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FREE

Celebrating the Lives of Local Women

Portraits

Women who are the faces of our community.

Brava

A retrospective salute to the colorful, quirky artwork of Debby Brown.

Minding Their Own Business

Mel&Mimi create a lasting destination boutique.

SUMMER 2013

RN-T.com


Table of Contents From the Porch Swing — Editor’s Message

She Said responses

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Name 3 things you love about summer. Name your 3 favorite teachers when you were in school. Name your 3 favorite foods. Name 3 countries you would like to visit. Name 3 things you love about our community. Name 3 books you’d recommend as good summer reads. Name your 3 favorite movies of all time.

Editor Charlotte Atkins Design and Layout Heather Koon

Bon Appetit Y’all

Sushi. The not so raw truth about enjoying this Asian cuisine.

Photographers and Contributing Writers Charlotte Atkins, Severo Avila, Mike Colombo, Brittany Hannah, Kim Jarrett, Lauren Jones, Tracy Page, Alan Riquelmy, Mary Lynn Ritch, Jeremy Stewart, Doug Walker

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Page 4 Page 8 Page 13 Page 17 Page 18 Page 20 Page 27

Advertising Director Mike Schuttinga

Brava

Debby Brown ... the eccentric, talented, quirky, generous and indisputably remarkable

50-Plus & Fabulous

Grands Who Care: Regular meetings provide group support

For the Health of It

CrossFit training takes a broad approach with bursts of intensity

Magnolias of the Past

The legacy of Ethel Harpst and Sarah Murphy

Magnolia Portraits Christa Jackson Cierra Jackson Ellie Mahon Rachel Rogers Kim Scoggins Linda Smith

Page 5 Page 7 Page 9 Page 21 Page 23 Page 25

Interview room at Harbor House.

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Making a Difference

Harbor House and The House Next Door offer safe refuge for abused children Page 24

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Advertising Sales Quincy Matthews Missie Tolbert Mandy Welborn Creative Services/ Advertising Design Tona Deaton, manager Lee Field Jamie Metts Allison Morris Circulation and Distribution R.J. Driskill Printing Rob Broadway

Special thanks to the following people who helped with this edition: Margaret Hollingsworth, Kirk Milam and the Rome Public Works Division as well as Lisa Smith for arranging for us to use the city’s Toonerville Trolley for Linda Smith’s portrait; Alan Storey and Berry College for allowing us to use their beautiful campus as a portrait backdrop once again; Sumo Japanese Steak House owners Mr. and Mrs. Kim for the grand sushi platter for Bon Appetit, Y’all; to Wanda Whitten and Andrea Pitts for connecting us with Miss Rome; and to Tracy Page of Babycake Studios who once again photographed many of the showcase portraits for this edition.

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About the Cover: Linda Smith as been a mainstay at the Greater Rome Convention and Visitors Bureau for 24 years. She retired from the CVB this summer, but Linda will undoubtedly continue to “sell” Rome to others and offer newcomers and visitors the warmest of welcomes. Linda is shown on the cover aboard Rome’s Toonerville Trolley, which the city uses for special events and is available for charter. (Cover Photo by Tracy Page/ Babycake Studios) To advertise in the next edition of Magnolia, email advertising@NPCo.com or call 706-290-5213. To contact us about Magnolia features, email us at magnoliaeditor@gmail.com. News Publishing Co. 305 E. Sixth Ave. Rome, GA 30161

Leonardo DiCaprio in

‘The Great Gatsby’

Cheers!

These ‘plot-tails’ pay homage to the spirits of literature

Minding Their Own Business

Mel&Mimi have built their business into a destination boutique. Page 11

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Home Sweet Home

Inside shines out through door décor Page 26

President: Burgett H. Mooney III Vice President of Operations: Otis M. Raybon Vice President of Production: Doug Crow Vice President of Community Relations (and Magnolia head cheerleader): Mary Sib Banks New Media Director: Jim Alred Magnolia is published seasonally by News Publishing Co. and is distributed free at more than 50 locations in the Greater Rome Area. ©2013.


EDITOR’S MESSAGE

From the Porch Swing

Our region is home to such an amazing array of women, from those in leadership roles to those on the front line of local services and agencies getting things done. Magnolia, in our celebration of local women, captures the faces of our community each season. In this summer edition, our showcase portraits spotlight women who represent Floyd and Polk counties to the outside world in some way. They range from 21-year-old Miss Rome Cierra Jackson, who’s represented Rome for about six months, to Linda Smith, who has represented Rome for part of three decades at the Greater Rome Convention and Visitors Bureau. Other notables include Rachel Rogers, who through Shorter University has been key to hosting the NAIA national football championship here in Rome for the past several years and is now helping the school transition to the NCAA; Ellie Mahon, who roasts and serves up fresh java with a smile to all who come into her Swift & Finch coffee shop on Broad Street; Christa Jackson, who is the face of Cave Spring in so many ways, especially when she dons her homemade Lady Liberty costume for the popular Independence Day parade each July; and Kim Scoggins who runs Polk Medical Center and is helping plan for the new hospital from the ground up. We are fortunate that our community is so well represented by smart, impressive women — from our esteemed Rome Mayor Evie McNiece, who was just named to the board of directors for the Georgia Municipal Association, to Gretchen Kuglar Corbin,

who has held several key state positions and is making headlines as the new Commissioner for Georgia’s Department of Community Affairs. These ladies are all official representatives of our local communities in some way. But the truth is we are each the faces of our community each day as we move through life, whether or not we have a job or title that makes it official. That happens anytime we have visitors to the region who come into our places of businesses, stroll our streets as tourists or perhaps visit local churches, schools and organizations. How they are received and treated makes a lasting impression of our area. If they get a big dose of our well-known warm Southern hospitality or perhaps a kind gesture or congenial conversation, that will color how they think of Rome, Cave Spring, Cedartown or Northwest Georgia. Our CVB works hard to sell Rome to visitors. Our Chambers of Commerce work hard to sell Floyd and Polk to business and industries. Our colleges bring thousands to Rome from elsewhere each and every year and many from the tri-state area come here for our state-of-the-art health care. So whether you are chatting with someone in a waiting room, in a grocery store or at a ballgame, we need to all remember that we are not just being kind and welcoming human beings, we are each in her own way representing our communities. Charlotte Atkins, Editor

Let us know what you think about Magnolia magazine. Email your comments to magnoliaeditor@gmail.com.

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3


She Said:

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Knock Out roses, magnolia blossoms and fresh okra. Denise Powers

Let’s celebrate our animals Many of you Magnolia readers are animal lovers who have beloved pets. We have long wanted to do an edition that celebrates local women and the animal in their lives. So we are going to do that in the fall/winter edition at the end of the year and want to get an early start. So start taking some cute photos of you and your animals this summer. So here’s what we want you to do. Dig out your favorite photo of you and your pet or snap a new one between now and Aug. 30. Then email a high-resolution photo (full size at least 300 dpi) to us along with a few paragraphs about your pets. We want the usual dogs, cats and birds, but we’d love to see some exotic animals too. Note: If you are taking a photo with your cell phone, be sure to send us a “large” or “actual size” photo file since cell images are often too small. Try to send us a file that’s at least 300K. Our goal is to pack the last edition of the year with as many women and animals as possible. Won’t that be fun? So start planning now and email your photos of you and your animals with some details to Magnolia editor Charlotte Atkins at magnoliaeditor@gmail.com by Aug. 30.

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L to R: Debbie Ruland, Angela Shropshire, Elizabeth Ponder

706.234.5482

www.watterslandscape.com


Photograph by Brittany Hannah

Christa Jackson

For 27 years, Christa Jackson has been the Statue of Liberty for Cave Spring’s Fourth of July Parade, donning a silver trash bag and aluminum foil crown.

