Issuu on Google+

Administrative Portfolio for Rebecca L. Munson

This portfolio highlights administrative projects completed during an internship associated with my Masters of Public Administration Program at the University of Michigan Flint. The Clinical practice was carried out at Riverside Academy West Middle/High School under the supervision of Principal Ramzi Saab and University of Michigan clinical supervisor Patrick O'Donnell.

To view online: http://issuu.com/rmunson3/docs/administrative_portfolio?mode=window&viewMode=doublePage


Rebecca L. Munson 50456 Anders New Baltimore, MI 48047 (810) 580-1409 rebeccamunson3@hotmail.com

CERTIFIED SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER (Grades 6-12) Dedicated teacher eager to transition into an administrative career. Offer a proven track record of commended performance teaching grades 6-12, with a passion for education and an unwavering commitment to optimizing student and school success.

CORE COMPETENCIES

   

Creative Lesson Planning Curriculum Development Instructional Best Practices Classroom Management & Discipline

   

Standardized Testing / Scoring Improvement Learner Assessment ELL/ESL Students Budget Evaluation

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Riverside Academy-West, Dearborn, MI Middle School Writing Teacher

    

September 2009-Present

Facilitate six classes consisting of 18-32 students for grades 6 and 8. Utilize multiple assessments in compliance with district and state requirements to inform instruction. Use innovative methods and materials to produce effective learning experiences including cooperative learning, thematic instruction, higher ordered thinking, and differentiation. Engage and motivate community in promoting higher education for all students regardless of background and economic status. Skilled in RTI, the SIOP planning method, NextK12 and PowerSchool programs, Atlas mapping, and Smart Board technology.

Key Contributions:

   

Contributed to an increase in student performances on standardized testing using research based, data driven methods requiring higher order thinking. Successfully developed and executed lessons for varying levels of ESL, at-risk, gifted, and special needs students. Created and implemented behavior modification program resulting in an 18% decrease of referrals and repeat offenses. Collaborated with staff and external resources to develop lesson plans; create and administer tests; and provide students with feedback targeting areas of improvement and align their strengths with course objectives and intended outcomes.


 

Designed and instituted new program to improve the after school tutoring program resulting in an increase academic performance in all academic areas. Member of School Improvement Program (SIP) committee, seventh grade class sponsor, and Middle School class sponsor committee chairwoman.

Anchor Bay School District Substitute Teacher 2006-2009

Worked my way through college as a substitute teacher. I provided instruction to students of multiple levels of learning capabilities, subject matter, At-Risk, and grade levels. I was regularly requested by teachers for long term assignments. I also provided tutoring to students in writing, reading, and test preparation. EDUCATION & CREDENTIALS University of Michigan-Flint Wayne State University

Flint, MI

MPA, Educational Leadership

Detroit, MI

BS Secondary Education 2009

2012

Michigan Teacher Certification (Grades 6-12), 2009

Michigan Licensure for School Administration 2012 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

    

Enthusiastic, creative, and passionate educator and leader who believes that all students can learn and thrive in a learning environment that is stimulating, comforting and appropriate to their unique talents and abilities. Specializations include: English for grades 6-12/Health Education for grades 6-12. Instructional Leadership - Use a balanced blend of motivational and targeted instruction methodologies to enhance curricula. Engage Parents – Work closely with parents throughout career, repeated successes securing parental support and improving student achievement Specializing in Writing – planning, creating, developing, and writing speeches, messages, correspondence, talking points, and briefings. Research, writing and editing speeches. Utilize a consistent sense of style, grammar, and flow to the finished product.


TABLE OF CONTENTS CLINICAL PROPOSAL AND TIMELINE SECTION I: OVERVIEW OF THE SETTING SECTION II: SPECIFIC CLINICAL ACTIVITES COMPETENCY 1: ACCOUNTABILITY ARTIFACT A1 COMPETENCY 2: COMMUNICATION SKILLS ARTIFACT B1 COMPETENCY 3: COMMUNITY RELATIONS ARTIFACT C1 COMPETENCY 4: CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, SUPERVISION ARTIFACT D1 COMPETENCY 12: Multicultural/Diversity Issues Artifact E1

SECTION III: JOB SHADOWING EXPERIENCE SYNTHESIS OF MAJOR LESSONS LEARNED


CLINICAL PRACTICE PROPOSAL Following are the planned clinical activities to be undertaken by Rebecca Munson during the Winter Term of 2012 at University of Michigan-Flint. The clinical practice will be completed at Riverside Academy-West Middle/High School under the direction of Principal Ramzi Saab, who will serve as the cooperating administrator and provide on-site supervision for the experience.

COMPETENCY 1: Accountability Related Task 1.4 Ability to prepare, develop, and evaluate research designed to assess the effectiveness of the instructional program. Specific Task 1.4.1 Present an evaluation of a given school curriculum program to teachers, parents, or the school board. COMPETENCY 2: Communication Skills Related Task 2.1 Knowledge of group interaction techniques. Specific Task 2.1.1 Develop goals with a committee of staff and community members for a school building or school department within a district. COMPETENCY 4: Curriculum, Instruction, Supervision Related Task 4.3 Knowledge of a variety of instructional methods and skills Specific Task 4.3.6 Conduct at least one clinical supervision cycle including pre-observations, classroom observation and evaluation session with teacher.


