly Sunni Muslim, sided with Saudi Arabia and other Sunni-dominated Arab states in trying to isolate Shiite-led Iran.

Police release video in Ark. patrol car shooting LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Police video recorded the night a young man was fatally shot in a northeast Arkansas patrol car while his hands were cuffed behind his back hasn’t resolved questions about whether he shot himself in the head as officers said. Jonesboro police released footage to news organizations. They released more footage Friday amid questions about why the first batch of video appeared to end before the officers found Chavis Carter, 21, slumped over and bleeding in the back of a patrol car on July 28 as described in a police report. Police have said officers frisked Carter twice without finding a gun. COMPILED FROM ADVOCATE WIRE REPORTS

CAMPAIGN TRAIL

Obama, Romney vie for undecided voters WASHINGTON (AP) – Rushing toward their party conventions, the rival presidential campaigns are trying to invigorate core supporters while reaching out to a sliver of undecided voters who harbor doubts about President Barack Obama yet aren’t sold on Republican Mitt Romney. In the past week, the campaigns have engaged in a vigorous debate over Medicare, pushing aside the economy and jobs, for the moment. Romney has charged Obama with running a campaign based on hatred, Obama has renewed a fight over Romney’s tax returns, and the issue of government spending has blossomed again. These are the August seeds that candidates are planting with fence-sitting voters even as the campaigns try to get backers excited in time for the conventions. Republicans will gather in Tampa, Fla., in a week, and Democrats will be in Charlotte, N.C., in the first days of September.

Romney’s selection of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as a running mate gave supporters extra motivation beyond their deep-seated antipathy toward Obama. In calling out Obama as a divisive, angry campaigner, Romney stoked Republicans’ dislike of the incumbent and tried to cut into an Obama advantage, his likability even among voters who take a dim view of his policies or his performance as president. At one point, Romney urged Obama to “take your campaign of division and anger and hate back to Chicago.” The Obama campaign said Romney’s remarks were “unhinged.” Obama dug in on his populist arguments, casting Ryan as the epitome of wrong-headed budget policies that will benefit the rich over the middle class. His campaign challenged Romney to prove his assertion that he had not paid less than 13 percent in taxes over a 10-year period.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama arrives at a campaign event Saturday in Windham, N.H., at Windham High School. The rival presidential campaigns are met with the challenge of rallying core supporters while engaging undecided voters who have yet to endorse either Obama or Republican challenger Mitt Romney. “They’re asking you to pay more in your taxes, not to reduce the deficit, or grow jobs, or invest in education, but to give another $250,000 tax cut to people making $3 million a year or more,” Obama

said. The tax rhetoric is a hit with the Obama faithful, but it is also designed to cast doubt among undecided voters who are seeking a reason to support Romney.

MIDDLE EAST

NATO, Taliban in war of words over Afghan civilian deaths KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) – A suicide bombing at a wedding, a deadly airstrike on a village, grenades in a mosque – hundreds of Afghan civilians are dying violently this summer, while the Taliban and the NATO coalition wage verbal warfare. A U.N. report says 1,145

civilians were killed and 1,954 others injured during the first half of the year, 80 percent of them by militants. But like other aspects of this decade-long war, facts are often obscured by perception and propaganda. That has left both sides locked in a battle of words,

crafted to win the Afghan public’s support. The foreign forces and Taliban fighters have been issuing dueling statements ever since the conflict began more than a decade ago. Civilian casualties are the latest focus of the information war. In a message ahead of Eid

al-Fitr, the feast that marks the end of Ramadan this weekend, Taliban leader Mullah Mohammad Omar instructed his fighters once again to avoid killing or wounding Afghan civilians. “Employ tactics that do not cause harm to the life and property of the common countrymen,” the one-eyed

chieftain of the insurgency said in an eight-page message released to news organizations. It came days after at least 50 people were killed in bombings and gun battles that erupted on either end of the country in the deadliest day of violence for civilians this year.

Shop Today, 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.

EUROPE

UK, Ecuador seek solution on WeikiLeaks founder LONDON (AP) – Britain is seeking an amicable solution with Ecuador to their diplomatic standoff over WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, a U.K. official insisted Saturday, as the secret-spiller prepared to make his first public statement since the Latin American nation confirmed it would offer him asylum. Assange, who took shelter in the Ecuadorian Embassy on June 19 after he exhausted all routes of appeal in the U.K. to avoid extradition to Sweden for questioning over sexual misconduct allegations, is scheduled to make a public statement Sunday. London diplomats have spoken with Ecuadorian Ambassador Ana Alban since the South American country granted Assange asylum on

Thursday, a move which threatens to further complicate Sweden’s two-year long attempt to have the activist extradited from Britain. British officials in Ecuador’s capital, Quito, have also contacted the country’s foreign ministry to discuss a resumption of talks over the case, and to quell anger prompted when Britain appeared to suggest it could invoke a little-known law to strip Ecuador’s embassy of diplomatic privileges – meaning police would be free to move in and detain Assange. Assange, an Australian, shot to international prominence in 2010 when his WikiLeaks website began publishing a huge trove of American diplomatic and military secrets.

©2012 Victoria Advocate Publishing Co. (USPS 658-920) Established May 8, 1846

Published every morning by Victoria Advocate Publishing Company, 311 E. Constitution St., Victoria, Texas 77901, P.O. Box 1518. Periodicals postage paid at Victoria, Texas. Member of the Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for republication of all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches.

DIRECTORY (Area Code 361)

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Outside Victoria City 3 months .. $45.00 3 months .. $48.00 6 months .. $86.00 6 months .. $92.00 1 year .... $160.00 1 year ........... $172.00 EZ-Pay Automatic EZ-Pay Automatic Charge $13.00/mo. Charge $14.00/mo.. Delivered by mail in the United States — 1 month, $29.30; 3 months, $87.92; 6 months, $175.84; 1 year, $351.68; EZ Pay Automatic Charge, $27.16 per month. POSTMASTER: Change of Address notice should be sent to P.O. Box 2393, Victoria, Texas 77902.

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A4 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

COVER STORY

PAGE DESIGNER: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@ VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: TONY BALANDRAN, TBALANDRAN@VICAD.COM

CATERPILLAR: Company officials pleased with business, community reception, local workforce TIMELINE

of Victoria’s Caterpillar plant: May 20, 2010: Caterpillar decides to pursue an excavator facility in the United States Aug. 12, 2010: Company announces plans to locate in Victoria Sept. 23, 2010: Victoria Economic Development Corp. hosts groundbreaking ceremony at Lone Tree Business Center April 7, 2011: Caterpillar officially breaks ground January 2012: First people move into building February 2012: Caterpillar hires first production employees June 2012: Company ships its first four machines Aug. 23, 2012: Company to host grand opening event SOURCES: CHRIS HEITZMANN, OF CATERPILLAR HUMAN RESOURCES, AND EVENT INVITATIONS

Want a Caterpillar job? There are two ways to apply. with JoinTeamCaterpillar.com and follow the application process. ■ Visit Workforce Solutions of the Golden Crescent, 120 S. Main St. or call them at 361-578-0341.

CONTINUED FROM A1 over the long run, which should support the work being done in Victoria.” The 336E excavator model – a 36-ton machine Jones said costs about $370,000 – is the only model in production but the plant will eventually produce seven total, ranging from 12 to 49 tons, Chris Heitzmann, Caterpillar’s human resources manager, said at a recent Victoria Chamber of Commerce luncheon. The first four machines were completed and shipped in June, Heitzmann said. Jones said the company would not say when other models would join the mix, but said Caterpillar was focused on a thoughtful and deliberate production ramp-up. Once fully up and running, he said it would take about three days, from start to finish, to complete a machine. Caterpillar in August 2010 announced plans to locate its North American hydraulic excavator plant in Victoria. A ceremonial groundbreaking took place in September of that same year, while the company officially broke ground in April 2011. On Thursday, almost exactly two years after that initial

announcement, the company will host its grand opening event. Although the process moved along quickly, the company faced one minor obstacle when it came to erecting the walls. Walls could only be lifted when winds were less than 25 mph, Jones said, noting Caterpillar had to wait for acceptable days to continue the process along. Those walls made it up, however, and employees made their way into their home away from home. And, so far, Jones said it’s gone well. “We are very pleased with our reception into the community and our ability to participate in community activities,” he said. “Recruiting and hiring have been going extremely well and we are very pleased with our team and the local workforce.” As for the company’s corporate level, it isn’t all business. There’s a sense of humor there, too. When asked where Caterpillar’s Victoria plant fit into the company, Chief Corporate spokesman Jim Dugan’s response was simple. “From what I understand,” he said, “it fits in Texas.”

■ Register

Did you know ... CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY CATERPILLAR INC.

336E excavator engine C9

Victoria’s Caterpillar plant is doing its part to prepare for hurricanes and other natural disasters. The company has worked with the city’s Office of Emergency Management, while the corporate safety team makes sure it has emergency preparedness plans in place. The local plant also has numerous bathrooms on-site that act as Federal Emergency Management Agency shelters, in case the need to take cover arises. Caterpillar invests time and resources into supporting the communities it calls home. Since its inception in 1954, The Caterpillar Foundation, the company’s strategic philanthropy program, has contributed nearly $500 million. So far this year, Victoria’s facility has supported more than 25 local organizations and causes through financial donations, employee volunteers and contributions to United Way’s annual campaign. SOURCE: JOHN JONES, SITE MANAGER FOR VICTORIA’S CATERPILLAR PLANT

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY CATERPILLAR INC.

336E excavator cab


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — A5

VictoriaAdvocate.com

TEXAS

PAGE DESIGNER: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

Storms halt West Nile spraying DALLAS (AP) – Officials said they won’t spray by air for West Nile virus in Dallas County on Saturday night because of storms, but expect to resume the work Sunday evening. Storms interrupted aerial spraying on Thursday and Friday nights as well. Dallas County spokeswoman Maria Arita said they were able to spray about 88,000 acres with pesticide that targets mosquitoes on Friday night. The remaining 222,000 acres are expected to be sprayed Sunday evening. The virus spread by mosquitoes has left 10 dead and more than 200 sick in Dallas County, which is home to 2.5 million people and the city of Dallas. Officials say it will be a record year for West Nile virus, and about half of the United States’ cases are in Texas. The City of Dallas said in a news release that, on the recommendation of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials, a second round of spraying will be done in Dallas County on Monday and Tuesday nights. That round is meant to kill larvae that hatched since the first spraying event. At a Saturday news conference, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins asked people to pray for no rain and light winds Sunday through Tuesday evenings so that the planes could go up. Although commonplace in other major cities, the pesticide efforts have provoked a debate in the Dallas area between health officials trying to quell the disease risk and people concerned about insecticidal mist drifting down from above. The Environmental Protection Agency has said that the insecticide, Duet, poses no significant threat to humans or animals, though it is toxic to fish and other types of aquatic life.

CRIME VICTIM

Brazos County constable remembered Officer would sacrifice himself for others, mother says COLLEGE STATION (AP) – Compassionate. Humble. A good friend. A dedicated public servant. Those were some of the words that family and friends used during a funeral service Saturday to fondly remember a law enforcement officer who was among three people killed in a shootout near Texas A&M University. More than 3,000 people attended the service for Brazos County Constable Brian Bachmann at an arena on the A&M campus in College Station. Among those in attendance were law enforcement officers from across the state, including Lubbock in West Texas and Hidalgo County

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brazos County Sheriff Chris Kirk, left to right, gives a flag to Donna Bachmann as her daughter Caitlyn Bachmann looks on during the funeral service for her husband Brazos County Precinct 1 Constable Brian Bachmann at Reed Arena on the Texas A&M University Campus on Saturday in College Station, Texas. in South Texas. A choir of more than 80 people from Bachmann’s Methodist church in College Station sang during the service. “Brian would sacrifice himself for the benefit of others,

always,” his mother, Carmen Bachmann said as she stood on a stage above her son’s flag-draped coffin. Authorities say Bachmann was fatally shot Monday by Thomas Alton Caffall III.

The 41-year-old constable was trying to serve Caffall with a court summons for being two months behind on rent. Other officers fatally shot the 35-year-old Caffall. A bystander also was killed

in the shootout, and three police officers and a female bystander were wounded. Caffall’s family has said he was suffering from an unspecified mental illness and has stated, “It breaks our hearts his illness led to this.” During Saturday’s more than 21/2-hour-long service, the Rev. Tommy Myrick, a pastor at the constable’s church, said Bachmann hated serving evictions and when he would have to put someone out of their home, he would do whatever he could to find them a new one. “He would help them with property transport to a safe place and the thing is he didn’t have to do that,” Myrick said. “Brian was going to try and find that guy (Caffall) a place to live,” he said. “There’s no doubt in my mind when he stepped out of his car (on Monday he was) thinking, ‘Where will I find this guy a place to live?’”

ARREST

Odessa man suspected in shooting

ODESSA – Odessa police say a 24-year-old man has been arrested after a shooting left one person dead and two injured in a mall parking lot. Police say Braushlyon Richardson turned himself in at the police department Saturday. Police say an arrest warrant charges Richardson with murder. He was booked into Ector County Law Enforcement Center, where an official said an attorney was not yet listed for him. Police were on their way early Saturday to the Music City Mall because some people were refusing to leave a bar and grill when several 911 calls came in saying that shots had been fired in the parking lot.

National Cataract Awareness Month Early detection is key. Did you know that most people above age 65 are already experiencing some vision loss from cataracts? Preserve & protect your vision. Schedule your cataract evaluation today to learn about the advanced lens implant technology now available for cataract patients.

Schedule your cataract evaluation today:

Call 361-578-0234 107 James Coleman Dr. Victoria, TX 77904

www.VictoriaEyeCenter.com / /VictoriaEyeCenter


A6 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

NATIONAL CITIES

ACCUWEATHER 5-DAY FORECAST FOR VICTORIA ®

Tonight

Today

Partly sunny with a shower or t-storm Winds SSE at 4-8 mph.

Monday

A t-storm in spots early; patchy clouds

High 92

Low 70

RealFeel: 109 Precip chance: 55%

RealFeel: 71 Precip chance: 40%

Tuesday

A morning t-storm in spots; some sun

90

Wednesday

Intervals of clouds and sunshine

68

92

RealFeel: 97/65 Precip chance: 45%

69

Variable clouds with t-storms possible

93

RealFeel: 94/67 Precip chance: 5%

Thursday

Some sun with thunderstorms possible

68

93

RealFeel: 96/69 Precip chance: 35%

72

RealFeel: 101/76 Precip chance: 35%

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effective temperature based on eight weather factors.

LOCAL ALMANAC

LOCAL WEATHER

Statistics for Victoria through 6 p.m. yesterday.

Temperatures High/low ....................................................... 99/76 Normal high/low ......................................... 95/74 Record high ......................................... 104 in 2011 Record low ............................................. 65 in 1992 Peak wind ............................................ S at 18 mph

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather.com ©2012

WORLD CITIES

Map shows today’s forecasts. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

La Grange 90/68

Precipitation Yesterday ending 6 p.m. ........................... 0.00” Month to date ................................................ 1.09” Normal month to date .................................. 1.43” Last year month to date ............................ 0.00” Year to date ................................................ 20.37” Normal year to date .................................. 25.54” Last year to date .......................................... 7.60”

Hallettsville 93/69

Gonzales 93/70

El Campo 89/69

Cuero 94/70

Relative Humidity

Edna 92/70

Yesterday at noon ......................................... 49%

SUN & MOON Sunrise today .......................................... 6:59 a.m. Sunset today .......................................... 8:03 p.m. Moonrise today ...................................... 8:58 a.m. Moonset today ........................................ 9:12 p.m. Sunrise Monday ..................................... 7:00 a.m. Sunset Monday ...................................... 8:02 p.m. Moonrise Monday ............................... 10:00 a.m. Moonset Monday .................................... 9:51 p.m. First

Full

Last

New

Aug 24

Aug 31

Sep 8

Sep 15

UV INDEX TODAY 10 a.m. ............................... 5 ...................... Moderate Noon ................................... 8 ...................... Very High 2 p.m. ................................. 8 ...................... Very High The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

VICTORIA RAIN LOG Mon.

2012

2011

Avg.

Rec.

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Year

2.07 2.95 3.29 1.20 2.31 1.39 6.08 1.09 ------------20.37

3.17 0.39 0.96 0.03 1.58 0.90 0.57 0.45 1.02 2.53 0.13 1.35 13.08

2.52 2.08 2.77 2.82 5.19 4.46 4.18 2.85 4.16 4.64 3.24 2.31 41.22

11.87 (1934) 9.08 (1992) 11.61 (1997) 11.70 (1997) 14.66 (1993) 13.50 (2004) 20.34 (2007) 10.88 (1914) 19.05 (1978) 17.25 (1960) 16.14 (2004) 8.67 (1923) 73.70 (2004)

ALLERGEN COUNT Rate

Parts/ cubic meter

Mold...........................................Low.......................... 423 Grass..........................................Low................................1 Pigweed.....................................Low................................1

Port Lavaca 90/73 Refugio 93/74

Beeville 93/72

TODAY Hi/Lo/W 90/77/t 85/66/s 90/76/s 113/85/s 86/72/s 91/71/s 64/45/t 64/48/pc 97/76/s 91/77/t 76/58/t 78/64/s 67/57/c 90/63/s 93/71/t 68/56/pc 97/68/pc 73/57/t 64/52/pc 86/73/t 95/69/s 61/37/pc 75/56/s 79/66/s 80/63/t 94/79/s 88/75/pc

MONDAY Hi/Lo/W 89/76/t 78/60/c 89/77/s 113/84/s 87/66/t 93/70/pc 66/45/sh 64/49/pc 95/75/s 91/76/t 77/59/pc 76/63/t 69/52/pc 87/61/t 92/72/sh 69/56/pc 100/69/s 70/56/t 61/45/r 87/74/t 87/65/pc 67/40/pc 77/57/pc 80/69/s 81/63/t 93/79/s 88/75/pc

TEXAS WEATHER FORECAST YESTERDAY City Hi Lo Prec Abilene 89 72 0.02 Alice 103 75 Amarillo 94 67 Austin 92 75 0.38 Beaumont 88 73 0.87 Brownsville 96 78 Bryan/C.S. 89 80 T Corpus Christi 100 79 Dallas/FW 87 70 0.74 Dalhart 90 60

TODAY Hi/Lo/W 88/63/t 98/74/t 80/56/pc 94/67/t 90/70/t 93/77/t 90/70/t 95/74/t 88/67/t 80/55/pc

MONDAY Hi/Lo/W 89/64/s 93/71/pc 86/60/t 95/66/pc 89/69/c 90/77/t 91/68/pc 92/74/c 90/68/s 86/58/t

City Del Rio El Paso Galveston Houston Kerrville Kingsville Laredo Longview Lubbock Lufkin

YESTERDAY Hi Lo Prec 100 82 91 69 0.06 93 83 T 94 73 1.07 91 77 100 77 103 80 90 74 0.11 91 70 92 77 T

TODAY MONDAY Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W 92/74/c 97/68/pc 91/71/t 91/76/s 91/80/t 90/77/pc 92/75/t 92/75/pc 87/66/t 91/60/pc 96/74/t 91/74/c 99/79/pc 95/77/pc 88/64/t 87/64/s 83/57/pc 85/60/pc 91/69/t 90/65/s

Lake Texana Wind southeast 6-12 knots today. Waters mostly smooth. Visibility under 2 miles in a shower or thunderstorm. Lake Coleto Wind east-southeast 4-8 knots today. Waters mostly smooth. Visibility under 2 miles in a shower or thunderstorm.

Actual Normal Release Level (cfs) Level Canyon ............. 909.0 ............... 902.77 ............................ 64 Texana ............... 44.0 ................... 43.13 .............................. 0 Coleto ................. 98.5 ................. 96.26 .............................. 0 Travis ................ 681.0 ................ 637.10 .............................. 0 Port O’Connor water temperature ............................. 84° Port Aransas water temperature ................................ 87° Port Arthur water temperature .................................. 89°

Port O’Connor Tides High Today 9:20 a.m. 7:06 p.m. Mon. 7:59 a.m. 9:02 p.m.

Ht.(ft) Low 0.4 ft. 1:53 a.m. 0.5 ft. 12:50 p.m. 0.4 ft. 2:14 a.m. 0.5 ft. 1:52 p.m.

Ht.(ft) 0.1 ft. 0.2 ft. 0.2 ft.

MONDAY Hi/Lo/W 89/68/t 59/50/r 79/66/pc 81/62/t 86/68/t 81/66/pc 78/66/pc 88/72/t 76/61/pc 79/57/pc 74/56/c 84/56/t 77/56/pc 77/55/pc 65/48/sh 88/74/s 79/59/pc 87/73/t 83/55/s 104/89/s 88/62/pc

YESTERDAY City Hi Lo Prec Los Angeles 94 71 Miami 92 77 0.19 Milwaukee 76 55 Minneapolis 78 56 Nashville 84 65 New Orleans 88 74 0.35 New York 79 63 0.23 Oklahoma City 81 65 1.27 Omaha 66 54 0.11 Philadelphia 82 65 0.43 Phoenix 100 82 Pittsburgh 78 57 Raleigh 86 67 St. Louis 83 61 Salt Lake City 95 68 San Diego 86 72 San Francisco 68 58 T Seattle 71 58 Syracuse 74 57 Tampa 83 73 1.27 Wash., D.C. 86 69 0.15

TODAY Hi/Lo/W 87/67/pc 91/79/pc 74/58/pc 73/52/pc 84/62/pc 87/75/t 82/66/s 86/60/s 78/54/pc 84/65/pc 103/86/t 78/56/t 86/68/t 79/61/t 92/66/pc 77/69/pc 67/54/pc 75/55/pc 79/55/s 90/76/t 85/70/pc

MONDAY Hi/Lo/W 85/64/pc 91/79/pc 72/57/pc 76/58/pc 81/60/pc 86/74/t 79/66/t 89/63/s 83/53/s 79/66/t 105/86/t 76/55/c 83/65/t 82/61/pc 91/67/s 76/68/pc 67/54/pc 78/55/pc 77/57/c 91/76/t 82/70/t

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, prcp-precipitation, T-trace.

NATIONAL EXTREMES (FOR THE 48 CONTIGUOUS STATES) High 118° in Death Valley, Calif.

Low 30° in West Yellowstone, Mont.

NATIONAL WEATHER FORECAST

City Marfa McAllen Midland Orange Port Arthur Presidio San Angelo San Antonio Waco Wichita Falls

YESTERDAY Hi Lo Prec 81 64 102 79 90 70 0.03 88 73 0.14 88 73 0.87 88 70 0.16 87 72 0.07 99 78 83 74 0.14 95 69 0.32

TODAY MONDAY Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W 83/61/t 82/61/pc 98/78/t 95/77/t 84/63/t 89/65/pc 88/70/t 87/68/c 89/71/t 89/71/c 91/66/t 91/69/pc 85/63/t 90/62/pc 93/72/t 93/70/pc 89/68/t 90/68/s 87/63/pc 92/64/s

Cold Warm Stationary Precipitation Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

-10s

Offshore (Port Arthur to Port O’Connor) Inner Waters Wind south 6-12 knots today. Waves 1-3 feet. Thunderstorms. Water temperature: 89. Outer Waters Wind south 6-12 knots today. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility under 2 miles in a thunderstorm. Water temperature: 89. (Port Arthur to Port Brownsville) Inner Waters Wind southeast 8-16 knots today. Waves 2-4 feet. A thunderstorm. Water temperature: 87. Outer Waters Wind south 8-16 knots today. Waves 3-5 feet. A thunderstorm. Water temperature: 87.

TODAY Hi/Lo/W 86/66/pc 60/52/r 83/69/pc 84/65/pc 87/73/t 87/69/t 76/62/pc 90/74/t 75/58/pc 80/58/t 76/55/t 84/56/s 76/55/pc 77/58/pc 69/46/pc 88/74/s 77/58/t 91/72/t 79/56/pc 102/85/pc 82/63/t

Fronts

MARINE STATISTICS

Lake Forecast

Water temperatures Total............................................................................. 425

Palacios 91/72

92/70

Goliad 93/71

Lake Levels (As of 7 a.m. yesterday)

Victoria Allergy and Asthma Clinic

As of Friday, August 17

Victoria

Karnes City 94/72

YESTERDAY City Hi Lo Prec Acapulco 91 78 0.30 Amsterdam 90 66 Athens 99 75 Baghdad 111 82 Beijing 82 72 0.14 Berlin 81 55 Bogota 64 50 0.11 Buenos Aires 64 57 0.43 Cairo 97 77 Caracas 89 77 0.06 Chihuahua 87 63 T Copenhagen 79 59 0.02 Dublin 70 61 Geneva 88 59 Havana 91 75 0.12 Lima 65 59 Madrid 102 70 Mexico City 67 54 0.75 Montevideo 68 57 0.61 Panama 86 72 0.12 Paris 100 64 Santiago 64 34 Sao Paulo 77 61 Rio de Janeiro 77 66 Tegucigalpa 84 63 Tehran 97 79 Tokyo 88 78 0.72

YESTERDAY City Hi Lo Prec Albuquerque 93 63 Anchorage 62 46 Atlanta 87 69 0.08 Baltimore 84 64 0.06 Baton Rouge 87 70 0.72 Birmingham 85 71 0.34 Boston 74 65 0.04 Charleston, S.C.90 72 0.01 Chicago 77 53 Cincinnati 81 59 Cleveland 75 55 Denver 81 57 Des Moines 75 51 0.03 Detroit 76 52 Fairbanks 68 44 Honolulu 88 72 Indianapolis 78 54 Jacksonville 91 73 Kansas City 84 57 Las Vegas 100 81 Little Rock 79 70 0.20

-0s

Sunday, August 19, 2012 0s

10s

Yest.

20s

30s

40s

50s

60s

70s

80s

90s

100s

110s

AIR QUALITY CONDITIONS

River Stages (through 7 a.m. yesterday) Flood Stage

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

24-hr Change

Guadalupe Gonzales .............................. 31.0 ............ 11.22 ............... -0.11 Cuero ................................... 24.0 ............ 6.85 ............. -0.03 Victoria ................................ 21.0 ............ 5.02 ............. +0.01 Near Bloomington ............ 20.0 ............ 9.29 ............. -0.05 San Antonio Falls City .............................. 12.0 ............ 0.53 ............. -0.02 Goliad ................................... 25.0 ............ 2.56 ............. -0.05 Navidad Sublime ................................ 27.0 ............. 5.14 ............... none Speaks ................................ 24.0 ............ 2.67 ............. +0.01 Morales .............................. 29.0 ............ 6.52 ............. -0.06 Lavaca Edna ..................................... 21.0 ............ 5.04 ............... none Colorado Wharton ............................. 39.0 ............ 7.54 ............. -0.03 Bay City .............................. 44.0 ............. 2.13 ............. -0.06 La Grange ........................... 26.0 ............ 3.45 .............. -0.01

Source: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Yesterday: Ozone

Today’s forecast: Ozone

Good

Good

Air quality is considered satisfactory, and air pollution poses little or no risk.

Air quality is considered satisfactory, and air pollution poses little or no risk.

TROPICAL STORM REPORT

Gordon will begin to weaken slowly on Sunday as it approaches the Azores from the southwest. Gordon will then weaken further as it moves east of the Azores and toward Portugal early next week. Tropical Rainstorm Helene will bring heavy rainfall to northeastern Mexico on Sunday and Sunday night as it continues to weaken over land. A tropical wave in the Atlantic could develop in the coming days.

WEATHER HISTORY After dumping 2.6 inches of rain on Cape Hatteras, N.C., the day before, Hurricane Bob moved northnortheastward on Aug. 19, 1991. The storm ripped through eastern New England during the afternoon.

COVER STORY

PAGE DESIGNER: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@ VICAD.COM.; COPY EDITOR: TONY BALANDRAN, TBALANDRAN@VICAD.COM

COLETO CREEK: School district could earn about $3.7M from plant and the county about $2.2M CONTINUED FROM A1 “Normally, you have to have everything in place by Oct. 1 – budget adopted and tax rate set,” Bowman said. “So I have to understand what the rules are going to be in calculating an effective tax rate – how that is done with a situation like this. I don’t have experience with that. No one in the county does … And the school has a tighter deadline because their budget year starts Sept. 1.” He also said he did not know how expensive a legal battle will be for the county. The company filed the petition in the 135th Judicial Court on Thursday, according to Danni Sabota, a company spokeswoman. “We felt that the original

valuation of the property was much higher than any other coal plant in the state and we wanted to work with the appraisal district to negotiate what we felt was a more applicable value for the tax base,” Sabota said. “We hope that we can come to an agreement before we go to trial.” Sabota said the Goliad County Appraisal District has three weeks to reply to the petition. In the annual Appraisal District appraisal notices, the plant was originally valued at $355.3 million, said Pat Brenna, the county's chief appraiser. The appraisal work was conducted by Pritchard & Abbott Inc., a Fort Worth valuation and consultant company. But the power plant had its

own appraisal conducted. Duff & Phelps, a Chicago-based investment management firm, set the value at $200 million. After the power company contested the county's valuation, the Appraisal Review Board lowered the value of the plant $26.7 million to $328.6 million on June 20. From there, the company had until Saturday to protest in court. Bowman said he did not know how the county plans to handle the situation. “We have to have some time to work on that and try to figure out what the best approach is going to be,” Bowman said. “This is a new experience for all of us.” His first step, he said, would be to get a copy of the petition on Monday.

PETROLEUM INDUSTRY

Decades after oil bust, West Texas’ Permian Basin sees boom again MIDLAND (AP) – Nearly three decades ago, Texas Monthly ran a post mortem on the Texas oil industry with headline reading “So long, it was fun while it lasted,” and a forlorn James Dean figure hitchhiking out of town. Back then, few would have questioned such a dire assessment, as the mother of all busts was destroying the West Texas banking industry, making oil barons into car salesmen, and turning parts of Midland and Odessa into junkyards of rusting equipment. Triggered by an oil glut that caused a relentless price decline, the crash of ’82, and the long depression that followed chased most of the industry majors out of the Permian Basin and an entire generation of oil field workers into other livelihoods. “In 1983, they thought the oil industry in Texas was done,” said Doug Robison, president of the Permian Basin Petroleum Association, who keeps a worn copy of the July 1983 magazine in his office.

But, as the saying goes, the obituary proved a trifle premature. As anyone who has tried to rent a house, navigate traffic or lease drilling equipment around here knows, the good times are rolling again. A strong demand for oil coupled with refined hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling techniques are tapping long untouchable, deep reserves. What began a decade ago as a modest revival is now a full-fledged boom. The play extends across hundreds of square miles of West Texas

and into New Mexico. The price of oil is hovering around $90 a barrel down from a peak over $110 this spring. But because of fundamental changes in how oil is being extracted, some doubt that a drop to $60 or $70 a barrel will kill the boom. There are now more than 155,000 producing wells, generating revenue and requiring service for years to come. “It’s unbelievable. This has 50 years worth of life. They’ll be redrilling the entire Permian Basin,” said Jim Smitherman, a Midland bank official.

Using the $328.6 million valuation and the current tax rates, the school district could earn about $3.7 million from the plant and the county

about $2.2 million. Though the Goliad School District is hoping to give staff members a 2-percent raise this year, Superintendent

Christy Paulsgrove said in an earlier interview that if Coleto Creek contests its value, the district may have to layoff employees or cut programs.


S E C T I O N

Obituaries, B2 Ed u c a t i o n , B 3 - 4 Crossroads, B5-6

B

CROSSROADS

Victoria Advocate, VictoriaAdvocate.com• Sunday, August 19, 2012

SCHOOL SPIRIT

GOVERNMENT CATY HIRST/ CHIRST@VICAD.COM

‘What we do’

The trash compactor in Goliad County Precinct 3 has been closed since Aug. 1, the day after the runoff election. Commissioner Jim Kreneck said a part is broken, but some residents suspect retribution from the commissioner.

Some think Goliad trash compactor is political pawn BY CATY HIRST

CHIRST@VICAD.COM

PHOTOS BY MORGAN WALKER/MWALKER@VICAD.COM

Anna-Ashley Spence laughs with her fellow cheerleaders during Unleash the Beast on Saturday evening at Memorial Stadium.

Victoria East parents, students show off school’s diversity BY CATY HIRST

CHIRST@VICAD.COM

Victoria East senior Dinah Retiz started her high school career at East by running through the tunnel at Unleash the Beast. And that’s how she is going to end it. “It is my third year to go through the tunnel, and I hope we can all cherish it,” she said. “All the parents are so proud of what the kids are doing. It is just a great feeling – I don’t have any words to express it. My smile is going to be huge, and I’m probably going to cry.” Retiz, captain of the Ballet Folklorico squad, a traditional Mexican dance group, said Unleash the Beast is the perfect way to start the school year.

SEE TITANS, B6

Residents of Goliad County in Precinct 3 haven’t been able to use the local trash compactor for almost three weeks. Instead, they are driving 14 miles into Goliad to dump their trash there or they burn it. Jim Kreneck, county commissioner, said the compactor in Weesatche is closed because the safety switch on the local trash compactor, bought in 2001, is broken. Some residents, however, such as Vickie Borgfeld, suspect Kreneck is punishing the precinct after he lost the runoff election on July 31 against Ronald Bailey. “It’s never broken before, and now it’s broken the day after the election. It is just weird, the timeline,” she said. She said Kreneck told residents before the election he would close the trash compactor if he lost the race. Kreneck said that is not true, and he cannot open the compactor until the safety switch is fixed. “I’ve had some ask when it is going to be open, and I’ve told them as soon as I get the parts and can reopen it,” Kreneck said. “I can’t open it in an unsafe condition. Goliad

Dinah Retiz, captain of the Ballet Folklorico squad, dances during Unleash the Beast.

SEE TRASH, B5

PUBLIC SAFETY

Police work to scratch out auto theft Officers, volunteers etch identification numbers, enroll people in auto theft prevention program BY CATY HIRST

CHIRST@VICAD.COM

Dozens waited in line Saturday in their air-conditioned cars, playing with the radio, texting and chatting as they inched their way closer to the front. Waiting on them were Victoria police officers and volunteers, armed with stickers and acid pens, ready to thief-proof their cars. The task force against auto theft worked nonstop to etch Vehicle Iden-

CONSTRUCTION

tification Numbers and enroll people in H.E.A.T. – a statewide program to prevent auto theft. “Anytime people enroll their vehicle in these programs, the car becomes so much less desirable for a thief. It becomes so much trouble, the money they are able to make off the vehicle is drastically reduced,” said Chris Guerra, crime prevention officer with the Victoria Police Department. “So in most cases, they will just leave the vehicle alone and find an easier target because there will always be an easier target.” Debbie Nitschmann, of Victoria, said she has never had her car stolen and she intends to keep it that way. “For safety, with all the crime nowadays, it is best to keep yourself cov-

CATY HIRST/ CHIRST@VICAD.COM

Chris Guerra, crime prevention officer for the Victoria Police Department, uses a template and acid to etch the VINs on car windows at Parkway Church. The event was Saturday. The process took about 15 minutes and is designed to deter thieves from stealing the vehicle.

MISSED SATURDAY’S EVENT?

Call the Crime Prevention Unit at 361-485-3803 and schedule a free appointment.

ered and protected,” she said. “I think it is great they are doing this.” Though the event didn’t start until 9 a.m., cars were lined up in the Parkway Church parking lot by 8:30 a.m., Guerra said. VIN etching on every window of a car makes it more expensive and harder to remove the VIN from a stolen vehicle. It also deters thieves from stealing

LOTTERY POWERBALL 14-26-41-55-59, PB: 1 --------------------

LOTTO TEXAS 8-19-22-32-37-41 -------------------

CASH 5 9-11-16-26-33 -------------------

PICK 3 DAY 2-1-4

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PICK 3 NIGHT 9-6-8

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DAILY 4 DAY 3-0-3-0

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DAILY 4 NIGHT 7-3-6-5

SEE VIN, B5

LOCAL NEWS

Two fire reports yield no injuries Two reports of fires Saturday kept rescue workers busy, but neither event caused any injuries or significant damage. Victoria firefighters responded to a call at 9:15 a.m. Friday at Jim’s Big Burger on Glascow Street. The caller said smoke was coming from the air conditioning unit. Capt. Adam Luther said the smoke was from a malfunctioning unit. No fire was discovered. At 8:13 p.m., the Victoria County Fire Marshal responded to a call about a possible electrical fire at a home in the 100 block of Bobbie Circle Drive. An official said an extenstion cord shorted and caused damage to a wall outlet. No fire was discovered.

NOMINATION

Tell us about your favorite veterinarian The Magazine of the Golden Crescent is accepting nominations for the December issue for Top 5 Veterinarians. Do you have a veterinarian who has done wonders with Marley, Tuck or Dolly? Tell us about an experience you’ve had with your pet and veterinarian in a letter (not more than one page) detailing what makes your nominee one of the top veterinarians in the Golden Crescent. Email it to gc@vicad.com or mail to: Jessica Rodrigo/ GC Top 5 Victoria Advocate 311 E. Constitution Victoria, TX 77901 Be sure to include the nominee’s name, address, telephone number and email address. The nomination deadline is Friday, Sept. 14.

LOCAL EDITOR: BECKY COOPER, BCOOPER@VICAD.COM, PRESENTATION EDITOR: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@VICAD.COM, PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ERIC JENSEN, EJENSEN@VICAD.COM


B2 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

OBITUARIES

OBITUARIES COORDINATOR: ADRIANA MARTINEZ, AMARTINEZ@VICAD.COM

TODAY’S SERVICES ARNECKE, HERMINE HARMS, 99, of Goliad: Funeral service 2 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, interment following at St. Andrew’s Cemetery, Finch Funeral Chapel, Yorktown, 361564-2277. BLUDAU, BRENDA J., 52, of Katy: Visitation 7 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at Kubena Funeral Home, funeral Mass 2 p.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic Church of Hallettsville, burial at Sacred Heart Catholic Cemetery, Kubena Funeral Home, 361-798-3271. BRAM, EMIL "JACK", 94, of Danevang: Visitation 2 - 6 p.m. at Triska Funeral Home, 979-543-3681. GRASMUCK, ALBINA, 94, of Bay City: Rosary 5 p.m. at Taylor Bros. Funeral Home, 979-245-4613. MEISMER, GLENDA CAROL BUTLER, 63, of La Grange: Visitation 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. with family receiving 5 - 7 p.m. and Rosary at 7 p.m. at Koenig & Strickland Funeral Home, 979-968-3121. ORTIZ, ALFRED QUIROZ SR., 92, of Victoria: Visitation 4 - 6 p.m. with Rosary at 6 p.m. at Rosewood Funeral Chapels, 361-573-4546. PILZNER, GREG, 59, of Yoakum: Funeral service 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church, burial at St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Thiele-Cooper Funeral Home, 361-293-5656. PUENTE, ALFONSO "PONCHO", 76, of Karnes City: Rosary 7 p.m. at Eckols Funeral Home, 830-583-2533. RAMIREZ, CONCHA CONCEPCION, 84, of Houston: Visitation at Eckols Funeral Home, 830-583-2533. SMITH, ELISE P., 90, of Smiley: Visitation 5 - 8 p.m. at Finch Funeral Chapel, Nixon, 830-582-1521.