In Rome, Christa Jackson is known as the director of admissions and development at St. Mary’s Catholic School. But in Cave Spring, where she’s lived her whole life, she is also an iconic hometown symbol every July. This Fourth of July was no different than the previous 26 as she donned her Lady Liberty ensemble for Cave Spring’s annual Fourth of July Parade, the epitome of patriotism wrapped in small-town charm. “My Statue of Liberty costume is a big heavy-duty silver trash bag. My crown is made of aluminum foil twisted together. And boy, that trash bag is hot on July 4 during our parade,” says Christa. “There are always those who ask me why I don’t buy a new costume that isn’t so hot, but it wouldn’t be the same. This is my original trash bag that I’ve been wearing since 1986, and every time I have thought about updating to a cooler, better costume, everyone says, ‘No! You HAVE to wear your trash bag!’ So, we patch up any holes with silver duct tape and I wear it every year.” Now the only thing she might be more enthusiastic about wearing than her trash bag is the red and black of the Georgia bulldogs. “I’ve been going to see the Dawgs play since I was just a few months old, and there is no question that I bleed red and black! When I was a little girl, I thought Georgia Tech was a bad word, and nobody in my family is allowed to wear orange — ever!” Christa is synonymous with Cave Spring, and the town’s First Baptist Church is special to her. “I love the time I spend at my church. I grew up in that church – and we now have four generations of our family who attend.” She loves calling Cave Spring home. “The wonderful people, the small town atmosphere, our rich history, the beautiful creek flowing right through the middle of town – it is a way of life that has already disappeared in so many places. We are truly blessed to experience it every day.” While she loves telling folks about her hometown, don’t even think about an invitation to her house. “I put yellow caution tape over my door when I think there’s even a remote chance that guests might even think about coming into my house. It’s a disaster zone,” confesses Christa. “But I learned a long time ago that I could choose to throw myself into all the many activities I enjoy, or I could clean and straighten my house ... and I guess it’s clear what choice I made!” Now isn’t that the true meaning of independence? Charlotte Atkins, Editor

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These ‘plot-tails’ pay homage to the spirits of literature By Charlotte Atkins Editor

Anyone who’s seen James Bond order a martini on the big screen knows the phrase “shaken, not stirred.” But it was actually born on the pages crafted by Ian Fleming where he created both the devilishly handsome British Secret Service agent and what has become an enduring catchphrase. Signature cocktails are scattered throughout literature, helping depict the personalities and tastes of characters. Some are iconic enough to become part of popular culture. Since summer is often a time for extra reading — whether on the beach, poolside, on the deck or in a porch swing — we decided to research and share some of our favorite “plot-tails.” While we know Mr. Bond likes his martini shaken, he also shared a variation on the traditional cocktail in the 1953 novel “Casino Royale” when he ordered a Vesper Martini. “A dry martini. One. In a deep champagne goblet ... Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon’s, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it’s ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel. Got it?” In a subsequent chapter he names it the Vesper after a beautiful double agent woman he meets ... no surprise there. This particular drink differs from the more traditional martini in that is a concoction of both vodka and gin and Kina Lillet instead of the staple dry vermouth. Lest you be tempted try to dash out for a bottle of Kina Lillet, don’t. You won’t find it. Kina Lillet was a fortified French wine-based tonic that had quinine in it and has since gone by the wayside, except for Bond apparently. You can use a modern version called Lillet Blanc that reduces the bitterness of the original, but if you want to be true to the taste of Bond’s original Vesper, you can always add a dash of bitters. Now in Fleming’s “Casino Royale” the first drink readers ever heard James Bond order was the Americano. This sipper was originally known as the Milano-Torino in Italy in the mid 1800s, but it was dubbed the Americano when it became popular with American tourists during Prohibition. Here’s how to make your own Americano: Fill an old-fashioned glass with ice cubes. Pour in 1 ounce Campari and 1 ounce of sweet vermouth. Then top it off with club soda and garnish with lemon twist or orange slice. Now a cocktail that caught my attention based on the setting was Stuart Woods’ description in his “Hothouse Orchid” and the Orchid series of books that are based in and around my former home of Vero Beach, Fla. His handsome leading man Stone Barrington saunters into one of my favorite gathering spots in the world — the Ocean Grill in Vero — and orders a Vodka Gimlet. Now a vodka gimlet is pretty easy. It’s basically 1oz of Rose’s Sweetened Lime Juice per 1.5 oz of vodka. You might even enjoy it with a 1:1 ratio. Mix it in a shaker over ice and then pour into a chilled martini glass and garnish with a lime wedge. It’s a cool, refreshing choice on a hot summer day, especially if you are poolside with a good book. Now Woods, who lived in Vero Beach until around 2004, himself offers up a simpler way to have vodka gimlets at the ready all summer long. He says, “Pour six ounces of vodka from a 750 ml bottle; replace with six ounces Rose’s Sweetened Lime Juice, add a small amount of

6

Leonardo DiCaprio in

‘The Great Gatsby’

water for ice crystals, shake twice and store in the freezer overnight. Pour into a martini glass and serve straight up. The glass will immediately frost over. With this recipe, no cocktail shaker is required and the cocktail is not watered down by melting ice. You may use even the cheapest vodka, and no one will ever know.” Now the traditional Gimlet of gin and lime juice makes appearances in literature. In Raymond Chandler’s 1953 novel “The Long Goodbye” we read as Terry Lennox tells detective Philip Marlowe that “a real gimlet is half gin and half Rose’s lime juice and nothing else.” Now it’s said Chandler didn’t write about the gimlet in his first draft. But after a trip to London, he apparently became fond of the drink and added it. The novel’s popularity made the cocktail a hit in the United States. Now “The Great Gatsby,” with its Jazz Age decadence and excess conjured up by F. Scott Fitzgerald, could provide a whole summer’s worth of sippers. While the Mint Julep is probably most often associated with Southern scribes like William Faulkner, what really put this drink in the national spotlight was F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” when he put it into the hands of Daisy Buchanan. In a Collins glass, muddle 4-5 mint springs and 2 sugar cubes. Then add 2.5 ounces bourbon. Fill with crushed ice. Drink as is, or top with water ... if you must ... Now my research here delves into perhaps a long forgotten cocktail, but as a John Steinbeck fan I have to point out that it makes appearances in “Sweet Thursday” and “Cannery Row.” Plus it’s rumored to be F. Scott Fitzgerald’s favorite drink. Plus it has the quirkiest drink name ever — Webster’s F-Street Layaway Plan. Webster’s F-Street Layaway Plan ¼ oz green Chartreuse 1½ cups cracked ice or 6 ice cubes 2 oz dry gin lemon twist for garnish Chill a martini glass. Pour

the Chartreuse in the glass and swirl it around to coat it. Discard any excess. Fill a cocktail shaker with the ice and add the gin. Shake vigorously. Strain the gin into the glass and garnish with lemon peel. Now you can’t write about literature and cocktails and not include Ernest Hemingway. Like Fitzgerald’s work, we could fill pages with drinks from Papa’s tales. As I was writing this, Rome’s Harry Musselwhite shared that there’s a new book “To Have and Have Another: The Cocktails of Ernest Hemingway” that does just that with scores of rich anecdotes in addition to recipes. We’ll just pick one here to share though. “The Sun Also Rises” mentioned the Jack Rose as the drink of choice for Jake Barnes as he awaits Lady Brett Ashley. It’s a mixture of citrus juice, vermouth, grenadine, gin and applejack. Here’s the recipe for a Jack Rose that Harry shared that purports to be the real one From Harry’s New York Bar in Paris, circa 1927: 1½ oz. applejack or Calvados ¾ oz dry gin ¾ oz orange juice ¾ oz fresh lime or lemon juice 1⁄3 oz French vermouth 1⁄3 oz Italian vermouth Grenadine to cover. A simpler version mixes 2.5 ounces of applejack, ¾ oz of fresh squeezed lemon juice and grenadine for taste in a cocktail shaker with ice cubes and then adds a lemon twist garnish. The most important part of enjoying a Jack Rose is to be sure to add the “Bung-O” toast before enjoying ... and imagine Hemingway smiling.