COMPETENCY 11: Student Personnel Related Task 1.2 Knowledge of principles of discipline, student control, etc. Specific Task 11.2.3 Analyze discipline referral and suspension data for a school year to identify the nature and frequency of student misbehavior. Based on findings, recommend a plan to reduce most common form of misconduct. COMPETENCY 12: Multicultural/Diversity Issues Related Task 12.1. Knowledge of multicultural issues and strategies for meeting needs of diverse student populations Specific Task 12.1.1 Create a curriculum for a World Cultures class using multicultural standards endorsed by a national professional association or society Competency X: Leadership X.1 Related Task: Job Shadowing Narrative Description of Task: Spend a minimum of one entire day (including after school and evening responsibilities, if any) shadowing the cooperating administrator. Narrative Description: Assist administrator, when appropriate, in accomplishing responsibilities. Maintain a journal of activities and prepare a thoughtful analysis of the number, nature, and focus of activities, and with whom the administrator interacted. Describe and assess the decision-making process and style used by the administrator in responding to various categories of demands or problems. Identify several crucial lessons the day taught about the art of administration and school leadership. This shall include insights gained concerning the role of a principal as an organizational manager and a visionary leader in guiding the school to better teaching and learning. This experience shall shed light on the multiplicity of demands placed upon the principal as he orchestrates his priorities and time commitments.


Implementation Timeline for Proposed Clinical Practice January 2012 Week 1: Meet with student coordinator to compile data for competency 11. Week 2: Discuss with SIP committee the components of competency two at regularly scheduled meeting. Evaluate goals and recommend changes if needed. Week 3: Complete first teacher evaluation with academic Coordinator. Week 4: Develop discipline plan to combat recurring behavior problems. Meet with Administration for input. February 2012 Week 1: Review sixth grade Language Arts curriculum for multicultural based literature and educational components. Week 2: Continue to develop discipline plan to combat recurring behavior problems. Week 3: Begin research on multicultural standards and literature. Week 4: Meet with administration for assistance and feedback with components.. March 2012 Week 1: Complete SIP goals and enter into system. Write up competency. Compile data regarding MEAP and EdPerformance scores for school board Presentation. Week 2: Complete power point presentation. Present to school board during monthly meeting. Week 3: Job shadowing. Complete second teacher evaluation with Academic Coordinator. Week 4: Complete third teacher evaluation with Academic Coordinator. Complete behavior modification program. Write up competency. Present to Administration for feed back.


April 2012 Week 1: Continue working on multicultural curriculum. Week 2: Complete multicultural curriculum map and write up competency. Week 3: Submit portfolio


Global Educational Excellence Charter Schools

Overview of the Setting


Riverside Academy West is located in Dearborn, Michigan. It opened to students in 2005 and serves students in grades 6 through 12. Riverside Academy West is a public school academy that adheres to all mandated regulations of the Michigan Department of Education. Our school prides itself on strong character education, an excellent group of certified teachers, a curriculum that exceeds Michigan standards, small class sizes, and a family-like environment. Riverside Academy West also has a strong ELL department that helps newcomers. The school offers Arabic as a foreign language, advanced classes, and a required dress code. About Global Educational Excellence Global Educational Excellence (GEE) is an educational service provider founded in 1998 in Michigan, with the mission to empower schools of choice by nurturing academic excellence, positive character traits and an appreciation of cultures. Mohammad Issa, Director of GEE, and Said Issa, Associate Director of GEE, ensure that GEE provides the following services to the school: recruit and engage personnel, best suited to the school and its community, facilitate the development and implementation of a curriculum fostering growth among all children, supervise the maintenance of the school’s physical facility and environment, and manage all record-keeping and financial aspects associated with the operation of the school. The staff of Global Educational Excellence has a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences which makes the team unique in its ability to serve the Global Academies. The departments at Global Educational Excellence have over 15 years’ experience in handling Federal and State Grant Reporting requirements and Board Policy. They also handle all No Child Left Behind Requirements, including Site Manuals and Administrative Guidelines for the buildings and school board. As an Educational Service Provider, Global Educational Excellence is prepared and equipped to handle any educational needs of the Academies requested by the School Board. Through their mission, GEE has worked with communities throughout Southeastern Michigan and Northern Ohio to provide a strong educational program specifically developed to meet the needs of the English as a Second Language student. Global Academies, through the Educational Service Provider GEE have been recognized state-wide in Michigan as well as nationally for the academic achievements of their academies’ students.


The Management Service Company provides the following services:

◦Financial Management

◦Reporting

◦Student Recruitment

◦Student Services

◦Facilities Planning and Management

◦Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

◦Technology Management

◦Cultural Development and Understanding

◦Cafeteria Program

◦Human Resource Management

◦School Operations Management

◦Compliance Oversight

Riverside Academy West is a School-Wide Title I School 

Title IA is a federal grant that provides federal funds and is authorized by the No Child Left Behind Act

The funds are used to help students reach proficiency in the core academic areas and follow a School-Wide School Improvement Plan

These funds do not replace the regular curriculum, but supplement and enhance the curriculum.

These additional programs and services use research and evidence based practices

Parental Involvement is key in the success of a Title I school ◦Parent Involvement makes the difference in student success

Parents can be involved in many ways

Parents are expected to be full partners in education of their children


Teachers Student-Teacher Ratio This School Students per FTE teacher

State Average

20

18 Source: NCES, 2008-2009

Students Student Ethnicity

Ethnicity

This School

State Average

White, not Hispanic

93%

71%

Black, not Hispanic

4%

20%

Hispanic

2%

5%

Unspecified

1%

n/a Source: NCES, 2008-2009

Student Economic Level This School

State Average

96%

42%

Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program

Source: NCES, 2008-2009

Attendance This School Attendance rate

State Average

94%

95% Source: MI Dept. of Education, 2006-2007

Spending Per Pupil

Total per pupil expenditures

This District

State Average

$7,891

$9,244

Breakdown By Expenditure Instructional

46%

59%

Student and staff support

4%

10%

Administration

20%

12%

Other expenditures

31%

19% Source: NCES, 2006-2007


Specific Clinical Activities


COMPETENCY 1: Accountability Related Task 1.4 Ability to prepare, develop, and evaluate research designed to assess the effectiveness of the instructional program. Specific Task 1.4.1 Present an evaluation of a given school curriculum program to teachers, parents, or the school board.