VLASTA H. REYBURN YOAKUM - Vlasta Hrabovsky Reyburn, age 83 formerly of Victoria and Yoakum, passed away on Friday, August 17, 2012. She was born on October 17, 1928 in DeWitt County, Texas to Louis and Annie Orsak Hrabovsky. She was retired and was a Catholic. She was a member of the Catholic Daughter’s. Survivors: brothers, Robert Hrabovsky of Yoakum and Leon (Sandra) Hrabovsky of Daphne, Alabama along with many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by: parents; husband, W. H. (Sam) Reyburn; sisters, Leona Hrabovsky and Mildred Hrabovsky Arnold and a brother, Willie Hrabovsky. Rosary on Monday at 9:30 a.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Yoakum followed by a 10 a.m. funeral mass with Rev. Matthew Huehlefeld officiating. Burial at St. Ann’s Catholic Cemetery. Pallbearers: Michael Hrabovsky, Brian Hrabovsky, Steven Hrabovsky and James Hrabovsky. On-line guest book may be signed at www.thielecooper.com Arrangements by Thiele-Cooper Funeral Home 361-293-5656.

Ex-county commissioner pleads guilty in drug case EL PASO (AP) – A former El Paso County commissioner has pleaded guilty to drug charges in a federal drug trafficking case. Willie Gandara Jr. pleaded guilty in federal court in El Paso to drug trafficking conspiracy and using a property for marijuana manufacturing. Gandara faces up to 20 years in prison on each count when he’s sentenced Nov. 14. He and associate Juan Canales were arrested in February. Prosecutors accused the pair of trying to smuggle 124 pounds of marijuana through a remote checkpoint in Sierra Blanca by hiding the drugs in Chicago-bound boxes of chili powder. Canales pleaded guilty last month to a drug conspiracy count. Gandara’s arrest prompted him to abandon a campaign for a seat in the Texas House.

DEATH NOTICES VICTORIA COUNTY TILLMAN, FLORENCE A. WHITE, 78, of Victoria, died Saturday, August 18, 2012. Arrangements are pending with Barefield Funeral Home, 361-557-6180. DEWITT COUNTY PULLIN, HOWARD, 69, of Cuero, died Saturday, August 18, 2012. Services pending with Freund Funeral Home, 361-275-2343. MATAGORDA COUNTY LOPEZ, ANGELINA VALDEZ, 59, of Bay City died Thursday, August 16, 2012. Taylor Bros. Funeral Home, 979-245-4613. ELSEWHERE BRAM, EMIL "JACK", 94, of Danevang, died Friday, August 17, 2012. Triska Funeral Home, 979-543-3681. KORTH. MICHAEL TODD "MIKE", 49, of Rockdale, died Wednesday, August 17, 2012. Phillips & Luckey Funeral Chapel, 979-542-3113. RAMIREZ, CONCHO CONCEPCION, 76, of Houston, died Thursday, August 16, 2012. Eckols Funeral Home, 830-583-2533. VERA, DARCELIA CORTINAS, 52, of Corpus Christi, died Thursday, August 16, 2012. Goliad Funeral Home, 361-645-1104.

DARCELIA CORTINAS VERA CORPUS CHRISTI - Darcelia Cortinas Vera of Corpus Christi passed away on Thursday, August 16, 2012 at the age of 52. She was born on August 30, 1959 to the late Adolfo Cortinas and Manuela Cortinas. She is survived by her mother and husband Ismael Vera. She was employed at Sunside Credit union. She went to school in Goliad, Texas. She was a member of St. Peters Catholic Church in Annaville, Tx. They didn’t have any children but had over 20 God Children. Visitation and Rosary will be on August 20,2012 at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Goliad, Tx. Mass will be celebrated on August 21, 2012 at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Goliad, Tx. Burial will follow at La Bahia Cemetery in Goliad. Goliad Funeral Home, 361-645-1104.

Ben Isaacs, oldest Pullman porter, dies THE LOS ANGELES TIMES (MCT)

For more than three decades, Ben Isaacs worked as a Pullman porter, one of the uniformed railway men who served first-class passengers traveling in luxurious sleeping cars – a much-coveted job for African-Americans between the 1870s and late 1960s. Isaacs, a charismatic centenarian who was believed to be the oldest surviving Pullman porter, died of kidney failure Wednesday at his home in Victorville, Calif., according to his brother, Andrew Isaacs. He was 107. Andrew Isaacs said his brother, who in his later years went blind, was hospitalized Aug. 10 and released a couple of days later. Born Sept. 8, 1904, in Kansas City, Kan., Ben Isaacs was one of five children of Breckenridge “B.R.” Isaacs, a butcher, and Cora, a school teacher and beautician. In Los Angeles, Isaacs found work as a chauffeur. But his life-changing plum assignment came in April 1936 when he began working as a Pullman porter, according to the Chicago-based Newberry Library, which keeps data on Pullman employees. The Pullman Palace Car Co. was most famous for developing the railroad sleeping car. The company primarily hired African-Americans, many of whom were elevated to middle-class status by their jobs.

WALTON "WALT" REYNOLDS VICTORIA - Walton "Walt" Reynolds, 72, of Victoria passed away Friday August 10, 2012. He was born on January 17, 1940 in Kenedy, Texas. He graduated from Pleasanton High school and Texas Vocational School in San Antonio in Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Controls. He served in the U.S. Army and worked for Citizens Medical Center for 28 years. He is survived by wife of 34 years Vivian Reynolds, sons David Reynolds and Kenneth Harris Jr. and daughter Janine Cook. Grand children Jason Matheny, Kelsey Cook, Tommy Robles, Patricia Salinas, Kenneth Harris, III, Justin Reynolds and Bret Reynolds. Great grand children Jaelynn Reynolds and Layla Reynolds. Brother Doug Reynolds, sister Jayne Baker and numerous nieces and nephews. As well as his Engineering Family at Citizens Medical Center. Memorial service and burial will be at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery in San Antonio, Texas Monday August 20, 2012, 2:30pm. Memorial donations can be made in Walt’s memory to the Warriors Weekend at warriorsweekend.org or the Dorothy H. O’Connor Pet Adoption Center at docpac.net.

CONCHA RAMIREZ HOUSTON Concha Concepcion Ramirez, 84, passed away, Thursday, August 16, 2012 in Houston, Texas . Concha was born, August 4, 1928, in Kenedy, Texas, the daughter of, Juan Diaz and Concepcion Garcia Diaz. She married, Bartolo P. Ramirez and was a loving mother and wife. She is preceded in death by her beloved husband; her parents; 1 daughter; 3 sisters and 4 brothers. Concha is survived by her 8 daughters and 4 sons. Visitation will be held, Sunday, August 19, 2012, at Eckols Funeral Home Chapel, Kenedy, Texas. Funeral mass will be celebrated at 2:00 P.M., Monday, August 20, 2012, at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Kenedy, with Rev. Norbert Herman officiating. Interment will follow in the Sacred Heart Cemetery.

NICHOLAS WAYNE STEPHENS VICTORIA - Nicholas Wayne Stephens, 60, of Victoria, passed away on Wednesday, August 15, 2012. Nick was born December 15th, 1951 to Ginny and Leonard Stephens in Fort Worth, Texas. It was here in his earliest years that he found friends that would stay close to him for the remainder of his life. He graduated from Coronado High School and later attended Texas Tech University where he became a devoted Red Raider, never missing a chance to hold his "Guns Up!" for the world to see. After college he completed physical therapy school at Texas Women’s University in Denton, Texas. In 1978 he moved to Victoria, Texas and began his career at DeTar Hospital with his long-time friend Jerry Brown. He went on to become the founder and medical director of Team Rehab Physical Therapy serving Victoria, Palacios and Port Lavaca, Texas for over 20 years. He devoted his life to helping others as a dedicated physical therapist that was well known, respected and tremendously loved by his community. Nick was at his happiest in Port O’ Connor, Texas on his boat in the deep blue water amongst friends and family waiting on the next big catch, drink in hand and listening to the music he loved. If he was not there he and his loving wife could be found singing and dancing anywhere from the sweet sounds of Austin to the New Orleans Jazz Fest. Nick was a man who loved all of life and had the unique ability to make those around him love it as well. He cared deeply for his children, always able to bring a smile to their faces and a laugh from their lips. He loved his wife with all of his heart and it was evident she held the key to his heart, always making him smile. He adored his two sisters and they were in absolute love with him. He loved his dog, Toby, both past and present. He was a loving and proud father, devoted husband, caring brother and a true friend. Best known for his piercing blue eyes, quick wit and sense of humor, charm, adventurous spirit and profound love for his friends and family, Nick was, simply put, one of a kind. Even in his final days, with a beloved friend and his family by his side, he had one last happy hour, smiled and tapped his foot to the beat of his beloved Stevie Ray Vaughn. He is preceded in death by his mother and father, Ginny and Leonard Stephens. He lovingly leaves behind his devoted wife Priscella Stephens, of Victoria; step-daughters, Adamiley Luna, Adriana Luna, and Briana Luna, all of Victoria, and Stephanie Depew of San Antonio; sons, Nicholas Adam Stephens of Houston, and Miles Wayne Stephens of College Station; sisters, Nancy Plemens of Dallas, and Carol Dorn of Carlsbad, New Mexico; grandson Nicholas Tate Stephens, and four step-grandchildren. Nick also leaves behind more friends than can be counted. Per his wishes there will not be a memorial service at this time. He wished that those who knew and loved him would gather together with smiles and laughs and raise a drink to celebrate the life that he lived. Soon, Daddy, your wish shall be granted. We love you deeply and miss you greatly. In lieu of the usual remembrances, please make donations in Nick’s name to the Memorial Medical Center Giving Tree, 815 N. Virginia, Port Lavaca, Texas 77979. Grace Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

ANGELINA VALDEZ LOPEZ ALFONSO "PONCHO" PUENTE KARNES CITY - Alfonso "Poncho" Puente, 76, passed away, Thursday, August 16, 2012. Poncho was born, April 17, 1936, in Kenedy, Texas, the son of the late Arnuflo Puente and Saragosa Puente. He was a retired water meter reader for the City of Karnes City. She is preceded in death by his parents and 3 brothers. Rosary will be held, Sunday, August 19, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. at Eckols Funeral Home Chapel, Kenedy, Texas. Funeral mass will be celebrated at 10:00 A.M., Monday, August 20, 2012, at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Kenedy, with Rev. Norbert Herman officiating. Interment will follow in the Sacred Heart Cemetery.

Family dog stricken while in airlines’ care HOUSTON (AP) – A dog returning to the United States with a soldier’s family was euthanized after suffering heat stroke in Houston while in the care of United Airlines. Rachel Estes said that she and her 5-year-old daughter were returning to North Carolina from South Korea, where her husband was completing a tour of duty. She says the family’s two cats arrived in Charlotte, N.C., a day after the family’s arrival, but their 14-pound terrier had to be euthanized at a veterinary clinic in Humble. The dog’s medical chart at Animal Emergency clinic Northeast in Humble showed the dog arrived collapsed in its carrier “tangled up in harness, and heat stroke.” United Airlines said it wasn’t responsible for the death.

BAY CITY - Angelina Valdez Lopez, 59, of Bay City passed away August 16, 2012 in Houston. She was born April 27, 1953, in Bay City to the late John Joe and Julia Rodriguez Valdez. Angelina was a life long resident of Bay City, worked for Bay City Independent School District, and was a member of Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church. She is survived by: her husband, Rogelio Lopez of Bay City; daughter, Lorraine Lopez of Bay City; son, Jaime Lopez of Bay City; two sisters, Corrina Cortez of Van Vleck and Mary Rose Cox of Bay City; four brothers, Jesse Valdez of Missouri City, John Joe Valdez Jr. of Bay City, Lorenzo Valdez Sr. of Bay City, and Guadalupe Valdez of Wharton. Angelina was preceded in death by: her parents, John Joe and Julia Rodriguez Valdez, and two sisters, Mary Guajardo and Mary Helen Paniagua. The Rosary will be recited at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 21, 2012 at Taylor Bros. Funeral Home. The Mass will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, August 22, 2012, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church with Father Gerry Cernoch officiating. Interment will follow at Cedarvale Cemetery in Bay City. Pallbearers will be John Joe Garay, Jonathan Jimenez, Victor Gusman, Lonnie Melchor, Mark Garza-Melchor, Enrique Lopez, Camerino Lopez Jr, and Joe Guajardo Jr. Honorary Pallbearers are all family, friends, and BCISD employees that worked with "Angie." Condolences may be shared with the family by visiting www.taylorbros.net. Arrangements are with Taylor Bros. Funeral Home, 979-245-4613

East Texas meat producer, US prosecutors settle LUFKIN (AP) – An East Texas meat producer and federal prosecutors have resolved a U.S. Agriculture Department investigation of mislabeled meat products. U.S. Attorney John Bales says John Soules Foods Inc., of Tyler, will tighten policies to comply with meat inspection laws and pay $392,000 to reimburse costs of a three-year investigation. No charges will be brought against the fajita processing

and marketing company. Bales said investigators found that in 2006-07, the company sold beef trimmings that had freezing problems to a broker as pet food. The company, however, didn’t change labels on the boxes and the broker violated an agreement by selling it to another broker who resold some meat to the Federal Bureau of Prisons for human consumption. Bales says there’s no evidence anyone became sick.

EMIL "JACK" BRAM DANEVANG - Emil "Jack" Bram, life-long resident of Danevang, passed away August 17, 2012 at the age of 94. He was born December 13, 1917 to the late Marius and Christine Christiansen Bram. He was a retired farmer and rancher. He is survived by his wife, Velma Gann Bram of Danevang; daughters Judy Cox and husband Jim of Victoria, Idelle Dukes and Gwen Perrin, both of Pearland; brother Elve Bram and wife Irene, sister-in-law Henrietta Bram, of El Campo; 5 grandchildren and 6 greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, daughter Rita Piwonka, sisters Johanna Saman and Clara Sifford; brothers Walter, Carl, Raymond, Otto, Clarence, Oscar, and Harry Bram. Visitation will begin 2:00 pm Sunday at Triska Funeral Home, with the family receiving friends 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. Funeral services will be 10:00 am Monday, August 20, 2012, at First Baptist Church with Rev. Rick DuBroc officiating. Interment will follow at Garden of Memories Cemetery. Serving as pallbearers are Gerald Foltyn, Wilbert Hansen, Clifton Bram, Walter Lilie, Jr., Emil Stepan and Brent Cerny. Honorary bearers are his grandchildren and greatgrandchildren, nephews and nieces, great-nephews and greatnieces, Art Janke, Edmond Holub, Eugene Krenek, Tim "Zeek" Zaskoda, Donald Roades. Memorial donations may be made to First Baptist Church of El Campo or Houston Hospice-El Campo. Words of Condolence may be left for the family at www.triskafuneralhome.com.


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — B3

VictoriaAdvocate.com

YOUR SCHOOLS Education reporter: CAROLINA ASTRAIN, 361-580-6578, castrainl@vicad.com

CUERO

UHV

New history, writing classes now offered Q:

I’d like to start taking classes at the University of Houston-Victoria this fall. Are there any new, interesting courses being offered? The University of Houston-Victoria has a variety of new class offerings for students this fall, ranging from courses about top trends like oil and gas to creative writing. Energy is a hot topic in the Crossroads region and around the world. To supplement this trend, the UHV School of Business Administration created an online graduate level class called “Accounting for Oil and Gas,” with an emphasis on accounting for costs incurred in the acquisition, exploration, development and production of oil and natural gas. This topic is so popular that KATY class is filling up WALTERSCHEIDT the COLLEGE Q&A fast. If you are interested in earning the new bachelor’s degree in creative writing offered by the UHV School of Arts & Sciences, there are a couple of writing classes that might interest you. All of the creative writing classes are taught by published authors. You can enroll in “Creative Nonfiction Writing” to learn about various forms of nonfiction such as memoir, reportage, new journalism and essay. Or take Reading for Writers, where you will develop the ability to better identify, characterize and understand the style and technique of significant prose and poetry writers. With the U.S. presidential election around the corner, people are buzzing about the government. “Introduction to Public Policy” will provide insight into how the government works and teach you about different policy-making institutions and processes, as well as different areas of public policy. If you’re a history buff, you can take Western Civilization to 1600 to learn about the people, ideas, events and major trends that happened from pre-history to 1600. Or take History of Mexico and trace the major developments in Mexican history from the pre-Colombian period to the present, as you evaluate Mexico’s place in the current global economy. Want to learn about Latin American culture? Do so by taking Latin American Literature and examine major works of contemporary Latin American authors. With all these new options, now you just have to get registered. If you’d like to attend UHV in the fall, it’s not too late. The fall semester starts Aug. 27. UHV has a continuous admission process, so there are no specific deadlines to meet. However, students interested in attending fall classes are encouraged to apply as soon as possible to allow time for processing and registration. For additional information about attending UHV, contact the Office of Admissions, at 361-570-4110 or admissions@uhv.edu.

A:

Do you have a question about the University of Houston-Victoria? Contact Katy Walterscheidt, UHV communications specialist, at 361- 570-4342 or at walterscheidtk@uhv.edu.

LOTS OF FISH IN THE SEA

CAROLINA ASTRAIN/CASTRAIN@VICAD.COM

Professional dog handler Roy Burris introduced incoming freshmen to his dog Wilson and demonstrated how the dog can easily detect alcohol and illegal drugs during Cuero High School’s Fish Camp.

Orientation helps new freshmen learn policies, make new friends

CAROLINA ASTRAIN/CASTRAIN@ VICAD.COM

While wearing drunk goggles, Kerstin Timpone, 14, gets into a go-cart with Sgt. Sam Saunders, with the Cuero Police Department, to experience what it’s like to drive while intoxicated at Cuero High School’s Fish Camp.

BY CAROLINA ASTRAIN CASTRAIN@VICAD.COM

CUERO – Teens dressed in a sea of green and blue tees amassed in the Cuero High School cafeteria Thursday morning. A total of 151 students showed up for their first day of Fish Camp, otherWHERE wise known as THE FISH freshmen orienARE FROM tation. This year, the fresh■ CUERO ISD: man class 145 broke the class ■ MEYERSVILLE: size record by 20 31 students ■ OUT OF THE with 175 stuAREA: 10 dents enrolled. ■ TOTAL In its seventh INCOMING year, the camp FRESHMAN: is designed to 175 get the new high school students acclimated to the school and policies, help them relax and meet new friends. “I remember being scared to death,” said Rhonda Patek, the camp’s coordinator, recalling her first day of high school. “By the second day of camp, the students will be a lot more at ease and you can tell that they’re ready for the start of the year.” The Cuero school district pays for the camp, said Michael Cavanaugh, Cuero High School principal. Students were split into groups, each group named by after different species of fish. Sloan Vaught, Courtney Clark and Jacob Helweg, all 14, were placed in the blue marlin group. “Watch out, don’t let a shark eat you,” said Jacob, as the students made their way to the first work-

CAROLINA ASTRAIN/ CASTRAIN@ VICAD.COM

Ryan Garcia, 14, and his team play a game of Gobbler Jeopardy at Cuero High School’s Fish Camp.

shop. Sloan and Courtney had just finished volleyball practice. Courtney wore a green sparkly headband and Sloan was dressed in a gray, long-sleeve jacket and ankle-length sweat pants. “Aren’t you hot in that?” Jacob teased. As the blue marlins settled into their first round of Gobbler Jeopardy, 17-year-old Kayla Hutchings sat against the wall whispering the answers to herself. Kayla, a junior, attended the camp to better familiarize herself with the school. Kayla moved to Cuero in June from

Mineral Wells, a city outside of Dallas. “I’m kind of shy,” Kayla said. “I don’t know a bunch of people here, but other than that, it’s not so bad.” Sitting a few feet away was Ryan Garcia, 14, who was getting into the game. “Cha-ching!” Ryan exclaimed after winning a few points. “I really want to win a lollipop.” Ryan, along with Jacob, just joined the freshmen football team. “I want to go far in football,” Ryan said. Next up was the drug dog workshop, where dog handler

Roy Burris introduced his dog, Wilson, to the freshmen class. One by one, Wilson detected and pointed out locations where Burris had hid small bottles of alcohol and a metal case of marijuana. “We have to invest into our kids, and prepare them for each stage of life,” said Ken McCarthy, a case manager at the Cuero school district. “Us being adults, we’ve already been down these roads, it’s our responsibility to teach them.” McCarthy spent the afternoon getting kids into line for the goggles test that simulated the effects of alcohol. They attempted to drive a go-cart while wearing the goggles. “I couldn’t put foot to foot,” 14-year-old Donovan Cardenes said. “My feet moved left to right and I kind of stumbled. I couldn’t walk straight at all.” Kids hit orange road cones with their go-carts while riding with Cuero Police Department officers. Cavanaugh said he had about 10 people from his staff working to get the freshmen acclimated to the Gobbler way. “I don’t want them going to school with a lump in their stomach,” Cavanaugh said. “It’s just something that has to be done.”

’s note

Star Student and Top Teacher are two new features on the Your Schools page that spotlight area teachers and students who stand out among their peers. We accept nominations from anyone affiliated with a school campus including fellow teachers, students, principals, staff, coaches, parents, etc. For more information or a nomination form, e-mail education reporter Kayla Bell at kbell@vicad.com.

Editor

HONORS, AWARDS VBEC spotlight business: Mid-Coast Family Services FROM A NEWS RELEASE

The Victoria Business and Education Coalition is recognizing businesses that have shown a commitment to volunteering in Victoria schools. Mid-Coast Family Services has been around since 1991 and has 65 contractors. The company provides services to victims of family violence, homelessness and substance abuse. This year their goal is to change to their primary funding contracts in the upcoming funding cycle. Mid-Coast Family Services explains why the organization wants to give back: Why do you feel it is important to be involved in our educational system? Education is the future. If we fail in our education system industry, innovation and social sectors are also affected. In what ways have you been a volunteer for the educational community? A daily presence in the Victoria school district as well as the surrounding counties. Mentoring, education, arts enrichment and service work have all been part of our experience.

Q: A: Q: A:

SPOTLIGHT MENTOR

VBEC honorary mentor: Marc Hinojosa FROM A NEWS RELEASE

The Victoria Business and Education Coalition is honoring mentors who donate their time to work with students in Victoria schools. This week’s spotlight mentor is Marc A. Hinojosa, an independent mentor of two students at Hopkins Academy. How long have you been a mentor for the district? Six years What made you decide to be a mentor? Hinojosa I was always involved with my children during their school days, so mentoring was a no-brainer. I guess I became familiar with the program at Hopkins Academy during my grandson’s years at the school. I was a regular visitor at the school at his lunch break, so I developed a rapport with his fellow students and the faculty.

Q: A: Q: A:

PRESENTATION EDITOR: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@VICAD.COM, PAGE DESIGNER: LUIS RENDON, LRENDON@VICAD.COM, COPY EDITOR: NICK ROGERS, NROGERS@VICAD.COM

Q: What do you feel you bring to the student? A: Children at these ages are so impressionable, so any positive influence works in their favor. Q: What do you enjoy most about mentoring? A: Working with children in any capacity is a rewarding experience. Reading is such a valuable tool and mentoring enhances that resource. What have you learned by the student, educational system, etc. that has enlightened you? Everyone wins through the mentoring experience. We, as mentors, provide support to our learning system and the kids reap the benefits for years to come.

Q: A:


B4 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

E D U C AT I O N

PAGE DESIGNER: JESSICA RODRIGO, JRODRIGO@VICAD.COM, COPY EDITOR: ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

DEWITT COUNTY

RECOGNITION

CISD hires new school resource officer

UHV alumnus works his way into medical school

FROM A NEWS RELEASE

Officer John White is the Cuero Police Department’s new school resource officer. White began his career as a law enforcement officer in 2002. “Safety of our students is my No. 1 priority. They need to feel safe on our campuses and safe in the classroom,” White said. School resource officers were introduced to Cuero school district initially through a collaboration between the Cuero Police Department and the school district in a 1999 US Department of Justice COPS Grant. In 2008 the CISD SMART Choices program, funded through a Safe Schools/Healthy Students federal grant, continued the collaboration and added a second SRO. As these funds have been phased out, an interlocal agreement between the two institutions continues the partnership, which provides

a safe school environment and law enforcement visibility throughout the district as a positive role model to deter crime and delinquency. White attended Victoria College Police Academy and was a patrol officer for Cuero Police Department until 2005. He received his SRO certification in Galveston through a rigorous curriculum provided through the state. He worked for the Victoria Police Department for five years as a school resource officer assigned to Mitchell Guidance Center campus. “I’m glad to be back,” he remarked. The department will hire a second school resource officer. One will be based at the high school and cover both the high school and junior high campuses. The other will work with the pre-kindergarten through sixth-grade campuses. “We want to be visible and

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Officer John White was named the Cuero Police Department’s new school resource officer on July 23. He worked for the Victoria Police Department for five years as a school resource officer assigned to Mitchell Guidance Center campus. specialized education pilot program to be launched in the Cuero school district in 2013-14. “I believe our CISD school resource officer has a posi-

be proactive in the community,” said Sgt. Sam Saunders, Community Services Division of the Cuero Police Department. He is also developing a

tive impact on our student body as he gets to know our kids and relates to them on a personal level,” said school district superintendent Jim Haley.

DEVELOPMENT

Job fair brings students, local businesses together FROM A NEWS RELEASE

University of Houston-Victoria students looking to earn supplemental income are invited to the university’s Part-Time Job Fair on Aug. 29. The job fair will be from 1-3 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room of University Center, 3007 N. Ben Wilson St. The event, organized by UHV Career Services, is free for students and employers. “Many of UHV’s new students are just moving to Victoria and are not familiar with the area,” said Amy Hatmaker, UHV Career Services specialist. Representatives from area retail, food service and media businesses, nonprofit organizations, and gov-

ernmental agencies, including UHV, will be at the fair looking for potential employees. Students are encouraged to dress appropriately and bring resumes. Job fair particiButschek pant Kenneth Butschek, owner of Liberty Tax Service, said he and other employers will be understanding of students’ school schedules and will work around them. “As a parent, I think grades are very important,” he said. The job fair was started in 2010 in

IF YOU GO:

FOR BUSINESSES

■ WHAT:

■ REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Aug. 27 ■ AMENITIES: Tables, electricity and

University of Houston-Victoria Part-Time Job Fair ■ WHEN: 1-3 p.m. Aug. 29 ■ WHERE: Multi-Purpose Room of University Center, 3007 N. Ben Wilson St. ■ COSTS: Free conjunction with the first UHV freshman class. With so many new students needing supplemental income and not enough jobs on campus for them, UHV started the job fair to bring together students and community business owners. With more than 14 companies already signed up and more expected,

Wi-Fi ■ PHONE: 361-570-4378 ■ EMAIL: hatmakera@uhv.edu ■ WEBSITE: myinterfase.com/uhv

/employer/home.aspx this year’s businesses offer a large variety for students. Some of the businesses scheduled to attend include AT&T, Boys & Girls Club of Victoria, H-E-B, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Ventura’s Tamales, Victoria Advocate, Victoria Television Group, YMCA and Walmart.

EXPANSION

UHV, Houston Community College extend partnership to benefit students FROM A NEWS RELEASE

A new agreement between the University of Houston-Victoria and Houston Community College will make it easier for students to earn an associate degree on their way to obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Starting this fall, HCC students who transfer to UHV can complete their associate degree by taking UHV courses. The same classes also will count toward earning a UHV bachelor’s degree. This marks the first reverse articulation agreement signed by UHV with a community college partner. “This agreement not only

strengthens the partnership between the University of Houston-Victoria and Houston Community College, but it also allows students to finish their associate degree either before or after transferring to UHV,” President Phil Castille said. “At the end of the day, both institutions want to make it easier for students to attend college and earn degrees. With classes in Greater Houston, Victoria and online, the pathway from HCC to UHV will be a seamless transition to allow students to earn an associate degree and bachelor’s degree.” HCC Northwest President

Zachary Hodges said he appreciates the partnership with UHV. “These types of partnerHodges ships are the future of higher education, and I am glad we are leading rather than following,” Hodges said. “Reverse articulation, sending classes back to allow students to finish their associate degree, is one more tool that will produce more graduates for the Houston area.”

FOR MORE INFO Fall classes at UHV begin Aug. 27. For more information about how to enroll, contact the UHV Office of Admissions at 361-570-4110 or admissions@uhv.edu. With more than 55,000 students, HCC is the fourth largest community college system in the United States. HCC offers two-year academic degrees, workforce certifications, continuing education classes, adult education classes and high school dual credit courses. UHV offers more than 60 bachelor’s and master’s de-

gree programs and concentrations in the arts and sciences, business administration, education and human development, and nursing fields. UHV will offer 11 classes for the first time this fall at the HCC Katy campus. The junior- and senior-level classes, along with one graduate class, will take place one afternoon or evening a week at HCC Northwest, 1550 Foxlake Drive, close to the Interstate 10 and Fry Road intersection. The courses are open to any UHV student, including HCC students who have been accepted into UHV.

‘I worked 70 hours a week... to help put me through college,’ former student says FROM A NEWS RELEASE

While studying at the University of Houston-Victoria, Brian Russ spent his nights as an emergency medical technician and his days poring over biology and chemistry books. This month, Russ, 22, began taking classes at Rocky Vista University Russ College of Osteopathic Medicine in Parker, Colo. He is studying to become an emergency room physician. Russ said the classes in biology and chemistry he took at UHV helped prepare him for medical school. He appreciated the convenience of online classes and having faculty and resources nearby at UH Sugar Land, where UHV offers many of the programs. “I don’t think I could have worked as much as I did if I attended any other university,” Russ said. “UHV did a great job preparing me for this. As a result, I think I may be ahead of some of my classmates.” Russ started out as a hospital volunteer when he was 16, and later worked as an emergency medical technician for four years at Memorial Hermann in Houston. “Sometimes, I worked 70 hours a week at the hospital to help put me through college,” Russ said. Russ said Richard Gunasekera, a UHV professor of biology and director of graduate biology programs, not only helped him in the classroom, but also wrote a recommendation letter for medical school for him. “A number of UHV faculty members assisted me in getting here,” Russ said. Jeffrey Di Leo, dean of the UHV School of Arts & Science, said he’s glad Russ was able to get started with medical school right away. “Brian clearly has a bright future ahead of him,” Di Leo said. “We are proud of what he has accomplished and are excited to follow his career.”

TRAINING

BACK-TO-SCHOOL

Math professor invites teachers to focus on fractions

HJM Elementary to host open house event for Pre-K through fifth grades

FROM A NEWS RELEASE

A free workshop for Victoria teachers on Friday will focus on how to help students learn and remember fractions. The program is open to kindergarten through sixth-grade teachers at public, private and home schools. Teachers are asked to bring scissors and markers. Barba Patton, a UHV associate professor of math education, will present interactive activities designed to help students understand

and remember fractions. Information also will be presented about how to avoid common fraction misconceptions. Patton Getting students to retain information about fractions has a number of state test and real life benefits, Patton said. For example, on the state math tests, fractions are embed-

IF YOU GO

R.S.V.P.

■ WHAT:

The “Motivation: Making Factions User Friendly” in-service training ■ WHEN: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Friday ■ WHERE: Alcorn Auditorium of UHV University West, 3007 N. Ben Wilson St.

Registration Deadline: 5 p.m. Thursday To RSVP or for more information, contact Barba Patton at pattonb@uhv.edu or 361-570-4263.

ded in 60 to 70 percent of the questions. While the test may not directly ask about a fraction, students need to know fractions to answer the questions correctly.

“Students will learn later in life that fractions are everywhere,” Patton said. “You use them for shopping, time, money, cooking, travel – the list goes on and on.”

FROM A NEWS RELEASE

HJM Elementary, 605 N. Commerce St., Port Lavaca, will host an open house from 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday for Pre-K through fifth grade students. Students will have an opportunity to meet their teacher and classmates. They will get to see their classroom, and parents

can ask the teacher questions about the first day of school. Other general information will be shared with parents on this evening. Parents are asked to report directly to their child’s homeroom. Classrooms will be posted on the evening of open house.


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — B5

VictoriaAdvocate.com

CROSSROADS

PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ERIC JENSEN, EJENSEN@VICAD.COM

ENTERTAINMENT

PUBLIC SAFETY

Nashville songwriting stars perform for charity Passing school buses ‘Prolific’ writers’ has consequences event will benefit Lion’s Club, Theatre Victoria, youth ranch BY CAMILLE M. DOTY CDOTY@VICAD.COM

Allen Shamblin has written his way into stardom in the music circuit. The 53-year-old Franklin, Tenn. resident moved from the Lone Star State to the Music City with $1,500 in his pocket and 14 songs under his belt. Victoria fans will have the chance to hear the story behind the melody in the Charity Concert Series at the Leo J. Welder Center on Thurs-

day. Shamblin will perform with fellow songwriters Mike Reid and Austin Cunningham. The former real estate appraiser decided to pursue his creative passion. “All my life, I had a love for words and music,” he said. Shamblin gained national notoriety in the songwriting community with Randy Travis’ version of “He Walked on Water.” The father of three has written songs recorded by Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. His most recent hit, “The House That Built Me,” was sung by platinum music jewel Miranda Lambert. Reid, a former NFL player with the Cincinnati Bengals

CHARITY CONCERT SERIES: NASHVILLE SONGWRITERS ■ Mike

Reid, Allen Shamblin, Austin Cunningham ■ When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday ■ Where: Leo J. Welder Center, 214 N. Main St., Victoria ■ How much: $25 ■ For more info: 361-570-8587 or online at theatrevictoria.org. turned songwriter will also perform at the concert. His credits include winning a Grammy award for Ronnie Milsap’s hit “Stranger in My House” and “Fallin’ For You for Years,” by Conway Twitty.

Cunningham, a Texas native, has penned more than 900 songs that have been recorded by artists such as Hank Williams Jr., and Martina McBride. Shamblin said the performance with fellow songwriters will be some down-home fun. “We’re going to tell the stories behind the songs and have a great time in music,” he said. Proceeds from the show benefit The Lion’s Club, Theatre Victoria and Bluebonnet Youth Ranch. Claud Jacobs, one of the Bluebonnet founders, said the audience is in for a treat. “These writers are prolific,” Jacobs said.

VIN: ‘Our goal is to prevent auto theft,’ detective says of event CATY HIRST/ CHIRST@VICAD.COM

Detectives with the auto theft task force for the Victoria Police Department use a template and acid to etch the VIN numbers on car windows.

CONTINUED FROM B1 cars for parts, because window glass is one of the biggest money makers at “chop shops,” Guerra said. The other program offered Saturday, Help End Auto Theft (H.E.A.T.), is sponsored by the Texas Department of Public Safety and helps officers identify stolen vehicles. Those enrolled have decals on their front and back windows, allowing officers to pull the vehicle over between 1 and 5 a.m., when most vehicles are stolen, to verify ownership. The department etched VINs on 73 cars and enrolled 63 cars in H.E.A.T. on Saturday. Officers at the free event said etching only costs about 6 cents a vehicle. Car dealerships, however, charge between $200 and $300 for VIN etching as an anti-theft pack-

age. Detective Adam Rodriguez with the motor vehicle theft and burglary task force said Saturday’s event is just one way the department is proactive about theft. “Our goal is to prevent auto theft by many different means,” he said “Etching VIN numbers lowers the chance of the vehicle being stolen. In the community of Victoria, we have a proactive auto theft division and thieves know that. So it keeps our numbers lower and theft is reduced.” The task force was named the Texas Automobile Burglary and Theft Prevention Authority Task Force of the year by the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles in July. The Victoria task force, which is funded by grants, has seen a 66-percent decrease in vehicles stolen

since the task force started in 1994. Scott Douglas, of Victoria, registered his car in the H.E.A.T. program and had his windows etched as a precaution against theft. “It provides a sense of community between the police and the citizens,” he said, waiting in the long line for his turn. “It is good to see tax dollars going to some good.” Guerra said the crime prevention unit also offers free etching by appointment, for those who missed Saturday’s event. Etching takes 10-15 minutes. “You are never going to curb the crime completely, as long as people fail to protect their vehicles,” Guerra said. “The more people that we can get to engage in these programs, the harder it will be for thieves to find their targets.”

TRASH: County judge has received dozens of calls CONTINUED FROM B1 County has another trash facility in Goliad, and residents can take their trash there.” County Judge David Bowman said his office has received dozens of calls about the closed compactor, but he has not looked into the situation. “It is up to him. A compactor is operated with funds out of his budget,” Bowman said. “It is like any other piece of equipment a commissioner would have, it is his prerogative on how he uses it.” Dr. Zena Trcka, of

Weesatche, said she believes the compactor is broken, but that Kreneck needs to focus on finding a solution. “I don’t think this is malicious, but something needs to be done regardless because it is important to the community,” she said. “There are widows and other people and they can’t be expected to burn their trash, and it is such a distance.” Kreneck said he has ordered the part, which keeps the compactor from operating when the door is open, from a company in Houston. He said the part is on back

TEXAS

Houston man gets prison for online prostitution HOUSTON (AP) – A Houston man has been sentenced to more than nine years in prison in a prostitution case involving hotels and online advertisements. A federal judge in Houston on Thursday sentenced 30-year-old Jerald Bland. Bland in January pleaded guilty to transportation of a woman for commercial sex. Prosecutors say Bland in 2010 transported the woman to Beaumont and to

Louisiana. Investigators used online ads and corresponding hotel records in several Louisiana cities, including New Orleans, Lake Charles, Lafayette and Baton Rouge. Several hotel employees recognized Bland and the woman as guests. Prosecutors say Bland kept all the money the woman earned. Further details on her were not immediately released.

order, but he is expecting it next week. “That machine is operated at my discretion,” Kreneck said. “That is not a mandated machine by Goliad County or by law. It was put in with my budget money, and I’m the sole operator of it.” Borgfeld said Kreneck has been a good commissioner, but fixing the compactor needs to be high on his list of priorities. “To me, win or lose, he still has a job to do,” Borgfeld said. “He is still collecting a paycheck and he needs to do the job to the best of his ability.”

