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Summer 1.1 2013 A R L I N G TO N H E I G H T S • B E N S E N V I L L E • C H I C A G O • D U PA G E • E LG I N • L A K E CO U N T Y • O R L A N D PA R K • P E O R I A • S C H AU M B U R G • S P R I N G F I E L D

Summer Preview 2013 PG. 11

PERFORMING ARTS SHOWCASE PG. 2

ALUMNI PROFILE: MONJA DERETA PG. 7

HE SAYS/SHE SAYS CIG TAX INCREASE PG. 8 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY


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THE NEWS Performing Arts Spring Showcase By Stacy Zamskaya The Robert Morris University Performing Arts Department held its annual Spring Showcase on April 13, 2013 at the Harold Washington Library. The showcase featured performances by several music groups at RMU, highlighting various talents within the department. The performance was divided into two acts: Act I consisted of ensemble performances and Act II was a rendition of “Les Misérables” performed by the State Street Singers. Under the direction of Patrick Keelan, the RMU Jazz Band kicked off the show with its renditions of jazz pieces, like the classic “Mood Indigo” by Duke Ellington. Each piece featured solos by current Jazz Band members, adding a special spin to the melodies through unique improvisation. The State Street Singers performed several popular songs, such

as Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know” and “I Feel Better”. The RMU Color Guard performed their rendition of “Look at Me Now”, featuring both f lag and weapon work. The performance included an addition of swing dancing and acting, tying together modern dance and traditional color guard shows. The Goldtones, an a capella group, sang several songs, such as “Over the Rainbow”, featuring solos by several of the members. The RMU Drumline radiated energy through its ability to get the crowd moving in their seats during their performance. Act I was concluded by the student led choir group, Mixed Variations, and their renditions of “Some Nights” and “All You Need is Love”. Act II was a new addition to the showcase, becoming the first Broadway musical performance at RMU. The performance of “Les Miserablés” was presented in a semistaged concert format, without dialogue

Eagle Advisor

Content Team

Paul Gaszak PGaszak@robertmorris.edu

Tyson Bosco [Editor] Stacy Zamskaya [Editor] Dan Ciaglia [Editor] Adrian Saucedo [Writer] Heather D. Alexander [Writer] Aaron Wilson [Writer]

Advisory Board David Pyle Mick McMahon

Campus Faculty David Belotti • Lake County DBelotti@robertmorris.edu Beth Gainer • Bensonville BGainer@robertmorris.edu Nicole Hager • Springfield NHager@robertmorris.edu Gerard Wozek • Dupage GWozek@robertmorris.edu Jane Wendorff-Craps • Peoria JWendorffCraps@robertmorris.edu

Design Team Blake Whitmore [Art Director] Tyson Bosco[Designer] Austin Huette [Designer] Robert McMorris [Designer] Matt Theodosopoulos [Designer] Kyle Ashley [Illustrator]

Contributors Amanda Ray Myranda Cate John Neville Brandy Bradley

or characterization. Gary Baker created the stage direction of the performance, while show choir leaders choreographed each song. Various members of the State Street Singers had solo performances during each song. Gina DiSalvo explains that a team effort was necessary to make the production successful, “It took a lot of everyone stepping up, not just the leaders, but the members of individual ensembles, to keep focused.” The students were asked to personally relate to the story of “Les Mis” and to share their individual stories during the performance. “Without music, life is meaningless, and that has been our

quote to focus on throughout the entire production,” states DiSalvo. The most unique feature of the entire showcase was how most of the students participated in more than one ensemble within the department. At the same time, students played a large role in putting the show together, as several aspects of the performances were student-designed. The showcase showed a lot of ambitious ideas, and even though not all of them were successful, the entire department continues to move towards more improvement. v