Description, Purpose, and Rational "Accountability for student performance is one of the two or three -if not the most- prominent issues in policy at the state and local levels right now," says Richard F. Elmore, a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education (Quality Counts, 1999). Some states, such as Florida and New Mexico, have been attempting to hold teachers accountable by tying their evaluations and pay to students' scores on state tests (Quality Counts, 2005). But many educators and teachers' unions contend that approach is unfair because too many factors contributing to student performance are outside teachers' control. As an addition to my ongoing learning process, the importance of accountability, and its process, has been in the forefront of my education; the validity of the school for which you are a part of demands precise data in order to move ahead. To accurately detail teacher performance and student achievement, data needs to be current at all times and presented not only to the governing body of the schools, but to the community as well. In April 2012, I, along with two other members of Riverside’s school improvement committee (SIP), presented the completed MEAP and EdPerformance data to the school board. During this presentation, we outlined our school improvement goals and our plans to achieve them, as well as what we needed from the school board in order to achieve these goals. Lessons Learned 1.

2.

I have learned that it is important to cultivate the leadership of others. It is important to continually encourage students to lead their peers, teachers to be effective leaders in their classrooms, and fellow administrators to assume their role in achieving the school’s vision. Without these structures, goals cannot and will not be met. Prioritizing the data and presenting it an effective way takes time, patience, and teamwork. The school board is comprised of educated, well respected community and school leaders; these are not individuals who accept half-hearted, sloppy work. It is important, as a team, to be concise and prepared at all times and to truly understand the material that is being presented. For the presentation given at the School Board meeting, please follow the link to view artifact A1. SIP Board Presentation.pptx


COMPETENCY 2: Communication Skills Related Task 2.1 Knowledge of group interaction techniques. Specific Task 2.1.1 Develop goals with a committee of staff and community members for a school building or school department within a district Description, Purpose, and Rational The SIP is a planning tool designed to address student achievement and system needs identified through the school's comprehensive needs assessment (CNA). Additionally, the SIP provides a method for schools to address the school improvement planning requirements of Public Act 25 of the Revised School Code and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as applicable. It is the belief of Riverside Academy, and its SIP committee, that all students are entitled to reach their highest potential and must be encouraged to strive for excellence through a meaningful educational experience. Academic work must be challenging for all students, taking them above and beyond state standards tapping into their diverse learning styles. The school should provide an environment where students are comfortable with their unique heritage regardless of their ethnicity, religion, race, or background. Learning is enhanced by diversity and the school must promote multicultural awareness. To be effective, our school must provide a safe, orderly, and positive learning environment. Parents are partners in the learning process and educational success is most often achieved when parents seize opportunities for involvement and support. Our school and community should be in a partnership that shares the responsibility of educating its citizens. Learning is a lifelong process. As a member of the SIP committee, I assisted in the development of school wide goals for the 20112012 school year. These goals are currently in the process of being revisited and redrafted for the 2012-2013 school year. To accomplish this task, the committee meets monthly to access the new data collected and compare it to the previous data to look for growth and decline in all academic areas. As a team, we then create realistic goals to improve student performance across the board. Lessons Learned 1-

2-

Without teamwork, programs of this magnitude and significance would be impossible. Every school has areas of needed improvement, and when the goals are met, it is this committee that has the capabilities and knowledge to make it even better. Data is everywhere, and using this data to drive the curriculum and education of our students is vital to the success of the community at large.


Artifact B2

Goal 1: Increased Achievement in Language Arts Content Area: English Language Arts Development Status: Complete Student Goal Statement: All Riverside Academy students will be proficient in reading and writing skills across all content areas. Gap Statement: Based on a review of the 2010 MEAP assessment data, there is a 51% gap between our 8th grade non-ELL students and our ELL students: 84% of our non-ELL students are proficient in reading, whereas only33% of our ELL secondary students is proficient in reading. Cause for Gap: The majority of students and their parents are English Language Learners, which affects academic achievement and the ability of parents to assist their children. Because of the language barrier, teachers who do not speak Arabic report difficulty in communicating with parents who do not speak English. Based on feedback from all teachers on professional developments, all teachers agree that additional training is needed inappropriately addressing the needs of ELL students. In addition, there is a lack of a defined ESL curriculum, resources, and sufficient support, as well as a lack of adequate training in determining the specific needs of individual ELL students based on assessment data. There has been an increased influx of ESL students this year, which has also contributed to the gap. Multiple measures/sources of data you used to identify this gap in student achievement: 2010 MEAP Staff Surveys EdPerformance DRA All Standardized Assessments What are the criteria for success and what data or multiple measures of assessment will be used to monitor progress and success of this goal? Our criteria for success will be minimizing the gap in reading proficiency levels between non-ELL and ELL students in 8th grade on the MEAP. This will be evident through a 10%reduction in gap between non-ELL and ELL students who score proficiently on the 2011 MEAP. Contact Name: Jennifer Daddow Reading Fluency & Comprehension From September 2011 to June 2012, overall ELL students will show an improvement equal to 1 grade level in reading fluency and comprehension skills as measured by DRA and at least a 5% improvement as measured by the MEAP (Fall 2010 to Fall 2011).

Word Study From September 2011 to June 2012, Riverside Academy students will show at least a 5% improvement in reading high frequency words as measured by Ed Performance.


Writing From September 2011 to June 2012, overall Middle and High School students at RiversideWest will improve their writing by at least 5% as measured by benchmark-based common writing assessments and ACT rubrics.