Cheers! Daniel Craig as

James Bond (AP photo)


Photograph by Brittany Hannah

Cierra Jackson

Spelman College senior Cierra Jackson was crowned Miss Rome in January and competed in the Miss Georgia pageant in Columbus this summer.

As Miss Rome, Cierra Jackson is most certainly a face of our lovely city even though she’s not from here. The 21-year-old Spelman College student hails from Columbus, though her path to Georgia was a circuitous one. “I was born in Bowling Green, Ky., the home of the Corvette,” she says, adding, “and I have lived on a military base in Camp Casey, South Korea.” But she has been to Rome quite a bit since being crowned in January, whether raising money for the Children’s Miracle Network, speaking to the Exchange Club or singing the national anthem at a Rome Braves game. “I love the people of the Rome area. I love being able to meet so many different people from various walks of life who seem to be very welcoming ... Overall, the people of Rome have truly been so kind.” The Miss Rome pageant is open to young women from around Georgia as a qualifier for Miss Georgia and Miss America. The pageant was not Cierra’s first Rome experience, which turned out to be memorable too. She played on her high school junior varsity basketball team and came to Berry College for a tournament. “I loved the campus. It was so beautiful and very peaceful. Before leaving Berry, we were playing one of our final tournament games at the college.” During a rebound attempt, Cierra took an elbow to the eye. “I got my first and only black eye right here in Rome. I definitely didn’t think I looked or felt attractive that day. But leaving the campus, I was reminded of how breathtaking it was and of the beauty of Rome. I told myself that one day I would be back to this place. In my wildest dreams, I never could have imagined that I’d be representing the city where Berry is located. “God has a funny way of bringing things full circle.” So Rome is where her dreams came true and put her on stage in Columbus in June at the Miss Georgia pageant as Miss Rome. “I was blessed with the crown and the title of Miss Rome, becoming the first African American woman to hold the title and winning my first ever swimsuit preliminary award,” said Cierra. “I am so glad and honored to have been blessed with the opportunity to represent such a fine city.” And this political science major still has big dreams, saying there are still a couple of titles she would love to hold ... like say Miss America or President of the United States. Until then, thanks for representing Rome, Cierra. Charlotte Atkins, Editor

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She Said:

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Want to be part of our next edition’s She Saids? Drop us a line at magnoliaeditor@gmail.com to be added to our email list.

Chip Limbrick helped make me a curious learner with his unique approach of getting us to research facts. Sally Riggs mentored me as a student and later a business teacher. She required excellence in the business classroom. Louise Shelnutt taught me the “correct” way to do many things in the kitchen and lowered my grade for licking the cake icing knife. Teresa Lumsden Jean Love, fifth grade at Garden Lakes Elementary; and Sara Wingard and Jackie Wagner, English teachers at Coosa High. Lynn Plunkett 3rd grade teachers at Pepperell Elementary (Primary now) were a married couple — Mr. and Mrs. Langdon. They always cooked us toast with homemade jelly or popcorn. I thought it was the best toast in the world. Mrs. Martha Taylor at Pepperell Elementary, my fifth-grade teacher. She was very strict but also very nice. She has been my neighbor for the last eight years and still as nice as ever and makes an awesome peach cobbler. Mrs. Carol Brinson — Pepperell High School — was my Algebra/Math teacher. Math was my favorite subject, and I learned a lot from her. I always thought she was the coolest because she was young herself and just always had a great attitude until you made her mad or were running in the halls. As an adult, I got to see her play one of her favorite sports, tennis, which is also mine. She will always hold a special little place in my heart. Scharla Battle

Women in Business GZZhVB^aidc OWNER Perfect Home 2013 Shorter Ave., Rome, GA 706-802-0500 www.perfecthomeofrome.com

Creating classic, yet comfortable, interiors is not only a career, but also a passion for Reesa Milton. After many years in the bridal business, in 2002 it was time for a change. After building an addition to The Wedding Belle, (now Perfect Dress of Rome), Perfect Home was born. As owner of Perfect Home, Reesa has the pleasure of designing, consulting and working with customers either in the store or on “house calls”. Whether it is custom window treatments, accent furniture, lamps and accessories, or a new rug to add that finishing touch, Perfect Home has just the thing to make your home, well, “perfect”. Reesa invites you to visit Perfect Home at 2013 Shorter Avenue soon, or call 706.802.0500 for your own personal “house call”.

8

These Magnolia Women are

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From florists to jewelers to retailers and lawyers to doctors to agents, these women offer it all! Come visit these local businesses and let these ladies help you with all of your needs! Each of these women are experts in their field and look forward to seeing you soon!


Photograph by Tracy Page / Babycake Studios

Ellie Mahon

Ellie Mahon’s coffee shop on the corner of Broad Street and Sixth Avenue has become a favorite downtown hangout for locals and visitors alike.

Swift & Finch Coffee in downtown Rome is a place visitors and locals alike relax in an inviting atmosphere amidst the aroma of fresh roasted java that usually comes with a warm welcome by owner Ellie Mahon, 27. To friends and strangers she touts the downtown area between the rivers, the old historic neighborhoods, the rivers and the hills. “I love being able to park my car at the shop and walk the length of Broad Street and around the Kingfisher Trail with our dog Tupelo. I love running into lots of Swift & Finch customers along the way.” While Rome is her home now, Ellie has a traveling spirit. “My mom worked for a travel agency while I was growing up, and my parents spoiled me with many, many opportunities to travel all over the world.” Still on her list is India. “It seems like the most colorful country. I want to walk through a market there and experience the vibrancy of the spices, the dyed tapestries, the jewelry and the pottery,” she says. “I see so much beauty in other cultures and lands.” Her adventures include climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2006. “There is something magical about working so hard to get to the top of a mountain. That Snickers bar I stowed away in my pack for the summit was the best tasting morsel of food in my life!” A lot of inspiration for her coffee shop came from design details she took note of while traveling. “Owning a coffee shop is an interesting combination of local and international. I am all about getting to know this town: its people and their regular coffee orders, its back roads and hole-inthe-wall restaurants, its nearby rivers and mountains and caves and swimming holes. But I love the coffee business because I also get to source unique coffees around the world to roast in our little Rome, Ga., shop.” Ellie has a sweet quirkiness she embraces. “I collect butterfly wings that I find on the ground ... and bits of green glass ... and bottle caps, and interesting leaves ... well I guess I collect most anything. I keep all my treasures on the dashboard of my car. Sometimes they all fly away when I open the windows.” She says her favorite place to eat in Rome is Pick O Deli. “If I ate fried okra every day of my life I’d be living the dream.” She also admits to a surprising honor. “I was featured in my high school yearbook as worst dressed. My cowboy boots and skirts weren’t cool in 2004.” Ellie moved to Rome three summers ago with her husband Dave, who works with the Young Life ministry. Their life together is her joy. “I want to have kids some day. I imagine a chaotic, messy home full of a whole lot of love.” Charlotte Atkins, Editor

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Women in Business @Vi]gncHb^i]HidkZg MANAGER

Kenyon T. Smith Moving & West End Mini Storage 2555 Shorter Avenue, Rome, GA 706-235-1142 Moving 706-235-1919 Storage

Kathryn Smith Stover is the daughter of Kenyon Smith. Our company offers moving and storage. We have 3 locations in West Rome of storage units varying in sizes. We can move a single item for you such as a piano or we can pack the whole house and move it to the new location. Kathryn has worked for her parents Ken & Deborah, at West End Florist for 9 years and took over managing the storage and moving paperwork about 2 years ago. She lives in Rome with her husband, Matt Stover and daughter, Kensley Stover. We offer free moving quotes for any size of a move. Office hours Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00 Saturday 9:00 - 12:00 but we move 7 days a week. Storage is accessible at all hours of the day at each location.