Robert Morris Gets a Student Technology Club By Tyler Crane, Jennifer Ramos, and Vicente Rico The Illinois Technology Foundation has opened a student chapter at Robert Morris University. The Student Technology Club is a networking focus group that brings events, guest speakers, leadership programs, internships, mentorships, webinars, lectures, certification classes, jobs, and scholarships to Robert Morris University. Students do not have to have an IT or computer major to join the club, they just have to want to improve their business skills and be prepared for working in the 21st century. Club members have the additional opportunity to join the exclusive AITP or Association of Information Technology Professionals, a national guild of C-level professionals and consultants with regularly scheduled lectures and socials. In the first official meeting, six students from Robert Morris met in the Graduate School with local industry leaders like Dave Kamath, Vice President of the AITP Chicago board; Alan Howard, Vice President of Maron Structural Technologies: William Waas, an RMU Graduate School professor;, and Paul Kitman,

CEO of Pathfinder software. “I really hope that this club will act as a bridge for students to transition well into the business world,” said Mr. Karmath, “when you graduate, having Chicago corporate connections is going to tremendously simplify a job search.” Professor Waas, Chairman of the ITF, is excited to start the student chapter at Robert Morris University. “Any way we can get [students] out into the business world, we can learn as much from them as they can from us,” said Mr. Waas, who is also a professor at Northwestern University. Erik Miller, former RMU MBA student and Technology Club President is pushing the club to grow. His goal is to have members in all RMU campuses as well as to merge with other downstate university computer clubs in areas like Springfield, Champaign, Bloomington and Peoria. The club meets virtually over email, Skype, or blogs. Students with LinkedIn can join online at http://illinoistechfoundation. o r g /s t u d e n t - t e c h n o l o g y - c l u b / j o i n membership/ for free. The Foundationsponsored Fifty for the Future $1000 Scholarship nomination sheet is on the website’s homepage. Students can see all upcoming events at http:// aitpchicago.com/events. v

Tau Sigma Is No

Spring Career Fair By Amanda Ray On April 4, 2013, Robert Morris University hosted a Spring Career Fair at the Chicago Hilton. There were 32 companies in attendance including GameStop, Panda Express, Oil-Dri, and The Corner Bakery. All of the companies had one single goal in mind to find willing and able college students who were graduating to help them get a foot in the door of their next possible career. Anne Bresingham, a Law Professor at RMU, explained the reasoning behind her students being at the career fair: "I assigned my students to come to the career fair to give them an opportunity to

experience looking for a job when they are not actively looking for one." Bresingham also said that when her students come to the career fair it gives them an opportunity to get a personal value on what it is actually like to search for a job and present their resume to prospective companies. Judy Pacheco, a student in Ms. Bresingham's law class, have a review of the Career Fair from a student perspective. She gave her overall experience an 8/10, the information she received a 10/10, and the likelihood of applying to one of the companies that were featured a 7/10 because she already has a job. v

Calling All Night Students New Night Class Model Begins in Summer 2 Quarter By Heather D. Alexander Starting with the Summer 2 quarter, which begins on July 15, Robert Morris University will have a new structure for its Adult Continuing Studies model (aka: night classes) that applies to all of RMU’s campuses. The new model will have two class sessions each night: the first session will run from 6:00-7:50 and the second from 8:009:00. Currently, night students take three courses per quarter. Ideally, students will be able to take a 6:00pm and 8:00pm course on the same night, and then a third course on another night, which will reduce the amount of time on campus to two nights per week.

However, this does not reduce the amount of work in each course. All classes in this model are Blended, which means the amount of in-class time is reduced, but a more substantial amount of work is expected to be completed online and at home between classes. Students who want more time in class can enroll in an additional 6:00pm class instead of an 8:00pm. Also, students interested in taking a fourth course per quarter rather than the standard three can appeal for the opportunity to do so. It is anticipated that all lecture courses will eventually be available in this new night model. Lab classes will continue to meet for different lengths of time as necessary. v