1.1. Objective: Reading Fluency & Comprehension Measurable Objective Statement to Support Goal: From September 2011 to June 2012, overall ELL students will show an improvement equal to 1 grade level in reading fluency and comprehension skills as measured by DRA and at least a 5% improvement as measured by the MEAP (Fall 2010 to Fall 2011). Curriculum Alignment for ELA Teachers and Curriculum Coordinators will be trained in how to do curriculum alignment and will align English Language Arts units and assessments with state benchmarks and standards. Integrating Technology Teaching staff will integrate technology in teaching and learning English Language Arts using technology in the classrooms, and computer labs, resource rooms, in and out of school time programs and for remediation. Parent Involvement and Education in Reading Teachers and staff will implement parent involvement and parent education activities focused on increasing student achievement in reading and writing. Reading Groups Teachers, literacy coaches, Reading Specialists, and paraprofessionals will implement guided reading groups, and literature circles across all grade levels. Reading Programs & Initiatives Teachers, Reading Specialists, ESL Teachers, Resource Teachers, and Title I Paraprofessionals will implement school-wide reading programs and activities including the use of recorded books, reading buddies, independent reading time, read aloud, reading comprehension program, and reading response activities such as graphic organizers and illustrations, to increase reading comprehension and fluency. Reading Response Activities Teachers, reading coaches, and paraprofessionals will use graphic organizers and illustrations as reading response activities at all levels and across the content areas. Resource Teachers The Reading Specialists, Language Arts teachers, and ESL teachers will work With individual students in small groups using individualized plans for students.

This is a sample of the School Improvement Plan for Language Arts. A full version of the plan is available upon request.


COMPETENCY 4: Curriculum, Instruction, Supervision Related Task 4.3 Knowledge of a variety of instructional methods and skills Specific Task 4.3.6 Conduct at least one clinical supervision cycle including pre-observations, classroom observation and evaluation session with teacher. Description, Purpose, and Rational Global educational Excellence (GEE), the service provider for Riverside Academy West, has established a protocol for teacher evaluation with varying degrees of depth and consequential results. Throughout the year, the academic service coordinator performs unannounced “walk through” observations of all teachers. Using a basic format, the coordinator’s evaluation is based upon standards that have been prescribed by the school as mandatory components of every classroom and lesson. Daily student goals that are posted and discussed with the class, the integration of technology, small group instruction, and the data that has been utilized to create the lesson presented upon request are some of these requirements. Immediately following the review, a two page feedback with both positive and negative results is given to and discussed with the teacher. The purpose of this type of evaluation is to improve teacher performance and student achievements before the formal evaluations from the principal are performed. The formal evaluations occur twice a year, one month after the start of the school year and one month before the end of the school year. The 21 page evaluation form used is exceptionally detailed, differentiated into specific categories including selecting instructional goals, creating an environment of respect and rapport, managing student behavior, and maintaining accurate records and noninstructional tasks. The review of the observation is discussed privately with the teacher and principal within a week of its completion. This review is used to determine contract renewal, merit pay, and strategies for improvement the following year. In an effort to achieve the best learning environment during my administrative experience, I assisted in an informal evaluation of three separate teachers. Due to privacy concerns, I was unable to be present during the formal evaluations. I shadowed the Academic Coordinator as she performed her “walk through”. I was allowed the opportunity to complete my own forms and compare my results with that of the coordinator’s for reasons of coherency and knowledge.


Lessons Learned 1. This was a challenging yet rewarding experience. As an instructor, I have specific ways of teaching that work for me. Viewing the work of others without prejudice is a skill, and one that needs to be perfected before entering into an administrative position. 2. The language used while returning constructive feedback is vital to the relationship between you as an administrator and the faculty member. There is a difference between direct and constructive and rude and fruitless. Open lines of communication further the mentoring process which assists in the further development of student learning. 3. These unannounced observations play an important role in the nurturing of the teachers in a less invasive way. They also allow for the administration to guide further evaluations; did the teacher listen to and “fix� the problem areas?


Artifact C1 Riverside Academy West Informal Teacher Observation Teacher:__________________________________________________ Observer:_______________________________________ Date:_____________________________ Hour/Period:_________ Subject:__________________________ Group:________________

Observations: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________

Areas of Strength:


________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Focus Areas: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Feedback/Recommendation: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________

COMPETENCY 11: Student Personnel


Related Task 1.2 Knowledge of principles of discipline, student control, etc. Specific Task 11.2.3 Analyze discipline referral and suspension data for a school year to identify the nature and frequency of student misbehavior. Based on findings, recommend a plan to reduce most common form of misconduct. Description, Purpose, and Rational Riverside Academy’s discipline prone students have recurring detentions and suspensions for the same reasons. After an in depth, analytical review of the policies and procedures, I will recommend changes and steps that the designated students can perform to keep themselves from incurring further punishment. There will also be recommendations for change to the current policies and procedures, if needed, to promote school wide behavioral modifications. In the past, there have been numerous attempts made at reducing discipline prone students in our building. Whether the problem rested with a lack of support, lack of employees to carry through with the plan, or poor planning, each attempt has failed to hit its intended mark. In an attempt to bring coherency to the schools discipline code, I have created a new program that works with the students and their parents to desist recurring behaviors in those students whom find it difficult to “keep themselves out of trouble”. The “Write the Wrong” program has been designed to give the students what they feel is lacking; a voice. “WRITE THE WRONG” PROGRAM A Behavior Modification Program to Decrease Discipline Referrals and Increase Academic Performance through Self-Regulation Techniques

Research has shown that the potential of self-regulation for increasing a student's academic response rate showed that higher academic rates occurred when the pupil arranged the contingency requirements rather than when the teacher specified them. Several other studies conducted in laboratory settings have further suggested the potential value of self-monitoring and selfreinforcement in the modification of behavior. The results of studies on self-administered reinforcement have consistently demonstrated that behavior may be modified and maintained as well with a self-administered reinforcement system as with an externally managed reinforcement system. Researchers found that self-reinforcement procedures were effective in maintaining previously learned verbal discriminations. It was also demonstrated that self-managed reinforcement was as effective as externally managed reinforcement in maintaining effortful motor behavior with children. (1) Any given school has a population of identifiable students that exhibit poor self-control in terms of behavior choices. These students repeatedly find themselves punished with detention, in- school suspension (ISS) or Out- of -school suspension (OSS) as a means to rectify their behavior. However, as proven through their repeated behavior referrals, these methods are ineffective with these students. In an effort to break the cycle of poor behavior, the following program has been designed to allocate self-reflection and self-reinforcement in a structured, supervised, collaborative setting for successful behavior modification.