Texan drowns in Oklahoma river BROKEN BOW, Okla. (AP) – The Oklahoma Lake Patrol says a Texas man has drowned while kayaking on the Mountain Fork River in southern Oklahoma. Troopers say 64-year-old Gary Burton of Quinlan, drowned in the river about three miles east of Broken Bow. Troopers say a witness reported seeing Burton’s kayak flip Thursday afternoon – then saw Burton swimming toward the kayak when he suddenly stopped swimming. Investigators say the witness was able to pull Burton to shore – but was unable to resuscitate him.

This week’s traffic law is found in The Texas Transportation Code, Sec.545.066. Passing a school bus; offense. (a) An operator on a highway, when approaching from either direction a school bus stopped on the highway to receive or discharge a student: (1) Shall stop before reaching the school bus when the bus is operating a visual signal as required by Section 547.701; and (2) May not proceed until: (A) The school bus resumes motion; (B) The operator is signaled by the bus driver to proceed; or (C) The visual signal is no longer actuated. (b) An operator on a highway having separate roadways is not required to stop: (1) For a school bus that is on a different roadway; or (2) If on a controlled-access highway, for a school bus that is stopped: (A) In a loading zone that is a part of or adjacent to the highway; and (B) Where pedestrians are not permitted to cross the roadway. (c) An offense under this section is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of not less than $200 or more than $1,000, except that the offense is: (1) a Class A misdemeanor if the person causes serious bodily injury to another; or (2) a state jail felony if the person has been previously convicted under Subdivision (1). (d) The court may order that the driver's license of a person convicted of a second or subsequent offense

under this section be suspended for not longer than six months beginning on the date of conviction. In this subsection, “driver’s license” has the meaning assigned by Chapter 521. (e) For the purposes of this section: (1) a highway is considered to have separate roadways only if the highway has roadways separated by an intervening space on which operation of vehicles is not permitted, a physical barrier, or a clearly indicated dividing section constructed to impede vehicular traffic; and (2) a highway is not considered to have separate roadways if the highway has roadways separated only by a left turn lane. Why the emphasis on this particular law? With the new school year quickly approaching us, it is time we remind ourselves of the traffic laws regarding school buses as well as other school zone issues. I will address more laws regarding school zones and school buses over the next few weeks. The Victoria Police Department Traffic Safety Unit reminds you to drive safe. The life you save may be your own. If you have a traffic law question, contact Senior Patrol Officer Zac De La Rosa, Victoria Police Department Traffic Safety Unit, 361-485-3700.


B6 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

CROSSROADS

PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ERIC JENSEN, EJENSEN@VICAD.COM

Ephron Shelton helps hold the blow up dome during Unleash the Beast on Saturday evening at Memorial Stadium. Because his wife is a vice president of one of the booster clubs at Victoria East High School, he offered to help with the festivities.

PHOTOS BY MORGAN WALKER/MWALKER@VICAD.COM

Dinah Retiz is escorted into Memorial Stadium by her fellow dance member, Jorge Perez, before Unleash the Beast.

Jorge Perez whispers a secret into Juhree Rodriguez ear while Dinah Retiz laughs. All are members of the Ballet Folklorico squad at Victoria East High School and performed at Unleash the Beast.

TITANS: Booster clubs started event to kick off the first year of Victoria East, principal says CONTINUED FROM B1 “I think it is very important because we get to show off everything Victoria East has, and we are proud of who we are and all that our school has,� Retiz said. Folklorico was just one of 24 student groups presented Saturday night to the community. Others included the hip hop club, dance team and journalism students. Mark Pullin, president of the football booster club, said about 200 parents volunteered to put the event together and they started working in June. “It is important for the kids because it gives the parents a chance to see all the clubs,� Pullin said. “Not everyone is an athelete or in the band. There are a lot of people that make East High function other than those groups, and it gives everyone a chance to display their kids and be a part of the whole excitement.� Principal Greg Crockett said the booster clubs started the event three years ago to kick-off the first year of Victoria East. “We had such a positive experience with the students, parents, the grand-

parents and the future Titans, we wanted to continue it for them,� Crockett said. The crowd, which filled half of Memorial Stadium, chanted “Unleash the Beast� with the students on the field, as Crockett marched in an authentic titan costume. Nicole Butler, a mother of two band members and one golf player at East, said it is exciting to see them all on the field together. “It helps us show that not only one sport is important, but they all are, and that we all support each other,� said Butler, vice president of the boys golf booster. Some groups also performed for the crowd, like the hip-hop club and Folklorico. Retiz said Unleash the Beast is an opportunity for her to share part of her culture with the community. “People can see what we can do and that it isn’t a regular club,� Retiz said. “We work out, we train, we go to workshops during the summer. It is like what football players, cheerleaders, what they are dong. I just want everyone to check out what we do and how we do it.�

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C2 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

BASEBALL

PAGE DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR: ALBERT ALVARADO, AALVARADO@VICAD.COM

MLB STANDINGS AND BOX SCORES

MLB ROUNDUP

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W 71 65 65 59 56

New York Tampa Bay Baltimore Boston Toronto

L 49 54 55 62 64

Pct GB .592 — .546 51/2 .542 6 .488 121/2 .467 15

1 /3 0 0 Veal Humber 1 1/3 0 0 Myers 1 4 4 Kansas City IP H R B.Chen W,9-10 6 5 2 K.Herrera H,15 1 1 0 1 Collins H,7 /3 2 2 2 /3 0 0 Crow H,14 L.Coleman 1 0 0 N.Jones pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. HBP—by Peavy (Butler).

0 0 1 0 0 1 4 0 0 ER BB SO 2 1 5 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1

Central Division W 65 64 54 53 50

Chicago Detroit Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota

L 54 56 65 66 68

Pct GB .546 — .533 11/2 .454 11 .445 12 .424 141/2

West Division W 69 63 62 56

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Texas Rangers' Nelson Cruz, right, celebrates after hitting a two-run home run against the Toronto Blue Jays in Toronto on Saturday.

Cruz homers, Nathan seals win over Toronto TORONTO – Nelson Cruz hit a two-run homer, Joe Nathan converted his team-record 22nd straight save opportunity and the Texas Rangers beat the Toronto Blue Jays 2-1 Saturday. Nathan broke the Rangers mark he shared with Francisco Cordero, who was successful on 21 chances in a row in 2004. Nathan was the sixth pitcher for Texas. Roy Oswalt started for Texas in place of Ryan Dempster, who missed his regular turn because of personal issues. Oswalt allowed one run and two hits in 4 2-3 innings, striking out five, walking two and balking twice in his first start since July 30. Robbie Ross worked 1 1-3 innings, Tanner Scheppers got an out, Michael Kirkman (1-2) escaped a bases-loaded jam in the seventh, Mike Adams pitched the eighth and Nathan closed it out for his 24th save in 25 chances. Toronto lost for the 15th time in 20 games despite limiting the AL West leaders, baseball’s highest scoring offense entering play Saturday, to five hits. The Blue Jays opened the scoring in the third when Anthony Gose drew a one-out walk, stole second, moved to third on a balk and came home as Adeiny Hechavarria singled through a drawn-in infield.

Hill, Young lead Diamondbacks over Astros HOUSTON – Aaron Hill hit a three-run homer in a nine-run fifth inning, Chris Young had four hits and the Arizona Diamondbacks routed the Houston Astros 12-4 on Saturday night.

Blue Jays

2 1

W: Kirkman; L: Villanueva; S: Nathan RECORDS: Texas 69-50; Toronto 56-64

Christopher Koeiman had the big blow in an eight-run first inning for the winners from Willemstad, Curacao with a three-run homer to center. Rallison Bentura added a two-run single, and

GB — 51/2 71/2 131/2

Friday’s Scores Detroit 5, Baltimore 3 N.Y. Yankees 6, Boston 4 Toronto 3, Texas 2 Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 2 Oakland 6, Cleveland 4 Tampa Bay 12, L.A. Angels 3 Seattle 5, Minnesota 3

Saturday’s Scores Texas 2, Toronto 1 Boston 4, N.Y. Yankees 1 Baltimore 3, Detroit 2 Kansas City 9, Chicago White Sox 4 Cleveland at Oakland, late Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, late Minnesota at Seattle, late

Sunday’s Games Baltimore (W.Chen 11-7) at Detroit (Fister 7-7), 12:05 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 13-7) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 7-10), 12:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-2) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3), 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 9-7) at L.A. Angels (Greinke 1-1), 2:35 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 9-10) at Oakland (J.Parker 7-7), 3:05 p.m. Minnesota (Deduno 4-0) at Seattle (Beavan 7-7), 3:10 p.m. Boston (Beckett 5-10) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 11-8), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Oakland, 9:05 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W 74 70 57 55 54

Washington Atlanta New York Philadelphia Miami

L 46 50 63 65 66

Pct GB .617 — .583 4 .475 17 .458 19 .450 20

Central Division W 73 66 65 54 47 39

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Houston

D-Backs

Astros

12 4

W: Corbin; L: Lyles RECORDS: Houston 39-82; Arizona 61-59 Young also drove in three runs and finished a triple shy of the cycle. Justin Upton added two hits for Arizona and Ryan Wheeler hit his first major league home run. Patrick Corbin (5-4) went seven innings, allowing four runs and seven hits with five strikeouts. Corbin has three straight wins in four outings since moving back into the rotation at the beginning of August. He has gone at least six innings in each of those starts. COMPILED FROM ADVOCATE WIRE REPORTS

Curacao, Conn., Mexico avoid elimination in South Williamsport

CURACAO 14, GERMANY 2

Pct .580 .534 .517 .467

Monday’s Games

Rangers

LLWS ROUNDUP

SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. – Kevin Oricoli finally has bragging rights over his big brother. Not many 12-year-old boys can say they hit a two-run single at the Little League World Series. Oricoli’s two-out clutch hit keyed a three-run third inning, and Matt Kubel silenced Nebraska’s bats to help Fairfield, Conn., avoid elimination Saturday at the Little League World Series with a 12-0 victory. Oricoli is savoring the moment – and not just because his team is one step closer to a Little League title. His 14-year-old brother, Jack, played on the Fairfield American All-Star team last year that lost in the regional semifinals. Egged on by his manager, Bill Meury, Oricoli didn’t waste an opportunity to talk smack following Saturday’s win after a reporter asked who was getting the last laugh in the Oricoli family.

L 50 55 58 64

Curacao also took advantage of four errors in the inning by the Europe region champions, comprised of children whose parents serve or work at the U.S. military installation in Germany. Justin Wilson and Kyle Glenn each had RBI singles for Germany in the third.

MEXICO 12, UGANDA 0 The first team from Africa to advance to the World Series in the 66-year history of the tournament received a baseball lesson from Mexico’s mini-mashers from Nuevo Laredo. Joel Turrubiates homered and drove in three runs for Mexico, which avoided elimination. The sluggers have hit eight homers in two games at the World Series.

NEW JERSEY 10, OREGON 4 A 13-year-old shortstop, Matti did his best impersonation of Yankees leadoff hitter Derek Jeter for the New Jersey team from the New York suburb of Parsippany. And New Jersey’s vocal fans chanted the names of each of their favorite sons as they strode to the plate as if they were Yankee Stadium “Bleacher Creatures.” COMPILED FROM ADVOCATE WIRE REPORTS

L 48 54 55 65 72 82

Pct GB .603 — .550 61/2 .542 71/2 .454 18 .395 25 .322 34

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

L 54 55 59 69 72

Pct GB .546 — .545 — .508 41/2 .430 14 .385 19

Friday’s Scores Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Cincinnati 7, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 4, L.A. Dodgers 3, 11 innings Arizona 3, Houston 1 Milwaukee 6, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1 Miami 6, Colorado 5 San Francisco 10, San Diego 1

Saturday’s Scores Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 3, 1st game St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 4 Arizona 12, Houston 4 N.Y. Mets 2, Washington 0 Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 7, 2nd game L.A. Dodgers 6, Atlanta 2 Philadelphia 4, Milwaukee 3 Miami at Colorado, late San Francisco at San Diego, late

Sunday’s Games Chicago Cubs (Volstad 0-9) at Cincinnati (Latos 10-3), 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 9-9) at Atlanta (Minor 6-9), 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Hefner 2-4) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 15-6), 12:35 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 10-10) at Houston (Galarraga 0-3), 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 5-9) at Milwaukee (Wolf 3-9), 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-3) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-4), 1:15 p.m. Miami (Jo.Johnson 7-9) at Colorado (D.Pomeranz 1-7), 2:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-6) at San Diego (Richard 9-12), 3:05 p.m.

Monday’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Colorado at N.Y. Mets, 6:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Miami at Arizona, 8:40 p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 9:05 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.

AL GAMES RANGERS 2, BLUE JAYS 1 Texas

Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 RDavis lf 5010 MiYong ss 3 0 0 0 Rasms cf 5000 Andrus ss 0 0 0 0 Encrnc dh 2000 Hamltn lf 4 0 0 0 Cooper 1b 4010 Beltre 3b 4 1 2 0 YEscor ss 4010 N.Cruz dh 3 1 1 2 McCoy 3b 0000 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b 3000 Morlnd 1b 3 0 2 0 Mathis c 4010 Gentry cf 3 0 0 0 Gose rf 3110 LMrtnz c 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr 3b-ss 3 0 2 1 LMartn ph 1000 Soto c 0000 Totals 30 2 5 2 Totals 33 1 7 1 Texas 000 020 000 — 2 Toronto 001 000 000 — 1 E—Jenkins (1). LOB—Texas 2, Toronto 10. 2B—Beltre (23), Hechavarria (2). HR—N.Cruz (19). SB—R.Davis (38), Gose (10). CS—Dav.Murphy (3), Gentry (6). S—Hechavarria. Texas IP H R ER BB SO Oswalt 4 2/3 2 1 1 2 5 R.Ross 1 1/3 3 0 0 0 3 1 /3 2 0 0 1 0 Scheppers H,3 2 /3 0 0 0 0 0 Kirkman W,1-2 H,2 Mi.Adams H,22 1 0 0 0 0 0 Nathan S,24-25 1 0 0 0 0 2 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO Villanueva L,6-3 6 1/3 4 2 2 1 4 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 Loup Jenkins 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 2 Oliver /3 0 0 0 0 0 Loup pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by Oswalt (Encarnacion). PB—Mathis. Balk—Oswalt 2.

ROYALS 9, WHITE SOX 4 Chicago

Kansas City h bi ab r h bi Wise cf 1 0 L.Cain cf 5010 Youkils 3b 1 0 AEscor ss 5340 A.Dunn 1b 2 2 AGordn lf 5231 Konerk dh 1 2 Butler dh 4233 Rios rf 0 0 Mostks 3b 4124 Viciedo lf 1 0 Francr rf 5000 AlRmrz ss 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4111 Flowrs c 1 0 B.Pena c 4010 Bckhm 2b 0 0 Giavtll 2b 4000 Totals 8 4 Totals 40 915 9 Chicago 000 002 020 — 4 Kansas City 102 011 04x — 9 E—Youkilis (9), Rios (5), Flowers (2), Beckham (6). DP—Chicago 1, Kansas City 1. LOB—Chicago 4, Kansas City 9. 2B—Wise (4), A.Dunn (15), A.Gordon (39). HR—A.Dunn (35), Konerko (20), Moustakas (19), Hosmer (11). SB—Wise (8), A.Escobar (24). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Peavy L,9-9 5 1/3 9 5 3 1 6 N.Jones 0 2 0 0 0 0 ab 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 34

r 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Baltimore

Detroit ab 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3

ab r h bi AJcksn cf 4120 Infante 2b 4010 MiCarr 3b 2120 Fielder 1b 2000 JhPerlt ss 4012 DYong dh 4010 Avila c 4000 JeBakr rf 3000 Boesch ph 1000 Dirks lf 301 0 Totals 32 3 8 3 Totals 31 2 8 2 Baltimore 000 000 300 — 3 Detroit 000 000 020 — 2 E—McLouth (1). DP—Baltimore 3, Detroit 1. LOB—Baltimore 3, Detroit 6. 2B—A.Jackson (21). HR—C.Davis (19). CS—Mar.Reynolds (3), Andino (5), Dirks (1). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO Britton W,2-1 7 6 0 0 3 5 Strop H,21 1 2 2 2 0 1 Ji.Johnson S,36-39 1 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Porcello L,9-8 6 7 3 3 1 6 Villarreal 1 0 0 0 0 2 Coke 1 1 0 0 0 1 Dotel 1 0 0 0 0 1 Porcello pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. HBP—by Strop (Mi.Cabrera). WP—Strop. Markks rf Hardy ss McLoth lf AdJons cf Wieters c C.Davis dh MrRynl 1b Machd 3b Andino 2b

r 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

h bi 20 00 00 10 10 23 10 00 10

RED SOX 4, YANKEES 1 Boston

New York ab 5 5 5 3 4 4 4 4 3

ab r h bi Jeter dh 3000 Swisher 1b 4030 Cano 2b 4000 AnJons rf 3000 ErChvz ph 1010 McGeh 3b 3000 Ibanez ph 1000 Grndrs cf 3121 RMartn c 4000 J.Nix ss 300 0 ISuzuki lf 301 0 Totals 37 410 3 Totals 32 1 7 1 Boston 200 010 001 — 4 New York 000 100 000 — 1 E—An.Jones (1). DP—Boston 2. LOB—Boston 8, New York 6. 2B—Pedroia (26), Ciriaco (7), Punto (6), Granderson (13). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (14), Granderson (32). SB—C.Crawford (5), Ciriaco (8), Punto (5), I.Suzuki (19). Boston IP H R ER BB SO Lester W,7-10 7 5 1 1 2 4 1 A.Bailey H,1 /3 1 0 0 0 1 2 Breslow H,1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 Aceves S,25-31 1 1 0 0 0 1 New York IP H R ER BB SO Phelps L,3-4 6 2/3 7 3 3 0 7 2 Logan /3 1 0 0 1 1 2 Eppley /3 2 1 1 1 1 2 Rapada /3 0 0 0 0 0 1 D.Lowe /3 0 0 0 0 0 Eppley pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. WP—Lester, Eppley. Ellsury cf Crwfrd lf Pedroia 2b AdGnzl 1b C.Ross dh Lvrnwy c Pdsdnk rf Ciriaco ss Punto 3b

r 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0

h bi 00 10 10 22 00 00 10 40 11

NL GAMES D-BACKS 12, ASTROS 4 Arizona

West Division W 65 66 61 52 45

ORIOLES 3, TIGERS 2

Houston

ab r h bi Altuve 2b 3110 R.Cruz p 0000 Greene ss 4122 Pearce 1b 4010 Maxwll lf 4000 BFrncs rf 4000 Wallac 3b 4120 BBarns cf 4000 CSnydr c 3112 Lyles p 2000 XCeden p 0000 Fick p 0000 FMrtnz ph 1000 SMoore 2b 000 0 Totals 41121310 Totals 33 4 7 4 Arizona 010 090 110 — 12 Houston 001 210 000 — 4 E—Wallace (3), Altuve (11). DP—Houston 1. LOB—Arizona 9, Houston 3. 2B—G.Parra 2 (16), M.Montero (17), C.Young (19), Altuve (30). HR—A.Hill (15), C.Young (13), R.Wheeler (1), Greene (6), C.Snyder (6). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO Corbin W,5-4 7 7 4 4 1 5 Bergesen 1 0 0 0 0 0 Zagurski 1 0 0 0 0 1 Houston IP H R ER BB SO Lyles L,2-10 4 8 7 5 3 4 2 X.Cedeno /3 0 2 0 1 2 Fick 2 1/3 3 2 2 1 1 R.Cruz 2 2 1 1 2 3 Lyles pitched to 6 batters in the 5th. WP—Lyles. Balk—Fick. GParra lf A.Hill 2b Elmore ph-2b J.Upton rf Gldsch 1b MMntr c Bergsn p Zagrsk p CYoung cf Drew ss RWhelr 3b Corbin p Nieves c

ab 6 4 0 6 4 3 0 0 5 4 4 4 1

r 1 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 2 0 0

h bi 20 23 00 21 11 10 00 00 43 01 11 00 00

REDS 5, CUBS 3 Chicago

Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi DeJess rf 3 1 0 0 Cozart ss 4010 Vitters 3b 4 0 0 0 Heisey cf 3010 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 0000 ASorin lf 4 2 2 2 BPhllps 2b 4000 SCastro ss 3 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4110 WCastll c 4 0 2 1 Frazier 3b 3222 T.Wood pr 0 0 0 0 Paul lf 3112 BJcksn cf 3 0 0 0 Cairo 1b 3111 Mather ph 1 0 0 0 Hanign c 3010 Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 Cueto p 3000 Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0 Ludwck ph 1000 Belivea p 0 0 0 0 Chpmn p 0000 Corpas p 0000 Valuen ph 1000 AlCarr p 0000 Totals 32 3 5 3 Totals 31 5 8 5 Chicago 200 000 001 — 3 Cincinnati 020 200 01x — 5 E—Samardzija (1). LOB—Chicago 4, Cincinnati 7. 2B—Cozart (30). 3B—Bruce (2). HR—A.Soriano (22), Frazier (17), Paul (1), Cairo (1). SF—Frazier. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Samardzija L,8-11 5 6 4 4 0 5 Beliveau 1 0 0 0 2 0 Corpas 1 0 0 0 0 2 Al.Cabrera 1 2 1 1 1 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Cueto W,16-6 8 3 2 2 0 8 Chapman S,29-33 1 2 1 1 1 2 HBP—by Samardzija (Heisey), by Cueto (DeJesus). WP—Samardzija. Balk—Beliveau.

CARDINALS 5, PIRATES 4 Pittsburgh

St. Louis

ab r h bi Furcal ss 5220 MCrpnt rf-1b 4 0 1 1 Hollidy lf 4010 Craig 1b 4120 Boggs p 0000 Descals 2b 0000 Freese 3b 2100 YMolin c 4132 SRonsn cf-rf 4 0 2 2 RJcksn 2b 2000 Beltran ph 1000 Motte p 0000 Lynn p 2000 Brwnng p 0000 Rosnthl p 0000 Schmkr ph 100 0 Mujica p 000 0 Jay cf 000 0 Totals 35 4 8 4 Totals 33 511 5 Pittsburgh 001 020 001 — 4 St. Louis 100 220 00x — 5 E—Freese (10). DP—Pittsburgh 2. LOB—Pittsburgh 10, St. Louis 8. 2B—Mercer (4), G.Sanchez (13), Furcal (17), Y.Molina 2 (24), S.Robinson (6). SF—G.Jones. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO Bedard L,7-13 4 2/3 9 5 5 3 4 J.Hughes 2 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 J.Cruz 1 2 0 0 0 1 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO 1 Lynn 4 /3 4 3 3 3 8 Browning W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 Rosenthal H,1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 Mujica H,19 1 1 0 0 0 0 Boggs H,23 1 2 0 0 0 2 Motte S,28-33 1 1 1 0 0 1 HBP—by J.Cruz (Jay), by Motte (Mercer), by Lynn (S.Marte). WP—Browning. SMarte lf YNavrr lf Mercer 2b-ss AMcCt cf GJones 1b-rf Snider rf JHughs p JHrrsn ph-2b PAlvrz 3b Barajs c Barmes ss McKnr ph J.Cruz p Bedard p GSnchz 1b

ab 2 2 4 5 4 2 0 2 3 3 3 1 0 2 2

r 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

h bi 10 00 22 01 11 00 00 10 00 00 10 00 00 00 20

METS 2, NATIONALS 0 New York Tejada ss Baxter rf

Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi 4 0 0 0 Werth cf-rf 4000 4 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 4020

DWrght 3b 3 1 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 4010 I.Davis 1b 4 1 2 2 Morse rf-lf 4000 DnMrp 2b 4 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 4010 Vldspn lf 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3000 Frncsc p 0 0 0 0 TMoore lf 3000 AnTrrs cf 3 0 0 0 Matths p 0000 Thole c 3 0 0 0 McGnzl p 0000 Niese p 3 0 0 0 Flores c 3010 Rauch p 0 0 0 0 EJcksn p 1000 Bay lf 0 0 0 0 Harper cf 1000 Totals 31 2 3 2 Totals 31 0 5 0 New York 000 000 200 — 2 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 E—Desmond (13). LOB—New York 3, Washington 5. 2B—LaRoche (26). 3B—Baxter (2). HR—I.Davis (22). SB—Zimmerman (5). S—E.Jackson. New York IP H R ER BB SO Niese W,10-6 7 1/3 5 0 0 0 7 2 Rauch H,13 /3 0 0 0 0 0 F.Francisco S,20-23 1 0 0 0 0 1 Washington IP H R ER BB SO E.Jackson L,7-8 7 2 2 2 1 11 Mattheus 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 3 1 Mic.Gonzalez /3 1 0 0 0 1

DODGERS 6, BRAVES 2 Los Angeles

Atlanta

ab r h bi Bourn cf 4110 Prado lf 5122 Heywrd rf 4000 C.Jones 3b 3010 FFrmn 1b 4000 Uggla 2b 1000 D.Ross c 4000 Janish ss 3010 Sheets p 2000 Avilan p 0000 Hinske ph 1000 CMrtnz p 0000 JFrncs ph 1000 Venters p 000 0 Totals 31 6 4 6 Totals 32 2 5 2 Los Angeles 030 003 000 — 6 Atlanta 100 000 001 — 2 LOB—Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 11. 2B—Prado (31), C.Jones (20), Janish (5). 3B—Bourn (10). HR—H.Ramirez 2 (18), Loney (4), L.Cruz (3), Prado (7). SB—Kemp (7). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Harang W,9-7 6 2/3 4 1 1 5 8 1 Choate /3 0 0 0 0 1 1 Guerra /3 0 0 0 2 0 1 Sh.Tolleson /3 0 0 0 1 0 1 Jansen S,25-31 1 /3 1 1 1 0 3 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO Sheets L,4-3 6 4 6 6 2 3 Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 0 C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 0 Venters 1 0 0 0 1 0 Victorn lf M.Ellis 2b Kemp cf Ethier rf HRmrz ss Loney 1b L.Cruz 3b A.Ellis c Harang p Choate p Guerra p ShTllsn p Jansen p

ab 4 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 0 0 0 0

r 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 00 00 00 00 24 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 00

CUBS 9, REDS 7 Chicago

Cincinnati

ab r h bi Stubbs cf 5010 Valdez ss 5100 BPhllps 2b 5120 Ludwck lf 4323 Frazier 1b 5011 Bruce rf 4220 Rolen 3b 3011 Mesorc c 4000 Rdmnd p 1000 Simon p 0000 Heisey ph 1011 LeCure p 0000 Paul ph 1000 Marshll p 0000 Cairo ph 1011 Ondrsk p 000 0 Totals 41 913 9 Totals 39 711 7 Chicago 010 313 001 — 9 Cincinnati 010 012 210 — 7 E—Valbuena (6), Redmond (1), Frazier (6). DP—Cincinnati 1. LOB—Chicago 10, Cincinnati 7. 2B—Valbuena (14), S.Castro (17), Cardenas (6), B.Phillips (24), Rolen (12). 3B—S.Castro (9), Cairo (2). HR—B.Jackson (1), DeJesus (5), Ludwick 2 (25). SB—S.Castro (20), LaHair 2 (4). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Raley W,1-2 5 1/3 5 4 3 2 4 Corpas 1 2/3 3 2 2 0 1 Russell 0 1 1 1 0 0 Camp H,13 1 1 0 0 0 1 Marmol S,15-17 1 1 0 0 0 2 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Redmond L,0-1 3 1/3 7 4 4 5 2 Simon 1 2/3 2 1 1 0 2 LeCure 1 3 3 1 0 3 Marshall 2 0 0 0 0 4 Ondrusek 1 1 1 1 0 0 Russell pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Valuen 3b Mather lf Rizzo 1b SCastro ss LaHair rf Russell p Camp p Marml p Clevngr c BJcksn cf Cardns 2b Barney 2b Raley p Corpas p DeJess rf

ab 4 5 5 5 3 0 0 0 4 5 4 1 4 0 1

r 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1

h bi 21 10 11 32 12 00 00 00 00 11 21 00 10 00 11

LATE GAMES MARLINS 6, ROCKIES 5 Miami

Colorado

ab r h bi EYong rf 5120 Rutledg ss 5221 Fowler cf 4120 CGnzlz lf 3001 WRosr c 4022 Pachec 1b 3011 Brothrs p 0000 WHarrs p 0000 Cuddyr ph 1000 MtRynl p 0000 Nelson 3b 4010 LeMahi 2b 4020 Francis p 1000 JHerrr ph 0100 Roenck p 0000 Colvin 1b 200 0 Totals 34 6 8 6 Totals 36 512 5 Miami 100 032 000 — 6 Colorado 000 230 000 — 5 E—Nelson (8), W.Rosario (11). DP—Miami 1, Colorado 1. LOB—Miami 4, Colorado 7. 2B—Ca.Lee (21), J.Buck (15), LeMahieu (6). 3B—D.Solano (2). HR—Reyes (9), Stanton (23). SB—G.Hernandez (4), E.Young (14). CS—Fowler (3). S—LeBlanc, Fowler. Miami IP H R ER BB SO LeBlanc W,2-2 5 9 5 5 2 2 Zambrano H,3 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 1 M.Dunn H,15 /3 0 0 0 0 1 H.Bell H,8 1 2 0 0 0 0 Cishek S,8-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO Francis 5 5 4 4 1 3 1 /3 3 2 2 0 0 Roenicke L,4-1 BS,1-1 2 Brothers 1 /3 0 0 0 0 3 W.Harris 1 0 0 0 0 2 Mat.Reynolds 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP—by Francis (Stanton). Petersn lf GHrndz cf Reyes ss Ca.Lee 1b Stanton rf DSolan 2b Velazqz 3b J.Buck c LeBlnc p Cousins ph Zamrn p MDunn p H.Bell p Kearns ph Cishek p

ab 5 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 0

r 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h bi 00 20 13 11 11 10 00 21 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

GIANTS 10, PADRES 1 San Francisco

San Diego

ab r h bi Amarst cf-2b 4 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b-3b 3 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3010 Guzmn lf 1000 Quentin lf 3000 Layne p 0000 Grgrsn p 0000 Thayer p 0000 Maybin ph 1000 Grandl c 3000 Alonso 1b 4110 Venale rf 3000 EvCarr ss 3011 Ohlndrf p 000 0 Mikolas p 100 0 Kotsay ph 100 0 Brach p 000 0 Denorfi cf 101 0 Totals 421015 9 Totals 31 1 4 1 San Francisco 108 000 001 — 10 San Diego 000 010 000 — 1 E—Grandal (4). LOB—San Francisco 9, San Diego 5. 2B—Posey (25), Pence (20), B.Crawford (20), Headley (23), Alonso (32), Denorfia (16). 3B—Pagan (8). HR—Scutaro (6). SB—Scutaro (8). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO M.Cain W,12-5 8 4 1 1 0 6 Kontos 1 0 0 0 1 0 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO 1 Ohlendorf L,4-4 2 /3 6 8 8 2 2 Mikolas 2 2/3 4 1 1 0 1 Brach 1 1 0 0 0 0 Layne 1 1 0 0 1 1 Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 2 Thayer 1 3 1 1 0 1 HBP—by M.Cain (Forsythe), by Thayer (Pence). WP—Mikolas. PB—Grandal. Pagan cf Christn ph-lf Scutaro 2b Sandovl 3b Arias 3b Posey c Kontos p Pence rf Belt 1b GBlanc lf-cf BCrwfr ss M.Cain p HSnchz ph-c

ab 5 1 5 4 1 4 0 4 4 4 5 4 1

r 1 0 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 2 0 0

h bi 32 00 22 11 00 10 00 21 11 21 20 11 00

ATHLETICS 6, INDIANS 4 Cleveland

Oakland ab 4 4 3 3 4 4 0 4 3 1 3 1 34

r 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

h bi 00 20 00 10 10 10 00 14 00 00 00 00 64

ab r h bi Kipnis 2b Crisp cf 5000 AsCarr ss JWeeks 2b 4000 Choo rf Cespds lf 4120 CSantn 1b Carter 1b 2111 Brantly cf Rosales pr-1b 0 1 0 0 Donald lf Moss rf 3210 Carrer lf JGoms dh 3000 Duncan dh Reddck ph-dh 1 0 1 0 Lillirdg 3b Dnldsn 3b 4142 Ktchm ph DNorrs c 4011 Marson c Pnngtn ss 3012 Hannhn ph Totals Totals 33 611 6 Cleveland 000 400 000 — 4 Oakland 000 310 02x — 6 E—Cespedes (3). LOB—Cleveland 5, Oakland 7. 2B—As.Cabrera (28), Cespedes (16), Donaldson (6). HR—Duncan (11). SB—Cespedes (11), Pennington (12). SF—Carter, Pennington. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO McAllister 6 8 4 4 1 6 2 /3 0 0 0 0 1 Sipp 1 J.Smith L,7-3 /3 1 2 2 1 1 Pestano 1 2 0 0 0 1 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO Milone 5 6 4 3 1 6 Neshek 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 2 Norberto W,4-1 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Balfour S,10-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Smith pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBP—by Norberto (Choo).

RAYS 12, ANGELS 3 Tampa Bay

Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi DJnngs lf 6 1 2 1 Trout cf-lf 4010 BUpton cf 5 1 4 3 TrHntr rf 4030 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 0000 Joyce rf 5 0 0 0 Pujols 1b 4010 Longori dh 4 1 1 0 BoWlsn 1b 0000 Fuld ph-cf 1 1 1 0 KMorls dh 4000 Zobrist ss 3 3 2 1 Trumo lf-rf 4000 EJhnsn ss 0 0 0 1 Callasp 3b 3110 Kppngr 1b 3 1 1 0 V.Wells ph 1000 C.Pena 1b 1 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4112 SRdrgz 3b 5 1 3 2 Aybar ss 3121 RRorts 2b 4 1 1 1 Iannett c 3010 JMolin c 4223 Totals 41121712 Totals 34 310 3 Tampa Bay 110 710 011 — 12 Los Angeles 001 200 000 — 3 DP—Tampa Bay 3, Los Angeles 2. LOB—Tampa Bay 7, Los Angeles 4. 2B—De.Jennings (16), B.Upton (20), S.Rodriguez (13). 3B—Fuld (1), Trout (6). HR—B.Upton (15), Zobrist (14), J.Molina (5), H.Kendrick (6), Aybar (7). SF—E.Johnson. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO Shields W,11-7 6 7 3 3 0 8 Badenhop 1 2 0 0 0 0 W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 0 Howell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Weaver L,15-3 3 8 9 9 2 2 Hawkins 2 3 1 1 0 1 Takahashi 2 2 0 0 0 2 Isringhausen 1 2 1 1 0 1 Geltz 1 2 1 1 2 0 Weaver pitched to 7 batters in the 4th. WP—Shields, Weaver.

MARINERS 5, TWINS 3 Minnesota

Seattle ab 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 33

r 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

h bi 00 21 11 10 00 10 11 00 00 63

ab r h bi Mstrnn cf Ackley 2b 5011 Mauer c MSndrs cf 4110 Wlngh lf Seager 3b 4000 Mornea 1b Jaso dh 3122 Doumit dh Smoak 1b 4010 Plouffe 3b Olivo c 4121 MCarsn rf TRonsn lf 4120 JCarrll 2b Thams rf 3121 Flormn ss Ryan ss 3000 Totals Totals 34 511 5 Minnesota 000 010 020 — 3 Seattle 210 002 00x — 5 E—Ryan (5). DP—Seattle 1. LOB—Minnesota 4, Seattle 8. 2B—Morneau (25), T.Robinson (3), Thames (10). HR—Mauer (8), Willingham (31), Jaso (8), Olivo (9). SB—M.Saunders (16). S—Ryan. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO Blackburn L,4-9 5 1/3 11 5 5 1 1 2 T.Robertson /3 0 0 0 0 1 Fien 1 0 0 0 0 2 Swarzak 1 0 0 0 1 0 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Iwakuma W,4-3 7 4 1 0 1 6 2 Pryor /3 2 2 2 0 1


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — C3

VictoriaAdvocate.com

3RD & SHORT

PAGE DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR: JOHN HORNBERG, JHORNBERG@VICAD.COM

NASCAR

TV SPOTLIGHT

YOUR PHOTOS

Martin wins pole at Michigan BROOKLYN, Mich. (AP) – Mark Martin has won the pole for the NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Michigan International Speedway. Martin posted the top qualifying speed Friday of 199.706 mph on the track’s still-new surface. Carl Edwards was second, followed by points leader Jimmie Johnson. It’s the fourth pole of the year for the 53-year-old Martin, who is making only his 15th Cup start this season. It’s the 55th pole of his career. The track at MIS was repaved in Martin the offseason, and Marcos Ambrose qualified for the race there in June at 203.241 mph, the first time since 1987 the 200 mph mark was broken during Sprint Cup qualifying. NASCAR altered left-side tires for the race that weekend, and cars slowed down.

SUNDAY AUTO RACING NOON ■ ESPN

— NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pure Michigan 400, at Brooklyn, Mich.

8 P.M. ■ ESPN2

— NHRA, Lucas Oil Nationals, at Brainerd, Minn. (same-day tape)

EXTREME SPORTS 1 P.M. ■ NBC

— Dew Tour, Pantech Beach Championships, at Ocean City, Md.

GOLF NOON ■ TGC

— PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, final round, at Greensboro, N.C.

2 P.M. ■ CBS

— PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, final round, at Greensboro, N.C. ■ TGC — Champions Tour, Dick’s Sporting Goods Open, final round, at Endicott, N.Y.