BVcYnAddg]Vb OWNER

Random Start Photography

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Rabbitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nest of Rome

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IVbbn@ZaaZn DESIGNER

Greeneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jewelers

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6a^hdcHb^i] OWNER Perfect Dress of Rome 2013 Shorter Ave., Rome, GA (706) 234-5532 www.perfectdressofrome.com

Perfect Dress of Rome is a full-service bridal boutique with exquisite collections of bridal gowns, bridesmaid dresses, social occasion and motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attire, as well as, tuxedo/suit rental. Additionally, they offer fabulous accessories to complete your ensemble with the perfect finishing touch. Hours of operation are Tuesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday: 11:00-5:30 and Saturdays: 11:00-3:00. Walk-ins are always welcome though appointments are encouraged. Alison is happily married with two young boys. She is a member of the Greater Rome Chamber of Commerce and Junior Service League of Rome where she serves on the board of directors for both. She also serves on the Westminster Christian Academy Board of Directors and is a community member for the Garden Lakes Elementary School Local School Governance Team. She has owned and operated Perfect Dress of Rome since 2010.

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Family Owned Since 1948 www.GreenesJewelers.com

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Minding Their Own Business

Mel&Mimi By Mike Colombo, Staff Writer

When asked to define their target clientele, Mimi Weed and Melanie Morris both smiled. Their answer: Everyone. That may seem like a bold claim for the lifetime friends who grew up in Rome and now own their own boutique — Mel&Mimi — at 203 E. Eighth St. in Rome, but the two women have executed a clever plan to lure customers to their door. The boutique has clothes for everyone, for women size 0 to 22. And Weed and Morris said they also have an eclectic collection for women of all ages. Often a mother and her teenage daughter will walk through the door looking for just that right item. And sometimes they even pick up something for grandmother, Weed said. It’s that ability to attract and satisfy customers, the women said, that has helped make them a success as they near their 16th year together. They began their partnership in 1997 when they bought Ragtime on East Second Avenue. They moved into their current location across Eighth Avenue from Second Avenue United Methodist Church in February 2000. A snap judgment may question the location. There is little foot traffic in the area, and downtown Rome is a few blocks away. But neither of those issues appears to be important. “I think we were destination by then,” Morris said about when they moved to their current location, “and we’ve always loved the idea that we have parking.” Weed agrees that there are definite benefits to their location. “East Eight is really a major corridor in East Rome for people going to Second Avenue and going to the Y,”Weed said. The boutique’s operating hours are Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The women still remember those men who appeared skeptical when they began their partnership. “I think at the very beginning we had a little trouble being taken seriously,”Weed said. “Don’t you just want to stay at home?” Morris said, mimicking those who questioned their desire and determination. Their answer to that is no. “That is why we are here,”Weed said. Weed said she has sometimes wanted to say something simple to her early critics over the years. “We’re turning 12, we’re turning 16, we’re still around,” she said. They carry both clothing and accessories. Fashion designers Johnny Was, Michael Stars and Karen Kane are among their more popular lines. They are also proud to say an overwhelming majority of their clothes are made in the United States. “Eighty-five to 90 percent of our merchandise is made or manufactured in the USA, and we found customers who that is important to. They have asked,”Weed said. The co-owners like what they do, but make it clear it requires some determination. “It is fun, but it is a job. It’s a business, and it is work,” Morris said. (Photo of co-owners Mimi Weed and Melanie Morris by Tracy Page / Babycake Studios)

11


Bon Appetit, Y’all

SUSHI

By Kim Jarrett Staff Writer

While sushi is popular in most larger cities, some people here still shy away from what they think is just raw fish and rice, according to local restaurant managers. But sushi is not actually raw fish and rice, according to Ping Xia, part owner and manager of Blue Fin restaurant in Rome. According to information from Xia, Asians used sushi as a method to preserve food in the 15th century. The word sushi actually means “made with a vinegared item.” The vinegared item is actually the sushi rice, not the fish. In fact, one popular sushi roll, the cucumber roll, does not have fish at all but is made of rice and cucumber. But if you go to Japan most of it is raw, according to Harlan Chen, manager of Japan Café. The thin slices of raw fish served in Japanese restaurants are called sashimi. In the 21st century, there are as many ways to make sushi as there are hamburgers.

Here are some of the ingredients with their Japanese name, according to Xia. ± Nori — the roasted seaweed layer. ± Shari — the vinegared rice. ± Maguro — the lean cut of the tuna. ± Sake — salmon ± Toro — the fatty cut of the tuna. ± Saba — mackerel Americans have changed sushi to meet their palates. “In Japan, we don’t have the tuna roll,” he said. The California roll, consisting of cucumber, crabmeat and avocado, did not originate in Japan but in Southern California in the 1960s. On the East Coast and at Blue Fin, the Manhattan role made with tuna is very popular and also originated in America, Xia said. Sauces are often part of the sushi experience. In many restaurants, spicy mayo is the preferred sauce. Some like the ginger dressing featured in most Japanese restaurants with their sushi. Many restaurants also serve a sweet soy sauce that gives the sushi roll extra flavor.

Sushi is turning up everywhere — in grocery stores like Kroger and in food courts in malls, like Japan Café at Mount Berry Square mall. But some people, particularly those who are older, are still leery to try it, says Chen. “It’s hard for people to try new stuff.” If you are trying sushi for the first time, visit a restaurant where there’s a sushi chef

making it to order. Most shrimp in sushi is cooked and is a good choice for first-timers. Most sushi menus explain what is in each roll. If not, just ask your server. Sumo Japanese Steak House on Martha Berry Boulevard has been a mainstay Japanese dining destination for years with it sushi bar and hibachi tables. While veteran sushi lovers might gravitate to rolls with soft-shell crab, tempura shrimp, tuna or eel, most first-timers try the California roll first according to Justin Howell, head server at the longtime Rome establishment. Once you find you like one of the basic rolls with cooked seafood, you might be game to try other items. If you like cooked tuna, you might even venture to try it raw in a sushi roll. It is a favorite of sushi lovers. And remember, don’t forget the sauce!

The sumptuous sushi platter above was created by Sumo Japanese Steak House, a longtime Japanese dining destination in Rome. (Photo by Tracy Page) 12


She Said:

Name your 3 favorite foods. Pinto beans, Mac & Cheese and collard greens. I could eat them every day. It just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any better that! Julia Dent Shrimp! I am Like Forrest Gump I LOVE them â&#x20AC;&#x153;any way. â&#x20AC;&#x153; Barbecue â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Good ole chopped pork or ribs. Yummy! And French Fries (with honey mustard of course!) Karli Morgan

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come in to Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for your furniture makeover.â&#x20AC;?