The “Write the Wrong” program consists of self-reflection, conferencing, and an Individual Development Plan (IDP). Students that are placed in detention, ISS, or OSS more than once will be required to participate in the program. At that time, the student will be placed on a zero tolerance contract. Through the IDP that will be drafted with the student, parent, and the supporting teacher, the student will work at behavioral and academic self-guidance. Students in the “Write the Wrong” program will be required to keep a daily journal. (This is an effort to show the student an alternative way to vent their frustrations in a productive manner.) In addition to this, the student will also meet with the supporting teacher weekly to review the IDP and journal. During these meetings, any modifications to the IDP that are needed to be done will be. The student will have an open line of communication with the supporting teacher in a safe, nurturing atmosphere where new behavior strategies will be taught and new attitudes will be born. All IDP’s will be submitted for approval by both the Principal and the Student Services Coordinator. If the student fails to comply with the terms of his/her IDP, the punishment could be up to and including expulsion. This will be at the discretion of the administration upon review of the individual situation. Outcomes Working with at-risk students, 18, or 13.4%, of my 134 students are prone to repeat behavior problems. In an effort to produce adequate data to present to the school board for program adoption, I began this program within my own classroom. In January, 2012, I contacted the parents of these students for conferences, most of which were motivated to attend. I thoroughly explained the program, its requirements, and its consequences (both positive and negative). Of the 17 parents that attended, only one did not want their child involved in the program. In April, 2012, I reviewed the data of the students whom have completed the program, which was 66% of the original group.

(1) BOLSTAD, O. D., & JOHNSON, S. M. (1972). SELF-REGULATION IN THE MODIFICATION OF DISRUPTIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR'. Journal of Applied behavior Analysis, 5(4), 443-454


"Write the Wrong" Behavior Modification Program Data for Disciplinary At-Risk Students Before Entering Program

After Completing Program

43%

29% 24%

23% 22% 18% 5%

General Misbehavior

2%

Lack of Preperation

Fighting

Tardiness/Absences

The data produced showed a decrease in all four of the major areas of discipline concerns, the smallest decrease being that of absences and tardiness. Upon further review, these circumstances were primarily occurring during first hour. The primary cause of which is the parent’s failure to bring their student to school on time on a daily basis. This is a non- bussing district, therefore our students rely on their custodial relationships to come to school. When that aspect in their life fails, so does the child. A 19% decrease in general misbehavior and an 11% decrease in fighting, the two areas of most concern, is proof that the “Write the Wrong” program can have considerable impact when used school wide with proper administrative and faculty involvement. When beginning the development of this program, I was wary if it would have any foundation in which to build upon; if it would have anything I could “sink my teeth into.” As I began the implementing the program and monitoring the students’ responses, I realized that this could have a considerable impact on the behavior of my students. The student’s responded well to the program. Those that have completed the program made comments such as “finally having a say so about me in school felt good”; “I was given the chance to tell my story without being yelled at the whole time”; “I was taught a different way to vent my anger, it was cool, I still do it.” Comments were also made about being forced to look at the situation through administrative eyes helped them realized what their behavior looked like to others, which helped them to understand why things needed to change. In May 2012, this plan, along with updated data that will reflect students that have, at this point, not completed the program, will be presented to the school board for adoption. It is my hopes, that with the inclusion of this program into the daily discipline routine and policy of the school, referral rates will significantly decrease, which in turn will create an increase in academic test scores and performances.


Lessons Learned 1. Behavior issues occur in any setting where numerous adolescents are present. The degree to which the behavior is tolerated varies as does the type of behavior problems that exist. The key to changing poor behavior into positive behavior is the ability to connect with students in a non-traditional manner that shows support and care versus the “you will do it my way or the highway” attitude. 2. Students are developing their cognitive and social abilities on a daily basis. This does not mean that they have no control over their actions. Many students simply do not know how to control themselves, and rewards and consequences do not work with these students. 3. Students have thoughts and, just as adults do, they need to have these thoughts heard. We as adults may not like what they have to say, but the student will be more receptive to what we have to say if we in turn listen to them. 4. One-size-fits-all punishments do not work. Teaching different forms of anger management is beneficial to all. Writing our thoughts and feelings is an endorsed method of therapy, and it works for all ages. While many administrators are reluctant to change and varying the “norm”, I have been blessed with an administrator that has given me his permission to try this. I now know that being flexible with the faculty happens all various levels and at various degrees, and it is as important as any other trait.


Artifact D1 STUDENT COPY Write the Wrong

In an essay format, you will answer the following questions in a thoughtful, complete manner. This is a time for you to reflect on the situation that has you in ISS today. Be honest in your answers, for you will have an opportunity to tell your side of the story. You have until 6 th hour to complete this. At that time, you will come to Mrs. Munson’s room (214) for a one-on-one conference. This is NOT an option, it must be completed TODAY! 1) Why have you been referred to this program? Do not answer “because the Principal said so”. What is the reason? Why did you get in trouble? What was the behavior or circumstance that happened that had you sent to the office. 2) Why were your actions wrong in the school’s opinion? What rules were broken? Why do you think that rule(s) was made? Be precise in your answer. 3) Why were your actions wrong in your opinion? If you think they were not wrong, here is your chance to explain yourself. 4) What could you have done differently to have avoided getting in trouble? 5) What will you do in the future to avoid getting in any more trouble? 6) What do you think should happen if you do get into trouble again? If you were the principal, what punishment would you give to a student who did the same thing as you? 7) Is there anything else you would like to say on your own behave? Again, during 6th hour, bring your writing to Mrs. Munson and be prepared to talk about it.