3 P.M. ■ NBC

CONTRIBUTED BY GARY MOSES

— USGA, U.S. Amateur Championship, championship match, at Cherry Hills Village, Colo.

6 P.M.

Are you ready for some football? CYFL ready to kick off 2012 season

■ TGC

The Crossroads Youth Football League opens its 2012 season on Saturday at St. Joseph’s O’Connor Sports Complex. Getting ready for the season are, from left, commissioner Gary Moses, treasurer J.R. Diaz, vice president Michael Zappe, secretary Deidrick Miller and league president Kevin Black.

— LPGA, Safeway Classic, final round, at North Plains, Ore.

LITTLE LEAGUE 11 A.M. ■ ESPN2

— World Series, Vancouver, British Columbia vs. Aguadulce, Panama-Lugazi, Uganda winner, at South Williamsport, Pa.

NASCAR-Sprint Cup-Pure Michigan 400 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Sunday

1 P.M. ■ ABC

— World Series, Petaluma, Calif. vs. Goodlettsville, Tenn., at South Williamsport, Pa.

Lap length: 2 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 199.706. 2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 198.626. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 198.44. 4. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 198.183. 5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 197.878. 6. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 197.78. 7. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 197.65. 8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 197.493. 9. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 197.433. 10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 197.163. 11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 197.114. 12. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 197.012. 13. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 196.893. 14. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 196.877. 15. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 196.732. 16. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 196.501. 17. (22) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, 196.249. 18. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 196.217. 19. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 196.18. 20. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 196.052. 21. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.956. 22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.822. 23. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 193.299. 24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 193.268. 25. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 193.138. 26. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 192.988. 27. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 192.709. 28. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.596. 29. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.56. 30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 192.539. 31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 192.359. 32. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 192.282. 33. (19) Jason Leffler, Ford, 192.205. 34. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.179. 35. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 192.118. 36. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 191.79. 37. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 191.724. 38. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 189.944. 39. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 189.036. 40. (32) T.J. Bell, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (98) Mike Skinner, Ford, 189.939.

Failed to Qualify 44. (33) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 189.444. 45. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 188.157.

SIGN UP 14U BRAVOS BASEBALL 14u Bravos baseball looking for catchers and pitchers to join team for upcoming season. For more info call Mark 361-655-0284 or Eddie 361-212-9679. 13U RED GENERALS The 13u Red Generals will be conducting tryouts for this upcoming season. For additional information, please contact Jim Simpson at 361-920-9023 or Charles Wenske at 361-550-9419. VICTORIA GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION DATE: Aug. 30 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Mall Fall season registration. Aug. 11, 18 and 25 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Thursday, Aug. 30 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Registration will take place at the Victoria Mall. For more information, go to vgsa.org. NEW BALANCE BASEBALL 2012: FALL HITTING CLINIC DATE: Sept. 1 TIME: time TBA COST: $135 LOCATION: Victoria East High School Join former Prairie View A&M player and SWAC champion Ro'Shard Shorter and former Astros first round pick Willie Ansley for the fall hitting clinic at the field at Victoria East. For participants 14 and under; fee is $135, limited to the first 50 to sign up. Deadline is Aug. 27. Those who sign up by the deadline get a free pair of NEW BALANCE MOLDED CLEATS. For more information, call Ro’Shard Shorter at (979) 232-1392. VICTORIA PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT FALL SOFTBALL AND KICKBALL LEAGUES DATE: Sept. 7 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Registration begins Monday, Aug. 13. The entry fee is $240 per team for an eight-game season in either sport. The registration deadline is Friday, Sept. 7. For information, call 361-485-3200 or email parks@victoriatx.org. SOFTBALL AND KICKBALL LEAGUE DATE: Sept. 7 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Parks And Rec. Dept. The Victoria Parks and Recreation Dept. will begin registering for this year's Adult Football Softball League and Kickball League on Monday, Aug. 13. Entry fee is $240 per team for both softball and kickball and the season for both sports is eight games. Deadline is Friday, Sept. 7. For more information, please call the Victoria Parts and Recreation office at 485-3200 email parts@victoriatx.org, or fax 485-3212. SOUTHERN SWING VOLLEYBALL TRYOUTS DATE: Sept. 30 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Victoria College Sports Center. Sunday, Aug. 26, 17s and 18s, 1-2:30 p.m.; 15s and 16s, 3-4:30 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 30, 12s and 13s, 1-2:30 p.m.; 14s, 3-4:30 p.m. Fee is $25. For information, go to at http://www.southernswing-volleyball.com/, or email ssvball@yahoo.com or call coach Mike Johnson at 979-533-0709.

4 P.M. ■ ESPN

— World Series, San Antonio vs. New Castle, Ind.-Gresham, Ore. winner, at South Williamsport, Pa.

6 P.M. ■ ESPN2

— World Series, Tokyo vs. Taoyuan, Taiwan, at South Williamsport, Pa.

MAJOR LEAGUES NOON ■ WGN

— Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati

CONTRIBUTED BY FAYE BARNETT

Abby Barnett takes gold in high jump at Junior Olympics

CONTRIBUTED BY SHANNON AND GENE SHANNON

Victoria Southeast team wins District 27 championship

Abby Barnett of Victoria Texas took first place in the high jump, beating out Eryn Puett of Columbia, Mo. (silver) and Camille Trotman from Douglasville, Ga. (bronze). Abby was awarded a gold medal with an All-American Patch. She was the only participant from Texas to place in the top 10 in the high jump.

The Victoria Southeast 9-10 year olds were named the 2012 District 27 Champions. They proceeded to the Sectionals tournament in Beeville and placed third. The team was managed by Alex Gutierrez. Coaches were Jesse Tipton, Arndra Thomas and Ismael Gutierrez. Pictured are, front row, from left, D'Shaye Galinato, Justin Nunez, Jarod Tipton, Zachary Gutierrez and Dylan Rivera. Middle row, from left, is Dominic Perez, Xander Mahan, Isaiah Salas, Arndra Thomas, Zachary Shannon and Jasper Gonzales.

12:30 P.M. ■ TBS

— L.A. Dodgers at Atlanta

7 P.M. ■ ESPN

— Boston at N.Y. Yan-

kees

MOTOR SPORTS 11 A.M. ■ SPEED

— MotoGP Moto3, at Indianapolis (same-day tape)

NOON ■ SPEED

— MotoGP Moto2, at Indianapolis (same-day tape)

1 P.M. ■ SPEED

— MotoGP World Championship, at Indianapolis

TOURNAMENTS YORKTOWN COUNTRY CLUB THREE-MAN TOURNAMENT DATE: Aug. 18 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Yorktown Country Club Aug. 18 and 19 at te Yorktown Country Club. Tee times, 7:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. $195 per team, includes mulligans. Flight by combined handicap. Entry deadline is Aug. 10. For more information, call, Warner Borth, 361-564-2148 (days), James Kaiser, 361-564-3302 (nights) or Club House at 361-564-9191. M&M KICKBALL/SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT DATE: Aug. 18 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Youth Complex Aug. 18, at the Victoria Youth Complex. Fee: $80 plus umpire fee. For more information, call Mike at 935-5421. SOFTBALL/KICKBALL TOURNAMENT DATE: Aug. 25 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Adult Complex Aug. 25 at the Victoria Adult Complex. Round robin tournament, $75 plus umpire fees. For more information, call Carlos at 218-1145 or George at

NFL 237-9209. MEN'S 30TH ANNUAL LABOR DAY WEEKEND SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT DATE: Aug. 30 TIME: time TBA COST: $190 LOCATION: Anderson East And Mora Field, Alice, Tx This double elimination tournament will be in Alice Sept. 1 and Sept. 2. The deadline for entry is Aug. 30. The top four teams will receive awards according to their finish. Balls must be purchased at the field. The $190 entry fee per team includes payment for umpires. All monies must be paid prior to the entry deadline. For more information contact Eustacio Alfaro Jr. at (361) 389-4732. TEXAS NURSES ASSOCIATION DISTRICT 20 3rd ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT DATE: Sept. 8 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Victoria Country Club Texas Nurses Association District 20 is having its 3rd Annual Golf Tournament Scholarship Fundraiser to Benefit Nursing Students in our region: Victoria, Lavaca, Dewitt, Goliad, Calhoun,

Matagorda, Jackson, & Wharton counties. It is a Four Person Scramble. Saturday, September 8, 2012 at the Victoria Country Club, 12:30 shot gun start. Entry fee: $400 per Team, includes cart rental, green fees, range balls, dinner, drinks, & music following play. A Silent Auction will also be held throughout the day. Call Debbie Peña, 361-212-0355, or visit TNA20.org for more information. COUPLES GOLF TOURNAMENT DATE: Sept. 15 TIME: time TBA COST: $80 - $100 LOCATION: Hatch Bend Country Club Hatch Bend Country Club will host its annual couples golf tournament. One woman and one man per team. The maximum handicap is 32 for women and 30 for men. Couples will be flighted by the lowest team member's handicap score. The $80 entry fee includes on mulligan for each player. OUR LADY OF SORROWS GOLF TOURNAMENT DATE: Sept. 22 TIME: time TBA LOCATION: Riverside Golf Course Sept. 22 with a rain out date of Sept. 29.

Shot gun start, four player scramble, best ball with a 45 handicap. $75 per player fee includes green fees, lunch and beverages. For more information, contact, Alex Lopez, 361-652-4631, alexgolf@suddenlink.net; Richard Vasquez, 361-652-4968, rmvasquez57@yahoo.com; or Jesse Escalante, .361-212-5363, jescalante49@yahoo.com. BABES ON BAFFIN AND BLUE LADIES FISHING TOURNAMENT DATE: Oct. 6 TIME: time TBA COST: $80 CONTACT/WEBSITE: http://www.babesonbaffin.com/ LOCATION: Roberts Point Park In Port Aransas Registration is ongoing for Babes on Baffin and Blue, an all ladies fishing tournament, sponsored by CCA's Corpus Christi Chapter. Tournament features a live weigh-in and donation bonus. Registration deadline is 9/21; register by 9/1 to ensure preferred shirt size. Fri.'s check in & social is at Doc's Restaurant in Corpus; Sat.'s tournament weigh-in & dinner is at Roberts Point Park in Port Aransas.

SCOREBOARD TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL

undisclosed amount for aggravated dissent against an assistant referee during an Aug. 15 game.

MLB— Suspended Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly two games and fined him an undisclosed amount for his excessive arguing in the top of the second inning of an Aug. 16 game.

American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES— Recalled LHP Zach Britton from Norfolk (IL). Optioned INF Joe Mahoney to Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX— Recalled INF Mauro Gomez from Pawtucket (IL). Placed LHP Felix Doubront on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 10.

NFL East

Jacksonville Houston Indianapolis Tennessee

W 2 1 1 1

National League CHICAGO CUBS— Recalled LHP Brooks Raley from Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS— Recalled RHP Todd Redmond from Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES— Placed OF Carlos Gonzalez on the bereavement list. Recalled OF Charlie Blackmon from Colorado Springs (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES— Recalled RHP Nick Vincent from Tucson (PCL). Optioned RHP Ross Ohlendorf to Tucson.

BASKETBALL

FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS— Reached an injury settlement with WR Michael Calvin. CINCINNATI BENGALS— Signed DE Luke Black.

SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS— Suspended Vancouver MF Barry Robson one game and fined him an

T Pct PF 01.000 7 0 .000 6 0 .000 20 0 .000 24

PA 6 17 43 43

South L 0 0 0 1

T Pct PF 01.000 59 01.000 26 01.000 38 0 .500 47

PA 55 13 3 34

Cincinnati Cleveland Baltimore Pittsburgh

W 2 2 1 0

L 0 0 1 1

T Pct PF 01.000 41 01.000 54 0 .500 43 0 .000 23

PA 25 27 44 24

West Denver Kansas City San Diego Oakland

W 1 1 1 0

L 0 0 0 2

T Pct PF 01.000 31 01.000 27 01.000 21 0 .000 27

PA 3 17 13 34

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Dallas Philadelphia Washington N.Y. Giants

L 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0

36 27 47 36

43 37 44 55

Pct .500 .500 .000 .000

PF 44 42 3 23

PA 31 31 31 56

W L T Pct PF San Francis- 1 0 01.000 17 co Seattle 1 0 01.000 27 Arizona 1 2 0 .333 58 St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 3

PA 6

W 1 1 0 0

L 1 1 1 2

T 0 0 0 0

West

T Pct PF 01.000 3 01.000 24 01.000 7 0 .000 31

PA 0 23 6 32

South W L T Pct

PF

PA

17 71 38

Friday, Aug. 24 New England at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 6:30 p.m. San Diego at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 7 p.m. Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 25 Indianapolis at Washington, 3 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 7 p.m.

Cleveland 35, Green Bay 10 Cincinnati 24, Atlanta 19 Tennessee 30, Tampa Bay 7 Minnesota 36, Buffalo 14 Jacksonville 27, New Orleans 24 Detroit 27, Baltimore 12 Carolina 23, Miami 17 Arizona 31, Oakland 27

WNBA

Saturday’s Scores N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, late San Francisco at Houston, late. Kansas City at St. Louis, late Washington at Chicago, late Dallas at San Diego, late Seattle at Denver, late Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.

Monday’s Game Philadelphia at New England, 7 p.m.

Thursday, Aug. 23 Green Bay at Cincinnati, 6 p.m. Jacksonville at Baltimore, 6:30 p.m. Arizona at Tennessee, 7 p.m.

L 5 7 10 10 12 16

Pct GB .750 — .611 3 .500 5 .444 6 .368 71/2 .200 11

WESTERN CONFERENCE Minnesota San Antonio Los Angeles Seattle Phoenix Tulsa

W 16 14 15 10 4 3

SOCCER 4 P.M. ■ NBCSN

— MLS, Philadelphia at DC United

TENNIS 11:30 A.M. ■ CBS

— ATP World Tour, Western & Southern Open, championship match, at Mason, Ohio

3 P.M. ■ ESPN2

— WTA, Western & Southern Open, championship match, at Mason, Ohio

FEEDBACK If you have a question, suggestion, gripe or compliment, Advocate sports department employees can be reached at the following phone numbers and e-mail addresses: John Hornberg, Sports Editor 361-574-1206/jhornberg@vicad.com Albert Alvarado, Sports Writer 361-580-6509/aalvarado@vicad.com WIll Brown, Sports Writer 361-580-6508/wbrown@vicad.com Mike Forman, Sports Writer 361-580-6588/mforman@vicad.com To report meetings, events and registrations, e-mail the Advocate sports department at sports@vicad.com.

■ Go to AdvoSports.com, click on

EASTERN CONFERENCE W 15 11 10 8 7 4

— Preseason, Indianapolis at Pittsburgh

You can submit photos or upcoming events for publication in the Victoria Advocate throughout the week one of two ways:

Sunday, Aug. 26

Connecticut Indiana Atlanta Chicago New York Washington

■ NBC

SUBMIT

San Francisco at Denver, 3 p.m. Carolina at N.Y. Jets, 7 p.m.

Thursday’s Scores

Sunday’s Game

East W 1 1 1 0

1 1 2 2

Friday’s Scores

North

National Basketball Association OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER— Agreed to terms with F Serge Ibaka on a multiyear contract extension.

L 0 1 2 2

.500 .500 .333 .000

Detroit Minnesota Chicago Green Bay

AMERICAN CONFERENCE W 1 0 0 0

1 1 1 0

North

All Times EDT

New England N.Y. Jets Buffalo Miami

Carolina Tampa Bay New Orleans Atlanta

7 P.M.

L 4 5 6 10 16 16

Pct .800 .737 .714 .500 .200 .158

Friday’s Scores Minnesota 98, Washington 69 San Antonio 89, Tulsa 79 Atlanta 82, Chicago 76

Saturday’s Scores Atlanta at Indiana, late New York at Connecticut, late Los Angeles at Seattle, late

GB — 11/2 11/2 6 12 1 12 /2

Add Photo or Submit Event add your item to the website ■ Email your photo and caption or event to sports@vicad.com.

All photos must include names of everyone in photo and information about the event or honor. Events run space permitting throughout the week.

Corrections and Clarifications The Advocate wants to correct promptly any error in fact or clarify any misleading information we publish. To report any error or need for clarification, please call 361-574-1206.


C4 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

T O D AY I N S P O R T S

PAGE DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR: JOHN HORNBERG, JHORNBERG@VICAD.COM

BIG 12 FOOTBALL

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Sooners’ player fighting cancer to play football

PICK 6: SIX TEAMS ON THE DECLINE

Austin Woods perseveres to stay on the field despite draining treatment NORMAN, Okla. (AP) – When Austin Woods walks off the football field after practicing in Oklahoma’s 100-degree August heat, sometimes it’s only the start of a grueling day for the Sooners’ center. After being diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the spring, Woods is undergoing chemotherapy treatments to deal with the form of cancer. For three to four hours every other week, a mixture of chemicals is pumped into his body through an inch-long needle in a process that leaves him feeling fatigued. All that still isn’t enough to keep the determined Texan from reporting for another practice and putting in the work it requires to be the Sooners’ deep snapper on place kicks and the backup for starting center Gabe Ikard. Some days, it’s practice in the morning and chemother-

apy in the afternoon. “It’s just something you’ve got to do. It’s something I want to do,” said Woods, a junior from Rockwall, Texas. “I want to play football, I want to battle this cancer and I want to win, so I want to help my teammates. That’s just something I had to do.” Woods was Woods bothered through much of spring practice by a sore throat and swollen glands around his neck. He eventually approached team trainer Scott Anderson, and was told it wasn’t normal. Over the course of a couple weeks, he had blood work and other tests done and was sent to an oncologist who was able to figure out what was going on. At first, he thought he’d have to sit out this season and use a redshirt. Giving up the sport, which his father used to play and now coaches, was never an option. “I love football. I love being

with my teammates. I love the University of Oklahoma,” Woods said. “Football was the first thing on my mind: How can I get back to playing football as fast as I can?” While fighting through the treatments, Woods is on track to be right where he wants to be this season: on the field. His role as the deep snapper is solidified and longtime starter Ben Habern’s decision to give up football after neck and back injuries could mean more playing time with the offense, too. As much as a person can be, Woods was prepared to tackle his lymphoma. His mother, Donna, beat breast cancer when he was 5 years old and has been a key part of his support system. And he believes the fact that he was already in football shape and going through Oklahoma’s demanding workouts probably prepared his body to handle the treatments. His position coach, James Patton, describes Woods as a “pretty powerful, strong-minded kid” with an unwavering vision for what he wants.

“The mind is the strongest part of your body. If your mind says you can do something, you’re going to do it. You’re going to get it done. That’s what my whole stance on this thing was,” Woods said. “I was going to tell my mind that I’m going to get through this, I’m going to attack these treatments just like we attack a team on Saturday. I’m going to attack these things, I’m going to get through it and I’m going to beat this thing. “Defeat was never really an option.” After Friday’s treatment, Woods is set to have three more chemotherapy sessions before he’s all done. The last is scheduled for around Oct. 1, one month into the regular season. So far, it has been relatively smooth sailing and he described the last scan of his lymph nodes as “excellent,” showing the cancerous cells going away. “God does some amazing things. He’s really given me a body that’s handled the treatments,” he said. “I’m just very thankful for that and just glad I’ve been able to go through summer workouts and everything and be with my teammates.”

BINK GRIMES | WOODS, WINGS & WATER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Coaches love to say it’s tougher to stay on top than it is to get there. Fans of Vanderbilt, Iowa State or Duke football might disagree, but there is no doubt maintaining a high level of success is difficult. These six teams coming off big seasons will be hard-pressed to repeat their feats in 2012. You’ll notice a trend. ■ OKLAHOMA

STATE: The Cowboys quite simply had the best season in the history of the program, going 12-1 with a Big 12 title, No. 3 final ranking and a resounding victory against rival Oklahoma. A firm foundation has been laid by coach Mike Gundy, but this is a retooling year. It starts at quarterback, where freshman Wes Lunt takes over for departed first-round NFL draft pick Brandon Weeden. FORECAST: 8-4 regular season. ■ STANFORD: Andrew Luck is gone. His replacement, Brett Nottingham, by all accounts has a chance to be a fine quarterback. And the team around him is very good. But he’s not Luck, and very few quarterbacks have ever been that good. FORECAST: 8-4. ■ BAYLOR: See above, but replace Andrew Luck with Robert Griffin III and Brett Nottingham with Nick Florence. While Florence showed he has made some progress since getting mauled as a freshman, the sheer amount of talent to be replaced for the Bears means they are likely taking a step back. FORECAST: 6-6. ■ KANSAS STATE: The Wildcats were maybe the most surprising team in the country last season. Picked to finish near the bottom of the Big 12, Bill Snyder’s crew went 10-3 and played in the Cotton Bowl. QB Collin Klein enters this season with Heisman Trophy buzz, but K-State won seven games by seven points or less and it’s tough to repeat that kind of good fortune in a difficult conference. FORECAST: 7-5. ■ BOISE STATE: The Broncos have to replace as much talent, as many key players, as any team in the country, starting with robotically efficient QB Kellen Moore. They have seven returning starters – total. That’s it! Boise State hasn’t won less than 10 games in season since going 9-4 in 2005, the last season under coach Dan Hawkins. FORECAST: 9-3. ■ GEORGIA: The Bulldogs bounced back nicely from a couple of mediocre seasons by going 10-4 and reaching the Southeastern Conference title game.The schedule sets up well again. Georgia misses Alabama, LSU and Arkansas out of the West, and plays three nonconference patsies. But ’Dawgs beware. The East should be better this year with Florida and Tennessee primed to step forward and Missouri joining.

EXTRA POINT: Houston, replacing both coach (Kevin Sumlin) and record-setting quarterback (Case Keenum), won’t be going 13-1 again, and Temple will have a tough time winning nine again as Steve Addazio takes a rebuilding team into the Big East.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

USC brushes off sanctions, tops AP poll CONTRIBUTED BY BINK GRIMES

This photo was taken Aug. 2, 2005, near the mouth of the Colorado River in Matagorda. Last week’s shad kill, in many estimations, did not come close to rivaling the 2005 episode or others since.

GRIMES: Red tide blooms most often in late summer, early fall CONTINUED FROM C1 caught wind of the typical occurrence and blew it up and out of proportion over the newspapers and televisions. Hyperbole is what my college English professors called it. I knew it was bad when the contemporary Christian radio station I listen to and support financially told beach-goers to beware of the fish kill on Galveston Island. Then my phone began to light up with calls from concerned clients about the fish kill and how it would affect their scheduled fishing charter. So, to squash the hysteria, here a level-headed evaluation of the situation. Early this week, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept. issued a statement saying the fish kill was attributed to red tide, an algae caused by high concentrations of a plant-like microorganism called Karenia brevis or K.

brevis. These high concentrations called blooms may cause the water to appear red, light or dark green, or brown. Karenia brevis produces a toxin, called brevetoxin, which can affect the central nervous system of fish, birds, mammals and other animals. The most visible result of red tide is dead fish on the beach or floating in the water. It is a naturally-occurring organism that is likely always present at low concentrations in the Gulf of Mexico and is believed to have been around for centuries. According to TPWD, red tide blooms most often beginning in late summer or early fall and can last days, weeks or months. Bloom locations can change daily due to wind conditions. People with respiratory problems may be especially affected by aerosolized toxins during red tides. Symptoms common when breathing

red tide toxins include coughing, sneezing, and watery, burning eyes. Many anglers, including myself, experienced these symptoms during the Fall of 2011 when red tide was present in most Texas bays, probably due to the lack of freshwater and hypersaline levels brought about by the severe drought Texas endured. As for red tide contributing to the fish kill last week? I am skeptical. I am not saying there are not algae blooms present, rather, I believe the kill was brought about by the same variables we see every August - weak tides, a increase of shad showing along the beachfront, triple-digit thermometers and a calm surf (waves create oxygen like an aerator when its water crashes over sand bars). In past years I have seen kills much worse, to the extent of floating shad cover-

ing the entire portion of the lower end and mouth of the Colorado River. I fondly remember August 1998 because I had never seen so many large schools of shad so tight to the beach and the surf so flat. I waded the first gut that morning and never caught a trout due to acres of tarpon pulling up shallow and blasting schools of shad. The next day thousands of dead shad littered the water and tested my gag reflex after a couple of days of extreme heat and decomposition. So last week's fish kill is nothing to be alarmed about. Just part of the circle of life along the Texas coast. Bink Grimes is a freelance writer, photographer, author and licensed captain (binkgrimes@sbcglobal.net).

SCRIMMAGE: Auten wants team to be ready from first snap CONTINUED FROM C1 days before the Bobcats open at Woodsboro, they will likely focus on their stamina. “I think they learned intensity means a lot,” Elkins said. “When you play with intensity, you can overcome some of those mistakes that you make. “Especially, early on for

us, we’re learning a new defense and a new offense. I think they have learned they need to push themselves a little bit more in conditioning. They are not quite in the shape they need to be in.” St. Joseph plans to spend the next fortnight focusing on the mental approach to football. New coach Kevin Auten said he wants his

team to be ready to play from the first snap. However, Auten was pleased his team dictated the tempo toward the end. “There at the end, in the last series, I felt we picked up the pace a little bit,” Auten said. “I felt we got better as we went throughout the day. That’s what I was happiest with was that we continued to get better as we

played.” At this point in the season, Auten and Elkins said their teams will improve as they get more on-field repetition. Both teams have scrimmages Thursday, coincidentally against opponents from Jackson County. Bloomington will host Ganado, while the Flyers will visit Edna.

Trojans are No. 1 in AP preseason poll for 7th time in school history NEW YORK (AP) – Southern California is No. 1 in the AP Top 25, tossing off the weight of NCAA sanctions and returning to a familiar place in the rankings – with a boost from LSU’s problems. USC earned the top spot in The Associated Press’ preseason college football poll for the seventh time in school history and the first time in five seasons, edging out No. 2 Alabama and No. 3 LSU. The Trojans, who were banned from postseason play the past two seasons, received 25 of a possible 60 first-place votes from a media panel in a close vote. USC received 1,445 points. Defending national champion Alabama had 17 first-place votes and 1,411 points while LSU, the Crimson Tide’s SEC rival, got 16 first-place votes and 1,402 points. “We definitely didn’t come here to be underdogs,” Trojans safety T.J. McDonald said Saturday. “The ranking doesn’t mean we’ve done anything as a team. But it’s good to see we’re back where we’re supposed to be.” Oklahoma was fourth with a single first-place vote and Oregon was fifth. Michigan, at No. 8, received the only other first-place vote. The Tigers were poised to start the season No. 1 before Heisman Trophy finalist Tyrann Mathieu got kicked off the team a week ago. In light of that development, the AP extended the voting deadline. Before Mathieu was dismissed, reportedly for failed drug

associated press top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press preseason college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final 2011 records, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and 2011 final ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Southern Cal (25) 10-21,445 6 2. Alabama (17) 12-11,411 1 3. LSU (16) 13-11,402 2 4. Oklahoma (1) 10-31,286 16 5. Oregon 12-21,274 4 6. Georgia 10-41,107 19 7. Florida St. 9-41,093 23 8. Michigan (1) 11-21,000 12 9. South Carolina 11-2 994 9 10. Arkansas 11-2 963 5 11. West Virginia 10-3 856 17 12. Wisconsin 11-3 838 10 13. Michigan St. 11-3 742 11 14. Clemson 10-4 615 22 15. Texas 8-5 569 NR 16. Virginia Tech 11-3 548 21 17. Nebraska 9-4 485 24 18. Ohio St. 6-7 474 NR 19. Oklahoma St. 12-1 430 3 20. TCU 11-2 397 14 21. Stanford 11-2 383 7 22. Kansas St. 10-3 300 15 23. Florida 7-6 214 NR 24. Boise St. 12-1 212 8 25. Louisville 7-6 105 NR Others receiving votes: Notre Dame 83, Washington 55, Auburn 53, North Carolina 32, Utah 30, Georgia Tech 25, BYU 22, Tennessee 15, South Florida 11, Baylor 9, Texas A&M 5, UCF 4, Cincinnati 3, Missouri 3, N.C. State 3, Houston 1, Louisiana Tech 1, Mississippi St. 1, N. Illinois 1.

tests, LSU had received 28 of a possible 60 first-place votes. USC was a close second with 22 first-place votes and Alabama was third with nine. The USA Today coaches’ poll, which was released Aug. 2, had LSU at No. 1, followed by Alabama and USC. Rounding out the top 10 in the AP rankings, Georgia was No. 6, followed by Florida State and Michigan. No. 9 South Carolina and No. 10 Arkansas give the Southeastern Conference half of the first 10 teams. For the Trojans, their return to national championship contention comes just two years after the program was hit by NCAA sanctions that seemed crippling at the time. Head coach Lane Kiffin was an assistant coach for USC during its last great run.


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — C5

VictoriaAdvocate.com

NFL

PAGE DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR: ALBERT ALVARADO, AALVARADO@VICAD.COM

NFL ROUNDUP

Schaub, Holliday lead Texans over 49ers HOUSTON – Matt Schaub threw a touchdown pass to Lestar Jean, Trindon Holliday returned a punt for another score and Houston’s defense stifled San Francisco in the Texans’ 20-9 win over the 49ers on Saturday night. Schaub completed 11 of 14 passes for 128 yards in two quarters, looking sharp in his second game since fracturing his right foot in Week 10 last season. The 5-foot-5 Holliday, who returned a kickoff 90 yards for a score in the Texans’ preseason opener, scored in the fourth quarter. The Texans held the 49ers to 267 yards and 13 first downs. Alex Smith completed 5 of 9 passes for 49 yards for the 49ers (No. 4). He was sacked twice by the Texans’ first-string defense.

Giants stifle Sanchez, Tebow in win over Jets EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. – Rookie Jayron Hosley returned an interception of Mark Sanchez 77 yards for a touchdown, and the New York Giants’ defense stifled the Jets’ starters in a 26-3

preseason victory between the hometown rivals on Saturday night. Tim Tebow, making his home debut for the Jets (0-2), didn’t fare much better in his six series. But the backup quarterback led the Jets (No. 14 in the AP Pro32) to their only points of the night – Josh Brown’s 30-yard field goal. Lawrence Tynes kicked four field goals for the Giants (1-1). Eli Manning and the Giants (No. 3) starters were mostly quiet, with the Super Bowl MVP going 7 of 14 for 62 yards and an interception.

Bradford on game, Rams beat Chiefs ST. LOUIS – Sam Bradford threw touchdown passes on his first two drives, and the St. Louis Rams made improvements on the other side of the ball in a 31-17 preseason victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in the annual Governor’s Cup game on Saturday night. Lance Kendricks and Danny Amendola scored on catches of 23 and 8 yards, and

Steven Jackson ran for 49 yards on seven carries in a 151-yard first quarter that handed the backups a two-touchdown cushion. The Rams (1-1) totaled 215 yards in a 38-3 loss last week at Indianapolis. Bradford was 6 for 9 for 102 yards for St. Louis (No. 28 AP Pro32). Matt Cassel played the first half for Kansas City (1-1) and was 13 for 18 for 142 yards.

Bears’ Hardin taken from field on cart CHICAGO – Bears backup safety Brandon Hardin was taken from the field on a cart because of a neck injury early in the third quarter Saturday night in a preseason game against the Washington Redskins. Chicago’s Lorenzo Booker had just returned the opening kickoff of the second half 105 yards for a touchdown, when Hardin went down. He was injured trying to tackle Logan Paulsen on a 19-yard pass from Kirk Cousins on the next play from scrimmage.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Houston Texans' Arian Foster carries in the first quarter an NFL preseason game against the San Francisco 49ers on Saturday in Houston. Hardin stayed down for fore being placed on a hands and gave the about 10 minutes as medical stretcher and taken away on COMPILED FROM ADVOCATE WIRE REPORTS personnel tended to him be- a cart. He was moving his

PREP VOLLEYBALL Victoria West wins Columbus tournament ADVOCATE STAFF REPORTS

COLUMBUS – Victoria West won six games to claim the championship of the Columbus tournament. Kelsea Kalich had 14 kills to lead the Warriors to a 25-17, 25-13 win over Brenham in the championship game. Kalich had 25 kills in West’s 25-23, 16-25, 25-21 win over La Grange in the semifinals. Kalich, Blair Butschek and Ellen Hermes were named to the all-tournament team for the Warriors, who improved to 7-0 on the season.

Lady Flyers take second SHINER – St. Joseph went 5-1 to finish second in the Shiner tournament. The Lady Flyers beat Shiner St. Paul 25-9, 25-11 in the semifinals before dropping a 18-25, 25-22, 25-19 decision to Burton in the championship game. Lauren Kurtz and Natalie Bales were named to the

all-tournament team for St. Joseph, now 5-2 on the season. Columbus Tournament Championship Brenham 17-13 Victoria West 25-25 Kills: (W) Kelsea Kalich 14 kills, Brooke Kirkpatrick 5, Deane Gallup 4; Blocks: Kirkpatrick 4, Kalich 2; Assists: (W) Ellen Hermes 18; Aces: (W) Hermes 3, Gallup 2. Records: West. All-Tournament: Kelsea Kalich, Blair Butschek, Ellen Hermes. Records: West 7-0.

Semifinals Victoria West 23-25-25 La Grange 25-16-21 Kills: (W) Kelsea Kalich 25, Deane Gallup 8, Blair Butchek 5, Rachel Hamon 3; Blocks: Hamon 6; Assists: Ellen Hermes 37. Brenham 25-23-25 Schulenburg 22-25-20 Kills: (S) India Connor 10, Bay Guentert 6, Kelsie Fietsam 5; Blocks: (S) Sarah Walker 3; Digs: (S) Kristin Moring 16, Shannon Mikesky 12, Bay Guentert 11; Assists: Mikesky 24, Moring 6.

Third Place La Grange 24-25-25 Schulenburg 26-18-20 Kills: (S) Bay Guentert 8, India Connor 7, Sarah Walker 6, Tanner Guentert 5; Blocks: (S) Walker 3; Digs: (S) Kristin Moring 25, Bay Guentert 16, Shannon Mikesky 14, Lexi Fowlkes 6; Assists: (S) Mikesky 25. Records: Schulenburg 5-4. Yoakum 25-25 Stafford 9-14 Kills: (Y) Leslie Seidenberger 8, Latrice Brown 4, Reagan Renken 3; Digs: (Y) Callie Witte 5, Seidenberger 5; Assists: (Y) Witte 11, Faith Hagan 4; Aces: (Y) Seidenberger 3, Witte 2, Brown 2.

Yoakum 24-12 Sweeny 26-25 Kills: (Y) Leslie Seidenberger 5; Blocks: (Y) Jaccarri Hights 4, Callie Witte 3; Digs: (Y) Witte 6, Faith Hagan 5, Shelby Pesek 5; Assists: (Y) Witte 9. Records: Yoakum 3-5. Hallettsville 25-22 Gonzales 25-22 Kills: (H) Cassidy Targac 9, Madison Schindler 4, Heather Henneke 3; Digs: (H) Morgan Mitchon 9, Schindler 4, Targac 4; Assists: (H) Schindler 15, Henneke 11; Blocks: (H) Lana Hickson 2, Henneke 2, Sha’Tiara Runnels 2; Aces: (H) Alicia Grahman 6, Mitchon 2, Schindler 2. Hallettsville 25-25 Brazos 22-21 Kills: (H) Heaather Henneke 9, Madison Schindler 5, Cassidy Targac 4; Digs: (H) Alicia Grahman 7, Schindler 7, Henneke 6; Assists; (H) Schindler 12, Henneke 8; Blocks: (H) Lana Hickson 2; Aces: (H) Morgan Mitchon 2. Records: Hallettsville 6-3.

Shiner Tournament Championship Burton 18-25-25 St. Joseph 18-25-25 Kills: (SJ) Lauren Kurtz 10, Analise Ybarbo 4, Carly Boles 4, Natalie Bales 4; Blocks: (SJ) Ybarbo 6; Digs: (SJ) Balkes 16, Peyton Cuellar 15; Assists: (SJ) Bales 19. Records: St. Joseph 5-2.

Semifinals Burton 25-26 Shiner 16-24 Kills: (S) Laneshia Hunt 8, Julianna Rankin 4, Lauren Oden 3; Blocks: (S) Amanise Coleman 5; Digs: (S) Oden 16, Meagan Chumchal 12, Kristin Schacherl 11; Assists: (S) Schacherl 13; Aces: (S) Oden 2. St. Joseph 25-25 Shiner St. Paul 9-11 Kills: (SJ) Carly Boles 6; Blocks: (SJ) Analise Ybarbo 10; Assists: Natalie Bales 12; Aces: (SJ) Kalyn Hempel 3.

Third Place Shiner St. Paul 13-25-18 Shiner 25-18-25 Kills: (S) Laneshia Hunt 10, Julianna Rankin 7, Lauren Oden 5; Digs: (S) Meagan Chumchal 14, Kristin Schacherl 13; Assists: (S) Schacherl 21; Aces: (S) Schacherl 3, Rankin 2. Flatonia 19-19 Shiner 25-25 Kills: (S) Julianna Rankin 5, Laneshia Hunt 4, Tabitha Blaschke 3; Blocks: (S) Amanise Coleman 3; Digs: (S) Hunt 6, Meagan Chumchal 5; Assists: (S) Kristin Schacherl 16; Aces: (S) Lauren Oden 3, Rankin 2, Schacherl 2. St. Joseph 25-25 Nixon-Smiley 21-9 Kills: (SJ) Lindsey Still 7, Lauren Kurtz 5; Blocks: (SJ) Still 3; Assists: (SJ) Natalie Bales 14. Final results: 1. Burton; 2. St. Joseph; 3. Shiner; 4. Shiner St. Paul; Consolation: Flatonia. MVP: Rachel Warner, Burton. All-Tournament: Burton, Kaitlyn Blakey, Katie Kieke; St. Joseph, Lauren Kurtz, Natalie Bales; Shiner, Laneshia Hunt, Kristin Schacherl; St. Paul, Morgan Long; Flatonia, Abigail Schacherl; Nixon-Smiley, Devon Tristan; Cuero, Abby Sheppard.