Good Chocolate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; candy, cakes. Homemade Italian foods. Seafood â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lobsta! Alison Lampkin

Tomato Sandwiches, Bacon, Eggs Ethel Evans

Lemon Ice Box Pie, Carrot Cake, Most anything chocolate ... Any wonder I have a sweet tooth? Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ann Downey

Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Furniture 1428 North Broad Street â&#x20AC;˘ Rome, GA 30161 â&#x20AC;˘ 706.291.6500 Hours: Wednesday - Saturday 10am - 6pm

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13


Brown By Severo Avila Staff Writer

There is a tiny box on my desk that doesn’t seem to fit with anything else. It’s a vibrant green with yellow, white and black accents. There are very distinctive patterns running across its surface, and a tiny little window gives a peek inside. The box is filled with small seashells, miniature starfish and a crystallized orange rock. This is Debby Brown’s handiwork. She brought me this little keepsake a year ago as simply a gift for being her friend. She beamed as I took it from her. I could tell she had spent a lot of time and effort making it beautiful, and I knew it came from her heart. She said it was filled with good luck charms and wanted me to have it. Debby passed away in May. And while she was known for her quirky, make-do attitude (she was notorious for not wanting to have her photograph taken) and her tireless work with the Rome Area History Museum, Chieftains Museum and Rome Little Theatre, she also leaves behind an artistic legacy. After her death, a multitude of Debby’s artwork surfaced. Friends, family members, coworkers, even complete strangers started displaying the beautiful pieces she painted. Her style was whimsical and colorful. And many of her pieces depicted iconic Rome scenes. Longtime friend Sandy Davis said she remembers working with Debby several years ago on the Rome Little Theatre annual Awards Gala. Debby would take large clay pots and paint them with various scenes from RLT shows. Some of the pieces were purchased and given back to Davis, who said she still displays them proudly at home and at the office. “They are whimsical, and that best describes Debby’s art for me,” Davis said. “Looking at her work makes you think of magic and twinkling stars, possibilities and joy in every moment of life. I also have a

14

Brava

... the eccentric, talented, quirky, generous and indisputably remarkable

wonderful canvas oval that Debby painted and gave me for my birthday many years ago. It is a blond girl holding a black and white kitty. Debby knew about my black and white kitty, and that’s why she chose the piece to give me.” Indeed, most of Debby’s pieces that are in homes and offices throughout the community were given as gifts. She thought that giving her paintings to friends was a way of saving money and offering a unique gift, especially since most of them were created specifically for the recipient. Mary Elena Kirk, another of Debby’s friends, said she can’t help but smile when she looks at a piece Debby created. “Especially when you see her artwork all together,” Kirk said. Her love of life and everything in it is so evident in her artwork. It’s almost impossible to look at her paintings and not catch yourself smiling. Debby’s personality was unique and so evident in all her artwork. She may have been short, but what a huge personality.” There are plates, platters, pots, boxes and even chairs that didn’t escape Debby’s creative impulses. All these items can be seen bearing whimsical scenes of children, flowers, cats, rainbows and mermaids — an endless cast of characters out of fantasy and imagination — that Debby brought to life. Debby’s daughter Mollie said her mom painted whenever she had free time. “It was always fun to watch her start to create something,” Mollie said. “Most of the time she didn’t even know what she was going to draw until she was almost done with it. She always told me she wanted to create art that made people smile and be happy. I feel like she accomplished that.” Mollie said many of Debbie’s pieces included animals. In fact, the very last thing Debby painted before she passed was the fire hydrant in front of Mollie’s home. She painted it to look like a Dalmatian wearing a fireman’s hat. “Everyone that rides by stops to look at it,” Mollie said. “I look at it daily and still remember her sitting out there with paint and markers fixing it for me and can’t help but smile.” Debby left behind a long list of reasons why people will remember her. Her art is a tangible reminder of a bubbly, vibrant, energetic and colorful woman. As I glance over to the little green box on my desk,

with its intricate patterns and hand-picked good luck charms locked inside, I am reminded of my friend — the eccentric, talented, quirky, generous and indisputably remarkable Debby Brown.

15


50-Plus & Fabulous Photograph by Alan Riquelmy

Ramona Duvall, 66, is the sole caretaker of her fraternal twin grandchildren. She’s a member of Grands Who Care, where she’s found a support group of like-minded grandparents who lean on each other for support.

GRANDS WHO CARE

Regular meetings provide group support

By Alan Riquelmy Staff Writer

After raising her own children into adulthood, Ramona Duvall suddenly found herself a parent of small children once again. That was nine years ago, when her two grandchildren — fraternal twins then 3 years old — became her sole responsibility. “The parents were in crisis,” said Duvall, 66. “The mother just moved out and left. At the time, it was the only choice.” Duvall found herself in a growing company. According to the recent Census, more than 300,000 children in Georgia younger than 18 live in homes where the heads of household are grandparents or other relatives. That’s about 12 percent of the state’s children, said Julia Kimple, coordinator of Grands Who Care. Kimple’s organization, housed in Mercy Senior Care, helps

16

grandparents who serve as caretakers for their grandchildren. Kimple said grandparents could find themselves once again raising children for several different reasons. “There are so many different reasons,” she added. “Divorce, single-parent households, teen pregnancy, mental-health issues.” Parenthood brings challenges to all parents. It’s no different for grandparents raising their children’s children. Duvall’s grandson grew angry easily when young. She said it stemmed from his mother’s departure. “He was very difficult to get through to,” Duvall said. “He would cry, scream, just fall on the floor. The sister wanted to be his mother, and she still does. “He’s 1 minute older than her, and he tells her that,” Duvall added. Emotional issues aren’t the only challenges grandparents face. Grandparents enrolling their grandchildren in schools

have found problems in other areas of the state, though Kimple said that’s not the case with Rome and Floyd County schools. Grandparents also can find themselves in an information gap. Today’s technology didn’t exist when they raised their own children. Now they find themselves in a world of newly emerging technologies their grandchildren might be more comfortable with than themselves. That’s one area where Kimple’s group can help. Grandparents can get online training through Grands Who Care. Duvall found that and more, including a support group of people who know what she’s experiencing. “All of us have similar situations in our group,” Duvall said. “It’s good to come together and share things and know it’s not going to be aired outside the room.” CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


She Said:

Name 3 countries you would like to visit. Egypt — To look upon the oldest of manmade creations. Italy — To discover my family heritage. Ireland — To find the other part of my family heritage. Laura Logan

I would like to visit Greece, yet again, because of its never-ending culture, delicious food and vibrant people; Italy, to ride in a gondola in Venice; and Thailand, as their beaches are said to be breathtaking and clear as the blue sky. To be able to experience an infusion of language and culture has always been something that I have enjoyed throughout life, thus far. María Leontini Bournakis Tahiti — to see if it is as beautiful in person as it is in photos. Australia — because it seems like it has so much to see and do. Kenya — to go on a safari. Elaine Abercrombie South Vietnam, because of the fantastic people who have moved to Rome and tell me about the natural beauty and culture of their homeland. Romania, because my husband has been and tells me that it has a fascinating culture and an emerging market with excellent, quality wines. Having survived the dark years of Communism, they truly appreciate the freedom that we have in this country. South Africa, because of the diverse culture and natural beauty and wildlife. Leigh Barba Tibet. I’m a mountain person and the Himalayas are the ultimate mountain trip. The people there are independent by nature in spite of struggling against the suppression of their culture by China. Antarctica is a place like no other. It has less precipitation than the Sahara desert. In addition, there are mountains and a series of lakes hidden under up to 2½ miles of ice! Galapagos Islands (Ecuador) — I want to see the blue-footed booby and the giant tortoises; most of all I want to see the environment that prompted Darwin’s seminal discovery. Dr. Anne White CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Duvall recently went to Kimple’s office to borrow some books about caring for children as a grandparent. She also attends regular Grands Who Care meetings — the only place some fulltime grandparents have for adult interaction. Kimple often has speakers at the meetings. One recent speaker discussed scholarships for college, and Duvall said she was impressed by how many were available. Duvall expects she’ll raise her two grandchildren to adulthood. She wants them to get a taste of working life with part-time jobs in high school before they reach college age.

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Getting her grandchildren through high school is just one more challenge people such as Duvall face. When a grandchild graduates — and Kimple hasn’t had one fail yet — the grandparents are celebrated by her group. “Put yourself in their shoes,” Kimple said. “Think about the challenges they face.” Duvall knows those challenges well, but she wouldn’t change her situation if given the chance. She wanted to care for her grandchildren because they’re family and the twins are dependent on each other. Foster homes are scarce, Duvall said, and she feared the twins might be split up. “When they’re family, you have to stop and think — what’s best for these children?” Duvall asked.