COMPETENCY 12: Multicultural/Diversity Issues Related Task 12.1. Knowledge of multicultural issues and strategies for meeting needs of diverse student populations Specific Task 12.1.1 Create a curriculum for a World Cultures class using multicultural standards endorsed by a national professional association or society Description, Purpose, and Rational American society is now undergoing the most radical demographic shift in its history and we must reflect the reality of our time (Rasor, 2010) and the vastness that divided ethnic and racial groups is now shriveling (Britt, 2010). Multicultural literature reflects the world’s myriad voices and it provides readers with a range of perspectives. We cannot, subconsciously or otherwise, continue to treat a particular monocultural lens as normative (Rasor, 2010). Multicultural literature has the power to teach diversity, it is anti-racist, and it is transformative. Upon review of the sixth grade Language Arts curriculum, the fact that multicultural literature and involvement was minimal was incommodious. The opportunity to educate our students in a manner that is unobtrusive and rational can easily be incorporated into the standing curriculum. Literature comes in many genres, and with the proper research and diligence, changing the novels from standard based readings to those that incorporate multicultural themes can change the curriculum from simply teaching the standards to educating for the future. To achieve the goal of adding multicultural awareness to the Language Arts curriculum, I began with Riverside’s curriculum as it has been established in the Atlas Curriculum mapping system. As it is separated into specific units, I researched and developed an adjunct curriculum map to incorporate into all units of study. The following artifact is the additional curriculum. Lesson Learned 1- It has not gone unnoticed that multicultural education has been taken for granted. This theme is present in almost every mission statement of almost every school across the nation, yet, in many instances, it is only assumed that it is being taught. Every school should review their curriculum and investigate additional components necessary to make the most of the plethora of multicultural literature available. 2- As students, teachers are taught not to reinvent the wheel. In other words, use what is available to assist you in your goals. There is an overabundance of information available to educators, and it is all available for use; one just has to find it. I learned that it is not as easy as it sounds, but well worth the time and energy that is put into it.


Artifact E1 English 6 / Grade 6 (Middle School) Course Overview Essential Questions 1. How does understanding your strengths and weaknesses as a student help you best learn and meet your potential in this class? 2. How can the knowledge and skills developed in this course be applied and made relevant to each student's life and the world in which they live? 3. How do reading different types of literature enhance my understanding of who I am and how I interact with others? 4. How does the setting of a book shape characters' lives, and are we molded by our relationships and community in a similar way? 5. How do I move from recognizing elements of the plot to thinking more critically about character motivation, theme, and symbolism in a story? 6. How does the writing of poetry and short stories enhance my creativity and encourage a love of language? 7. How does learning how to write a literary essay help me to understand the process of using the text to support my ideas? 8. What skills are necessary to be successful as a learner and a student?

Content

Skills

Themes Building Community and Friendship

Reading Reading Comprehension: identifying main idea and supporting details, following written directions, understanding cause and effect, recognizing sequence of events, predicting events, summarizing Active reading: underlining key ideas, summarizing chapters, annotating text with margin notes, identifying character details, making connections Literary techniques: understanding characterization, setting, plot, conflict, resolution, theme, point of view, foreshadowing, flashback

Genres Novels (Island of the Blue Dolphins, Maniac Magee, Bridge to Terrabithia, Watsons go to Birmingham, 1963, Silent Boy, The Incredible Journey) Poetry (Good Masters, Sweet Ladies) Grammar Vocabulary

Writing Functional: note taking, friendly letter, summary


Creative: poetry, short stories, myths and fables Analytical: paragraphs (topic sentence, supporting sentences, closing sentence), three part literary essay (introduction, body, conclusion), Civil Rights speech (tcx) Process: brainstorming, planning, drafting, revising, drafting, publishing Speaking and Listening Public Speaking: preparing, delivering, and evaluating a speech, dramatic monologue, literary reading Grammar Structure and function: Identifying types of sentences Understanding parts of a sentence Recognizing fragments and run ons Identifying parts of speech Usage and mechanics: Using possessives, contractions, and capitalization correctly Vocabulary (tcx) Knowing definitions Using new words in writing Study Skills Organizing materials Following directions Using assignment notebook Time management

Assessment

Book review/report Independent reading assignment choices Artwork Book cover Creative Writing Short stories, fables/myths, poetry generated in writing workshop. (tcx 30 Days of Poetry quest) Design and Build Project Medieval Time Capsule (tcx) Dramatization Monologue from Good Masters, Sweet Ladies Group Project Five Day Trip (tcx) Other oral assessments Recitation of monologue Other oral assessments Dramatization of literature


Other written assessments Literary essays Test Traditional literature tests (multiple choice, short answer, true/false, matching, essay) Quiz Reading and vocabulary quizzes (announced and unannounced) Artwork Movie Poster

Diversity & Identity Formation Race Socio-Economic Status Religion Ability I. Content Integration 1. Race: Maniac Magee--What does it mean to live in a racially segregated town? The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963--What does it mean to be an African American kid during the Civil Rights era? 2. Socio-Economic Status: Bridge to Terabithia-What does it mean to have a best friend with more or less money than you? Silent Boy--In the past, who or what decided a person's education or employment opportunities? Values, Service & Character Formation Honesty Trust Respect Honesty: Academic and personal honesty are emphasized. Trust: Building a community and creating a safe environment in which to share ideas, thoughts, and writing are top priorities in the English classroom. Respect: Honoring different learning styles, personalities, and interests encourages students to respect themselves and others.