Palacios Tournament Palacios 25-25, Boling 14-19 Ganado 25-25, Columbia 14-21 Van Vleck 25-25, Louise 17-19 Bloomington 25-18-15, Tidehaven 14-25-9 Palacios 25-23-15, Ganado 21-25-8 Van Vleck 25-25, Bloomington 17-20 Columbia 25-25, Boling 18-23 Tidehaven 25-25, Louise 16-20 Consolation: Columbia 22-25-15, Tidehaven 25-16-8 Championship: Palacios 25-19-25-22-15, Van Vleck 18-25-15-25-13

Score. Stats. Spirit!

PGA

Go to AdvoSports.com to find out how the Cowboys did against the Chargers on Saturday.

Garcia takes 1-stroke lead at Wyndham GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) – Sergio Garcia shot a 4-under 66 on Saturday to take the lead at 14-under 196 after three rounds at the Wyndham Championship. Tim Clark and Bud Cauley were a stroke back, with Jason Dufner, Harris English and Carl Pettersson at 12 under entering the final round of the last event before the FedEx Cup playoffs. Dufner shot a 63, Cauley had a 66, Clark a 67, and English and Pettersson 68s. Garcia – whose second-round 63 marked his best PGA Tour round in a decade – made a move with consecutive birdies midway through the back nine that briefly helped him leapfrog his playing partner, Clark. PGA-Wyndham Championship Par Scores

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sergio Garcia hits from a sand trap during the third round of the Wyndham Championship on Saturday. Saturday At Sedgefield Country Club Yardage: 7,117; Par: 70 Third Round Sergio Garcia Bud Cauley Tim Clark Jason Dufner Harris English Carl Pettersson Davis Love III Matt Every Jimmy Walker Justin Leonard Will Claxton Richard H. Lee

67-63-66 66-65-66 63-67-67 68-67-63 66-64-68 62-68-68 67-66-66 65-66-68 66-62-71 68-68-64 69-66-65 66-69-65

— 196 — 197 — 197 — 198 — 198 — 198 — 199 — 199 — 199 — 200 — 200 — 200

-14 -13 -13 -12 -12 -12 -11 -11 -11 -10 -10 -10

Chad Campbell Bill Haas Troy Matteson Webb Simpson Bobby Gates Charl Schwartzel Scott Stallings Tommy Gainey Nicolas Colsaerts Billy Horschel Heath Slocum John Merrick Brandt Snedeker Kevin Streelman Brendon de Jonge D.A. Points Graham DeLaet Rocco Mediate Trevor Immelman John Huh

71-64-65 68-65-67 64-68-68 66-63-71 69-67-65 67-68-66 64-70-67 66-67-68 67-65-69 69-67-66 68-67-67 66-69-67 67-67-68 68-66-68 68-68-67 68-68-67 69-67-67 70-65-68 67-68-68 69-65-69

— 200 — 200 — 200 — 200 — 201 — 201 — 201 — 201 — 201 — 202 — 202 — 202 — 202 — 202 — 203 — 203 — 203 — 203 — 203 — 203

-10 -10 -10 -10 -9 -9 -9 -9 -9 -8 -8 -8 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7

Angel Cabrera Patrick Cantlay Gary Christian Tim Herron Dicky Pride Kyle Thompson Chris Kirk Rod Pampling Kyle Reifers Blake Adams Jeff Overton Russell Knox Y.E. Yang Alexandre Rocha Nick Watney Jamie Donaldson Nick O’Hern Jonas Blixt Scott Dunlap Kevin Stadler Ryan Moore Stuart Appleby Ryuji Imada Josh Teater Derek Lamely Charles Howell III Chez Reavie David Mathis Troy Kelly Cameron Beckman Jerry Kelly Brendan Steele Kevin Kisner Ben Kohles Charlie Wi Camilo Villegas Chris Stroud Arjun Atwal

67-71-66 70-68-66 67-70-67 76-61-67 69-68-67 69-67-68 66-69-69 68-66-70 67-72-66 67-71-67 69-69-67 68-68-69 67-69-69 68-68-69 66-69-70 68-66-71 68-71-67 72-67-67 70-69-67 73-65-68 71-68-68 67-71-69 67-70-70 67-71-69 69-68-70 67-69-71 67-69-71 63-71-73 71-68-69 73-66-69 72-67-69 72-65-71 68-71-70 72-67-70 72-67-70 72-67-70 68-70-72 66-69-75

— 204 — 204 — 204 — 204 — 204 — 204 — 204 — 204 — 205 — 205 — 205 — 205 — 205 — 205 — 205 — 205 — 206 — 206 — 206 — 206 — 207 — 207 — 207 — 207 — 207 — 207 — 207 — 207 — 208 — 208 — 208 — 208 — 209 — 209 — 209 — 209 — 210 — 210

-6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E

NFL

Peppers confirms transcript was posted online CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) – Former North Carolina football star Julius Peppers confirmed it was his academic transcript that was posted on the university’s website and insists there was “no academic fraud” with it. The Chicago Bears’ defensive end released a statement through his agent Saturday, nearly a week after a link to the transcript surfaced. “This week has been an upsetting and challenging week for me, as one of my most private academic documents appeared on the university’s website for public examination,” Peppers said. “I’m terribly disappointed in the fact that my privacy has been violated, as well as frustrated

with whoever negligently and carelessly committed such a flagrant error.” The school never confirmed the authenticity of the transcript, which lists Peppers’ name at the top, but has said it is investigating how the document wound up on the website. School officials removed the link and have said they can’t discuss confidential student information covered by federal privacy laws. The link showed Peppers received some of his highest grades in classes in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies (AFAM). A school investigation has since found fraud and poor oversight in 54 AFAM classes between sum-

mer 2007 and summer 2011, with football players making up more than a third of the enrollments and student-athletes making up 58 percent of the overall enrollments in those suspect classes. “I can assure everyone that there is no academic fraud as it relates to my college transcript,” Peppers said in the statement. “I took every course with qualified members of the UNC faculty and I earned every grade whether it was good or bad. “I was never given unapproved assistance or preferential treatment in terms of my academic career because I was a student-athlete. I was also never deemed ineligible to compete on any of the

football or basketball teams.” Peppers played two seasons for the men’s basketball team under Bill Guthridge and Matt Doherty, serving as a reserve on the team that reached the Final Four in 2000. He was the No. 2 pick of the Carolina Panthers in the 2002 NFL draft, spent eight seasons there before signing with the Bears and is a six-time Pro Bowl defensive end. Nine of the 10 classes in which Peppers earned a B-plus, B or B-minus that could’ve helped ensure his eligibility came in the AFAM department where he was majoring, according to the transcript.

LOCAL GOLF Following are results from Saturday’s Aggie Golf Classic at the Victoria Country Club 2012 Aggie Golf Classic 1st Place: 52 Ron Dickson, Quint Burris,

Zak Koenig, Dr. Mark Spivey. 5th Place: 54 Chris Janak, Dennis Satsky, Daryl Pohalek, Jonathan Pozzi. 12th Place: 59 Alan Culberson, Thomas Culberson, TJ Culberson, Jack Culberson. Straightest Drive #1: Devin New Closest to Hole #8: Ron Dickson Closest to Hole #12: Quint Burris

NBA

Ibaka’s signs new deal reportedly for $48M OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – The Oklahoma City Thunder took a big step toward sticking around as an NBA championship contender. The Thunder and general manager Sam Presti still face difficult decisions in the team’s quest to remain a title threat for the long haul after reaching the NBA Finals last season, but reaching a contract extension with blocks leader Serge Ibaka is certainly a good start. Ibaka came to terms on the deal on Saturday as the Thunder locked up another key member of their nucleus while also putting into question whether the small-market team can afford to keep Sixth Man of the Year James Harden beyond next season.. Ibaka posted on Twitter that he was happy for the chance to play for the Thunder for five more years. Presti didn’t provide details of the contract, citing team policy, but Yahoo! Sports first reported that the deal is for four additional years and $48 million. “At 23 years old (by the

time next season starts), we really do expect his best basketball to be in front of him,” Presti said in a conference call, hours before his wedding. Presti dismissed the notion that Ibaka’s signing means that Harden’s departure is inevitable. But with more than $50 million committed per season to All-Stars Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook and starting center Kendrick Perkins, there is not much room left in the budget for Harden, who earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic team that won gold in London. Ibaka played for Spain’s silver-medal winning Olympic team. Both he and Harden were eligible for extensions to their rookie contracts for the first time this summer and were set to become free agents after next season. To make that happen, Oklahoma City would likely have to go over the salary cap – set at about $58 million for next season – and pay a luxury tax or make other moves, such as using the amnesty clause to erase Perkins’ contract.


C6 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

FINAL MINUTE

PAGE DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR: JOHN HORNBERG, JHORNBERG@VICAD.COM

“I know this is a big year for me. ... Not a lot of teams want to give a fifth-year player practice squad. Somehow, I knew that it was a big year for me to try and make the roster.” CODY WALLACE, Cuero native working to earn make the Texans’ roster

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nick Florence has a chance to prove his mettle this year after a rough time filling in as starter his freshman year.

BAYLOR: Florence lost redshirt year as backup QB in 2011 CONTINUED FROM C1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cody Wallace splashes water on his face during training camp last year. The 27-year-old offensive lineman is hoping to earn a spot on the roster in Houston this year.

ON SPORTS: He is eligible for one more year on practice squad CONTINUED FROM C1 “As far as people’s notions of the NFL before they get there, it’s kind of hard to realize coming from college to the pros what a business it is. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s still a job and you have to keep that in perspective and realize this is your career you’re working at. A lot of times it’s short-lived even if you have a long career. It’s not a whole lifetime worth.” Wallace played center in the Texans’ preseason opener against the Carolina Panthers, but can also play both guard positions, which helped him earn another shot with the team. “Well, Cody’s been here for a while, and he’s a talented guy,” said Texans offensive line coach John Benton. “But probably the biggest reason is he’s very versatile, he can play all three interior spots, he’s got a great handle on the offense, so it was seamless to bring him back that way.” Wallace played at 295 pounds at Texas A&M and went into Saturday night’s game at 307 pounds. He feels more com-

fortable in the Texans’ offense than he did with the 49ers. “Here, they don’t really need you to be that big,” he said. “When I was in San Francisco, there was a point when I was 318 pounds, and I could definitely tell. They were all power whenever I was there. Here it’s a lot of lateral running. They like to have athletic linemen here.” Wallace knows the clock is ticking on his pro football career. He is eligible to play one more season on the practice squad, but has spoken with Sean Washington, the team’s player development director about the future. Wallace’s plans could include returning to Texas A&M where he had begun working toward a master’s degree. “I know this is a big year for me,” Wallace said. “Not a lot of teams want to give a fifth-year player practice squad. Somehow, I knew that it was a big year for me to try and make the roster.” Wallace’s chances of making the Texans’ active roster depend on how he performs the rest of training camp and on

the field in preseason games. “Like anybody else, he’s got to produce on a consistent level,” Benton said. “He’s been very close for a long time and continues to progress and whatnot. But that’ll be how he does it, is through his versatility and contributing that way.” Wallace has found a way to succeed at every level and he hopes to continue the trend. “When I was young, I never really thought about it,” Wallace said. “But once I got into high school and started playing football, my whole goal was just to get a college scholarship. Once I was able to do that and finally get to start in college that became my next goal. “It’s been a lot of fun to realize a dream that you’ve worked hard for since you were a freshman in high school.” Mike Forman is a sports writer for the Victoria Advocate. Contact him at 361-580-6588 or mforman@vicad.com, or comment on this column at www.VictoriaAdvocate.com.

Wallace likes Aggies’ move to SEC Cody Wallace was an All-Big 12 center at Texas A&M, but is excited about the Aggies’ joining the Southeastern Conference. “I think it’s going to be great for us in the long run,” Wallace said. “It’s going to bring a lot of exciting games to Kyle Field, which will be fun and hopefully I’ll get to get back for some of them. It’s sad that the rivalry is going to be lost a little bit, but I’m sure we’ll make some new ones.” – MIKE FORMAN

scored 31 points to turn a tight game into a 66-42 victory. That cost Florence a redshirt year. So instead of this year and next as Briles originally planned, Florence has only this season to be the starter. Yet the senior quarterback, also the primary starter in 2009 as a freshman when Griffin tore ligaments in his knee, has no regrets about burning a full season of eligibility for that one half of football. “I had the funnest half of football you could have,” said Florence, who is in graduate school. “I have one year, all I can ask for is an opportunity to play, and I’m going to get that opportunity and I’m going to have fun with it, and take advantage of it.” Florence isn’t alone in trying to prove that Baylor can keep winning without Griffin, now starting for the Washington Redskins after bypassing his senior season and being the second overall draft pick. “This year I feel is the statement year,” junior linebacker Ahmad Dixon said. “I understand that last year we made a statement, but this year, we have to prove to people that Baylor is never defined by one guy on the team, one star on the team. It’s a team thing, and we applaud Robert for everything he did. But it’s time now that we show people that we’re not just a one-hit wonder.” Baylor plays its first game in the post-RG3 era Sept. 2 at home against SMU. The Bears go into the season with a six-game winning streak. Northern Illinois (nine games) and new Big 12 foe TCU (eight games) are

BAYLOR’S KEY LOSSES ■ QB

Robert Griffin III: 291-402, 4,293 yards passing, 37 TDs, 6 INTs; 179 rushing attempts, 699 yards, 10 TDs ■ WR Kendall Wright: 108 catches, 1,663 yards and 14 TDs ■ RB Terrance Ganaway: 1,547 yards rushing and 21 TDs ■ Key linemen: Philip Blake (C), Robert T. Griffin (OL) the only FBS teams with longer active streaks. “They have us picked to finish seventh (in the Big 12). ... That’s just more motivation,” senior receiver Terrance Williams said. “We just see that we can show them better than we can tell them. So that’s basically what we’re trying to do.” Griffin was one of five offensive starters drafted by NFL teams last spring. The others were big-play receiver Kendall Wright, running back Terrance Ganaway, center Philip Blake and offensive lineman Robert T. Griffin. The Bears set 101 offensive records last season, when they averaged 587 total yards and 45 points a game. In 2010, the Bears won seven games and ended a 16-year bowl drought with their first winning season as a Big 12 team. They followed that by matching the team record of 10 wins set during Mike Singletary’s senior season in 1980, and got their first bowl victory in 19 years. “Can they maintain what they did last year was actually asked of us last year after we got to a bowl game for the first time in a long time,” Briles said. “They were saying can (Baylor) sustain again and win in ’11. The answer was yes.”

TEE’S MUSIC HOUSE


E2 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

PUZZLES&GAMES

PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM

RELEASE DATE - SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012

LOS ANGELES TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

“INVITATION TO THE DANCE” by PANCHO HARRISON ■ EDITED BY RICH NORRIS AND JOYCE NICHOLS 1 5 9 14 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 30 33 34 38 39 43 46 51 52 53 54 55 57 60 61 64 65 66 71 73 74

ACROSS Frivolous Household moniker Farm houses Medieval Italian chest Western casino city Portent Longtime talk show Sewing case item 117-Across film which he also co-directed She won the All-Around gymnastics gold eight years before Mary Lou Male prefix Simoleons Film that earned 117-Across a Best Actor nomination Prize hopeful Shakespeare’s fairy queen Instead Chaney of chillers Garment district biz Film pairing 117-Across with Fred Astaire Former Toyota models Kingly Mauna __ Brouhaha Rest Like reel-to-reel recordings Prepare With 75-Across, Scopes Trial film featuring 117-Across Newer, in a way Leb. neighbor Handbook list, briefly 117-Across Oscar-winning film Moment to shine Publicity “Good heavens!”

75 See 60-Across 77 “Wonder Woman” star Carter 79 It’s measured in litres 84 Corkscrew pasta 85 Uruguayan uncle 86 PBS funder 89 Hindemith’s instrument 90 Journalist Alexander 91 117-Across film with a classic umbrella scene 95 Uses a cell 97 Lateral opening? 98 Marine flier 99 Calgary’s province 103 So-so 106 117-Across’s film debut 110 Daring 115 Caribbean honeymoon destination 116 Discontinue 117 Song-and-dance man born 8/23/1912 120 Cave __: beware of the dog 121 “Oklahoma!” aunt 122 Airport sign in red letters 123 Fateful day 124 Bk. after Genesis 125 Floor 126 Not at all wandering 127 Arboreal abode DOWN 1 Package label word 2 “Leading With My Chin” author 3 Absorbed by 4 Sci-fi writer whose career spans more than 70 years 5 Place for a patch 6 Latin trio word 7 Chapel bench

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 21 23 28 29 31 32 34 35 36 37 40 41 42 44 45 47 48 49 50 54 56 58 59 60 62 63 64 66 67

1997-2006 U.N. chief Bury, say Colorful fish Novus __ seclorum: dollar bill phrase Dancers, often Alternatives to Nehis Nighttime problem “The Kiss” sculptor Herder from Wales Lei giver’s greeting Tool serrations Caesar’s end? “I, Claudius” role Crisis offering Gal in a gang __-European Literary Pound Financial claim Saturn maker The same to vous? Pleased Like some sums Antique auto Regional plant life Language for a 69-Down Sorbonne sweetie Word spoken with one hand up Copier insert: Abbr. Grounded fleet: Abbr. Sloped connection Sign of spring Common Mkt. What Butler didn’t give 19s Cosby/Culp show Sell Miff Business abbr. Prince Valiant’s wife Like a hopeless situation

68 69 70 71 72 76 77 78 80 81 82 83 85 87 88 91 92 93 94 96 99 100 101 102 104 105 107 108 109 111 112 113 114 118 119

Composer Rorem 45-Down speaker “Still Me” memoirist Narrow waterways: Abbr. “I know! I know!” Where Alice’s adventures really took place Household screen target “You can observe a lot by watching” speaker Improvised swing Banzai Pipeline sound Ken of “Brothers & Sisters” Country way “__ better to have loved ...”: Tennyson __’acte Big name in shaving Where to find happy mediums? Poetic technique St. Petersburg’s river Most costly Taxonomic suffix “I’ve Just Seen __”: Beatles His story is told by the Once-ler Kirby of “City Slickers” Surround tightly “Enigma Variations” composer Cry of fear Shoulder muscle, for short Bueno’s opposite Nieuwpoort’s river Check Retro sign word Spots in la mer Dermatologist’s concern “Little” ’60s singer Swig

©2012 Tribune Media Services Inc.

ANSWERS

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these six Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form six ordinary words.

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

SHOCOY ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SALVIH UWATOL NACCEH

SUDOKU

SSMYTE

Q1

ANSWERS TO WEEKLY BRIDGE QUIZ Q 3 - As South, vulnerable,

- Both vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠ A J 7♥ K 10 9 3 ♦ A J 9 6 2♣ 8 The bidding has proceeded:

you hold: ♠ J 8 3♥ A 9 8 6 2 ♦ 9 4♣ J 7 6 The bidding has proceeded:

SOUTH WEST

NORTH EAST

NORTH EAST

1♦ Pass 1♠ Pass ? What do you bid now? A - A bid of two hearts now would be a reverse, showing extra strength. Since you have a minimum opener, all you can do for the moment is raise to two spades and see how partner reacts.

Q2

- Both vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠ 8♥ A J 8 6 3 ♦ K 7♣ Q J 7 4 3 As dealer, what action do you take? A - Pass! You have no good rebid over partner’s expected one-spade response. To bid two-clubs with such a shabby suit asks for trouble and to bid one no trump with a weak singleton, even though partner has responded in the suit, misdescribes your holding.

SOUTH WEST

1♦ Pass 1♥ Pass 1♠ Pass ? What action do you take? A - Partner’s one-spade rebid was not forcing, so take advantage of this to tell partner you have a mediocre hand - pass!

Q4

- As South, vulnerable, you hold: ♠ A Q 9 3♥ K J 5 ♦ 7♣ A 9 6 4 3 The bidding has proceeded: SOUTH WEST

NORTH EAST

1♣ Pass 1♠ Pass ? What do you bid now? A - With 14 high-card points, a singleton and no wasted values, your hand is worth more like 18 points than its high-card points suggest. Jump raise to three spades.

Q 5 - Both vulnerable, as

South, you hold: ♠ Q 7 6 2♥ A Q 7 4 ♦ 6♣ A K J 6

CITPED

The bidding has proceeded: SOUTH WEST

1♣ Pass 1♠ Pass ? What do you bid now? A - In support of spades your hand is worth about 19 points. Tell partner the good news by making a splinter bid in your short suit. Jump to three diamonds!

PRINT YOUR ANSWER IN THE CIRCLES BELOW

LOS ANGELES TIMES

SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle.

Q6

- East-West vulnerable, as South, you hold: ♠ -♥ Q 8 5 4 ♦ A Q 5 2♣ A Q 8 7 3 The bidding has proceeded: SOUTH WEST

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

NORTH EAST

Answer : CHOOSY OUTLAW SYSTEM CHANCE DEPICT LAVISH He wanted to start going to the gym regularly, but he had —

NORTH EAST

TOO MUCH ON HIS PLATE

1♣ Pass 1♥ Pass ? What do you bid now? A - A jump to three spades would show a singleton and a strong hand - theoretically, to show a void you need to jump to four spades. However, that gets you to the five-level. You have to tell a little white lie and treat your void as a singleton - jump to three spades.

JUMBLE

Email responses to gorenbridge@aol.com.

A S P I C

M O U T H

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NEW YORK TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLE “THE MEANING OF IT” by WILL SHORTZ ■ EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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ACROSS Tsp. or tbsp. Tax expert, briefly Slow-cooked dish “Star Trek: T.N.G.” character Geordi ___ Coin of little value Mine layer Iditarod endpoint Short, light musical piece “Talking isn’t going to reseal that wine bottle!” “Quit trying to make a paper doll by ripping the paper!” “I can see why shoppers avoid this off-brand white bread!” One of England’s Cinque Ports Dinette set Cry for Zookeeper’s injuries, maybe Beverage that’s graded “Do the Right Thing” pizzeria “I already know my homemade cold cream is useless!” “So you finally got the gist of that Stephen Hawking book!” Response to feeble excuses Scrammed Semitransparent curtain Carnival dance Faulkner’s “A Rose for ___” Seat seeker Hard workers Lawn starter Actress Russo Furry feller? Spree stops “Of course this car isn’t voice-controlled!” Go by IHOP order

70 72 75 76 77 78

Hold up one’s end? Field authority Wood nymph Drink name suffix Saintly quality Peabody Essex Museum city 80 Old Testament section 83 Slow and steady 85 Lucky charms 88 “This tippy Christmas tree is driving me crazy!” 91 “Stop dillydallying and use your boarding pass!” 94 Apiece 95 Old school 96 Mechanical engineer Howe 97 Grotesque giant 98 Practices wearing gloves 103 Underside of a ship 104 “How dare you climb a barbed-wire fence wearing my sweater!” 106 “I’m in a hurry to see that bug squashed!” 110 “Yeah, I’m asking for people’s impression of this inkblot -- so?!” 111 Annual Academy list 112 “Catch!” 113 U-Haul driver’s place 114 Abbr. for an unlimited number? 115 They take stock during an emergency 116 Senatorial agreements 117 Rooting area 118 [How shameful!] DOWN 1 Gelatin made from consommZ 2 Conversation opener? 3 Rwandan people 4 Truffle coating

5 Boat tip 6 Pilot who makes vertical takeoffs 7 Most snarky 8 In good shape 9 Kuwaiti ruler 10 Ready to go through the wringer 11 Slatted windows 12 Kicks in one’s share 13 Barometer reading 14 1951 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee 15 Kia subcompact 16 Bearded beast 17 Partake of 21 “Great” guy 23 “Maisie” star Sothern 24 Honored a king, perhaps 27 Peace disrupter 30 It means “farmer” in Afrikaans 31 Binary star in Cetus 32 Bullet points 33 First circle of hell in Dante’s “Inferno” 34 Work in a bakery 35 Castaway’s message 36 Hip-hop’s Run-___ 37 Shirley who sang “Goldfinger” 38 Eisner’s successor as Disney chief 39 Marisa of “The Wrestler” 40 Really economize 41 Claim 42 Approximately one out of every two deliveries 43 Sea gull nesting site, maybe 47 Gave out 48 Fighting spirit 51 Handles badly?

52 Besieged city during the Spanish Civil War 54 Pinkish red 55 Single-sex house, usually 58 Symbol on California’s flag 59 Spot 60 55-Down letter 62 Like Tarzan’s mannerisms 64 Whitebeards 65 D-Day code name 66 Incessantly 67 The Teflon Don 71 Opposite of “da” 72 Employment 73 “Speed-the-Plow” playwright 74 Demotion victim of 2006 77 Palmtop, e.g., in brief 79 North Carolina college town 81 Muckraker Jacob 82 Vegas attraction 83 Hedonists’ opposites 84 ___ degree 86 Kid aged 10-12 87 Goofballs 89 Renders invalid 90 Dainty desserts 92 Inclines 93 Stable supply 97 John who wrote “Appointment in Samarra” 98 Didn’t get involved 99 Skilled hand 100 Until now 101 Joins the mob 102 Unable to leave 103 Paleontological find 104 Quaker pronoun 105 Coup d’___ 106 NBC offering, briefly 107 Besides 108 Alt-rock genre 109 Animal trap 110 It’s asked for a reason

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RELEASE DATE - SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012

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VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — E3

VictoriaAdvocate.com

YOUR LIFE

PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

MEETINGS AND SUPPORT GROUPS SUNDAY WONDERKIDS CLASSES Parkway Church, Rooms 203 and 204. ■ 4802 John Stockbauer Drive ■ 11 a.m. ■ Designed for children and youth with special needs (two groups, ages 2-10 and ages 11-18). ■ Email: krisiti@parkwayvictoria.org ■

■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 10-11 a.m. ■ Ginger Watkins with

Advanced Home Health Services sponsor the event.

BLOOD DRIVE

DIVORCE CARE FOR WOMEN

■ Halepaska’s Bakery ■ 5805 John Stockbauer Drive ■ 3-7 p.m. ■ Contact: Visit the “blood” page

■ ■ ■ ■ ■

at southtexasblood.org or call 800-292-5534, ext. 3500.

TUESDAY

CELEBRATE RECOVERY Faith Family Church, choir room ■ 2002 E. Mockingbird Lane ■ 9-10 a.m. ■ Contact: 361-652-8137. ■

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD LODGE 3694 MEETING ■ ■ ■ ■

Golden Corral 5102 N. Navarro St. 6:30 p.m. Contact: Bobby L. Clark at 361-578-5066.

CHRISTIANS AGAINST SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA) Central Church of Christ, annex 801 E. Airline Road 9-10 a.m. A 12-step recovery program for any kind of addiction. Including but not limited to drug, alcohol. ■ Contact the church at 361-573-9133. ■ ■ ■ ■

MONDAY NAMI VICTORIA MONTHLY MEETING St. Francis Episcopal Church 3002 Miori Lane All Saints Room. 6:30 p.m. No charge, all are welcome. Open to the public. Discuss mental health issues. ■ Contact: Lisa, 361-935-0080. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

VICTORIA BOULEVARD LIONS CLUB MEETING ■ ■ ■ ■

Grapevine Cafe 110 Medical Drive 6-7 p.m. Contact: Cheryl Moore, president, 361-578-7449.

DIVORCE CARE ■ ■ ■ ■

Faith Family Church 2002 E. Mockingbird Lane 7 p.m. Contact: Adam Harris, 361-573-2484, Ext. 10.

CELEBRATE RECOVERY Parkway Church 4802 John Stockbauer Drive 6:30-8:30 p.m. A place of healing for life’s hurts, hang-ups and habits. ■ Contact: Becky at 361-572-8340. ■ ■ ■ ■

YOUNG-AT-HEART ■ ■ ■ ■

Baptist Temple Church 1804 N. Laurent St. 2-4:30 p.m. Contact: 361-573-9157.

KIWANIS CLUB OF VICTORIA MEETING ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Sky Restaurant 236 Foster Field Drive Noon-1 p.m. New members are welcome. Contact: Terry Blevins, 361-573-6451 or terrylynn@suddenlink.net

BINGO ■

Victoria County Senior Citizens Murray Center

have to be diagnosed, taking medications or in recovery to attend. ■ For more info, call 361-578-3935.

VICTORIA COMPOSITE SQUADRON OF THE CIVIL AIR PATROL MEETING ■ 6 p.m. ■ Building

381 on Hangar Drive at Victoria Regional Airport ■ Anyone interested in aviation, search and rescue, and the training of cadets for a future in aviation or the military are invited to attend. ■ Contact: Robert H. Brecount, 361-575-0078.

TOASTMASTERS ■ Gonzales

County Farm Bureau Community Room ■ 1731 Seydler St., Gonzales. Visitors are welcome.

VFW POST 4146 AND AUXILIARY ■ 2001 VFW/Lova Drive ■ 7 p.m. covered dish meal;

8

p.m. meeting ■ Contact: Winnie McCarrell, 361-574-8939.

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY ■ First

Baptist Church Fellowship

Hall ■ Moody Street entrance ■ 8:30-10 a.m. ■ Contact: 361-572-0523 or 361-578-1205.

MOM’S DAY OUT ■ Baptist Temple Church ■ 1804 N. Laurent St. ■ 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. ■ Contact: 361-573-9157.

KNIT HAPPENS ■ Parkway Church ■ 4802 John Stockbauer Drive ■ 5:30-7:30 p.m. ■ Knitting and support group for

any life challenge. (Enter building through the side entrance.) ■ Contact: Cindy Tharp at 361-655-1418.

DIVORCE CARE FOR MEN ■ Parkway Church ■ 4802 John Stockbauer Drive ■ Church offices facing Salem ■ 6:30-8:30 p.m. ■ Contact: 361-572-8340, or

becky@parkwayvictoria.org

LIVING COURAGE SUPPORT GROUP ■ Mid-Coast Family Services ■ 120 S. Main, Suite 310 ■ 2-3 p.m. ■ For female survivors of family

violence who have been affected by physical or emotional abuse, either past or present. ■ Contact the Family Violence Department at Mid-Coast Family Services to sign-up: 361-575-7842.

NAMI CONNECTION PEER SUPPORT GROUP ■ 3002 Miori Lane ■ 6-7:30 p.m. ■ Meet at 5:45 p.m.,

group starts at 6 p.m. Consumers do not

Parkway Church 4802 John Stockbauer Drive Church offices facing Salem 6:30-8:30 p.m. Contact: 361-572-8340, or becky@parkwayvictoria.org

Aug. 21 – A novelty in the shape of a hen’s egg was found about the Laycock Livery stable a few days ago. The contents of the egg have apparently hardened and settled in one end, and if it is placed on a flat surface, it jumps about like it is full of life on the order of a “Roly Poly” toy. A man gathered this egg along with others, and when he laid them on a table, he was nearly frightened out of his wits when it began to jump about. Aug. 24 – The Junior, Intermediate and Adult Sunday School Classes of the First Presbyterian Church enjoyed a straw ride last evening. Refreshments were served on the Pump House lawn.

1937 Aug. 22 – Port O’Connor, long recognized as one of the finest fishing grounds on the Texas coast by sportsmen through the state, is fast losing a patronage that is otherwise deserved – because of lack of good roads and shorter routes leading to the resort. Aug. 23 – Victoria County’s current cotton crop passed over the 7,000 bale stage Saturday with 7,300 bales ginned in the county up to Saturday night. The cotton market, however, continued in a slump with prices well under 10 cents. The day’s price was 9.61 cents per pound with no immediate indication that a rise would be in effect in the near future.

1962 Aug. 20 – A total of 33,447 Victoria residents, representing near-

ly 72 percent of the entire population of 46,475, appeared in person at 14 dispensing stations for the first of three Sabin oral polio vaccine immunizations, or received it elsewhere. The “elsewhere” included the City and County Jails, where 25 prisoners were given the vaccine; local hospitals, where 235 patients received it, and the Twin Pines Nursing Foundation home, where more than 100 oldsters were not neglected. Aug. 25 – Army PFC James F. Mealer Jr., son of Mrs. Katherine Mealer, participated with more than 70,000 Army and Air Force personnel in Exercise Swift Strike II, a two-week U.S. Strike Command Maneuver in North and South Carolina that ended Aug. 17. Mealer is a clerk in Headquarters of the 4th Logistical Command regularly stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C. He entered the Army in September 1961 and completed basic training at Fort Carson, Colo. and is a 1961 graduate of Victoria High School.

1987 Aug. 19 – Texans paying high interest rates should cut up their bank credit cards and shop for cheaper ones, Consumers Union urged Tuesday. Carol Barger, CU’s southwest director, said a July survey showed credit card interest rates are out of kilter at many Texas banks, especially ones that have moved their credit card operations out of the state to avoid the 14 percent legal maximum here. “Results show consumers are still paying too much for credit at a time when the lending rates for

donation of $3 will be accepted. ■ All senior citizens, 60 years of age or older and their spouses (regardless of age), are invited to attend a luncheon each Wednesday. A hot meal will be served at 11:30 a.m. Bingo will be played after lunch. A suggested donation of $3 will be accepted. The event is presented by the Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association, Inc.

I CAN CONTROL MY DIABETES Pine Street Community Center 803 Pine St. 6-8 p.m. Free Seven classes to learn to control your diabetes. Each Tuesday through Oct. 2 ■ Call to register at 361-575-4581.

QUILTERS & CRAFTERS

COMPUTER CLASS | INTRO TO MICROSOFT OFFICE 2007

SELF-GUIDED COMPUTER TRAINING

Workforce Solution Golden Crescent Computer Lab ■ Victoria Public Library ■ 302 N. Main St. ■ 9:30-11:30 a.m. ■ An introduction to commonly-used features in Word 2007. Registration required by phone or online, victoriapubliclibrary.org. ■ For more information call the Victoria Public Library, 361-485-3302.

■ Victoria Public Library ■ 302 N. Main St. ■ 9-10:30 a.m. ■ Enhance your skills with

■ ■ ■ ■ ■

GAME/BRIDGE DAY Victoria County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ Noon-3 p.m. ■ Anyone 60 or older can come play card games, board games, dominoes, Bridge, or shoot a game of pool. ■ To reserve a place for Bridge, call Johnnie Gayda at 361-645-3763. ■

OLS BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP Trinity Hall 204 W. River St 6-8 p.m. Tim Hornback Executive Director of CASA will speak on CASA: The Child Advocate ■ Contact: Naomi 361-648-3318. ■ ■ ■ ■

■ Victoria

County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 8 a.m.-3 p.m. ■ Fun, food and fellowship while you quilt or craft items. Come-and-go atmosphere. Bring a friend.

more than 110 different tutorials. ■ Visit victoriapubliclibrary.org or call the Victoria Public Library, 361-485-3302.

BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKED ■ Victoria

County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 10-11 a.m. ■ Pauline Pena with Citizens Medical Center Home Health will sponsor the event.

LUNCHEON AND BINGO ■ First

United Methodist Church fellowship hall ■ 601 South Second St., Seadrift ■ 11:30 a.m. ■ A suggested donation of $3 will be accepted. ■ All senior citizens, 60 years of age or older and their spouses (regardless of age), are invited to attend. A hot meal will be served at 11:30 a.m. Bingo will be played after lunch. The event is presented by the Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association, Inc.

ADVANCE BABY SHOWER ON PREGNANCY WELLNESS

CHRISTIANS AGAINST SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA)

■ Trinity

Bloomington Church of Christ Corner of Fifth Street and Rail Street, Bloomington ■ 7-8 p.m. ■ Twelve-step recovery program for any kind of addiction. Including but not limited to drug, alcohol. ■ Contact: Robert Schmidt at 361-920-1947.

■ 106 N. DeLeon St. ■ 1:30-3 p.m. (session 3) ■ 3:30-5 p.m. (session 2) ■ All pregnant ladies will receive

■ ■

AUG. 22

Lutheran Church, nurs-

ery

a free diaper bag at this shower since all three sessions are being taught. ■ Contact: Jo Ann Garcia at 361-542-6938 or Driscoll Children’s Health Plan-Member Services at 877-220-6376.

BLIND COURAGE SUPPORT GROUP

WEIGHT WATCHERS MEETING

Victoria Mall Community Room ■ 7802 N. Navarro St. ■ 9:30-11:30 a.m. ■ Your care provider or family member is welcome to accompany you. ■ Contact: Debbie Ross, 361-573-2424, or Donna Munsch, 361-580-1998.

35, Port Lavaca. ■ Registration begins at 5 p.m., meeting at 5:30 p.m. ■ For more information contact Pat Babb at 361-576-4705.

LUNCHEON AND BINGO First United Methodist Church fellowship hall ■ 601 South Second St., Seadrift ■

100, 75, 50 AND 25 YEARS AGO 1912

POTLUCK DINNER

■ 11:30 a.m. ■ A suggested

■ Best Western ■ 2202 N. Highway

THURSDAY QUILT GUILD OF VICTORIA ■ Grace Presbyterian Church ■ 3604 N. Ben Jordan St. ■ 9:30 a.m. ■ We meet the fourth Thursday

of each month. quiltguildvictoria.org

■ Contact:

COMPUTER CLASSES/ INTERMEDIATE WORD 2007 ■ Workforce

Solution Golden Crescent Computer Lab ■ Victoria Public Library ■ 302 N. Main St. ■ 9:30-11:30 a.m. ■ This class will expand your knowledge of Microsoft Word 2007 beyond the basics. Registration required by phone or online, victoriapubliclibrary.org. ■ For more information contact the Victoria Public Library, 361-485-3302.

BINGO ■ Victoria

County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 10-11 a.m. ■ Sandra Pace with Comfort Keepers will sponsor the event.

BINGO ■ Victoria

County Senior Citizens Halsey Center ■ 4009 Halsey St. ■ 10-11 a.m. ■ Holli Hasserodt with Elmcroft of Victoria Assisted Living will sponsor the event.

HOW TO RAISE A MONEY-SMART CHILD ■ The Club at Colony Creek ■ 301 Colony Creek Drive ■ noon ■ Free ■ Learn how to start teaching

your child or grandchild about financial goal-setting, self-discipline and the basics of making wise money choices. ■ Contact: Michele Rohde, Edward Jones Financial Advisor, at 361-579-9251 to RSVP.

PROGRESSIVE BRIDGE ■ Victoria

County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 12:30-3 p.m. ■ For the serious Bridge player. ■ To reserve a place for Bridge, call Johnnie Gayda at 361-645-3763.