Frat-House By Tyson Bosco Of all the social clubs out there, sometimes it’s difficult to know what to get into. After getting an email about Tau Sigma, I decided to look into it. I know it is a generalization to assume any groups that have names based off of characters in the Greek alphabet to be a Fraternity or a Sorority, but Tau Sigma is certainly not in this category. For starters, Tau Sigma is an honor society. As well, students do not become members through a hazing ritual like eating a goat heart or being spanked with a wooden paddle until you no long feel the want or need to sit down ever again. What makes Tau Sigma National Honor Society different than other honor societies is the fact that one must be a transfer student to become a member. Although that is a pretty intense perquisite, that is close to the only limitation. Tau Sigma understands the difficulty for students to transfer from one school to the next. Therefore, this club stands as a catalyst to help students along in terms of getting acquainted to other students. How does it actually help students; you may ask. Well, students are given the

ability to do whatever they want with it. It can do close to anything its members want it to do. I know what you are thinking; that is a very broad range, but the club offers an almost limitless potential. Tau Sigma offers scholarships, chances to meet with other Tau Sigma organizations, and all around opportunities to network with people in your field as well as fields of common interest. In many ways it is a chance to meet people that have common interests, which is more or less the building blocks to any social event. As well as giving members a chance to get more out of their college experiences, Tau Sigma is also a badge that one can put on their resume. With all honor societies comes the idea that what you do can help prepare you for the future, which is why Tau Sigma has events to get other local chapters connected. Experience through networking is essential to growing and understanding the business world. No one would know this better than other students going through the exact same scenarios. College can be a difficult place to find yourself, so why do it alone? v

Mission The Eagle is the student-centered news source of Robert Morris University (IL) and does not necessarily represent the views of Robert Morris University administrators, faculty, or students. The Eagle provides a venue for the exchange of ideas and information pertinent to the students of RMU.


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THE NEWS Making More RooM In Peoria By Aaron Wilson The Making RooM project at Robert Morris University is going strong and addressing the needs of the communities the university represents. At the Peoria campus this spring quarter, two events were launched by staff and students to assist local food banks in addressing hunger problems in the community. Organized by the Peoria-RMU Film Club along with the assistance of instructor and advisor Jane WendorffCraps, an online silent auction for various items as well as a bowling event were held to raise funds and awareness for food shortage. What started in 2010 as a campaign throughout the entire university continued successfully through 4 quarters of I-Center projects at several sites as well as some other projects held periodically since the initiative’s inception in 2010. Both of the most recent events were successful in fulfilling the original mission to raise awareness and provide monetary assistance to area food banks. The silent auction alone raised more than $500 over the course of one week. The bowling event was also a success with students gathering for a good time to promote a worthy cause. Film Club Secretary Ivana Martinez spoke of the success of the bowling event, noting how participants from the silent auction expressed how much “they really loved their [gift] baskets.” Film Club Vice President Dalton Sackett stated, “The charitable event was fun filled with bowling from students, faculty, and families. Everyone had a great time, and it’s nice to see those who support others in need. The event was successful and we are hoping to bring even more success to the Food Bank at our next event. Plus I won COOKIES!” Both events achieved their goals of raising awareness toward hunger by having some fun. RMU will continue to stand guard over this issue, especially as we approach the

warmer months of the year where hunger wreaks havoc on families everywhere. Almost 500,000 children in Illinois and one in six Cook county kids go hungry around this time. When the Making RooM project was launched, the Board of Trustees of Robert Morris approved matching funds of up to $10,000 for the program, which would include both student and staff participation. There have been amazing results to date with thousands of dollars given to RMU area food banks.

Pictured from left are: Ivy Martinez, Dalton Sackett, Dominic Powell, Nicole Hartseil, Jake Emmons, Jose Perez, and Jane WendorffCraps.

The charitable gifts so far have gone well in reaching the public sectors most in need. Cash donations, rather than goods, are better suited toward the tailored needs of those who benefit from proceeds. A breakdown of how funds are distributed show of a bigger picture: $1 donated provides 7 meals, so giving $1.50 every two weeks feeds one person breakfast, lunch, and dinner for a week. Donations of $6.00 every two weeks feeds one person breakfast, lunch, and dinner for a month. Of course, these are hard times for everyone in some way, but even worse for some who have to decide whether to pay for housing, utilities, or food for the family. The thought of giving a little bit to add to so many bites to eat is truly rewarding. The food depositories served by these

efforts have appreciated the monetary gifts, volunteer efforts, and awareness the RMU promotions provide. Many at RMU will continue to give of themselves so that others are able to enjoy a more balanced load of important resources. Everyone benefits when entire neighborhoods are supported toward stability. For example,

the Peoria Area food bank serves 8 counties in central Illinois, a testament to the fact that the energy of all who contribute is felt for miles around as one food bank can serve over 100 communities’ pantries, shelters, rehabilitation centers, senior housing, youth centers, and low income day care centers. v