3. Religion: Not Exactly Normal--What does it mean to have a friend from a different faith background from you? Is it true that a "mystical experience" will leave you better than you were before, caring less about yourself and more about others? 4. Ability: The Silent Boy--How do we treat others who learn, communicate, or act differently from the way we do?

Supplemental Readings: Adoff, Arnold, editor. I Am the Darker Brother: An Anthology of Modern Poems by African Americans. Simon & Schuster, 1997. 208 pages. Age 11 and older Alexie, Sherman. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Illustrated by Ellen Fourney. Litte, Brown, 2007. 240 pages. Ages 13-16 Alvarez, Julia . Before We Were Free. Alfred A. Knopf, 2002. 167 pages. Ages 12-15 Bruchac, Joseph . Bowman's Store: A Journey to Myself. Dial, 1997. 311 pages. Age 14 and older Feelings, Tom. The Middle Passage: White Ships/Black Cargo. Dial, 1995. 80 pages. Ages 14 to adult Flake, Sharon G. . The Skin I'm In. Jump at the Sun / Hyperion, 1998. 171 pages. Ages 12-16 Hamilton, Virginia. Sweet Whispers, Brother Rush. Philomel, 1982. 215 pages. Age 11 and older Herrera, Juan Felipe. CrashBoomLove: A Novel in Verse. University of New Mexico Press, 1999. 155 pages. Ages 14 - 18 Hidier, Tanuja Desai. Born Confused. Scholastic Press, 2002. 413 pages. Ages 15 and older Jaramillo, Ann. La LĂ­nea. Deborah Brodie Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2006. 131 pages. Age 13 and older Johnson, Angela. The First Part Last. Simon & Schuster, 2003. 144 pages. Ages 13 - 18 Kadohata, Cynthia. Kira-Kira. Atheneum, 2004. 244 pages. Ages 10-14


Myers, Walter Dean. Monster. Illustrated by Christopher Myers. HarperCollins, 1999. 1999 pages. Ages 13 and older Myers, Walter Dean. Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom. HarperCollins, 1991. Ages 9 and older Na, An. A Step From Heaven. Front Street, 2001. 156 pages. Age 13 and older Nelson, Marilyn. A Wreath for Emmett Till. Illustrated by Philippe Lardy. Houghton Mifflin, 2005. 40 pages. Age 14 and older Osa, Nancy. Cuba 15. Delacorte Press, 2003. 277 pages. Ages 12 - 15 Park, Linda Sue. When My Name Was Keoko: A Novel of Korea in World War II. Clarion, 2002. 199 pages. Ages 11 - 14 Sheth, Kashmira. Blue Jasmine. Hyperion, 2004. 186 pages. Ages 11 - 14 Soto, Gary . Baseball in April and Other Stories. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990. 109 pages. Ages 11-14 Woodson, Jacqueline. I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This. Delacorte, 1994. 115 pages. Ages 11 14 Woodson, Jacqueline. If You Come Softly. Putnam, 1998. 181 pages. Age 13 and older Yang, Gene Luen. American Born Chinese. First Second, 2006. 233 pages. Age 13 and older

Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison St. Andrew's Episcopal School Kiingi, Liz; Koons, Dresden; Robinson, Susheela / (CO)

Britt, D. (March 31, 2010). The Search for the Best Bottom in the World, Politics Daily, www.aol.com. Rasor, P. (2010). Can Unitarian Universalism Change? UUWorld


Job Shadowing Experience


Competency X: Leadership X.1 Related Task: Job Shadowing Narrative Description of Task: Spend a minimum of one entire day (including after school and evening responsibilities, if any) shadowing the cooperating administrator. Narrative Description: Assist administrator, when appropriate, in accomplishing responsibilities. Maintain a journal of activities and prepare a thoughtful analysis of the number, nature, and focus of activities, and with whom the administrator interacted. Describe and assess the decision-making process and style used by the administrator in responding to various categories of demands or problems. Identify several crucial lessons the day taught about the art of administration and school leadership. This shall include insights gained concerning the role of a principal as an organizational manager and a visionary leader in guiding the school to better teaching and learning. This experience shall shed light on the multiplicity of demands placed upon the principal as he orchestrates his priorities and time commitments. Description, Purpose, and Rationale: “In today’s global society characterized by a transforming economy, technology integration, and standards-based accountability; the role of the school principal is experiencing rapid change. Traditionally the role of the principal has been perceived as a middle manager who is concerned mainly about institutional oversight. This organizational manager was concerned with books, busses, and teachers. Yet today’s principal needs to shape vision, cultivate leadership, improve instruction, and manage data, people and processes. The principal plays a critical role in implementing and improving the quality instruction and support services”. Creating a culture of leadership development at Riverside Academy-West has become an objective shared by the education management company GEE, the chartering university CMU, l and the principal at Riverside Academy-West. Their vision is to create an atmosphere of leaders, whether they are inside the classroom teaching or working in an administrative role. I have been privileged to have been mentored by an inspiring and collaborative administrative team that supports the philosophies of the stakeholder objectives, and have taught me, by example, the true meaning and duties of an administrator. I may have begun this journey a timid, less-than-confidant rookie; however, I have grown to become a self-assured, bold leader, ready and prepared to face the challenges that lie ahead. As an addition of my ongoing learning process, I completed a “job shadow”. This job shadowing has been an amazing opportunity for me to experience situations that most faculty and staff do not get the opportunity to see. I shadowed my supervisor in February, 2012. I received experience in, and have had my skills strengthened in my problem-solving and decision-making skills, I have received training in areas such as evaluation of staff, budget development, working with the board, planning faculty meetings, evaluating and improving our instructional program, articulating our school’s mission, and disciplining students. My day shadowing went as follows:


7:20am-7:55am: Staff meeting The principal discussed the events of the day to come, as it was a day of assemblies, parent meetings, and RTI enforcement. MEAP scores were briefly reviewed and the SIP committee reviewed the goals for the second quarter of the year. 7:55am-8:15am: Walk through To begin each day, the principal walks through the school at the sound of the first bell. At this time, he interacts with the students, teachers, and staff to set the tone for the day; pleasant greetings are exchanged among all. This is also an opportunity to be proactive in disciplinary issues that may begin to arise. 8:20am-8:45am: Meeting with student A graduation requirement for our high school students are required to complete community service hours each year. Freshman are required to complete 50 hours, sophomores 50 hours, juniors 75 hours, and seniors 75 hours. As a senior, students must also complete a capstone project. This is the time that they create a full presentation and paper about their experiences during their community service. On the day of my shadowing, a student came to the office expressing concern about her capstone and the progress that she is making, or rather not making. With her permission, I sat with the principal as they discussed possibilities for community service opportunities and contacts were made to begin the process. After the student meeting, the principal took time to reflect with me on the events that occurred during our meeting. I experienced firsthand the importance of open communication between administration and student, and the importance of community relations and connections. 8:45am-11:00am: Miscellaneous housekeeping and other administrative duties The day of my shadowing was the same day as our honor roll assembly and Tea with the principal parent meeting. To prepare for these events, honor roll certificates needed to be signed and dated, which I did with the principal. During this time, I assisted an injured student, dealt with a situation with a substitute, and conducted two student meetings to that dealt with bullying issues. 11:00am-12:45pm: Lunch duty Observation of lunchroom facilities and students.


12:45-1:15pm: Lunch 1:15pm-1:30pm: Discipline Situation While preparing for the honor roll assembly, a fight broke out in the computer room between 6 freshman girls. They were brought to the office and detained individually. Each student was given the chance to explain their side of the incident. They were then brought together to be spoken to as a whole. While together, another fight broke out. After the students were calmed down, the principal spoke to them in a tough, but calm manner. They were then served with In School Suspension for the remainder of the day. 1:30pm-2:15pm: Honor roll assembly With parents in attendance, students were awarded with their certificates for making the honor roll for the semester. 2:15pm-3:00pm: Tea with the Principal Upon completion of the honor roll assembly, the parents were invited to join the principal for refreshments in the library and to discuss any questions or concerns they may have. This meeting takes place every month, and it serves as a community outreach and stakeholders meeting. This is an informal gathering that allows the staff and community to share ideas and answer questions in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere. The principal is focused and direct in his comments, yet relatable to the community. 3:00pm-4:00pm: dismissal, hallway sweeps, home

Lessons Learned 1. First, I see that the principal must be strategic in his/her use of time. The demands on the principal’s time are unrelenting. In my observations and subsequent discussions, I conclude that the urgent needs of the moment must not drown out the important value-driven objectives of learning and student growth. 2. I have learned that it is important to foster the leadership of others. As I observe my principal, I notice that he is continually helping others to be better leaders. He is encouraging students to lead their peers, teachers to be effective leaders in their classrooms, and fellow administrators to assume their role in achieving the school’s vision. 3. The principal must demonstrate a commitment to values that are outside of him or herself. He can’t have his own agenda or seek individual notoriety or prestige. It is about the success of the students and the teachers. 4. It is important to separate home from work. The discipline of students must remain professional. Our individual beliefs cannot encourage our actions; we must follow the guidelines set forth by the school district and apply appropriately, whether we agree with them or not.


SYNTHESIS OF MAJOR LESSONS LEARNED


Beginning in September 2010, I began my journey as a graduate student of the Masters in Public Administration program at the University of Michigan-Flint. I was prepared for the hard work and expectations set forth by my professors and I expected to learn a great deal of information. However, I am in awe of the amount of practical skills that I have attained skills that have been founded in real life situations with achievable results. My time spent working with my principal, Mr. Ramzi Saab, was no different. The overwhelming specifications set forth by our professors for the capstone project seemed endless. After reviewing the contents, multiple times, I began utilizing the skills that I learned over the past two years; time management, record keeping, and utilization of resources. I assumed the role of an administrator whenever possible and with the guidance of Mr. Saab, I learned many of the skills and necessary qualities that are needed to be an effective administrator that are often overlooked. The following are the top five lessons that I learned. 1. Time management. As an administrator, it is vital to be flexible with your time. Schedules rarely stay on track despite the effort you put forth to keep it as so. “Something always comes up. Whether it is a situation with a student, a parent, or a building problem, you have to be ready for whatever the day throws at you� (Mr. Saab). 2. A strong sense of self. An administrator must have pride in what they do and how they do it. In order to make the on-the-spot and long term decisions that are required of you, you must be confident in your knowledge and experience to get you through. An administrator needs to be able to defend their decisions to all stakeholders, especially if the decisions come under fire. 3. Data is key. To make the decisions that can be defended and supported, they need to be based upon accurate data. Decisions regarding discipline, curriculum, and guidelines, just to name a few, must have evidentiary support to be thorough. 4. Commitment. This one little word is the most powerful lesson to learn. Without commitment to yourself, your staff and faculty, to your school, and to the true purpose of education, you will fail at being an effective administrator. Trust yourself and those you surround yourself with and commit to being the best that you can possibly be,


asking for assistance when needed, and never be ashamed to make mistakes, and you will be successful. 5. Even as an administrator, you will still be a teacher. Administrators must nurture the faculty, staff, students, and community to be leaders in their own way. Each of these “units� must work together to become a whole, and when this is achieved, the school will then be successful. The achievement of your personal goals does not mean you stop working, it means you work harder. You work harder and assist others in fulfilling their dreams by sharing the knowledge that you have gained and giving support when needed. This is a true leader.


Administrative Portfolio