CHRISTIANS AGAINST SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA) ■ Central Church of Christ, annex ■ 801 E. Airline Road ■ 7-8 p.m. ■ Twelve-step recovery program

for any kind of addiction. Including but not limited to drug, alcohol. Meets on Thursday and Saturdays. The Thursday meeting is under new leadership. ■ Contact the church at 361-573-9133.

FRIDAY WOMEN RICH IN FAITH MINISTRY ■ Faith

Family Church, Kid’s Life Room. ■ 2002 Mockingbird Lane ■ 7-9 p.m. ■ A support group for women who have or had distractions with their walk with God. We invite you and your friends to join us for study, fellowship and fun. Our mission is to help and encourage women to find the true love that God has for them. Childcare provided. ■ Contact: Patricia Pruett, leader at 361-578-2677.

ADULT GAMES NIGHT AND

■ ■ ■ ■ ■

First Baptist Church 301 N. Glass St. 6:30 p.m. Public is invited. Contact church office 361-573-4373.

THE VICTORIA WRIGHT-PATTERSON MAHJONGG CLUB ■ ■ ■

1 p.m. Beginners are welcome. Call 361-575-1344 for location.

TEXERCISE Victoria County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 9-10 a.m. ■ Rita Williams with Warm Springs Specialty Hospital will lead the exercises. ■

BINGO Victoria County Senior Citizens Murray Center ■ 603 E. Murray St. ■ 10-11 a.m. ■ Mindy Brown with Carter Health Care will sponsor the event. ■

BLOOD DRIVE First Victoria National Bank, Navarro Branch ■ 8811 N. Navarro St. ■ 2-5 p.m. ■ Contact: Visit the “blood” page at southtexasblood.org or call 800-292-5534, ext. 3500. ■

SATURDAY CHRISTIAN AGAINST SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA) Central Church of Christ, annex 801 E. Airline Road 7-8 p.m. Twelve-step recovery program for any kind of addiction. Including but not limited to drug, alcohol. Meets on Thursday and Saturdays. The Thursday meeting is under new leadership. ■ Contact the church at 361-573-9133. ■ ■ ■ ■

LIFE IMPACT LADIES ■ ■ ■ ■

Life Impact Church 1603 Port Lavaca Drive 3-6 p.m. Contact: Pastors Ray and Janice Vargas at 212-9481.

AUG. 26 WONDERKIDS CLASSES Parkway Church, Rooms 203 and 204. ■ 4802 John Stockbauer Drive ■ 11 a.m. ■ Designed for children and youth with special needs (two groups, ages 2-10 and ages 11-18). ■ Email: krisiti@parkwayvictoria.org ■

CELEBRATE RECOVERY Faith Family Church, choir room ■ 2002 E. Mockingbird Lane ■ 9-10 a.m. ■ Contact: 361-652-8137. ■

CHRISTIANS AGAINST SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA) Central Church of Christ, annex 801 E. Airline Road 9-10 a.m. A 12-step recovery program for any kind of addiction. Including but not limited to drug, alcohol. ■ Contact the church at 361-573-9133. ■ ■ ■ ■

MYSTERY HISTORY other types of loans are still relatively low,” Ms. Barger said at a news conference. Although the Texas ceiling on bank credit card rates is 14 percent, many of the major banks collect 19.8 percent by setting up their MasterCard and Visa operations in other states, primarily Delaware and South Dakota. Aug. 20 – A target closing date for the Texas Zoo is under consideration by the South Texas Zoological Society. Society members decided Wednesday if long-term funding of the zoo cannot be guaranteed, they can no longer “scratch by.” The society voted to establish a committee that will create a one-year budget goal for operating the zoo. And if that goal is not reached by this time next year, the society will turn the keys of the zoo over to the city. The action came out of discussion of the proposed budget for operation of the zoo, beginning Oct. 1. It was partially in response to a proposed $15,000 budget reduction from the city of Victoria. The city is considering giving the zoo $85,000. The budget under consideration by the zoological society is currently between $32,000 and $50,000 shy of revenues to cover the expected $238,000 of operational costs. The zoo’s budget for the current year is $239,158. Jackie Mead, zoo director, noted that funds represent hard dollars needed by the zoo. She said donations of materials and in-kind labor and services would almost double the zoo’s budget.

PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION AT VC/UHV LIBRARY

The people in this photo, which ran on July 29, have been identified. They are, from left, the Rev. Dan Morales, Melissa Mitchell, Tim Griffith, Kelly Bena and Chris Griffith. The occasion was the 1993 Our Lady of Victory parish festival and auction.


H4 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

VIEWPOINTS

C

ongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Editorial page editor: Lauren Hightower-Emerson, 361-580-6590, lhightower@vicad.com

– First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

FROM US

Longer summer vacation not the best idea E ■ Topic: School schedule ■ Our View: State calendar does not meet needs of students

ducation can be a controversial topic in Texas. We have emphasized its importance many times, but there are some aspects of public education today that go against common sense. One of these problems involves the late start Texas students get every year. In 2006, the state legislature passed an amendment to Texas Education Code – Section 25.0811, which postponed the start of school until the fourth Monday in August. The original code prevented schools from starting earlier than the week of Aug. 21. There were many reasons for this decision. Legislators cited a need to take migrant worker schedules and summer employment into consideration, as well as a shortened tourism season, higher

school operation costs, and the need for summer teaching and training programs. According to Diane Boyett, VISD’s communications director, Victoria’s schools have not sought a waiver to start the school year earlier since the law was put in place. While we appreciate the need to be frugal with public money, especially in such an essential area as education, we think making the decision to extend summer vacation to cut back on utility costs is a short-sighted move by the state legislature. Public schools have received budget cuts from the state, but their main focus should always be educating students. According to the National Summer Learning Association, students lose reten-

tion of the information they learned in the previous school year. Expanding summers will only exacerbate this problem, forcing teachers to waste time reviewing last year’s material instead of being free to move on to new concepts. And while this reason may be valid in other districts, according to Boyett, there is no evidence to suggest VISD is saving money on utility or operating costs due to longer summers because campuses are often in use for various programs starting in early August. The argument to give students and their families a longer tourism season seems superficial when compared to the need for improved education in Texas. According to the state comptroller’s website, Texas is ranked 36th in

the nation for high school graduation rates. When looking at SAT scores, the numbers are even worse. Texas is 49th in verbal SAT scores and 46th in average math SAT scores. We understand there are students whose families take full advantage of the summer vacation and also participate in summer learning activities, such as educational camps and visiting historic sites. But there are others who spend all summer at home playing video games, watching TV or doing other things that waste the valuable time they have instead of taking the initiative to expand their minds on their own. For the students who are willing and able to take advantage of their breaks, longer summers are an asset, but

FROM OTHERS

many waste the summer away. Giving them more time will not change their behavior. We would like to see the state legislature re-examine this scheduling law. When we look at Texas’ educational ranking, as well as the lack of savings to our local district, it is clear this expanded summer vacation is not benefiting our students the way it should. Perhaps it is time to take another look at schedules and think about what’s best for students, rather than what will save money and boost tourism economies. We can’t afford to leave our future high and dry in favor of current prosperity. This editorial reflects the views of the Victoria Advocate’s editorial board.

FROM YOU Victorians are what make VISD great

SYNDICATED COLUMN

Paul Ryan : A bold, smart choice for Republicans

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hoosing Paul Ryan is a game-changer. Ask the Chicago Gang and its publicists in the mainstream media. They’re terrified. They know that when Mitt Romney chose Ryan for his vice president, it re-defined the Romney campaign overnight. It proved Mitt was not as boring, cautious and moderate as conservative Republicans feared and the Obama Left hoped. In one bold, smart move, Romney’s VP choice makes it clear that this election is about one thing – the economy. And there is no better person on the planet to discuss that issue than Ryan, the young, articulate, spirited, openly Reaganesque conservative who heads up the House Budget Committee and is the leading Republican deficit hawk in Congress. With Ryan as his VP choice, Romney also took a huge step in redefining what the Republican Party is and reminding everyone what it’s supposed to stand

for. For decades, Reagan conservatives have been wondering what has hapMIKE pened to the GOP my father loved. He worked hard to shape it into a party that clearly and proudly stood for smaller government, more freedom, free enterprise and a strong military. But for two decades, Republican politicians have been trying to out-Democrat the Democrats. The GOP my father left behind lost its way, lost its nerve and chose to betray many of its core principles to win elections. By choosing Ryan, Romney has ended the era of Republicrat fuzziness overnight. It makes me think Mitt and his advisers have decided that the way to defeat Obama was to heed the advice my father gave to the GOP in 1975 at the Conservative Political Action Conference. Republicans, disheartened by the post-Watergate thrashing they got at the

REAGAN

YOUR POEM

EDITORIAL BOARD Dan Easton, Publisher

John M. Roberts, President, Chairman of the Board

Catherine R. McHaney, Secretary-Treasurer

polls in 1974, were being urged by moderates to water down (i.e., liberal-up) their party’s principles to broaden its appeal to voters. My father told them not to further “blur” the distinctions between the two parties but to “revitalize” the GOP by reasserting its conservative principles and raising them “to full view.” He challenged Republicans to raise “a banner of no pale pastels, but bold colors which make it unmistakably clear” that their party believed in “a free market as the greatest provider for the people,” not socialism. The conservative conventioneers took my father’s wise message to heart, but the nation’s voters didn’t. Jimmy Carter was elected in 1976 and the country got four years of economic malaise and folly in the Middle East that did not end until my father was elected in 1980 – as an unabashed conservative. America today is truly at a crossroads. This election is going to decide the direction we take for the next 50

Hamp Rogers, Circulation/ Marketing Director

Becky Cooper, Local Editor Tony Balandran, Delivery Desk Editor

Nick Rogers, Senior Copy Editor Lauren Hightower-Emerson,

Chris Cobler,

Community Conversation Editor

Editor, Vice-President of Content

Jessica Puente, Interactivity Editor

Opinions published on this page under the heading “From Us” represent the consensus views of the editorial board of the Victoria Advocate, whose members are named above.

Lighted Lamps The electricity failed. Lamps stood ready. Wicks rose to meet the match. Kerosene burned its yellow light. Shadows played in the walls. Sr. Frances Cabrini Janvier, Victoria

years. For the first time in a while, the American people will have a clear choice. Do you want the USA to go down the Obama Expressway to Greece or, God forbid, California? Or do you want to go down the Romney-Ryan-Reagan Freeway to freedom, growth and prosperity for all people? It’s up to the American people to decide where they want to go. It’s up to Romney and Ryan – R & R, two letters that look pretty good together, I’d say – to sell their message of conservatism. Americans can’t afford to wait for someone to come along four years from now and fix the damage Obama has already done. Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan, a political consultant, and the author of “The New Reagan Revolution.” Visit his websites at www.michaelereagan.com and www.reagan.com. Send comments to Reagan@caglecartoons.com. Follow @reaganworld on Twitter.

WORDS For I have not sent them, saith the Lord, yet they prophesy a lie in my name; that I might drive you out, and that ye might perish, ye, and the prophets that prophesy unto you. Jeremiah 27:15 “There is a destiny that makes us brothers: None goes his way alone: All that we send into the lives of others comes back into our own.” Edwin Markham, American poet

Editor, the Advocate: As we prepare for another outstanding school year in the Victoria Independent School District, we are extremely excited about the many opportunities and endless possibilities that await our wonderful students and staff. The success of our school district is defined by our leadership and we would like to extend our sincere appreciation to our Board of Trustees for their commitment to excellence throughout our 612 square miles. On August 16, at our regular scheduled board meeting, our Board of Trustees approved a pay scale that affords every employee a salary increase. Our teacher Jaklich salary increases range from $1,050 to $1,300 depending upon their years of experience. Classified and paraprofessional employees will receive a 47 cent per hour increase while administrators will receive a $1,200 annual increase. The Victoria ISD is extremely proud to be able to provide these pay raises at a time when the Legislature has cut school funding and there are still many questions challenging school districts in terms of school finance. We would like to thank our Victoria community for your support of our bond projects and for always serving as a “Champion for our Children.” This dedication to achieving excellence for all students is another example that the “Power of Victoria” is the “Power of our People.” Winston Churchill once stated; “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” It has been said that people who have great hearts and minds never have to fear what lies ahead, for their hearts and minds determine the quality of their future. It is clearly evident that the future of Victoria is in great hands. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Victoria ISD, thank you for all that you “give” to our amazing school district and for your continued focus on “Every Child, Every Classroom, Every Day.” YOU make us great. YOU make us special. YOU make us Victoria.

Robert Jaklich, VISD superintendent, Victoria

SPOTLIGHT LETTER ith Cowboy Camp Thank you for helping w

cate: Editor, the Advo d to have so extremely blesse terest, imagis ity un m m co This ledge, in izens with know ge many willing cit olm Trail Herita e ish Ch e Th . ss ne pl nd ki am d ex g an in n inatio a glow wboy Camp was Museum 2012 Co dinary people. of these extraor , but my grateful ems inadequate se ” andard u, St : to u yo “Thank yo k an so here goes. Th is and Dan Glidness is sincere; av , Construction, Tr el eb ot City, Ful-O -Pep Printing, Go Bo ’s er nd ve Ca l, el l rw be Bu na y An dd e, Pa on d Sl den, -op, Walmart, To nja DeWitt County Co chs, Janie and Laura Veth, So Fu n a gu se ot el Sh Ch d d, an eo McL n Sitton im, TDECU, Ro Ir win, va Ne d an Wolfe, Kathy Cr n le BHP Billiton, Al dist, Double J Sa (his Longhorn), rcle Y, Carolyn Le and Mar vin Ci r, Robert Olive n no athercraft, Shan dlery, AA&E Le gis, Sherri r Supply, Van Har the to ac Tr m Blaschke, fro sto Rodriguez Driskol and Erne k and Jean Nagle, Ted uc Alamo, H-E-B, Ch e Adams, Matt Jo n, an M m Ji , Aven EC. Thigpen and GV A a huge success. s wa p m ca e Th ed nt le to our ta heartfelt thanks mmunity. co us ro ne ge and

Candy Glidden, Cowboy Camp Coordinator, Cuero

WE WANT YOUR LETTERS We want your letters because we value your opinion on issues in the community and region. We have few requirements and will help you meet these if needed. We will need your name, home address and daytime telephone or cell phone number so we can contact you to verify you want your opinion published. When sending letters by email, and if you do not hear from us within a couple of days, you should call us to see if we received your letter because, sometimes, our email filter will not let a letter through. Our letter lengths are 150 words for thank-yous, 200 words for election-related letters and 350 words for all others. We ask that letter writers submit one letter per 30-day period. Letters may be delivered at the Advocate, 311 E. Constitution St.; mailed to P.O. Box 1518, Victoria 77902; faxed to 361-574-1220; or emailed to letters@vicad.com.


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — H5

VictoriaAdvocate.com

■ YOUR SEAT AT THE TABLE

PERSPECTIVES

We invite you to a seat at the editorial board. Send us your ideas and issues to share with community to the Advocate, 311 E. Constitution St.; mail them to P.O. Box 1518, Victoria 77902; or email them to editorialboard@vicad.com.

Editorial page editor: Lauren Hightower-Emerson, 361-580-6590, lhightower@vicad.com

FROM OTHERS

ONLINE POLL OF THE WEEK What do you think is the best school calendar? 1. Longer summer 2. Shorter summer 3. Year-round school 4. Not sure/Don’t know Comment:

To vote on this question, go to VictoriaAdvocate.com, or call 580-6587 to voice your opinion on our Speak Out line.

LAST WEEK’S POLL Poll was conducted during Aug. 10-17 at VictoriaAdvocate.com

How often should parents monitor their child’s online activities?

80% 20% 0% 0% 0%

1. Every day 2. Few times a week 3. Once a week 4. Every few weeks 5. Once a month

SPOTLIGHT ONLINE COMMENT OPINIONS

In Europe, prosperity is taking a vacation

B

oy, our friends in Europe sure know how to vacation. If they get sick while taking their employer-paid vacation, their employer now has to pay them to take another. According to The New York Times, all 27 countries within the European Union, and all employers within them, must abide by that recent vacation ruling by the EU’s highest court. My hat goes off to my vacationing pals overseas. Take the French. Their government mandates that every employee get at least five weeks of paid vacation. The French average 37 days of vacation every year – and 22 paid holidays on top of that. Virtually all European countries have government mandates that require employer-paid vacation of four to six weeks – whereas America has no government-mandated vacation requirements. European employees enjoy all kinds of additional workplace perks and benefits, too. Canadian weekly

Maclean’s reports that: ■ “Spanish workers get an extra two weeks off for honeymoons, TOM and 20 days of severance, even if they’re fired with cause.” ■ “In France, companies must give extra paid leave to staff who work 39 hours per week instead of the statutory 35, even if the workers are paid for the overtime.” ■ “In Italy, firms that lay people off during an economic downturn can face years of costly legal proceedings. ... Rome is proposing a law requiring employers to pay laid-off workers a whopping 27 months in wages.” Vacations are way different in America. CNN says the average employed American worker got about 18 vacation days in 2011, but only used 14 of them. And unlike our European counterparts, we never really “leave” work. Fearing for our jobs, with the economy still in the tank, we stay in

PURCELL

touch with the office. According to Rasmussen Reports, 72 percent of Americans use email, smartphones and other electronic devices to keep themselves accessible to their employers 24 hours a day. It’s even worse for America’s small-business owners. According to Business News Daily, fewer than half take a week off during the summer. With the economy so uncertain and revenues down, many are afraid or unable to hire. They are picking up the slack by working two or three jobs themselves. But we Americans are workers, I suppose. We’re so different from our European friends. In tough times, we are happier working hard and keeping revenues coming in, rather than spending lots of dough at hoity-toity resorts. We don’t like our government telling us or our employers how we ought to conduct business or how many vacation days employers must provide. Heck, if our Supreme Court ruled that employers must not only provide paid vacations but pay for them

all over again if an employee gets sick while vacationing, many Americans would take to the streets in protest. Americans protest loss of their freedoms. Europeans tend to protest meddling with their government-mandated benefits. At least that used to be a distinction between America and Europe. Our government has been so busy handing out goodies to citizens, it’s just a matter of time before the freedom lovers are overrun by the benefit lovers. It will be a sad day when that happens. We’ll have an even more anemic economy, just as most EU nations do now, and all of us will struggle to pursue happiness and wealth. Oh, well, at least our employers will have to pay us for another week off if we get sick while we’re on vacation. Tom Purcell is a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Email Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com.

Stop comparing Paul Ryan to Sarah Palin

T

he charm of Sarah Palin as a vice presidential pick is she set the bar incredibly low for her successors. As long as a nominee can name a newspaper and their foreign policy experience isn’t living next to a foreign country, the press can dub them better than Sarah Palin. More qualified. More gravitas. More ready to lead than Palin was... A Palin standard for being fit for public office is like a Donald Trump standard for public humility. Basically, no standard at all. It’s really not fair to compare Paul Ryan to Sarah Palin. Sure it makes Ryan as a VP nominee seem less cynical – less Hail Mary – less desperate than if Palin had never word-souped the nation four years ago. If John McCain would have picked Tim Pawlenty in ’08, the Ryan pick would look pretty irresponsible. But now the GOP has the “Palin Standard.” A better comparison for Paul Ryan is former Republican presidential candidate Congresswoman Michele Bachmann. Both are from Midwestern cheese-heavy states. Both are high-profile tea party Republicans in the lowest-rated Congress in the history of percentages.

Even when Bachmann is causing international incidents with her xenophobic race baiting TINA about the Muslim Brotherhood’s alleged infiltration of the U.S. government – she sounds as pleasant as someone selling orange juice on television. If the 1980’s Michael J. Fox sit-com character – the beloved Reagan-idolizing Alex P. Keaton – were a self-hating public employee who cherry-picked all the worst parts of Ayn Rand, the Bible and the Heritage Foundation’s reading room, he’d be Paul Ryan! Quirky, young and clearly trying to fill a larger man’s suit – the rightest of Republicans love Paul Ryan. Well they kind of love him. Both Paul Ryan and Michele Bachmann are guilty pleasures for Republicans. They like listening to them beat up on President Obama and spout their cheery condemnations of liberalism, but they don’t want to admit it too loudly, lest they get stuck defending ALL their ideas. Bachmann won the Iowa straw poll, but now she’s not even invited to introduce anyone,

DUPUY

let alone speak, at the upcoming Republican National Convention. Obama tried to campaign against the Ryan Budget plan this past spring since the House GOP voted for it, but that was declared out-of-bounds. Now? It’s in play and Republican politicians are not thrilled about explaining their vote to give future senior citizens coupons for chemotherapy. Bachmann and Ryan also share the distinction of being ineffective lawmakers. According to ThatsMyCongress.com, in her nearly six years in office “Bachmann has passed three rhetorical bills with no force of law, and one amendment that asks an Inspector General to conduct inspections.” Paul Ryan has been an incumbent for twice that time and has only introduced two bills that have become law: One renaming a post office in his home town, the other changing how arrows are taxed (how very 21st century). Bachmann at least gets to distance herself from the Republican Congressional blank check given to the big-spending Bush administration. Under Ryan’s allegedly hawkish eye, his party started two unpaid-for wars, cut taxes during said wars, grew the government,

exploded the national debt and then bailed out unregulated banks with taxpayer money. Paul Ryan voted yes for all of it and doesn’t ask for a correction when he’s called a small government conservative. Both Bachmann and Ryan are also at the extreme end of the spectrum when it comes to gay rights and reproductive freedoms. They both have consistently voted for any anti-abortion/anti-contraception bills that came before them. Ditto with expanding martial rights to same sex couples. Ryan, with all his libertarian billing, has voted to take away liberties from his fellow citizens. He is the government he’s warned us about: Freedom is for corporations, and regulations are for our private lives. If Ryan is now the Republican mainstream, Bachmann is now the Republican mainstream. If Ryan is getting the full embrace of his party – Bachmann should be getting that same welcome into the fray. Or in the case of Republicans in 2012, the fringe. Tina Dupuy is an award-winning writer and the editor-in-chief of SoapBlox. Tina can be reached at tinadupuy@yahoo.com.

Oh my gosh, I am FURIOUS!!! Last I checked, I was living in the United States! It is becoming more obvious that if I were here illegally, or chose not to work, I would have every last thing handed to me! I am so mad! America, WE NEED CHANGE! Remember that in November!

Carrolyn I have been struggling with this issue for a while now. I have a 1-year-old and she gets four shots every two months! I would love it if you or someone could give me more information on exactly what vaccines are really, honestly a good idea to get or what might be poison. I've researched it, but I'm still really not sure

Britnee

Wonder why the risk of catching these diseases is low? Because most people have been vaccinated. Yes few will have an adverse reaction just as with any other medication. Ever seen a young child struggle to breathe with whooping cough? They turn purple and choke. Ever seen the effects of polio? Please, if you do not vaccinate your children, keep them away from others they may unknowingly infect (most of these diseases have an infectious period prior to symptoms) especially children under one year. Whooping cough has been making a recent comeback due to lack of vaccinations, adults can catch it too. So maybe the Pedi who suggests you follow the state mandated vaccinations has seen the consequences of these diseases. So when everyone is required to buy insurance this program will be gone?

Kelly

HOW TO CONTACT YOUR LAWMAKERS TEXAS U.S. SENATORS ■ U.S.

Sen. John Cornyn: 317 Hart Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510, office: (202) 224-2934, fax: (202)228-2856 ■ U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison: 284 Russell Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510, office: (202) 224-5922, fax: (202) 224-0776

TEXAS U.S. REPRESENTATIVES ■ U.S.

Rep. Ron Paul: 203 Cannon House Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515, office: (202) 225-2831 ■ U.S. Rep. Ruben Hinojosa: 2463 Rayburn House Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515, office: (202) 225-2531 ■ U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett: 201 Cannon House Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515, office: (202) 225-4865

TEXAS SENATORS ■ State

Sen. Glenn Hegar: P.O. Box 1008, Katy 77492 office: (281) 391-8883, fax: (281) 391-8818, Austin: (512) 463-0118 ■ State Sen. Juan Hinojosa: 612 Nolana, Suite 410B, McAllen 78504, office: (956) 972-1841, fax: (956) 664-0602, Austin: (512) 463-0120

TEXAS REPRESENTATIVES ■ State

Rep. Geanie Morrison: 1908 N. Laurent, Suite 500, Victoria 77901, office: (361) 572-0196, fax: (361) 576-0747 fax, Austin: (512) 463-0456 ■ State Rep. Todd Hunter: Corpus Christi 78418 Office: (512) 463-0672, fax: (512) 463-5896

VICTORIA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COURT ■ County

Judge: 101 N. Bridge St. Victoria 77901 (361) 575-4558 (general number for the commissioners court) ■ County Commissioners:

Precinct 1 at DaCosta 77905, (361) 575-8711 Precinct 2 at Nursery Drive 77976, (361) 575-3972 Precinct 3 at Goliad Highway 77905, (361) 578-8212 Precinct 4 at Foster Field 77904, (361) 575-5221

VICTORIA COUNTY SHERIFF 101 N. Glass St., Victoria 77901 (361) 575-0651 CITY OF VICTORIA ■ City

Manager and City Council 105 W. Juan Linn St., Victoria 77901, (361) 485-3030


E6 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

YOUR LIFE

PAGE DESIGNER: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG @VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

PETS

PETS OF THE WEEK

Please, take us home DOROTHY H. O’CONNOR PET ADOPTION CENTER 135 Progress Drive, Victoria Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays; Noon to 5 p.m. on Saturdays ■ docpac.net, 361-575-8573 ■ ■

ADOPT-A-PET OF VICTORIA ■ ■ ■

8215 Houston Highway, Victoria Call for hours and more information adoptapetvictoria.com, 361-575-7387

CALHOUN COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY ■ ■ ■

CROSSROADS PET RESCUE ■

Is breeding dogs for you?

Q:

I’m considering purchasing a female dog for my male to breed so that I can sell the puppies. I have never bred dogs but it seems like a pretty easy way to make some spare cash. Do you have any advice for a novice breeder before I jump in with both feet?

A:

201 Stringham Drive, Port Lavaca Call for hours and information. calhouncountyhumanesociety.org, 361-553-8916 By appointment only, 361-935-0751

BY SARAH MARSHALL/ CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Chevy is a 1½-year-old male Boxer with a stunning brindle and white smooth coat. He is already housetrained and crate-trained. Find him at the Dorothy H. O'Connor Pet Adoption Center, 135 Progress Drive, Victoria. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and from noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. For information, call 361-575-8573 or visit www.docpac.net.

PETS

Just like anything else you try and do, you can do it perfectly to the T or you can try and get by doing the bare minimum. The time of “good old ma and pa breeding a good pup” is gone. People who spend good money on puppies expect to get what they have paid for. I’ve heard many, many times from the breeders who use me as their vet: “Breeding is not for those who want to make money but for those who love the breed.” There are multiple types of breeders out there. I’ll hit on the two extremes and the middle of the road. Let’s start from the bottom up. Unfortunately, the majority of people breeding dogs do not put the proper time and effort into it. They go get a male dog, a female dog, let them breed and pray for puppies. They may or may not give any vaccinations, deworming or see a vet before being sold. Sometimes they are not even aware that their dog is pregnant or who she got pregnant from. This makes record keeping a non-existent thing. The quality of dog then becomes questionable. The sale price

of these dogs has to be low because they have not received appropriate care and do not have a recorded background. The purchasers of these pups should expect to foot the bill in medical care that hasn’t previously been provided by the JOHN breeder, not to mention, you FOR THE LOVE have no idea makes OF YOUR PETS what them up genetically. Are they carriers of hip dysplasia, demodectic mange, eye problems (entropion), cryptorchid, parrot mouth/under bite, cleft palate, cleft nose, umbilical/inguinal hernias, liver shunt, heart defects? The middle-of-the-road breeder is pretty responsible. They usually have a well-documented history for both the male and female showing no diagnosed genetic mutations or defects. They are fully aware of who bred who and when. They start deworming the puppies at 10 days of age and have a history from a veterinarian accounting for at least one wellness exam and regularly scheduled vaccinations until the point of sale. These breeders usually make great puppies that are free of most genetic defects and are partially socialized before headed for a new home. These puppies usually sell for a reasonable price to cover the costs of medical

BECK

services and proper record keeping. Finally, there is the tip of the top. These breeders breed for a living. They will get an extensive lineage history of both the male and female before they breed. Not only are these two dogs tested for any diseases, they usually have their hips and eyes certified before being bred. They come from parents who received the same testing and treatment. Pregnant females receive regular radiographs and/or ultrasounds multiple times during their pregnancy to ensure proper development of puppies and monitor mom incase a C-section is needed. Once born the puppies are taken to the vet within the first 24 hours of life and usually once monthly until sold. All vaccinations, dewormings, genetic screenings, etc. are documented and given to the new owner at time of sale. Obviously, these puppies make very expensive pets and are usually purchased with the idea of making them a breeding dog. Breeding is a tough business when done right and profit is usually slim to none (especially when starting out). Consult with other breeders, your veterinarian or me if you have any other questions. Dr. John Beck has a veterinary practice at Hillcrest Animal Hospital in Victoria. Submit questions to Dr. Beck at drjohnbeck@hotmail.com.

Dog’s odd behavior makes scents (MCT)

Q: Molly, our

3-year-old English springer spaniel, hunts slugs every summer evening in our backyard. What’s strange is that she doesn’t eat them — rather, she rolls over on top of them, squishing them into the ground and her fur. Have you ever seen or heard about this?

A: Most likely this be-

havior is the same as when a dog finds a dead animal or some other odoriferous object and rolls all over it so the dog is coated in the scent. I personally cannot say I have noticed much of an odor emitting from slugs, but Molly’s nose is much stronger than mine. Some people say this is an old behavior left over from when dogs were wolves and wolves would do this to hide their scent to fool any prey animals they were sneaking up on. However, this sort of cognitive thought process really is quite rare in any mammal and most likely wolves — and dogs like Molly — do this just because they enjoy the smell of whatever it is they are rolling in and want to preserve it as long as possible.

BY SARAH MARSHALL/ CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Marigold is a 1½-year-old female domestic shorthair mix with an orange tabby and white coat. Find her at the Dorothy H. O'Connor Pet Adoption Center, 135 Progress Drive, Victoria. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and from noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. For information, call 361-575-8573 or visit www.docpac.net.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Pancake is a small female Chihuahua mix who get along with other dogs. Dogs available by appointment only by calling Ron Ledbetter at 361-277-3706, 361-648-0002 or email ronledbetter @directv.net.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Jackson is a 7-year-old, tri-color Rat Terrier/Corgi cross male. He can be found at Adopt-A-Pet of Victoria, 8215 Houston Highway. For hours and information call 361-575-7387 or visit adoptapetvictoria. com.

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VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — E7

VictoriaAdvocate.com PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

■ Graduation ■ Weddings ■ Engagements ■ Anniversaries ■ Parties

TODAY’S HOROSCOPE

45th Anniversary

Price-Miller David and Theresa Saucedo, of El Campo, and David Weston, of Sealy, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jillian Price, of Victoria, to Allan Miller, of Victoria, son of Brenda Talkington, of Victoria, and Allan and Janet Miller Sr., of Victoria. The couple will exchange vows at 2:30 p.m. on September 8, 2012 at Holy Family Catholic Church in Victoria. Jillian is a 1999 graduate of El Campo High School and a 2003 graduate of Sam Houston State University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in General Business. She is the Office Manager at Wolf Point Ranch in Port Lavaca. Allan is a 1999 graduate of Victoria High School and a 2004 graduate of Victoria College with an associates degree in Process Technology. He is the Shop Manager at Allan’s Wrecker Service.

Patricia Kloesel and James Pooley were married on August 19, 1967. They have 2 children: Daniel, of Victoria, and Bruce, of Houston; and 3 grandchildren: Evie and Abbie, of Victoria, and Nicolas, of Houston. James is a devoted husband and grandfather. He retired from a long career within the oil industry. James honorably served two tours in Vietnam. The final tour was served with the Army Special Forces as a Green Beret. Patricia is a devoted wife and grandmother and along with James is a parishioner at Our Lady of Lords Catholic Church, where she is also a member of the Alter Society. She retired from a long career associated with the education field and is an avid book reader.

WA

YOUR PHOTO To submit photos, go to VictoriaAdvocate.com and upload your digital image at Your Photos. To have your picture selected, you must include detailed caption information, including the full name and hometown of the person featured and an explanation of the picture. You also may mail your photographs to: Your Photos, P. O. Box 1518, Victoria, TX 77902

Let’s just table the issue, shall we?

BRANDON

Let These People Procreate Under Any Circumstances Ever list.” And yet, here we are. Two grown adults, living in our very own house that is “technically” owned by our landlord, and without a single surface to eat on or a chair to sit on that is not of the office variety. Yes, my friends, my husband and I have never owned a set of table and chairs. For the past, oh, eight years or so, ever since we met, we have been reduced to eating on the couch like a pair of, of animals (or frat guys, same difference). Now, you’re probably thinking, “How in the world do two grown adults go without a table and chairs for eight, long years!?!” Of course, for all I know, you could be thinking, “Cheese may just be the world’s most perfect food.” And I’d have to agree with you there. But for the sake of continuity, let’s assume you’re thinking the former. It’s not like we didn’t try. We always meant to get an actual dining room set. But other, more pressing financial matters got in the way,

such as paying the vet approximately $3 million because our dumb dog tried to chew his own tail off and the fact that we couldn’t live another day without owning “Rock Band 2.” Although, one time, we did get as far as purchasing a second-hand table. Which we had for years. But since we had no chairs to go with it, it ended up turning into “The Giant Shelf of Random Items We Were Too Lazy to Put Away.” And then, there was the winter we actually used our patio furniture as our “official” indoor table and chairs, which ended after the Great Thanksgiving Collapse of ’09. We also tried to go all bohemian a few times, making people sit on pillows on the floor as they ate off the coffee table, but that stopped once I hit 30 and the process of getting up off the floor started to resemble one of those bugs that gets caught on its back and can’t right itself. And then, a miracle happened. Like a deus ex machina plot twist (yeah, who didn’t pay attention in English class now, Professor Greenberg?) the hand of

God himself came down from the heavens and plopped a beautiful, dark wood six-seater with red velvet chairs right in our dining room. Or, to be more specific, our friend was moving to Chicago and said “Hey, you want this guy?” And we did want that guy. Oh, how we wanted that guy. Finally! A place to have a nice, intimate dinner! A place for guests to actually sit and eat without our aforementioned dumb dog breathing right in their face! A place to whatever else since I need a third example thanks to that annoying “Rule of Three” writing principle. I have to tell you, it has completely changed our lives. All two times we have used it in the past three months. We are now, officially civilized. Aprill Brandon is a columnist for the Advocate. Her column runs every two weeks in the Your Life section. Comment on this story at VictoriaAdvocate.com.

RANCH LIFE

And that’s no bull My boys are very different. Austin is older, has brown hair and deep blue eyes. Jamison is fair haired with green eyes. Their appearances are as different as their personalities. Austin is all about speed. Nothing he does is slow, from effortlessly rushing through his school work, to running at top speed wherever he is headed and talking non-stop. Whenever his body finally does slow down, it is guaranteed his mind is still racing. Jamison is calm and thoughtful. He is very cautious, honest to a fault, and has a streak of shyness. He is agreeable, understanding and is such a hard worker. Whatever he sets his mind to, he does and does it well. As you can tell, I am a very thankful mom. I am thankful of who my boys are and who they will become. I am also very thankful for their many differences. They certainly keep my life interesting. This was all on vivid display recently. In true ranch fashion, we had an appointment to take a new Brahman bull into our local veterinarian’s office to vaccinate and have tests performed. This bull is new to our ranch, young at only 2 1/2 years old, and he is a little spirited. He was not too happy about getting in a trailer, or about being taken away from his girls at the ranch. My youngest child Jamison has recently decided that being a veterinarian would “be cool.” He was busy watching the vet work and asking a ton of ques-

tions. “What is that shot for?” “Why does he do that?” “Did you really stick that there?” “Whoa, he really weighs 1,565 pounds?” Taking a break from his many questions, he added that he weighs 55 pounds. The light bulb went off in Jamison’s head. Just then he realized that this Braham bull, that we affectionately call “Big Boy,” is JOHANNA indeed a force to be reckoned SMELLY with. Jamison SOCKS started explaining his sudden realization to Austin, who was already fully aware of the size situation. Actually, Austin was extremely quiet, which is very unusual for him. Austin and Jamison’s eyes were suddenly extremely wide watching how the vet was working on Big Boy with a new respect for the vet’s abilities in handling the sheer size involved. After a couple of lunges and extreme efforts to break free of the squeeze chute, Big Boy seemed to give up, and he sunk to the ground. Every hair on their head was standing on end and their gazes were razor sharp, watching the vet and the bull. The vet began hurriedly releasing levers so Big Boy could breathe and stand back up. John motioned for me to take the boys behind the metal gate should there be any problem with Big Boy’s unhappiness with his cur-

BLOOM

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR SUNDAY, AUG. 19, 2012:

This year you could be very concerned about your security. You also often find yourself having to repeat conversations after you have them, which could be frustrating. If you are single, you might become very fussy when relating to potential suitors. If that trait emerges, you are not with the right person. If you are attached, you often will have JACQUELINE discussions about finances. Don’t let these talks domiBIGAR’S STARS nate your interactions. VIRGO makes a great accountant.

BIGAR

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

NTED

LIFE LESSONS For years, my husband and I have harbored a shameful secret. A secret so hideous, so horrifying, so wholly conducive to alliteration, we have hardly dared to even whisper it out loud. And the worst APRILL part is we have carried this secret with us LIFE HAPPENS from state to state, apartment to apartment, every time we move, from Ohio to Texas to, now, Boston. Each time, with each new set of friends and colleagues, our pain and embarrassment only growing as we again try and miserably fail to hide this, this abomination from their innocent eyes. This shame has only increased ever since we got married and became somewhat upstanding citizens (hunchbacked citizens). I mean, we pay taxes (occasionally), for crying out loud. We fully intend to register to vote someday probably before we die. Someday, we might even be parents, once Child Protective Services takes us off their “Do Not

C E L E B R AT I O N S

««« You tend to be so responsive that you could assume the role of many other people. Listen to your inner voice before approaching a conversation. Tonight: If the other person doesn’t make the first move, it will be up to you to take the initiative. This Week: Others are energized to tell you exactly what they think. Can you resist rolling your eyes?