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17


She Said:

RIGHT: Tabatha Bright of Rome gets warmed up for her CrossFit workout by pressing some weight. Bright has lost 220 pounds since beginning to exercise on her own because of back problems. BELOW: Crossfit UCS coach Jessica Bost began crossfit training in January 2011 and became a certified trainer five months later. (Photos by Jeremy Stewart)

Name 3 things you love about our community. Volunteers! You may not be aware of all the folks on the sidelines, making things happen, but they are there! The variety and quality of cultural and community events â&#x20AC;&#x201D; everything from hand cycling races to choral and orchestral music and theater. The variety of weather is always interesting. Jane Slickman

Friendliness of the people, delicious Southern foods available and wonderful gardens of friends who offer us their delicious vegetables and fruits. Carol Grajzar The friendliness of Rome residents. We have met so many really nice people since we moved here in 2010. We have awesome neighbors. The best hospitals around. Fell in Love with the downtown area from day one, warm welcoming. Love Sweet Pickles for lunch. Had our first lunch there before we even looked at houses. Penny (the owner) was so helpful, recommended a Realtor (Susan Babcock) and before we knew it we were buying a home in Rome. Kathy McGonigal Rome Christmas Parade because it is so representative of small town atmosphere. Very inclusive of anyone who wants to participate, and no matter how cold it is that night everyone has a smile on their face. Our rivers and the ways we utilize them. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boating on them, walking beside them or having a concert or event next to them, it is special for Rome and its citizens. I believe the amount of churches we have in this area is a testament to the type of people who live here and what their values are. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go far without seeing another church of some denomination. Amy Astin I have lived in Rome since 1979 and I love living here! I love that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s small enough to see people that you know when you are out and about. Whether you are swimming at the Y or walking on the levee or in the grocery store, people smile and chat, and you know you are a part of a friendly community. Rome is very health minded, and it is a fabulous place to ride your bike or walk on the levee or at Berry or in town. Not many cities have the great walking paths along the river and in town. Rome is in such a gorgeous setting. You can look around and see mountains and rivers and lakes. Each season has its own special beauty. And I love the many volunteer opportunities that are available in Rome. I think it makes our community stronger. Cathy Strickland

Want to be part of our next editionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s She Saids? Drop us a line at magnoliaeditor@gmail.com to be added to our email list.

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CrossFit

By Jeremy Stewart Staff Writer

The transition between stations are only a few seconds as participants go from lunging forward with weights on their shoulders to leaping onto a bar and bringing their feet as high as they can go. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just part of the continuous physical exertion that is the foundation for CrossFit, a training program that has caught on in popularity and become a way of life for the people who have been changed by it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best thing ever,â&#x20AC;? said Nancy Ely, who has been doing CrossFit for two years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great stress release and provides a great sense of accomplishment.â&#x20AC;? At the core of the program are WODs. A WOD â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or Workout of the Day â&#x20AC;&#x201D; consists of a combination of many different stations or exercises including weightlifting, box jumps, sprints and gymnastic drills. While some are done for the number of reps a person can do in a certain amount of time, usually 12 minutes, other WODs are done for time, meaning a person has to see how fast they can get through the detailed regimen. Josh Holloway is the program director for CrossFit UCS, a CrossFit gym based out of Unity Christian School in Rome. Holloway promotes the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to work for any person of any age or gender and bring out a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strength. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We work on everything,â&#x20AC;? Holloway said, adding that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as much about improving the person mentally as it is making them physically fit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We work to improve the way people look at themselves and how they fit into a community,â&#x20AC;? Holloway said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where the success of CrossFit comes from and why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing in popularity.â&#x20AC;? The three aspects of CrossFit are to ensure a

fitness program that is broad, general and inclusive, and presents a technique to improve on a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weakness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to take people in and make them better, not make them professional athletes,â&#x20AC;? Holloway said. Romeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tabatha Bright did CrossFit casually for about seven years before getting serious about it around March. Bright was introduced to it through her chiropractor, who told her that due to her back problems she would have to either lose weight or have back surgery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I found that I just loved it,â&#x20AC;? Bright said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I refused to have back surgery.â&#x20AC;? Brightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, Landau, had been doing CrossFit and she had noticed the major transformation that he had gone through and wanted that as well. Since she started out as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;closetâ&#x20AC;? CrossFit fan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; getting her daily workouts through the WODs posted on the CrossFit website â&#x20AC;&#x201D; www.CrossFit. com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bright has lost 220 pounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was an all-around change,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is such a positive environment that goes along with doing this with a group of people that it makes you want to make a change for the better.â&#x20AC;? Bright said she tries to come to the CrossFit UCS classes five days a week, but would come more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They say that you have to have a rest day, but I love it so much itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss it,â&#x20AC;? Bright said. CrossFit UCS coach and trainer Jessica Bost wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always a fitness enthusiast. She started at CrossFit UCS when it began in January 2011. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was not in great shape,â&#x20AC;? Bost said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was 30 or 40 pounds overweight and health-wise I just wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in a great place.â&#x20AC;? CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


For the Health of It

CrossFit training takes a broad approach with bursts of intensity. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

In three months of coming to classes at CrossFit UCS, Bost had lost 25 pounds, and in her fourth month she was asked to become a certified CrossFit coach to help with the growing number of people joining the program.

“I enjoyed it, and I enjoyed the people here,” Bost said. “So I decided with my husband that it could be something I could do part time.” While Bost won’t admit that CrossFit is the easiest way to get in shape, she does believe that it is the fastest. “It doesn’t matter how much you’re overweight or if you’ve never worked out a day in your life,” Bost said.

Any part of a WOD can be modified to adapt to a person’s capabilities and still be a high-intensity workout. “It’s all about doing the work the best they can,” Bost said. “People can come in and feel great about the environment and accomplish something that was hard.”

19


She Said:

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Name 3 books youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d recommend as good summer reads. â&#x20AC;&#x153; The Glass Castleâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boy in the Striped Pajamasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hunger Gamesâ&#x20AC;? Angela S. Baron

I always think of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Gatsbyâ&#x20AC;? when I think of hot summers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Wrinkle in Timeâ&#x20AC;? is a good classic, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bossypantsâ&#x20AC;? is a fun recent book. Whitney Sullins Langley Anything by Dorothea Benton Frank, Pat Conroyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;South of Broadâ&#x20AC;? and throw in Stephen Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duma Keyâ&#x20AC;? for a different kind of summer read. P.J. Miller â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shackâ&#x20AC;? by William P. Young Nicholas Sparks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; any one of his novels Sue Graftonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;A is for Alibi,â&#x20AC;? etc. Lynn Todino â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone Girlâ&#x20AC;? by Gillian Flynn â&#x20AC;&#x153;11/22/63â&#x20AC;? by Stephen King â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightwoodâ&#x20AC;? by Charles Frazier Nancy Smith â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lean Inâ&#x20AC;? by Sheryl Sandburg, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bonfire of the Vanitiesâ&#x20AC;? by Tom Wolfe, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Native Sonâ&#x20AC;? by Richard Wright, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Souls of Black Folkâ&#x20AC;? by W.E.B. Du Bois. Tasha Toy â&#x20AC;&#x153;And The Mountains Echoedâ&#x20AC;? by Khaled Hosseini. Loved it! Stories intertwined of generations. It takes a bit to figure out who they are. It makes you realize people are people wherever they are. It takes place in Afghanistan as his other books have. This is my favorite so far. I could not put it down! Karen Jordan

20

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Photograph by Tracy Page / Babycake Studios

Rachel Rogers

Rachel Rogers came to Rome for college and stayed because she fell in love with its Southern hospitality and charm, especially in historic Downtown Rome.