Robert Morris University’s Leadership

Provost Mablene Krueger

By Blake Whitmore Robert Morris University has been around since 1913 and it does not run itself, but do RMU students know who does run the show? At most universities, students do not get to know the President, Provost, or Deans of their institution. Students probably see administrators as the “bad guys” that makes the rules, wear the suits, and makes the dough, but in actuality they are everyday people, too. In the coming issues of the Eagle, we will profile RMU’s leaders. Starting off the introductions is Provost Mablene Krueger. The Provost is the Chief Academic Officer for the University. Krueger’s job at the university works mainly with long range planning, such as new programs and budgets, as well as student success. Krueger started off getting her Associate’s degree in Secretarial Studies from Robert Morris. She continued on in her education at the University of Illinois at Springfield, earning her M.B.A. Though Krueger is a driving force behind the CMT classes at RMU, ironically she never set up a 5-year plan for herself when she was in school.

She took things as they came and knew one thing: “Whatever I did I wanted to be the best.” Krueger continued, “If you would have told me when I was 20 that I would be where I am now I would not have believed you.” She said she got to where she is now thanks to the pushing from others around her including professors and coworkers. “When you see talent you stretch people,” Krueger explained about her years of being pushed. Outside of RMU Krueger is a mother to a freshman in college, so with the young out of the nest Krueger enjoys reading. “I know it sounds boring, but I really love to read,” Krueger says. She loves the film Gone with the Wind, although it is not her favorite book. Her favorite book is The Help by Kathryn Stockett. Krueger said that if she were any type of food she would be “a really good dessert, because it is sweet, everybody likes it, and it is a little bit dangerous.” Her piece of knowledge to students, “Whenever asked to do anything, at work or school, do it. Always volunteer, because you never know where it will take you.” v

Mablene Krueger

Experiential Learning At It's Best By Heather D. Alexander At the beginning of the RMU Spring Quarter, I had the pleasure of meeting three enthusiastic students in my English 325 course with English Professor Mick McMahon: Maria Gallardo, Sage McDonald, and Gerry Medina. Mr. McMahon told the class to form groups and name ourselves accordingly since we would be working together the remainder of the quarter writing simulated business letters and proposals for non-profit organizations. By the end of week one we established a name for our simulated Community Writing Organization (CWO), Agents For Change (AFC). “I never thought about writing for non-profit organizations and this experience has made me look at my neighborhood a little differently because I actually consider the amount of work people put into making sure a community is safe and inviting to others,” said AFC member Sage McDonald. Even though we are students we have developed a sincere connection with the organizations we chose to represent. Our mission could be simplified with three letters, RPD. In order to effectively help these organizations we had to Receive the issue at hand and develop an understanding for what it was the organization was trying to establish. Next we Produced a plan that addressed each issue individually and the impact it had on the community. After the plan was developed we Delivered a solution to the dilemma and began moving forward with the writing process. By week seven, we addressed issues within communities in addition to making sure certain organizations were recognized for their service commitments. Developing a business letter or proposal that addresses serious issues for a group of people can be very challenging. They have to show an equal amount of ethos, pathos, and logos. The best way to establish this balance is to think of it as a triangle, with the community being the core. Pathos is the most important of the three and is established to show the audience that we are not only passionate about our work, but also the missions of the service organizations and the impact they have on the community. “People within movements for social change, those directly affected by the issues, make the decisions related to the