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) ««««« You seem to be more childlike and fun than you have been in a long time. As a result, you are better able to relate to other generations, as you draw out the inner child in them, too. For those of you at the right age, romance will bloom. Tonight: Forget tomorrow. Live now. This Week: Accomplishment is your middle name.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) «««« Once you get into a lazy-day mood, it is difficult for you to break out of that mindset. A roommate or family member also might enjoy this laziness, which gives you time to hang out together. Tonight: Act on your newfound spunkiness. This Week: You frolic into Monday ever playful.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) «««« Make your round of Sunday calls or visits to friends and loved ones. As a family-oriented sign, you tend to think of these individuals as part of your extended family. Enjoy the easy pace. Tonight: Catch up on news. This Week: Be nurturing to someone special; he or she might be testing your level of commitment.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) ««««« Make an effort to contact someone you have wanted to spend time with. A late brunch together will give you an opportunity to catch up on each other’s news. Refuse to stand on ceremony with someone. Tonight: Respond to emails. This Week: Others try to draw you in. Only you can decide how interest-

JOHANNA BLOOM/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO rent situation. Suddenly, the bull took a big gasp of air and let out a loud bellow as he jumped to his feet ready to lunge once again. Before I could make a move, Austin shot past my side taking cover on the seemingly safe side of the metal gate. Jamison, however, didn’t move quite as fast. He was so intent on watching exactly what the vet was doing; the sudden movements from the bull, loud bellows and the intense clanking of the metal of the squeeze chute, it took a while to get through to him. He shot behind the metal gate with Austin’s encouragement of, “Run Jamison! Come on!” This encouragement came unfortunately a little too late. Jamison had just received a blast from Big Boy’s swishing tail. This swish consisted of all kinds of smelly stuff that cattle expel when they get excited. Austin smiled at him and gave him the thumbs up sign. Jamison was initiated

into the club. He was a true rancher now. After his initial disgust, his lip curled with a little sense of pride. On that particular day my boys reacted in completely different manners. Austin chose to react, and he reacted very fast. However Jamison’s curiosity got the better of him, and he got his own reward of sorts, a virtual badge of honor. I overheard Austin mentoring Jamison, “Yeah that happened to me a couple of times, but I think you smell worse than I ever did.” That comment made Jamison smile even wider. John and I had to laugh. That familiar saying is so very true, “Boys will be boys.” Johanna is a proud seventh generation Texan. She lives on her family’s South Texas ranch with her husband and two lively boys. Email Johanna Bloom or Anita Spisak at smellysocks@vicad.com.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) «««« You finally slow down and decide to handle your finances, especially if you believe your budget is off. You also might want to make sure you are on solid ground before making a big purchase or taking a mini-vacation. Tonight: Treat yourself and others. This Week: You value making money and working hard. Expect to honor these priorities.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) ««««« You act as if you have your vitality back. Count on this revived feeling as the beginning of a new sense of freeness. The next few months play into this change, and the veil of heaviness will start to disappear. Tonight: Only as you like it. This Week: All smiles, you do whatever you have to do.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) «««« Listen to others with openness. You do not need to comment. In fact, you might want to rethink a situation, as you are getting new information. Keep your own counsel for the moment. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. This Week: You emerge as a force Wednesday. Play it low-key.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) «««« Friends interfere with your plans once more, but you love the attention. How you decide to handle this ongoing popularity needs to suit your life, too. Do not forget an important person who might need to speak to you. Tonight: The festivities surround you. This Week: You have no time to waste -- go for it!

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) «««« Be more in touch with your needs and desires. Others make demands that you might not want to meet. Make it OK to let go and take care of yourself first. Take a vacation from being so responsible. Tonight: In the spotlight. This Week: Assuming responsibility is normal for you. Let others fill in; they will appreciate you more.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) ««««« Look at the whole picture and understand what is happening behind the scenes. You might be missing an important detail involving a friend or loved one at a distance. Once you understand what is happening, you could decide to reverse your stance. Tonight: Let your imagination play out. This Week: Take off if you can.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) «««« Someone close to you makes it clear that he or she wants greater closeness between you, which is what you also desire. Do not be shy or withdrawn. If you allow yourself to be vulnerable, you could experience a new level of closeness. Tonight: Togetherness spices up the night. This Week: Understand what is going on before you jump in.

ADVICE

Cluttered home off-limits to toddler with mold allergy Dear Abby: I have been with my wonderful boyfriend for almost five years, and we have a 4-year-old daughter together. The problem is, his parents are hoarders. Their house is a disaster. It’s falling apart from the inside out. They DEAR have piles of junk in the JEANNE house and PHILLIPS yard, and six dogs that live in the house with them. My daughter has just been diagnosed with a severe allergy to mold. I don’t like her to go to their house, but they adore her and want to spend time with her. I don’t know what to do! I have tried talking to my boyfriend about it, but he’s in complete denial about his parents’ situation and says I’m “overreacting.” I don’t want to hurt their feelings, and I don’t want to keep my daughter from her grandparents. Help, please!

ABBY

Big Boy in the trailer.

ed you are.

things – like animal dander and dust. Dear Abby: My daughter was recently married in our hometown. Although she was born and raised here, she’s now living in another state, so it was a destination wedding for many of the invitees. It wasn’t a large affair – only 60 people attended. I received an email today from an old friend who was surprised to hear about the wedding and wanted to know why she wasn’t invited. I’m at a loss as to how to respond. I have known her a long time and now I feel guilty for not having invited her, but we had decided early on that only family and a few close friends would be invited. Is there a polite way to respond to her? I feel it was rude of her to even ask.

Mother Of The Bride

Dear Mother of the bride: For the woman to ask why she wasn’t on the guest list was, indeed, rude. A polite response would be to tell At A Loss In Texas her the wedding was very small – family and only a Dear At a loss: The lovfew friends were invited – ing grandparents can but you’ll be sure to let her spend time with the child know when the grandchilat your home rather than dren start arriving. theirs. Schedule an appointment with your daughter’s pediaDear Abby is written by trician or allergy specialist Abigail Van Buren, also for you and your boyfriend. known as Jeanne Because your daughter has Phillips, and was foundsevere allergies, he needs to ed by her mother, understand what that Pauline Phillips. Write means and how serious her Dear Abby at allergic reactions could bewww.DearAbby.com or come. If your daughter is alP.O. Box 69440, Los Angelergic to mold, she also may les, CA 90069. be severely allergic to other


E8 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 PAGE DESIGNER: DESIGNER/COPY EDITOR: VERONICA GONZALEZ, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: XXXXXXXXXXX@XXXXXXXXXXX ESTHER PEREZ, EPEREZ@VICAD.COM

VictoriaAdvocate.com

C E L E B R AT I O N S

■ Graduation ■ Weddings ■ Engagements ■ Anniversaries ■ Parties

Spears-Bell

Eichhorn-Lyle Brittany Nicole Eichhorn, of Austin, and Brian Lyle, of Trenton, NJ, were married at 4 p.m. on June 30, 2012 at Holy Family Catholic Church in Victoria. Fr. George Henninger, of Victoria, officiated the doublering ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Ron and Tina Eichhorn, of Victoria. She is the granddaughter of Reinhold and Lois Eichhorn, of Victoria, and the late Ernest Bomersbach, of Houston, and John and Julia Bomersbach of Victoria. The groom is the son of Allan and Sandy Lyle, of Hutto. He is the grandson of John Lyle, of Austin, Tom and Gladys Thompson, of Hutto, and the late Ruth Lyle, of Austin, and Fred Sanford, of West Monroe, LA. Alyssa Lampert, of Austin, attended as maid of honor. Linda Chhay, of Austin, attended as matron or honor. Bridesmaids were Rachel Morris, of Victoria, Deena Smith, of San Antonio, and Megan Lyle, of Jackson, MS, sister of the groom. Ms. Annabell Scott, of San Antonio, attended as flower girl. Adam Lucas, of Tomball, served as best man. Groomsmen were Chad Lawrence, of Round Rock, Marc Fuller, of Houston, Nathaniel Muster, of Austin, and Bracen Eichhorn, of Victoria, brother of the bride. Ushers were Sterling Kocian, of Victoria, and Randy Scott, of San Antonio. A reception was held following the ceremony at Raisin L Ranch. The couple honeymooned in Miami and on a cruise to the Bahamas. They will make their home at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. The bride is a 2007 graduate of St. Joseph High School and a 2011 graduate of The University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing. Prior to the wedding, she was employed as a Registered Nurse at Dell Children’s Medical Center in Austin on the Respiratory Unit. The groom is a 2007 graduate of Hutto High School and a 2009 graduate of Texas A&M University with an Associate’s Degree in Fire Science Technology. He is currently enlisted in The United States Air Force and is stationed at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey as a C-17 Crew Chief.

Miller-Post Ashleigh Miller, of Portland, Texas, and Travis Post, of Portland, Texas, were married at 4:00 p.m. on July 7, 2012 at First United Methodist Church in Portland. Fr. Mark Porterfield, of Port Lavaca, officiated the double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Arlen and Sherri Miller, of Portland. She is the granddaughter of Arlen and Frieda Miller, of Victoria, and Glenn and June Hagemann, of Portland. The groom is the son of Paul and Sandra Post, of Victoria. He is the grandson of F.F. and Elaine Post, of Victoria, and Henry Juenke and the late Earlene Juenke, of Victoria. Koethe Bourgeois, of Thibodaux, Louisiana, friend of the bride, attended as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Amber Hagemann, of Portland, Audrey Hagemann, of Portland, Natalie Post, of Austin, sister of the groom, and Victoria Huerta, of Portland. Clayton Franke, of Goliad, served as best man. Groomsmen were Matthew Miller, of Portland, brother of the bride, Anthony Abrameit, of Richmond, Jaron Post, of Victoria, brother of the groom, and Raymond Smith, of Portland. Ushers were Austin Hagemann, cousin of the bride, and Brian Hagemann, uncle of the bride. A reception was held following the ceremony at Northshore Country Club. The couple will honeymoon in Colorado and will reside in Portland, Texas.

FASHION

Denise Donell Spears and Otis G. Bell, both of Victoria, were married at 5 p.m. on June 2, 2012 at Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Victoria. Rev. Vernon J. Garza, of Victoria, officiated the double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Joyce Bell and the late Allen L. Bell, of Nursery, and the late Fred D. Spears Sr., of Corpus Christi. The groom is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Dallas Bell, of Victoria, and the late Mable Grant, of Victoria. He is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Bell Sr., of Ganado. Mrs. Angie James-Gooden, of Houston, and Mrs. Gwendolyn Spears-Jones, of Montgomery, attended as matrons of honor. Morgan Blakes and Kellen Foster, both of Houston, attended as flower girls. Gary Ellis and Markham Cook, both of Victoria, served as best men. Cassien Foster and Dash Foster, both of Houston, and Kameryn Spears, of Victoria, served as ring bearer’s. Ushers were John L. Barefield, of Victoria, and Quinton Spears, of Montgomery. A reception was held following the ceremony at T.H. Robisnon Fellowship Hall. The couple honeymooned in Las Vegas, Nevada, and will reside in Victoria. The bride is a graduate of Victoria High School and attends Victoria College, majoring in Criminal Justice. She is employed by C.L. Thomas, Inc. The groom is a graduate of Victoria High School and attended Victoria Business School. He is employed by Energy Maintenance Service as a Senior O&M Tech.

25th Anniversary Mike and Janet Sylvester, of Victoria, recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on August 2, 2012 with a family dinner at Red Lobster. Janet Nester and Mike Sylvester were married at First United Methodist Church in Victoria. They have two daughters: Mandy (Pedro) Rodriguez and Amy (Taylor) Imes, both of Victoria; and two grandchildren: Alivia and Ayden Rodriguez, both of Victoria. Mike was born in Victoria, Texas and is retired from Dow Chemical. He currently works at UHV as a security officer, and enjoys motorcycles and hunting. Janet was born in Charleston, West Virginia, she has been in Texas for twenty-five years. She currently works at Toyota, and enjoys taking care of her family. Mike and Janet are both members at Parkway Church.

BIRTHS Editor’s Note: Announcements of births in Victoria County are published as a free public service based on information from local hospitals. For more information, call 361-574-1222. Those outside Victoria County, or more detailed or specially worded, are available for a fee through the classified advertising department. Call 361-574-1226. Paid birth announcements appear on this page in a box.

DeTar Hospital

Mr. and Mrs. Mario Perez of Cuero, a daughter, 6 pounds, at 4:11 a.m. on Aug. 2, 2012 ■ Shanika Nuells and Tory Stovall Sr., a son, 7 pounds, 4 ounces, at 12:49 p.m. on Aug. 2, 2012 ■ Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Tijerina Sr., a son, 5 pounds, 8 ounces, at 8:10 a.m. on Aug. 3, 2012 ■ Mr. and Mrs. Devin Immenhauser, a daughter, 2 pounds, ■ Fernando Rangel to at 6:20 a.m. on Aug. 4, 2012 Lashaundrea Yvonne Thomas ■ Yesenia Lozano and Sean ■ Lavon Wendell Crane to Arredondo, a daughter, 5 Tracey Antoinette Ramirez pounds, 8 ounces, at 8:50 ■ Randell Morgan Hebert to a.m. on Aug. 4, 2012 Leslie Ann Bennett ■ Mr. and Mrs. Clodoaldo ■ Ronald William Johannesen to Ramirez, a daughter, 7 Misty Kay Yaws pounds, 9 ounces, at 8:52 ■ Anthony Allen Gwosdz to Morp.m. on Aug. 4, 2012 gan Machel Schoonover ■ Mariana Acosta and Saul Al■ Jose Maria Flores III to cantar, a daughter, 7 pounds, Darlene McClanahan-Flores 8 ounces, at 3:25 a.m. on ■ Timothy Raymond Bryant Jr. Aug. 4, 2012 to Jennifer Amanda Garza ■ Erika Troncoso and Cody Herman, a daughter, 6 pounds, 14 ounces, at 3:01 p.m. on Aug. 5, 2012 ■ Heather and Joshua Ocanas, a son, 6 pounds, 4 ounces, at 5:49 p.m. on Aug. 5, 2012 ■ Christy Rodriguez and Whitney Smid, a son, 6 pounds, 8 ounces, at 8:32 a.m. on Aug. 6, 2012 ■ Cassandra Munoz and Silvestre Dominguez of El Campo, a son, 7 pounds, 1 ounce, at 12:43 a.m. on Aug. 6, 2012 ■ Linda Rodriguez and Bobby Perez-Fuentes Jr., a daughter, 5 pounds, 2 ounces, at 10:51 a.m. on Aug. 6, 2012 ■ Crystal Capistran and Joshua EUAN TORRIE/ Wills of Woodsboro, a daughCONTRIBUTED ter, 6 pounds, 11 ounces, at PHOTO 3:09 p.m. on Aug. 6, 2012 Jamie ■ Kayla Thompson and Brandon Torigian Austin of Seadrift, a son, 7 wears an pounds, 14 ounces, at 8:39 Anthropologie p.m. on Aug. 6, 2012 ■

MARRIAGE LICENSES Thomas Dewayne Ellason to Martha Decena ■ Donald Gene Otto to Teresa Sue Reese ■ Matthew James Ice to Falecia Carol Shreve ■ Edward Clay Sanders to Dinna Marie Wilkins ■ Matthew Allen Frank to Veronica Marie Gil ■ Garrett Vincent Riedesel to Aaron Ashley Magee ■ Tommy Herrera III to Michelle Marie Samudio ■

Accessorize your life with statement pieces Accessories can transition the overall appearance and change the look up completely. Adding staple accessory pieces to your wardrobe can extend your wearing of apparel – it’s a cheap way to add outfits to your closet. A bold statement necklace can create a cocktail dress out of a little summer dress in an instant. You have got to scout out the Haili appropriate pieces that can create the FASHION TIPS look you’re going for. WITH HAILI Z When wearing a cocktail dress or any strapless dress that you opt to wear a statement necklace with, skip out on earrings and go for studs. The overall effect will draw attention (that you want all eyes on) to the accessory of choice – it also looks much classier not to overdo jewelry. We, of course, love pieces that are big here in Texas and it’s definitely “the bigger, the better” type of mentality. Definitely choose just one staple piece or the other – either earrings or necklace but never the both of them together. Unique earrings always add an exEUAN TORRIE/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO tra element to the great dresses you Jamie wears the Point Assembly Necklace to jazz up a have in the closet. Change up your accessories often to add a new look little black dress. to an old dress or outfit. It is amazing what new accessories EUAN TORRIE/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO can do for old outfits. Keep apparel The Metropolis Bib and add new accessories. It not only Necklace is a stunning creates an entirely new look, it is a cheaper way of shopping. staple piece.

Z

Haili Pue is the president of All Ze Details. Visit her website at allzedetails.com

ED WANT

YOUR PHOTO

To submit photos, go to VictoriaAdvocate.com and upload your digital image at Your Photos. To have your picture selected, you must include detailed caption information, including the full name and hometown of the person featured and an explanation of the picture. You also may mail your photographs to: Your Photos, P. O. Box 1518, Victoria, TX 77902

necklace with a strapless dress.

Citizens Medical Center ■

No births reported


In Good Company, H2, Viewpoints, H4, Perspectives, H5, Gushers & Dusters, H6, Livestock Markets, H6,

S E C T I O N

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YOUR MONEY Victoria Advocate, VictoriaAdvocate.com• Sunday, August 19, 2012

ALL GEARED UP,

READY TO ROLL

Caterpillar plant means big business for other companies in Crossroads BY ALLISON MILES AMILES@VICAD.COM

With Victoria’s Caterpillar plant now open and initial excavators off assembly lines, things are booming at the new location. But that activity doesn’t end with Caterpillar. Other Victoria companies feel the effects of the newly-opened plant. HOLT CAT, a Caterpillar dealer with a Victoria site, sees a direct impact from the new location, said Howard Hicks, HOLT CAT’s vice president of public affairs. Hicks works in the company’s regional office in San Antonio, which covers 118 counties, including Victoria. Not only does the plant give HOLT CAT a place to take customers on company tours, but the added supply also helps. Hydraulic excavators are the products the company has the hardest time finding available because much of Caterpillar’s supply was built in Japan. Shipping time added to the wait, he said, noting most came in through a port in Washington. Now, he said, the longest delivery drive

will be about 200 miles, to Dallas or the Rio Grande Valley. It helps that its most in-demand excavator – the 336, the prime machine for Eagle Ford Shale activity – is the one the company will produce first. “It’s very timely for us,” Hicks said, noting Victoria’s HOLT CAT might eventually become a place the company can prep the excavators and store them before shipping to customers. Victoria’s plant also knocks $5,000 or more off the price per machine because freight costs are down, he said. “It adds up in a hurry,” Hicks said. “Over the next few years, we’ll probably save several hundred thousands of dollars.” Clegg Services provided exhaust extraction, platforms and specialized fixtures for the plant, said John Clegg, the company’s vice president. While it meant about 20 new jobs on his end, he said the effects flow down.

Seguin plant builds 25,000 engines, through two-minute intervals BY MELISSA CROWE MCROWE@VICAD.COM

SEGUIN – Along a quarter-mile production line, the heavy duty muscle behind Caterpillar’s hydraulic ground movers takes life. A crew of the 1,400 employees at Caterpillar Inc.’s Seguin plant installs crank shafts, fuel systems and other components at rapid-fire, as engine blocks roll with excruciating precision, timed to the second, down the line. Jim Lock, operations manager at the Seguin Caterpillar plant, stops by a work station to check the progress. “Every station is supposed to be two minutes,” he said, as the green light flashed and the engine moved on to another of the 136 stations in the plant.

SEE CROSSROADS, H3

PAGE DESIGNER: PRESENTATION EDITOR KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@VICAD.COM, COPY EDITORS: TONY BALANDRAN, TBALANDRAN@@VICAD.COM, NICK ROGERS, NROGERS@VICAD.COM

SEE SEGUIN, H3

VC, Caterpillar team up for employee training, H3 Inside look of Seguin plant, H3 Cat by numbers, revenue, net income 2010-2011, H3


H2 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

YOUR MONEY

PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ERIC JENSEN, EJENSEN@VICAD.COM

IN GOOD COMPANY

MY FIRST JOB

DATE BOOK

■ Name: Cally Coleman Fromme ■ Age: 43 ■ City of residence: Victoria ■ Current title: Executive vice president

TUESDAY VICTORIA PARTNERSHIP MEETING of Zarsky Lumber

Co. ■ First

Mikulik

Hubbard

Kosler

job: I worked at Mam’selle, a high-end women’s clothing store, when I was 15. ■ What it taught me: I really learned customer service – how to take care of your customers. I also learned not Fromme to work somewhere where you like the product, because you’ll wind up spending your whole paycheck. My First Job is a feature that highlights people’s first – or wackiest – job and what they learned from the experience. Please limit responses to 100 words or less. Responses may be edited for style, content or length. A photo of the jobholder accompanies the feature.

Butler

Ruiz

Silkey

Tammy Mikulik joined Victoria College’s Physical Therapist Assistant Program as its coordinator of clinical education. Mikulik worked part time as an adjunct instructor with the PTA Program for the past year and prior to that, worked at Victoria Pain and Rehab for eight years. She has a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and is a few months away from completing a doctorate in physical therapy at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene. Jeff Hubbard is the new full-time government instructor at Victoria College. Prior to joining VC, Hubbard taught government for a year at Coastal Bend College. Prior to that, he worked three years for Frank Phillips College. He has a bachelor’s degree in political science from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Minnesota. Sheryl Kosler joins Victoria College as a full-time faculty member teaching chemistry. Kosler most recently worked as a part-time adjunct instructor for VC at the VC Gonzales Center and prior to that, taught science at Smithville school district. She obtained her associate degree from VC, a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston-Victoria and a master’s degree from the University of Maryland. Deb Butler is the new curriculum and instruction specialist at Victoria College. Prior to joining VC, Butler worked as the registrar at Westwood College in Houston. She has a bachelor’s degree from Glenville University in West Virginia, a master’s de-

Walterscheidt

gree from Shepherd University, also in West Virginia, and is working toward a doctorate in education from the University of Houston. Walter Kerr, of the financial services firm Edward Jones in Victoria, won the firm’s Edward Jones Senior Founders Award for his achievement in building client relationships. Kerr was one of 2,315 of the firm’s 12,000 financial advisors to receive the award. Natalia Ruiz began working as the senior administrative assistant in the University Advancement Office at the University of Houston-Victoria. She provides administrative support for the office, which handles alumni relations, donor cultivation and more. She also works as a part-time patient access supervisor at Citizens Medical Center. Ruiz has a bachelor’s degree in business from UHV and is enrolled in the UHV Global Master of Business Administration program. Lynn Silkey was named the July Employee of the Month at the University of Houston-Victoria. She is the senior administrative secretary in the Office of Student Affairs and has worked at UHV since 2004. Katy Walterscheidt recently began working as a communications specialist in the University of Houston-Victoria Marketing Department. Her duties include writing news releases, editing marketing copy and assisting members of the media with stories and information. Walterscheidt previously worked as a public relations and social media manager for Hospitality Financial and Technology Professionals in Austin.

7:30 a.m. Second floor, 700 Main Center For more information, call 361-485-3190.

INTRO TO MICROSOFT OFFICE 2007 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Workforce Solutions of the Golden Crescent computer lab, 120 S. Main St. ■ For more information, call 361-485-3302 or visit victoriapubliclibrary.org. ■ ■

WEDNESDAY

NEW DIGS Kerr

■ ■ ■

SELF-GUIDED COMPUTER TRAINING

New shop offers home decor and gifts

■ ■ ■

9 to 11 a.m. Victoria Public Library, 302 N. Main St. For more information, call 361-485-3302 or visit victoriapubliclibrary.org.

DIPPING INTO SOCIAL MEDIA 10 a.m. to noon UHV Small Business Development Center, 3402 N. Ben Wilson St. ■ For more information, call 361-575-8944. ■ ■

THURSDAY INTERMEDIATE WORD 2007 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Workforce Solutions of the Golden Crescent computer lab, 120 S. Main St. ■ For more information, call 361-485-3302 or visit victoriapubliclibrary.org. ■ ■

ALLISON MILES/AMILES@VICAD.COM

Golden Wings opens for business Sept. 1 at 6605 N. Navarro St., Suite D. Owned by Meredith Golden, the business will offer home decor and gifts. She said the goal was to provide Victoria a unique place to purchase both inspirational and spiritual items. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 361-573-9464.

This is a listing of building permits issued by the city of Victoria from Aug. 9 to Aug. 15, for new commercial, commercial remodeling, new residential construction and manufactured homes.

COMMERCIAL

MANUFACTURED HOMES

■ Gemini

■ Goodner

RESIDENTIAL ■ Abraham

Gonzalez, 1912 Dudley St., $4,000. ■ LDS Builders, permit for Deam Mathews, 707 Washington St., $7,000.

HOW TO RAISE A MONEY-SMART CHILD Noon The Club at Colony Creek, 301 Colony Creek Drive ■ For more information, call 361-579-9251.

FRIDAY

Specialties, permit for Edward Balfanz, 2007 Port Lavaca Drive, $6,500. ■ M and S Mobile Homes, permit for Bruce Hammack, 4302 John Stockbauer Drive, $41,230. ■ Clegg Services, Ltd., permit for Charles Green, 108 Crestwood Drive, $12,000.

WHAT’S YOUR SIGN? 10 a.m. to noon UHV Small Business Development Center, 3402 N. Ben Wilson St. ■ For more information, call 361-575-8944. ■ ■

Building values listed in this graphic are based on averages used by the city to assess fees charged builders for construction permits. The estimated costs do not necessarily reflect actual sale values or values used to figure property taxes. The city requires permits to be issued when new or used mobile homes are moved to or within the city.

PERSONAL FINANCES

10 a.m. to noon UHV Small Business Development Center, 3402 N. Ben Wilson St. ■ For more information, call 361-575-8944. ■ ■

■ ■

BUILDING REPORT

Construction, permit for Hull Storey Retail Group, 7800 N. Navarro St., $8,575. ■ Don Krueger Construction, permit for Southern Flow/Zedi, 3001 N. Cameron St., $440,000.

STARTING YOUR OWN BUSINESS

SATURDAY DOWNTOWN PUB CRAWL ■ ■ ■

5 to 8:30 p.m. Downtown Victoria For more information, visit victoriamainstreet.org.

ECONOMY

Are coupons a waste of time or worth every penny? Where’s the growth? Q: Is it worth the time and effort to use coupons, or are they just a waste of time and a ploy to get you to buy things? – Tammy

A: Coupons are definitely

a ploy to entice you to buy something you may not have purchased otherwise. But that doesn’t mean they’re bad things. The practical and sensible application of coupons can definitely help you save money. The main things to watch out for when using coupons are overbuying and spending your money on things you don’t really need. Seriously, you don’t need to hit Sam’s or Costco and walk out with nine gallons of mustard. I’ve even heard of people buying things they know they don’t like just because it was on sale or they had a

coupon. I mean, how dumb is that? I guess there is a time factor involved in colDAVE lecting coupons, especially if you DAVE SAYS still like to clip them from the newspapers or flyers that come in the mail. Plenty of folks still do that every week. I think online coupons are a lot easier to search for and save though. There’s a company I love called eMeals that will work with you to plan recipes and also give you information on coupons and sales in your area to make the meals. I’m definitely not anti-coupon, but at the same time couponing alone won’t change your family tree. It’s like any other tool. If used in

a smart way, it can help you stance, we didn’t buy any of save money. And that’s not a our kids their first cars. But bad thing. we did agree to match whatever they saved when it What’s the best way came to this purchase. to save or use money givThere’s also nothing wrong en to a baby as a birthwith just setting up a simple day present? – Ron savings account and watching it grow. As they get oldI think it depends on er, you can involve them in your financial situation the process and begin to along with your plans and teach them about the three goals. If you’re at a place uses for money: spending, where you can’t afford necessities, then there’s abso- saving and giving. And if you start something lutely nothing wrong with like this when they’re really using birthday money for little, chances are they’ll alfood, diapers or clothes. ready have a nice pile of That’s not a fun answer, already stashed but sometimes you have to money away when they become old do whatever it takes to properly care for your fam- enough for those teachable moments. ily. The point is to have a plan. If money isn’t a big issue though, you’re left with fig- Once you have a definite uring out a plan. In our case, idea in mind, it’s a lot easier we invested lots of it toward to achieve the goal. their college funds. Then we For financial help, visit taught them to save for othdaveramsey.com. er things themselves. For in-

dates were really installing malicious software to their computers. Those who travel take extra caution before updating software products through their hotel Internet connection.

awarded anything. So, if you didn’t apply for a grant and you receive one of these calls, someone is trying to scam you. These scammers are not affiliated with the government or any reputable organizations. They are criminals who are seeking financial information in an effort to get money from those they target – not award money.

Q:

RAMSEY A:

Our latest long-term forecast calls for Texas to continue to outpace the nation in terms of economic performance. The outlook for the state calls for moderate M. RAY expansion for decades to THE come. ECONOMIST The state’s largest metropolitan statistical areas will continue to serve as the drivers of overall growth. (Ranked by 2011 wage and salary employment, these are Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Dallas-Plano-Irving, San Antonio-New Braunfels, Fort Worth-Arlington, Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, and El Paso.) Texas’ smaller MSAs are also centers for business activ-

ity, with many expected to see moderate long-term growth. As a group, the state’s 20 other MSAs are expected to contribute 18.3 percent of the total jobs added in Texas through 2040. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Tyler, Brownsville-Harlingen, Waco, Laredo, and Corpus Christi are expected to see the fastest compound annual growth rates in employment. Smaller cities are especially likely to be affected by particular industries. For example, oil and gas exploration is providing a strong boost to the Midland and Odessa areas, which are among the healthiest economies in the nation. Amarillo has the third lowest jobless rate in the state at 5.5 percent, and San Angelo and Abilene round out the top five metropolitan areas in unemployment.

azine subscriptions that were paid for but never delivered, to food products that were not of the high quality originally promised. Some examples of high pressure sales tactics include hostile and persuasive rebuttals to consumer con-

cerns, deep discounts offered upon immediate payment and refusal to take “no” for an answer.

PERRYMAN

CONSUMER ADVICE

Be aware of computer messages in hotel rooms The FBI recently issued a warning to consumers about “malicious schemers targeting travelers when they are establishing an Internet connection in their hotel rooms. The FBI determined that once consumers were logging on to their computer attempting to connect to the Internet they were being presented with a pop-up window notifying them to update their software. The pop-up appeared to be offering a routine update to software for which updates are frequently available. Those consumers who accepted and installed the up-

Government grant used as fraud Your BBB has recently been receiving phone inquiries from conALAN sumers who are suspicious BETTER of calls they’ve BUSINESS received about BUREAU qualifying for a government grant. This has become a popular means of defrauding people as many are not familiar with government grants and are not sure if they might qualify for one. Believe me, grants are not easy to come by and there is always an in-depth process that applicants must go through before they are

BLIGH

When a business closes I just hate getting calls that a business has closed its doors. So from a consumer’s viewpoint what is your recourse when you’ve paid for or ordered something through a business that all of a sudden closes? Well, the business is still obligated to provide the goods or services that have been paid for, or issue a refund if they can no longer provide the goods. If you find yourself in this situation:

■ Write to the owner and keep

copies of your correspondence. Mail is usually forwarded when a business closes. ■ If you paid via credit card, write to your credit card company to dispute the charges. Under federal law, you have 60 days after the charge first appears on a bill (this doesn’t work if you paid with a debit card). ■ Contact the landlord to inquire about gaining access to merchandise inside the property. ■ Check to see if the company has filed for bankruptcy.

Door-to-door salesmen complaints After receiving hundreds of complaints against companies using aggressive door-to-door sales tactics to pressure consumers into buying bogus or misleading products, BBB is issuing an alert about such companies. The issues range from mag-

Alan Bligh is the executive director of the Better Business Bureau in Corpus Christi.


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — H3

VictoriaAdvocate.com

C AT E R P I L L A R

PAGE DESIGNER: KIMIKO FIEG, KFIEG@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: NICK ROGERS, NROGERS@VICAD.COM

CATERPILLAR CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPH/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

An inside view of the Seguin Caterpillar plant where 1,400 people are employed to assemble engines for excavators that are built in the company’s Victoria plant.

CAT BY THE NUMBERS

$2.6 billion Capital Expenditures in 2011

$4 billion Estimated capital Expenditures in 2012

$60.14 billion, +41.2% Consolidated sales and revenues in 2011, increase from 2010

125,099, +19.7% Number of employees globally at the end of 2011, increase from 2010 SOURCE: CATERPILLAR.COM

CROSSROADS: Hard hats to boots bought from local companies CONTINUED FROM H1 His company needed hard hats, boots and other supplies, he said, explaining they purchased those locally. Some equipment also came from Sunbelt Rentals. “That job has put a lot of people to work,” Clegg said. “Even the big contractors have used a lot of Victoria people.” Victoria Air Conditioning, Ltd. is one example. In addition to the work the air conditioning company does on Caterpillar’s systems, Clayco, the project’s contractor, also hired it to construct buildings, Warren Heilker, Victoria Air’s chief estimator, said in an email. The project is one of the largest, by building size, that they’ve worked on, he said. “Construction of the new plant has directly and indirectly benefited the local economy, and I expect the plant and support business to be a continuing economic boom for the area,” Heilker said in the email. “This will provide real opportunities for our community.” One other Crossroads company, High Brehm Hats and Western Wear, has a contract to supply Caterpillar with steel-toed boots, owner Kelly High said. Although he did not know exactly how many extra sales that meant, he said he thought each employee required boots. Caterpillar employs about 200 people – for now, said John Jones, the plant’s site manager. The store appreciates any infusion of business, High said, whether one pair of boots or 500. And, just because it won the contract, it doesn’t mean the job is done. “We’re learning something new every day with them and what their employees like and dislike,” he said. “We tried our hardest to earn their business and now we’re trying to keep it. It’s an ongoing work.”

SEGUIN: About 60 percent of plant’s engines are exported CONTINUED FROM H1 By the end of the quarter-mile journey, the signature Cat-yellow engines are swept out the door, packaged and shipped across the world. The plant assembles 15- and 18-liter engines on the C15 line. The newest products are the 11and 13-liter engines, called C9 and C13, which become the force behind the hydraulic excavator built in Victoria. Bridget Young, a media relations representative for Caterpillar Inc., said the C9 engine will be fully transitioned by the end of the year. Lock said Caterpillar broke ground on the Seguin plant in January 2009. It opened for business June 4, 2010. The town’s location, on Interstate 10 near Interstate 35, and its easily accessibility to the ports of Houston and Corpus Christi give it a prime location for exporting. In just over two years, the plant has produced more than 25,000 engines, of which about 60 percent are exported, Young said. Lock said the production style encourages maximum efficiency. The Caterpillar Processing System uses visual indicators at each station to show progress, efficiency and validation. Lock said all engines are built on demand. One will not enter the production line until someone makes an order. “Victoria will signal when a tractor is down the line and we’ll send an engine,” Lock said. “It’s pull-trigger delivery.” He said both Seguin and Victoria’s plants will keep very little inventory onsite, about enough materials for two days of work at all time. “We had a good start up here,” Lock said. “We’ve worked very well. Our policy is to treat people right.” He said the Seguin plant has had a positive impact on the local economy, and there are opportunities for spin-off businesses: paint suppliers, distributors and such. “For every one job we create, there are five in the community,” Lock said.

CATERPILLAR CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPHY/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Seguin’s Caterpillar plant opened in June 2010. It employs about 1,400 workers.

CATERPILLAR CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPHY/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

An employee at Seguin’s Caterpillar plant builds an engine.

ATERPILLAR CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPH/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Employees at Caterpillar’s Seguin plant work on components of an engine.

FOR MORE INFORMATION To learn more about Caterpillar and its services, visit VictoriaAdvocate.com, click on this story and follow the attached link.

CATERPILLAR CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPH/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Caterpillar plant in Seguin supplies Victoria’s new facility with engines for its hydraulic excavator.

VC, Caterpillar team up to train company workforce

Program includes logistics, welding, safety procedures BY CAROLINA ASTRAIN CASTRAIN@VICAD.COM

Victoria College’s partnership with Caterpillar to train its employees has led to the college’s expansion. “They taught us everything that we needed to know,” said facility well technician Fred

Chaney. “They teach you how to deal with hazards that actually exist and a lot of companies don’t do that.” Chaney said he is happy to be at a company dedicated to developing his skill set and career. “I oversee the quality of the welds, inspect the parts and make sure when they’re going out the doors they meet Caterpillar’s standards,” Chaney said. “I have 28 years in welding experience.” In March, Chaney, of Goliad,

took part in Caterpillar’s new employee training at Victoria College. The training covers areas in safety, welding, basic assembly, warehouse operations and logistics. Since completing the training, Chaney now oversees the testing for the welding portion of VC’s training alongside the part-time instructors at VC. Jennifer Yancey, vice president of College Advancement and External Affairs at Victo-

ria College, said the college and Caterpillar started working on the training program soon after Caterpillar announced it was coming to Victoria. “It’s very exciting for VC to be working with a company such as Caterpillar,” Yancey said. “We look forward to working with our business and industry partners.” In February, VC started looking to expand the training program into another building on 1404 N. Liberty

Street. The VC college board approved the purchase of the 7,200-square-foot building for $200,000. “There is a demand in our community for skilled workforce,” Yancey said. In May, voters approved a $22 million bond proposal for the college to build an Emerging Technology Center. It will face the Caterpillar plant. The center will serve as a training facility for Caterpillar and other busi-

nesses. The facility would include welding and computer labs, traditional classroom space and rooms for large-scale corporate training events. It would create a home for all workforce and continuing education training, freeing up space on a landlocked campus for academic programs. The center would serve VC’s longtime partners, such as petrochemical, manufacturing and oil and gas companies.