A year and half before she turned 30, Rachel Rogers decided to create a 30 Before 30 list. “Like most bucket lists, mine was composed of things I’ve always wanted to do, but never really had the time, nor made the time to do. Now at 31, I have 12 left to finish, and I’m still working toward completing them all.” Some of the most memorable things she’s checked off the list include running a 5K, buying a Jeep Wrangler, renting a stretch limo with her girlfriends for their 30th birthday bash in Vegas to visit the Hoover Dam and taking a trip that required a passport — Costa Rica. Others were of a more humanitarian, spiritual nature like keeping a prayer journal, a mission trip to Haiti and sponsoring a child living in poverty. “My little boy is William. We share the same birthday. He lives in Zambia, Africa.” She’s come to realize that people are her passion. “I love to meet and learn about people, trying to soak in their wisdom and laughing until it hurts. In the same breath, I’ve always been a compassionate person, and my heart is most happy when I’m helping others. In all honesty, I would be most happy if I could pack up my life here in the states and serve the people of Haiti.” But for now Rachel’s heart is in making a difference in Rome. She has become a face of Rome in many regards in her role as senior woman administrator in Shorter University’s Athletics Department. After stints with the Greater Rome Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Rome Braves, she returned to her alma mater, Shorter. Since then she served as the game week coordinator for the NAIA Football National Championship in Rome and she’s also part of the team facilitating Shorter’s transition from an NAIA school to NCAA Division II membership. “I came to Rome in the fall of 2000 to attend Shorter. Rome quickly became home, welcoming me in with open arms, and before long it became a part of my heart.” Rachel tries to share her love of Rome with everyone she meets. “I want them to know this is a great community to live, work and play in. ” She says there’s so much to love about Rome, “including its unique history and beautiful landscape, but the thing I love most is its Southern hospitality. It’s the random ‘hey’ from a stranger walking down Broad Street, or the polite ‘excuse me’ you hear from a child. It is everywhere you are. Romans have the genuine ability to make people feel welcome and appreciated.” Charlotte Atkins, Editor

21


The legacy of Ethel Harpst and Sarah Murphy Murphy, an alumna of Selman College, ran the orphanage with the help of her husband Shug, and their motto was “We’ll make room.” Meals Often times, the bruises you see on a child’s were scarce, and times were more difficult than skin are a mere shadow of the scars to his spirit. More than 3 million reports of child abuse are anyone could possibly imagine. But miraculously, Murphy won an award of made in the U.S. each year, according to National $1,000 in 1946 on a national radio show, and the Child Abuse Statistics from Child Help, and that exposure brought in a rush of donations, allowing involves nearly 6 million children. But nearly a them to expand the home. Sadly, a 1950 fire century ago, two women in Polk County started reduced the building to rubble and ashes, but with taking the necessary steps to protect children the help of Methodist from abuse and death. women, the children It was in 1914 that were housed. Following Ethel Harpst, born in Murphy’s death in 1883, was appointed by 1954, the national the Women’s Home Women’s Division of Missionary Society of the Methodist Church the Methodist Church to took over the Sarah Cedartown where she Murphy home in 1966. taught both children The Women’s and adults, conducted Division merged both worship services and the Harpst and Murphy nursed the sick and ‘Without the homes in 1984, neglected. But when the widespread dedication, selflessness forming today’s Murphy-Harpst tuberculosis, typhoid and love of both Harpst Children’s Centers. The and influenza epidemics children who lived in struck, many parents and Murphy, many the homes had succumbed to the children would have not suffered severe diseases, leaving many children orphaned. only suffered the same traumatic events from emotional abuse and Knowing Harpst’s fates of their parents, but neglect and receive caring and loving hands, the parents’ dying wishes some would likely have professional treatment. The mental health were for Harpst to care also been incarcerated in professionals and for their children. While the number of orphaned mental institutions and social workers work to build a safe, children skyrocketed, prison.’ therapeutic Harpst established the environment for the Harpst Home in 1924, a children to end the cycle of abuse, poverty and permission granted by the Mission Society. The home expanded for more children during neglect. In 2012, Murphy-Harpst served 314 children, said the center’s Director of the Great Depression and then World War II. She worked tirelessly collecting donations, spreading Development Communication Jim Tichenor. Without the dedication, selflessness and love the word about her home and efforts until her of both Harpst and Murphy, many children would retirement in 1951 and then her death in 1967. have not only suffered the same fates of their It was around that time that in 1931, Sarah parents, but some would likely have also been Murphy, born in 1892, established a school near the outskirts of Cedartown for black children, but incarcerated in mental institutions and prison. It is because of these two Magnolias of the she soon transformed the school into an Past in Cedartown that struggling children stand orphanage as many of her students were a chance in the world today. becoming orphaned with each passing day. By Lauren Jones Staff Writer

Sarah Murphy

Magnolias of the Past 22

Ethel Harpst


Photograph by Tracy Page / Babycake Studios

Kim Scoggins

Kim Scoggins loves the outdoors, whether riding on her husband’s motorcycle with him through the countryside or spending the weekend at the lake.

Kim Scoggins sees the best of what both Floyd and Polk counties have to offer. Like many women in the area, she lives in one and works in the other. “I love living in Rome, but I really enjoy the small town atmosphere of Cedartown. Rome is a great place to raise a family. Not too big but has everything you need. Cedartown is a great community. Everyone is like family. Just down to earth and friendly. I love all the history in Floyd and Polk counties and the beauty of the mountains and downtown areas.” As the administrator of Polk Medical Center, Kim is a face of Polk health care both in the community and in the industry. But her medical career started in Rome almost 30 years ago when she graduated from Jacksonville State with her B.S. in nursing. “I began my nursing career at Redmond Regional Medical Center. Due to a nursing scholarship I had to work at the hospital for two years to repay. I ended up being there 29 years.” Her success as an RN at Redmond led to her rising to the helm of Polk Medical Center, which was managed by HCA Healthcare until last year. The hospital is now managed by Floyd, and Kim has not only led the transition but also is a key player in the building of a new hospital for Polk that was part of the deal. “I am about to embark on the most exciting thing I have ever done in my career. I get to be a part of planning a new hospital from the ground up. This is huge for Northwest Georgia and is truly deserved and needed by the community. I can’t wait!” But all work and no play is not good for any Magnolia, and Kim knows how to relax during her down time. “I love to camp. I love to ride on my husband’s motorcycle, and I love to work outside in the yard and garden.” As you can tell, she loves being outdoors especially during the summer. “I enjoy my little piece of heaven at Lake Weiss. It is our getaway. It is so peaceful,” says Kim. “I love jet skiing, swimming, going to the beach and spending time with my family at the lake.” She checked a big item off her personal To Do list when she earned her master’s degree in 2003. An item she still wants to do concerns music. “I really want to take piano lessons.” Kim says she knows she’s found the right fit in health care and just can’t imagine doing any other job ... unless of course she could be a country singer. Charlotte Atkins, Editor

23


Making a Difference

A safe refuge for abused children By Mary Lynn Ritch Staff Writer

Playroom for before & after interviews.

24

Interview room decorated for teenagers.

(Photos contributed by Harbor House.)

Interview room at Harbor House.

Harbor House is as its name suggests — a safe refuge. Since January 1995, it has served as a neutral facility for sexually abused children who have been brought to the attention of the police and the Division of Family and Children Services. When Gail Garland started her career she didn’t realize she’d ever be the executive director of such a facility. “I started my career at Redmond and moved on to the Harbor House. I went from working a corporate level job to helping kids one-on-one,” Garland said, “and every day I wake up and go to work, I feel like I am making a difference.“ Cases at the Harbor House are staffed by a team of representatives from all agencies involved in the investigation who coordinate a plan that will best serve the child. “Sometimes the cases get difficult because the kid doesn’t say anything. And I have to remember there are all kinds of dynamics that go on in abusive situations that you or I wouldn’t typically grasp because we’d approach a situation differently,” Garland said, “but many times the person that’s hurting them is the person paying the bills. And they even miss their home life. But kids become smart at a certain age and realize maybe while spending the night at a friend’s house that they see what’s normal may not be normal at their house. You just have to do what you can.” The Harbor House, which Garland says is quietly active within the community, is funded by state and federal grants as well as donations from the community. It is implementing prevention programs within schools in which approximately 4,000 children participate. One of the groups is Safety Awareness For Everyone. SAFE provides self-esteem building, active participation, role-playing, games, puppets and more and teaches kids the powerful practice in learning how to speak up if they find themselves in a situation requiring such a response. “SAFE is a ‘good touch-bad touch’ program where one of our trained facilitators empowers children to know about body safety,” Garland said. Another program the Harbor House offers is Heroes Great & Small, groups for kids targeted from 5 to 13. The group shows young victims of sexual abuse that they are heroes for having told of their abuse and reminds them that they are not alone. The Harbor House has two houses were victims can go seek help. “The House Next Door” is set up for adolescents and teenagers, and the Harbor House is for younger children. For more information contact Garland at 706-235-5437 or visit www.nwga-cac.org.