H4 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

VIEWPOINTS

C

ongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Editorial page editor: Lauren Hightower-Emerson, 361-580-6590, lhightower@vicad.com

– First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

FROM US

Longer summer vacation not the best idea E ■ Topic: School schedule ■ Our View: State calendar does not meet needs of students

ducation can be a controversial topic in Texas. We have emphasized its importance many times, but there are some aspects of public education today that go against common sense. One of these problems involves the late start Texas students get every year. In 2006, the state legislature passed an amendment to Texas Education Code – Section 25.0811, which postponed the start of school until the fourth Monday in August. The original code prevented schools from starting earlier than the week of Aug. 21. There were many reasons for this decision. Legislators cited a need to take migrant worker schedules and summer employment into consideration, as well as a shortened tourism season, higher

school operation costs, and the need for summer teaching and training programs. According to Diane Boyett, VISD’s communications director, Victoria’s schools have not sought a waiver to start the school year earlier since the law was put in place. While we appreciate the need to be frugal with public money, especially in such an essential area as education, we think making the decision to extend summer vacation to cut back on utility costs is a short-sighted move by the state legislature. Public schools have received budget cuts from the state, but their main focus should always be educating students. According to the National Summer Learning Association, students lose reten-

tion of the information they learned in the previous school year. Expanding summers will only exacerbate this problem, forcing teachers to waste time reviewing last year’s material instead of being free to move on to new concepts. And while this reason may be valid in other districts, according to Boyett, there is no evidence to suggest VISD is saving money on utility or operating costs due to longer summers because campuses are often in use for various programs starting in early August. The argument to give students and their families a longer tourism season seems superficial when compared to the need for improved education in Texas. According to the state comptroller’s website, Texas is ranked 36th in

the nation for high school graduation rates. When looking at SAT scores, the numbers are even worse. Texas is 49th in verbal SAT scores and 46th in average math SAT scores. We understand there are students whose families take full advantage of the summer vacation and also participate in summer learning activities, such as educational camps and visiting historic sites. But there are others who spend all summer at home playing video games, watching TV or doing other things that waste the valuable time they have instead of taking the initiative to expand their minds on their own. For the students who are willing and able to take advantage of their breaks, longer summers are an asset, but

FROM OTHERS

many waste the summer away. Giving them more time will not change their behavior. We would like to see the state legislature re-examine this scheduling law. When we look at Texas’ educational ranking, as well as the lack of savings to our local district, it is clear this expanded summer vacation is not benefiting our students the way it should. Perhaps it is time to take another look at schedules and think about what’s best for students, rather than what will save money and boost tourism economies. We can’t afford to leave our future high and dry in favor of current prosperity. This editorial reflects the views of the Victoria Advocate’s editorial board.

FROM YOU Victorians are what make VISD great

SYNDICATED COLUMN

Paul Ryan : A bold, smart choice for Republicans

C

hoosing Paul Ryan is a game-changer. Ask the Chicago Gang and its publicists in the mainstream media. They’re terrified. They know that when Mitt Romney chose Ryan for his vice president, it re-defined the Romney campaign overnight. It proved Mitt was not as boring, cautious and moderate as conservative Republicans feared and the Obama Left hoped. In one bold, smart move, Romney’s VP choice makes it clear that this election is about one thing – the economy. And there is no better person on the planet to discuss that issue than Ryan, the young, articulate, spirited, openly Reaganesque conservative who heads up the House Budget Committee and is the leading Republican deficit hawk in Congress. With Ryan as his VP choice, Romney also took a huge step in redefining what the Republican Party is and reminding everyone what it’s supposed to stand

for. For decades, Reagan conservatives have been wondering what has hapMIKE pened to the GOP my father loved. He worked hard to shape it into a party that clearly and proudly stood for smaller government, more freedom, free enterprise and a strong military. But for two decades, Republican politicians have been trying to out-Democrat the Democrats. The GOP my father left behind lost its way, lost its nerve and chose to betray many of its core principles to win elections. By choosing Ryan, Romney has ended the era of Republicrat fuzziness overnight. It makes me think Mitt and his advisers have decided that the way to defeat Obama was to heed the advice my father gave to the GOP in 1975 at the Conservative Political Action Conference. Republicans, disheartened by the post-Watergate thrashing they got at the

REAGAN

YOUR POEM

EDITORIAL BOARD Dan Easton, Publisher

John M. Roberts, President, Chairman of the Board

Catherine R. McHaney, Secretary-Treasurer

polls in 1974, were being urged by moderates to water down (i.e., liberal-up) their party’s principles to broaden its appeal to voters. My father told them not to further “blur” the distinctions between the two parties but to “revitalize” the GOP by reasserting its conservative principles and raising them “to full view.” He challenged Republicans to raise “a banner of no pale pastels, but bold colors which make it unmistakably clear” that their party believed in “a free market as the greatest provider for the people,” not socialism. The conservative conventioneers took my father’s wise message to heart, but the nation’s voters didn’t. Jimmy Carter was elected in 1976 and the country got four years of economic malaise and folly in the Middle East that did not end until my father was elected in 1980 – as an unabashed conservative. America today is truly at a crossroads. This election is going to decide the direction we take for the next 50

Hamp Rogers, Circulation/ Marketing Director

Becky Cooper, Local Editor Tony Balandran, Delivery Desk Editor

Nick Rogers, Senior Copy Editor Lauren Hightower-Emerson,

Chris Cobler,

Community Conversation Editor

Editor, Vice-President of Content

Jessica Puente, Interactivity Editor

Opinions published on this page under the heading “From Us” represent the consensus views of the editorial board of the Victoria Advocate, whose members are named above.

Lighted Lamps The electricity failed. Lamps stood ready. Wicks rose to meet the match. Kerosene burned its yellow light. Shadows played in the walls. Sr. Frances Cabrini Janvier, Victoria

years. For the first time in a while, the American people will have a clear choice. Do you want the USA to go down the Obama Expressway to Greece or, God forbid, California? Or do you want to go down the Romney-Ryan-Reagan Freeway to freedom, growth and prosperity for all people? It’s up to the American people to decide where they want to go. It’s up to Romney and Ryan – R & R, two letters that look pretty good together, I’d say – to sell their message of conservatism. Americans can’t afford to wait for someone to come along four years from now and fix the damage Obama has already done. Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan, a political consultant, and the author of “The New Reagan Revolution.” Visit his websites at www.michaelereagan.com and www.reagan.com. Send comments to Reagan@caglecartoons.com. Follow @reaganworld on Twitter.

WORDS For I have not sent them, saith the Lord, yet they prophesy a lie in my name; that I might drive you out, and that ye might perish, ye, and the prophets that prophesy unto you. Jeremiah 27:15 “There is a destiny that makes us brothers: None goes his way alone: All that we send into the lives of others comes back into our own.” Edwin Markham, American poet

Editor, the Advocate: As we prepare for another outstanding school year in the Victoria Independent School District, we are extremely excited about the many opportunities and endless possibilities that await our wonderful students and staff. The success of our school district is defined by our leadership and we would like to extend our sincere appreciation to our Board of Trustees for their commitment to excellence throughout our 612 square miles. On August 16, at our regular scheduled board meeting, our Board of Trustees approved a pay scale that affords every employee a salary increase. Our teacher Jaklich salary increases range from $1,050 to $1,300 depending upon their years of experience. Classified and paraprofessional employees will receive a 47 cent per hour increase while administrators will receive a $1,200 annual increase. The Victoria ISD is extremely proud to be able to provide these pay raises at a time when the Legislature has cut school funding and there are still many questions challenging school districts in terms of school finance. We would like to thank our Victoria community for your support of our bond projects and for always serving as a “Champion for our Children.” This dedication to achieving excellence for all students is another example that the “Power of Victoria” is the “Power of our People.” Winston Churchill once stated; “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” It has been said that people who have great hearts and minds never have to fear what lies ahead, for their hearts and minds determine the quality of their future. It is clearly evident that the future of Victoria is in great hands. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Victoria ISD, thank you for all that you “give” to our amazing school district and for your continued focus on “Every Child, Every Classroom, Every Day.” YOU make us great. YOU make us special. YOU make us Victoria.

Robert Jaklich, VISD superintendent, Victoria

SPOTLIGHT LETTER ith Cowboy Camp Thank you for helping w

cate: Editor, the Advo d to have so extremely blesse terest, imagis ity un m m co This ledge, in izens with know ge many willing cit olm Trail Herita e ish Ch e Th . ss ne pl nd ki am d ex g an in n inatio a glow wboy Camp was Museum 2012 Co dinary people. of these extraor , but my grateful ems inadequate se ” andard u, St : to u yo “Thank yo k an so here goes. Th is and Dan Glidness is sincere; av , Construction, Tr el eb ot City, Ful-O -Pep Printing, Go Bo ’s er nd ve Ca l, el l rw be Bu na y An dd e, Pa on d Sl den, -op, Walmart, To nja DeWitt County Co chs, Janie and Laura Veth, So Fu n a gu se ot el Sh Ch d d, an eo McL n Sitton im, TDECU, Ro Ir win, va Ne d an Wolfe, Kathy Cr n le BHP Billiton, Al dist, Double J Sa (his Longhorn), rcle Y, Carolyn Le and Mar vin Ci r, Robert Olive n no athercraft, Shan dlery, AA&E Le gis, Sherri r Supply, Van Har the to ac Tr m Blaschke, fro sto Rodriguez Driskol and Erne k and Jean Nagle, Ted uc Alamo, H-E-B, Ch e Adams, Matt Jo n, an M m Ji , Aven EC. Thigpen and GV A a huge success. s wa p m ca e Th ed nt le to our ta heartfelt thanks mmunity. co us ro ne ge and

Candy Glidden, Cowboy Camp Coordinator, Cuero

WE WANT YOUR LETTERS We want your letters because we value your opinion on issues in the community and region. We have few requirements and will help you meet these if needed. We will need your name, home address and daytime telephone or cell phone number so we can contact you to verify you want your opinion published. When sending letters by email, and if you do not hear from us within a couple of days, you should call us to see if we received your letter because, sometimes, our email filter will not let a letter through. Our letter lengths are 150 words for thank-yous, 200 words for election-related letters and 350 words for all others. We ask that letter writers submit one letter per 30-day period. Letters may be delivered at the Advocate, 311 E. Constitution St.; mailed to P.O. Box 1518, Victoria 77902; faxed to 361-574-1220; or emailed to letters@vicad.com.


VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012 — H5

VictoriaAdvocate.com

■ YOUR SEAT AT THE TABLE

PERSPECTIVES

We invite you to a seat at the editorial board. Send us your ideas and issues to share with community to the Advocate, 311 E. Constitution St.; mail them to P.O. Box 1518, Victoria 77902; or email them to editorialboard@vicad.com.

Editorial page editor: Lauren Hightower-Emerson, 361-580-6590, lhightower@vicad.com

FROM OTHERS

ONLINE POLL OF THE WEEK What do you think is the best school calendar? 1. Longer summer 2. Shorter summer 3. Year-round school 4. Not sure/Don’t know Comment:

To vote on this question, go to VictoriaAdvocate.com, or call 580-6587 to voice your opinion on our Speak Out line.

LAST WEEK’S POLL Poll was conducted during Aug. 10-17 at VictoriaAdvocate.com

How often should parents monitor their child’s online activities?

80% 20% 0% 0% 0%

1. Every day 2. Few times a week 3. Once a week 4. Every few weeks 5. Once a month

SPOTLIGHT ONLINE COMMENT OPINIONS

In Europe, prosperity is taking a vacation

B

oy, our friends in Europe sure know how to vacation. If they get sick while taking their employer-paid vacation, their employer now has to pay them to take another. According to The New York Times, all 27 countries within the European Union, and all employers within them, must abide by that recent vacation ruling by the EU’s highest court. My hat goes off to my vacationing pals overseas. Take the French. Their government mandates that every employee get at least five weeks of paid vacation. The French average 37 days of vacation every year – and 22 paid holidays on top of that. Virtually all European countries have government mandates that require employer-paid vacation of four to six weeks – whereas America has no government-mandated vacation requirements. European employees enjoy all kinds of additional workplace perks and benefits, too. Canadian weekly

Maclean’s reports that: ■ “Spanish workers get an extra two weeks off for honeymoons, TOM and 20 days of severance, even if they’re fired with cause.” ■ “In France, companies must give extra paid leave to staff who work 39 hours per week instead of the statutory 35, even if the workers are paid for the overtime.” ■ “In Italy, firms that lay people off during an economic downturn can face years of costly legal proceedings. ... Rome is proposing a law requiring employers to pay laid-off workers a whopping 27 months in wages.” Vacations are way different in America. CNN says the average employed American worker got about 18 vacation days in 2011, but only used 14 of them. And unlike our European counterparts, we never really “leave” work. Fearing for our jobs, with the economy still in the tank, we stay in

PURCELL

touch with the office. According to Rasmussen Reports, 72 percent of Americans use email, smartphones and other electronic devices to keep themselves accessible to their employers 24 hours a day. It’s even worse for America’s small-business owners. According to Business News Daily, fewer than half take a week off during the summer. With the economy so uncertain and revenues down, many are afraid or unable to hire. They are picking up the slack by working two or three jobs themselves. But we Americans are workers, I suppose. We’re so different from our European friends. In tough times, we are happier working hard and keeping revenues coming in, rather than spending lots of dough at hoity-toity resorts. We don’t like our government telling us or our employers how we ought to conduct business or how many vacation days employers must provide. Heck, if our Supreme Court ruled that employers must not only provide paid vacations but pay for them

all over again if an employee gets sick while vacationing, many Americans would take to the streets in protest. Americans protest loss of their freedoms. Europeans tend to protest meddling with their government-mandated benefits. At least that used to be a distinction between America and Europe. Our government has been so busy handing out goodies to citizens, it’s just a matter of time before the freedom lovers are overrun by the benefit lovers. It will be a sad day when that happens. We’ll have an even more anemic economy, just as most EU nations do now, and all of us will struggle to pursue happiness and wealth. Oh, well, at least our employers will have to pay us for another week off if we get sick while we’re on vacation. Tom Purcell is a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Email Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com.

Stop comparing Paul Ryan to Sarah Palin

T

he charm of Sarah Palin as a vice presidential pick is she set the bar incredibly low for her successors. As long as a nominee can name a newspaper and their foreign policy experience isn’t living next to a foreign country, the press can dub them better than Sarah Palin. More qualified. More gravitas. More ready to lead than Palin was... A Palin standard for being fit for public office is like a Donald Trump standard for public humility. Basically, no standard at all. It’s really not fair to compare Paul Ryan to Sarah Palin. Sure it makes Ryan as a VP nominee seem less cynical – less Hail Mary – less desperate than if Palin had never word-souped the nation four years ago. If John McCain would have picked Tim Pawlenty in ’08, the Ryan pick would look pretty irresponsible. But now the GOP has the “Palin Standard.” A better comparison for Paul Ryan is former Republican presidential candidate Congresswoman Michele Bachmann. Both are from Midwestern cheese-heavy states. Both are high-profile tea party Republicans in the lowest-rated Congress in the history of percentages.

Even when Bachmann is causing international incidents with her xenophobic race baiting TINA about the Muslim Brotherhood’s alleged infiltration of the U.S. government – she sounds as pleasant as someone selling orange juice on television. If the 1980’s Michael J. Fox sit-com character – the beloved Reagan-idolizing Alex P. Keaton – were a self-hating public employee who cherry-picked all the worst parts of Ayn Rand, the Bible and the Heritage Foundation’s reading room, he’d be Paul Ryan! Quirky, young and clearly trying to fill a larger man’s suit – the rightest of Republicans love Paul Ryan. Well they kind of love him. Both Paul Ryan and Michele Bachmann are guilty pleasures for Republicans. They like listening to them beat up on President Obama and spout their cheery condemnations of liberalism, but they don’t want to admit it too loudly, lest they get stuck defending ALL their ideas. Bachmann won the Iowa straw poll, but now she’s not even invited to introduce anyone,

DUPUY

let alone speak, at the upcoming Republican National Convention. Obama tried to campaign against the Ryan Budget plan this past spring since the House GOP voted for it, but that was declared out-of-bounds. Now? It’s in play and Republican politicians are not thrilled about explaining their vote to give future senior citizens coupons for chemotherapy. Bachmann and Ryan also share the distinction of being ineffective lawmakers. According to ThatsMyCongress.com, in her nearly six years in office “Bachmann has passed three rhetorical bills with no force of law, and one amendment that asks an Inspector General to conduct inspections.” Paul Ryan has been an incumbent for twice that time and has only introduced two bills that have become law: One renaming a post office in his home town, the other changing how arrows are taxed (how very 21st century). Bachmann at least gets to distance herself from the Republican Congressional blank check given to the big-spending Bush administration. Under Ryan’s allegedly hawkish eye, his party started two unpaid-for wars, cut taxes during said wars, grew the government,

exploded the national debt and then bailed out unregulated banks with taxpayer money. Paul Ryan voted yes for all of it and doesn’t ask for a correction when he’s called a small government conservative. Both Bachmann and Ryan are also at the extreme end of the spectrum when it comes to gay rights and reproductive freedoms. They both have consistently voted for any anti-abortion/anti-contraception bills that came before them. Ditto with expanding martial rights to same sex couples. Ryan, with all his libertarian billing, has voted to take away liberties from his fellow citizens. He is the government he’s warned us about: Freedom is for corporations, and regulations are for our private lives. If Ryan is now the Republican mainstream, Bachmann is now the Republican mainstream. If Ryan is getting the full embrace of his party – Bachmann should be getting that same welcome into the fray. Or in the case of Republicans in 2012, the fringe. Tina Dupuy is an award-winning writer and the editor-in-chief of SoapBlox. Tina can be reached at tinadupuy@yahoo.com.

Oh my gosh, I am FURIOUS!!! Last I checked, I was living in the United States! It is becoming more obvious that if I were here illegally, or chose not to work, I would have every last thing handed to me! I am so mad! America, WE NEED CHANGE! Remember that in November!

Carrolyn I have been struggling with this issue for a while now. I have a 1-year-old and she gets four shots every two months! I would love it if you or someone could give me more information on exactly what vaccines are really, honestly a good idea to get or what might be poison. I've researched it, but I'm still really not sure

Britnee

Wonder why the risk of catching these diseases is low? Because most people have been vaccinated. Yes few will have an adverse reaction just as with any other medication. Ever seen a young child struggle to breathe with whooping cough? They turn purple and choke. Ever seen the effects of polio? Please, if you do not vaccinate your children, keep them away from others they may unknowingly infect (most of these diseases have an infectious period prior to symptoms) especially children under one year. Whooping cough has been making a recent comeback due to lack of vaccinations, adults can catch it too. So maybe the Pedi who suggests you follow the state mandated vaccinations has seen the consequences of these diseases. So when everyone is required to buy insurance this program will be gone?

Kelly

HOW TO CONTACT YOUR LAWMAKERS TEXAS U.S. SENATORS ■ U.S.

Sen. John Cornyn: 317 Hart Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510, office: (202) 224-2934, fax: (202)228-2856 ■ U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison: 284 Russell Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510, office: (202) 224-5922, fax: (202) 224-0776

TEXAS U.S. REPRESENTATIVES ■ U.S.

Rep. Ron Paul: 203 Cannon House Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515, office: (202) 225-2831 ■ U.S. Rep. Ruben Hinojosa: 2463 Rayburn House Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515, office: (202) 225-2531 ■ U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett: 201 Cannon House Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515, office: (202) 225-4865

TEXAS SENATORS ■ State

Sen. Glenn Hegar: P.O. Box 1008, Katy 77492 office: (281) 391-8883, fax: (281) 391-8818, Austin: (512) 463-0118 ■ State Sen. Juan Hinojosa: 612 Nolana, Suite 410B, McAllen 78504, office: (956) 972-1841, fax: (956) 664-0602, Austin: (512) 463-0120

TEXAS REPRESENTATIVES ■ State

Rep. Geanie Morrison: 1908 N. Laurent, Suite 500, Victoria 77901, office: (361) 572-0196, fax: (361) 576-0747 fax, Austin: (512) 463-0456 ■ State Rep. Todd Hunter: Corpus Christi 78418 Office: (512) 463-0672, fax: (512) 463-5896

VICTORIA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COURT ■ County

Judge: 101 N. Bridge St. Victoria 77901 (361) 575-4558 (general number for the commissioners court) ■ County Commissioners:

Precinct 1 at DaCosta 77905, (361) 575-8711 Precinct 2 at Nursery Drive 77976, (361) 575-3972 Precinct 3 at Goliad Highway 77905, (361) 578-8212 Precinct 4 at Foster Field 77904, (361) 575-5221

VICTORIA COUNTY SHERIFF 101 N. Glass St., Victoria 77901 (361) 575-0651 CITY OF VICTORIA ■ City

Manager and City Council 105 W. Juan Linn St., Victoria 77901, (361) 485-3030


H6 — VICTORIA ADVOCATE, Sunday, August 19, 2012

VictoriaAdvocate.com

YOUR MONEY

PAGE DESIGNER: VERONICA GONZALEZ, VGONZALEZ@VICAD.COM; COPY EDITOR: ERIC JENSEN, EJENSEN@VICAD.COM

GUSHERS&DUSTERS Editor’s Note: Gushers and Dusters is compiled from reports filed by oil and gas operators with the Texas Railroad Commission in Austin. The Advocate does not independently verify the information reported.

LOCATIONREPORTS Recent location reports for the Advocate readership area.

API No.: 42-177-32656 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Verlander Unit Well No.: 12H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 11,000 feet Direction and Miles: 8.5 miles SE. of Cost Survey Name: S.H. Gates, A-228 Acres: 976.83

KARNES COUNTY BEE COUNTY API No.: 42-025-33841 Classification: Fld. Dev. Operator: Killam Oil Co. Ltd. Lease Name: Tynan Ranch Well No.: 1 Field Name: Papalote West Total Depth: 5,500 feet Direction and Miles: 5 miles SE. of Skidmore Survey Name: H. Brian, A-47 Acres: 80

DEWITT COUNTY API No.: 42-123-32848 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Burlington Resources O and G Co. LP Lease Name: Stanchos Unit A Well No.: 3 Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale) Total Depth: 17,000 feet Direction and Miles: 6.5 miles NW. of Yorktown Survey Name: J. Hall, A-217 Acres: 666.46

GONZALES COUNTY API No.: 42-177-32657 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Penn Virginia Oil and Gas LP Lease Name: Kusak Unit Well No.: 1H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 14,000 feet Direction and Miles: 11.95 miles NE. of Gonzales Survey Name: G. Blair, A-4 Acres: 490.19 API No.: 42-177-32639 Classification: Fld. Dev and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Sample Baros Unit Well No.: 17H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 12,750 feet Direction and Miles: 0.1 mile SE. of Sample Survey Name: J.L. Wood, A-473 Acres: 640

API No.: 42-255-32686 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Pfeifer-Bell Unit Well No.: 2H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 16,500 feet Direction and Miles: 9.5 miles W. of Kenedy Survey Name: J. Bradberry, A-24 Acres: 401.30 API No.: 42-255-32688 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Pfeifer-Bell Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 16,500 feet Direction and Miles: 9.5 miles W. of Kenedy Survey Name: J. Bradberry, A-24 Acres: 401.30 API No.: 42-255-32691 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Vajdos-Foegelle Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 15,500 feet Direction and Miles: 6 miles SW. of Karnes City Survey Name: Hrs. R.C. Bras hear, A27 Acres: 360 API No.: 42-255-32698 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Rippstein-Rafter Unit Well No.: 2H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 15,000 feet Direction and Miles: 3.5 miles W. of Karnes City Survey Name: F. Ruiz, A-9 Acres: 360 API No.: 42-255-32689 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal

RIG COUNT

PRICE PER BARREL

Week Ending Aug. 19

Week Ending Aug. 19 ..........................$95.60

.............................122 Week Ending Aug. 12 ..............................102 The rig count is provided by the Victoria office of Halliburton, showing the number of active drilling rigs in Victoria, Goliad, Gonzales, Calhoun, Jackson, Bee, Refugio, DeWitt, Lavaca, Wharton, Karnes, Colorado and Matagorda counties.

Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Rippstein-Rafter Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 15,500 feet Direction and Miles: 3.5 miles W. of Karnes City Survey Name: F. Ruiz, A-9 Acres: 360 API No.: 42-255-32692 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Plains Exploration and Prod. Co. Lease Name: Richter North Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 13,600 feet Direction and Miles: 3.8 miles E. of Gillett Survey Name: D.B. McConnel, A-191 Acres: 418.17 API No.: 42-255-32690 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Plains Exploration and Prod. Co. Lease Name: Richter North Unit Well No.: 4H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 13,600 feet Direction and Miles: 3.8 miles E. of Gillett Survey Name: D.B. McConnel, A-191 Acres: 418.17 API No.: 42-255-32694 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Best-Beard Unit Well No.: 4H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 16,500 feet Direction and Miles: 10 miles W. of Kenedy Survey Name: J. Bradberry, A-24 Acres: 360.94

Week Ending Aug. 12 ..........................$93.36 Price per barrel figures are provided from New York by the Associated Press and reflect the cash F.O.B. price of West Texas Intermediate, the benchmark grade of U.S. crude oil.

API No.: 42-255-32693 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Best-Beard Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 16,500 feet Direction and Miles: 10 miles W. of Kenedy Survey Name: J. Bradberry, A-24 Acres: 360.94

VICTORIA COUNTY API No.: 42-469-34257 Classification: Fld. Dev. Operator: Americo Energy Re sources LLC Lease Name: A.M. McFaddin Well No.: 52 Field Name: McFaddin East Total Depth: 7,000 feet Direction and Miles: 7.6 miles SW. of Bloomington Survey Name: C.O. Edwards, A-526 Acres: 4,680 API No.: 42-469-34258 Classification: Fld. Dev. Operator: Petra Oleum Corp. Lease Name: Mueller Well No.: 1 Field Name: Coleto Creek (2800) Total Depth: 2,900 feet Direction and Miles: 7 miles SW. of Victoria Survey Name: R. Manchola, A-87 Acres: 56.38

WHARTON COUNTY API No.: 42-481-35033 Classification: Wildcat and Re completion Operator: Petropro Energy Partners LP Lease Name: Lulu Well No.: 1 Field Name: Wildcat Total Depth: 7,207 feet Direction and Miles: 6.1 miles SE. of Pierce

Survey Name: C. Howard, A-181 Acres: 80

OILANDGAS COMPLETION Recent oil and gas completions for the Advocate readership area.

BEE COUNTY API No.: 42-025-33823 Classification: Fld. Dev. Operator: Enco Exploration Company Lease Name: Brown H Well No.: 1 Field Name: Norbee, SE. (4,230) Survey Name: M. Carroll, A-11 Direction and Miles: 1.1 miles W. of Beeville Oil: 28 MCF: 118 Choke Size: 1/8 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 280 Total Depth: 4,496 feet Plug Back Depth: 4,369 feet Perforations: 4,219-4,222 feet

DEWITT COUNTY API No.: 42-123-32590 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Pioneer Natural Res. USA Inc. Lease Name: Pedraza 01 Well No.: 01H Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale) Survey Name: J. Forster, A-176 Direction and Miles: 7.8 miles NE. of Yorktown Oil: 26 MCF: 3,676 Choke Size: 12/64 of an inch Tubing Pressure: 5,510 Shut In Well Pressure: 8,015 Total Depth: 17,912 feet Perforations: 13,920-17,912 feet API No.: 42-123-32777 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Marathon Oil EF LLC Lease Name: Anne Friar Thomas Well No.: 4H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Survey Name: J. McCoy Jr., A-30 Direction and Miles: 8.3 miles SW. of Yoakum Oil: 402 MCF: 2,295 Choke Size: 12/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 5,800 Total Depth: 17,990 feet Perforations: 13,513-17,883 feet

GONZALES COUNTY API No.: 42-177-32284 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc.

Lease Name: Smith Unit Well No.: 1H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Survey Name: T.G. Weeks, A-476 Direction and Miles: 6.2 miles SW. of Smiley Oil: 1,077 MCF: 360 Choke Size: 26/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 1,111 Total Depth: 14,873 feet Plug Back Depth: 14,782 feet Perforations: 9,890-14,782 feet

KARNES COUNTY API No.: 42-255-32367 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Thomas Unit Well No.: 2H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Survey Name: D. Taylor, A-280 Direction and Miles: 8.5 miles E. of Gillett Oil: 1,579 MCF: 1,769 Choke Size: 32/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 1,569 Total Depth: 17,300 feet Plug Back Depth: 17,214 feet Perforations: 11,781-17,195 feet API No.: 42-255-32355 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Thomas Unit Well No.: 1H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Survey Name: D. Taylor, A-280 Direction and Miles: 8.5 miles E. of Gillett Oil: 1,599 MCF: 1,823 Choke Size: 32/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 1,533 Total Depth: 17,441 feet Plug Back Depth: 17,351 feet Perforations: 11,613-17,341 feet

WHARTON COUNTY API No.: 42-481-35244 Classification: Fld. Dev. Operator: Maverick Prod. Co. Inc. Lease Name: Hawes Well No.: 55 Field Name: Boling (Segment A) Survey Name: S.F. Austin, Sec tion 6, A-2 Direction and Miles: 0.9 miles NE. of Boling Oil: 20 MCF: 0 Choke Size: 12/64 of an inch Pumping: Yes Total Depth: 3,400 feet Perforations: 3,292-3,300 feet

LIVESTOCK MARKETS BEEVILLE Aug. 10 ■ Cattle on hand: 526 ■ Horses: 2 ■ Sheep/goats: 21 ■ Trends: Steers and heifers, steady/good. ■ Steers: (200-300) $182-$245; (300-400) $139-$185; (400-500) $135-$166; (500-600) $125-$160; (600-700) $116-$134; and (700800) $105-$130. ■ Heifers: (200-300) $155-$175; (300-400) $135-$195; (400-500) $129-$200; (500-600) $123-$182; (600-700) $108-$141; and (700800) $102-$116. ■ Slaughter cows: $40-$83; slaughter bulls, $75-$94; stocker cows, $60-$97; bred cows, $560$1,275; pairs, $1,010-$1,800; horses, $50-$125.

CUERO Aug. 17 ■ Receipts: 1,234 ■ Had 65 cows and 16 bulls. There were not many cows and bulls on hand. The market was essentially the same as last week’s market. The last 3 weeks have seen little change in these markets. ■ The calf market was stronger than last week’s market. Real improvement was noted in the lower grades along with a general $2 to $3 better prices in all the other classes. Some heifers under 450 pounds look $4 to $5 per count higher. Heavy weight steers and heifers were a solid $2 to $3 higher. Not many light cattle but a good healthy market for all classes of calves. ■ Packer bulls: Heavy weights, $90-$95; lower grades, $82-$88. ■ Packer cows: breakers, $65$74.50; boning cows, $68-$78.50; canners and cutters, $68-$89; light

and weak, $40-$70. ■ Palpated dry cows: none; pairs: none. ■ Steer calves: (under 200) none; (200-250) none; (250-300) $186$222.50; (300-350) $193$215;(350-400) $171-$198; (400450) $151-$173; (450-500) $148$168; (500-600) $145-$157; (600700) $131-$140; (700-800) $123$133. ■ Bulls: (over 700) $119-$133. ■ Heifer Calves: (under 200) none; (200-250) $175-$191; (250300) none; (300-350) $165-$171; (350-400) $152-$168; (400-450) $144-$159; (450-500) $140-$158; (500-600) $131-$149; (600-700) $124-$140.50; (700-800) $117$121.

EDNA Aug. 13 ■ Receipts: 444 ■ Steers: (200-300) $202-$246; (300-400) $167-$200; (400-500) $146-$182; (500-600) $138-$160; (600-700) $126-$140; and (700 and up) $113-$133. ■ Heifers: (200-300) $183-$237; (300-400) $141-$164; (400-500) $140-$158; (500-600) $128-$146; (600-700) $117-$131; (700 and up) $113-$121. ■ Stockers pairs: n/a; Stocker cows: n/a. ■ Packer cows: (600-800) $56$66; and (800 and up) $67-$88. Packer bulls: (800 and up) $78$100.

EL CAMPO Aug. 14 ■ Receipts: 311 ■ Trend: Feeder steers and heifers were steady to $1 higher. Cows and bulls were steady.

■ Steers: (under 200) $190-$215; (200-300) $175-$210; (300-400) $170-$195; (400-500) $164-$191; (500-600) $137-$158; (over 600) $120-$140. ■ Heifers: (under 200) $190$210; (200-300) $159-$185; (300400) $159-$200; (400-500) $137$150; (500-600) $130-$151; (over 600) $122-$138. ■ Slaughter cows: smooth fat, $72-$76; excessive fat, $70-$74; cutter, $76-$80; canner, $60-$70. ■ Slaughter bulls: high dressing, $93-$100; low dressing, $90-$95. ■ Replacement cows: pairs, $900$950.

GONZALES Aug. 11 Receipts: 699 cattle ■ Compared to our last sale: Calves and yearlings sold steady. Packer cows sold steady. ■ Stocker-feeder steers: Medium and large frame No. 1 (150-300) $210-$280;(300-400) $185-$197.50; (400-500) $149-$175; (500-600) $132-$144; (600-700) $123-$131; (700-800) $118-$124. ■ Bull yearlings: (700-900) $91$113. ■ Stocker-feeder heifers: Medium and large No. 1 (150-300) $175$225; (300-400) $148-$169; (400500) $139-$147; (500-600) $122$138; and (600-700) $116-$118. ■ Packer cows: Good lean utility and commercial, $74-$79; cutters, $77-$84.50; canners, $58-$68; and low yielding fat cows, $64-$71. ■ Packer bulls: Yield grade 1 and 2, good heavy bulls, $93-$102.50; light weights and medium quality bulls, $83-$89. Stocker cows, $850$1,150. Pairs, $1,050-$1,350.

HALLETTSVILLE

Aug. 14 ■ Cattle on Hand: 1,211 ■ Week ago: 1,109; Year ago: 2,789 ■ Compared to last week: Better quality classes of calves and yearlings were stronger in all areas. Heavier weights 550 pounds and up sold $2 to $3 higher. Lighter weights were $2 to $5 higher. Demand was very good on all classes. ■ Packer cows and bulls sold fully steady on about 160 head total. ■ Packer cows: Higher dressing utility and cutter cows, $75-$88; lower dressing utility and cutter cows, $63-$75; light weight canner cows, $53-$63. ■ Packer bulls: Heavyweight bulls, $97-$103.50; utility and cutter bulls, $88-$97; light weight canner bulls, $78-$88. ■ Stocker and feeder calves and yearlings: No. 1 steer and bull calves, (under 200) $210$275;(200-300) $190-$230;(300400) $180-$220;(400-500) $148$192.50; (500-600) $128$158;(600-700) $120-$140;(700800) $118-$130. ■ No. 1 Heifer calves: (under 200) $200-$270; (200-300) $165$215;(300-400) $148-$182;(400500) $132-$166;(500-600) $124$152; (600-700) $117-$130;(700800) $105-$121. ■ Stocker cows: good stocker cows and heifers, $1,000-$1,275; medium stocker cows and heifers, $775-$1,000; good cow and calf pairs, $1,275-$1,650; medium cow and calf pairs, $1,000-$1,275.

KARNES CITY Aug. 11 ■ Cattle on hand: 305 ■ Market was steady and higher in spots.

■ Steers: (200-300) $170-$235; (300-400) $160-$195; (400-500) $142-$175; (500-600) $132-$145; (600-700) $128-$142; (700 and up) $110-$120. ■ Heifers: (200-300) $160-$185; (300-400) $145-$165; (400-500) $138-$180; (500-600) $128-$150; (600-700) $120-$135; (700 and up) $115-$125. ■ Stocker cows (per head): Bred cows $850-$1,100, Pairs $1,100$1,275; Packer cows: No. 1 $78$89, No. 2 $68-$72, and Bulls $94$98. ■ Goats and other (per head): 172 on hand ■ Kid goats: (25-50) $65-$95; (50-100) $75-$120. Nannies: $75$115. Billies: $125-$185. Sheep: $95-$125. Rams: $115-$200. Piglets: $55-$80. Top Hogs: $50-$55 (per pound). Sows: $38-$45 (per pound). Boars: $8-$15 (per pound). ■ *No sale Sept. 1 due to Labor Day.

KARNES COUNTY Aug. 16 ■ Cattle on hand: 379. Market stronger compared to last week. ■ No. 1 steer and bull calves: (200-300) $186-$220; (300-400) $171-$225; (400-500) $152-$194; (500-600) $132-$154; (600-700) $120-$131. ■ No. 1 heifer calves: (200-300) $164-$180; (300-400) $150-$190; (400-500) $138-$165; (500-600) $132-$150; (600-700) $120-$125. ■ Stocker cows: Bred good cows and heifers, $1,150-$1,650; medium cows and heifers, $800-$950; good cow/calf pairs, $1,600-$2,100; medium cow/calf pairs, $875-$925; common cow/calf pairs, $675-$750. ■ Packer cows: higher dressing utility and cutter cows, $75-$82;

lower dressing utility and cutter cows, $69-$74; light weight canner cows, $61-$68. ■ Packer bulls: heavyweight bulls, $90-$98; utility and canner bulls, $81-$89; and light weight canner bulls, $75-$80.

NIXON Aug. 13 ■ Volume: 804; ■ Horses: 0; sheep and goats: 0. ■ Steers: (200-300) $188-$220; (300-400) $164-$213; (400-500) $147-$181; (500-600) $129-$155; (600-700) $119-$146; (700-800) $112-$129. ■ Heifers: (200-300) $161-$183; (300-400) $144-$200; (400-500) $133-$178; (500-600) $119-$178; (600-700) $111-$138; (700-800) $114-$116. ■ Slaughter cows: $56-$87; slaughter bulls, $91-$104; stocker cows, $730-$1,300; pairs, $1,400; horses, none. ■ *Closed on Sept. 3 for Labor Day.

WHARTON Aug. 15 ■ Receipts: 497 ■ Steers: (200-300) $187-$246; (300-400) $177-$212.50; (400-500) $152-$186; (500-600) $138-$159; (600-700) $125-$142; (700 and up) $111-$121. ■ Heifers: (200-300) $188-$218; (300-400) $149-$177; (400-500) $145-$175; (500-600) $131-$157; (600-700) $122-$146; (700 and up) $104-$118. ■ Stocker pairs: $700-$960; stocker cows, n/a. ■ Packer cows: (600-800) $56$68; (800 and up) $69-$89; packer bulls, (800 and up) $80-$102.

Victoria Advocate Aug. 19, 2012  

A family owned community newspaper serving South Texas.

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