Photograph by Tracy Page / Babycake Studios

Linda Smith

Linda Smith, aboard Rome’s trolley, has been a warm and welcoming presence to locals and visitors alike for many years.

Linda Smith was one of the first to reach out to me when I returned to Rome years ago. She showed me around town and made me feel so welcomed. There are many who’ve had the same experience during the 24 years she worked for the Greater Rome Convention & Visitors Bureau. Linda recently retired from her job there but is clever about not revealing her age. “I’m not sure because I get my bust size and my age mixed up,” she jokes. No matter how many years ago it was, Linda’s connection to Rome began when she was in the eighth grade. Her father brought the family here when he got a job with Esserman’s store as a buyer for the men’s department. He later bought OwensKing men’s store on Broad Street. Linda also worked at Esserman’s as a teenager. “I started my connection to Downtown Rome all those years ago and didn’t even know it.” Linda is known for her welcoming smile and willingness to make people’s experience as special as possible, whether it was booking bus trips for tourists or helping tend bar at parties. She said as many people know her from her bartending service as they do from her tourism work. She’s not retired from that because she loves it so. “I can’t imagine not working a party every week. I love bartending because I love being part of someone’s special occasion like a wedding.” Some might be surprised that she’s a professed homebody. “Even though I love being around people, I am also very content being at home. It doesn’t take much to make me happy.”That’s because she knows she’s never alone. “My relationship with God is a defining part of who I am.” She’s still adjusting to retirement from her day job, but says she looks forward to having time for spontaneity and travel. “I want to travel throughout Georgia to the places I have talked about and learned about for 24 years through the CVB,” says Linda. “I’ve been to places like Montreal, South Dakota and New Orleans, but there is so much of this state and this country I have never seen.” Of course, no other place will ever hold a candle to her Rome. She feels like she inherited her father’s sales acumen, and she’s used hers to “sell” Rome. “The product that I have sold all these years is Rome, Ga. Rome is worthy of people’s time to come here. There’s so much to see and do, so much to learn and to enjoy.” She says it’s the people who give Rome that extra something. “I love the people here and their warm hospitality.” Perhaps they are just mirroring her own warm hospitality ... Charlotte Atkins, Editor

25


Home Sweet Home

Photograph by Doug Walker

Nancy Smith puts up her summer sunflowers on her front door on East Third Street. Smith said she likes to put up a display that is bright and colorful.

Inside shines out through door déc r From color to arrangements, doors unlock keys to the nature of a homeowner By Doug Walker Associate Editor

The first thing a friend or visitor notices about someone’s home or business is the door. Design experts say that the door often provides key insight into the resident or business owner’s personality and lifestyles. For instance, a red door can indicate someone who is calling out for attention. That person really wants to stand up and be noticed. A white door, according to many design experts is the sign of a wellorganized person who generally pays a lot of attention to detail. A black door can often be the sign of someone who is not particularly flashy and is very consistent. Then there are those who decorate their doors. When it comes to door décor, wreaths are for much more than the Christmas season. Nancy Smith lives in Rome’s historic Between the Rivers District. She usually changes the arrangement on her door with the season but confesses that she

didn’t get around to doing it for spring this year. It was just an oversight because she doesn’t much like to do decorations during the winter, except for Christmas. She associates the wintertime with grays and browns. “I’d rather be real colorful and bright,” Smith said. She believes that all things bright, sunny and cheerful are a real reflection of her personality. Aside from the seasonal changes, Smith does do special decorations for some of the special holidays like the Independence Day, Halloween and Christmas. Amy Astin at Floyd Medical Center said she enjoys decorating her door with something that is seasonal. “If it’s a broad season, it’s going to stay there for a while,” Astin said. Occasionally I’ll do something a little more special like for the Fourth of July.” Most of the time Astin said it’s not a big deal. She generally takes a basic wreath and puts different kinds of decorations on the wreath. Astin said Halloween is her favorite holiday and adds that she goes all out for that holiday.

The festive decorations on Astin’s door are a reflection of her festive personality because she points out that her home doesn’t sit right on the street. “I don’t know how much people who are just driving by can pick out the details from that far away,” Astin said. “Sometimes I’ll put something by my mailbox, and that’s a little easier for folks to see.” Linda Gibbs, retired owner of the Just Kids Day Care Centers, has been decorating the front door of her home for between 15 and 20 years. “I think it just makes people happy,” Gibbs said. “During special seasons and holidays it helps get everybody in the mood.” Gibbs decorates her door for all the holidays and changes of the season. Not just the major holidays either. Gibbs will go so far as to put out the green for St. Patrick’s Day. “I think Christmas is my favorite. I kind of go crazy for Christmas,” Gibbs said. “But I also like fall and all the colors, so I guess you could say it’s a toss-up,” Gibbs goes beyond her door, with a faux evergreen that usually sits in her kitchen, which she also changes out with decorations to mark the holiday.

‘I think it just makes people happy. During special seasons and holidays it helps get everybody in the mood.’ 26


She Said:

Name your 3 favorite movies of all time.

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I am a huge movie buff, old and new. I love to be drawn in by a movie for a couple of hours ... to name my favorites is extremely hard. I love them all for different reasons. My No. 1 is an absolute ... from there it is a crapshoot. 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Notebookâ&#x20AC;? 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Green Mileâ&#x20AC;? 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eight Belowâ&#x20AC;? Tina Bowling â&#x20AC;&#x153;Which Way is Up?,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wizâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Shop of Horrorsâ&#x20AC;? Beth McCain

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bridges of Madison County,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Officer and a Gentlemanâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;On Golden Pond.â&#x20AC;? Dianne Stansberry â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty Woman,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Got Mailâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Days of Thunder.â&#x20AC;? I have wonderful memories of watching â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty Womanâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Days of Thunderâ&#x20AC;? with our son, Jeff, years ago. We could almost say the lines with them. Julie Henderson

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Dancing,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty Womanâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Footlooseâ&#x20AC;? Becky Smyth

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grease,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Home Alabamaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Got Mailâ&#x20AC;? Erin Hernandez 1) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Green Mileâ&#x20AC;? 2) Tyler Perry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Did I Get Married?â&#x20AC;? 3) Eddie Murphy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nutty Professorâ&#x20AC;? Rosaland D. Gooden

Want to be part of our next editionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s She Saids? Drop us a line at magnoliaeditor@gmail.com to be added to our email list.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The caregivers are eager to take care of all our needsâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; HC

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knowing that my parents are in a place with people who love them gives me such a sense of peace.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AG

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The entire staff has created a caring and loving atmosphere for all the residents.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; KB

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My dad feels happier and more secure at The Harbor.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LH

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a vision of heaven and that heaven looks a lot like Renaissance Marquis.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JD â&#x20AC;&#x153;I regret all the years that I wasted not making the decision to move to Renaissance Marquis.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TC

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daddy is so much calmer at The Harbor.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MA

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Harbor has truly been a blessing sent from God!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; KB

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have not seen my daddy and mother â&#x20AC;&#x153;My motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quality of life so happy in such a long time.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AG has increased tenfold.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LH

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Magnolia Summer 2013  

Magnolia Summer 2013

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