campaign or movement; minimize hierarchy within their organization to maximize shared power and equity of voice; and utilize direct action as an effective means to compel decision-makers to implement decisions made by the community,” as stated by an article in Non Profit Quarterly. In order to establish pathos sometimes you must step out of your comfort zone and talk to other people to find out how they feel about some of the topics that are being addressed. Visions are also another element to consider when writing for non-profit organizations. When writing letters, papers, or proposals that you are passionate about and that have several steps that must be taken, you have to visualize your plan coming to life. “I really enjoy working with my classmates on these papers and most of our ideas I could see happening in the future,” said AFC member Maria Gallardo. Seeing the way the plan is grounded allows you to live in the moment before it is even created and you want your audience to have that same feel. Create a tangible vision that sponsors can put themselves in and be surrounded with each element. The course is designed to teach students the importance of civic engagement, especially while we are young and still trying to become credible to perspective employers. Even though RMU curriculum is designed to get students engaged with others and offers programs in which we get involved with other communities, students have to have the willpower to want to continue such work after receiving their degree. Civic engagement teaches us not to be self-centered and brings issues to our attention that go on outside of our daily lives. Something that is most shocking is the way you look at your individual community and see things that need to be changed or could use some improvement once so much time has been consumed developing letters for other non-profit organizations. v

Hair Hits the Floor in the Student Center By Myranda Cate On Thursday, April 11, Robert Morris University students, faculty, coaches, and family members joined the Men’s and Women’s Volleyball programs in support of a St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraising event in the Chicago Student Center. For months, the Men’s Volleyball program, with help from the Woman’s program, has been organizing this event in hopes to raise awareness and funds for life-saving childhood cancer research, which includes volunteers having their heads shaved in support of children fighting cancer. What started as an idea grew into a statement that will make lasting memories for those who participated for years to come. Over half of the Men’s team signed up in advance to have their heads shaved, including Men’s Volleyball Coach Lauren Joyce Hensel. As the afternoon went on, their bravery inspired more men and woman to have their heads shaved. Up first was Gordy Gurson representing the Men’s Soccer team. “It’s for a good cause, and I wanted to be an inspiration for others,” said Gordy. Next to Gurson were men’s Volleyball Steven Weaver, and Dean Zummo with his long locks. Later on, many people started to join in as the Men’s team was finishing up. Woman’s Volleyball Rebecca Lourwood, Holli Dougan, and Coach Melissa Joyce were all moved as they saw their hair fall from their heads. Seeing this pushed other woman of Robert Morris to shave their heads as well. Professors also turned out in support of the event, including English Professor Mick McMahon who showed some skin when he

decided to shave his head clean. As part of the event, the volleyball program hosted the family of Erin Potts, including her mother, Mary, and older sister, Sarah. Erin was an 18-year-old volleyball player at Lyons Township High School who died in 2009 of Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare bone cancer. In loving memory of young Erin, Mary and Sarah were so pleased with the outcome of the event. “It is fantastic that people are still remembering Erin after all of these years. It’s great to see that people are willing to fundraise and wear shirts in support of her and other children like her,” said Sarah.

“From such sadness and grief come so many good things. The goodness in people comes out and it goes to show the lengths people would go for a cause,” said Mary. Coach Lauren added, “It’s been great to see how many people have signed up the day of and took part in this event. I know it means a lot to the Potts family. As a woman it’s definitely difficult because our hair is so important to us but I definitely grew as a person doing this.” Anyone who would like to contribute can still do so by visiting the website:www.stbaldricks.org/login/participate/9612/2013/ v


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THE NEWS Alumni Forum Proves the Foundation for Success Starts Here

Alumni Profile: Monja Dereta

Robert Morris In Handshake Mode

By Ty Bosco

By Amanda Ray

By Dan Ciaglia If you recall from The Eagle’s Spring 2 Issue, RMU’s new Alumni Initiative was introduced as the new project that aims to heighten the importance of bringing alumni back to campus and connecting them with current students. On April 3rd, one of the first major steps in this project was taken with a successful Alumni Forum that was based on the topic of leading diverse teams in the workplace. The event, put together by Liz Wheeler, the Dean of Graduate Success, was held right here in Robert Morris’s 8th f loor Auditorium and featured presentations from Natasha Granholm, Monica Barrera, and Laura Zumdahl, all of which have several different ties to RMU.

The speakers, all of whom have established themselves very well since their college years, spoke to students and other guests about the best practices and experiences with regard to leading teams in the workplace. Granholm, a CPA who currently works as a Tax Partner for Pricewaterhouse Coopers, has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting from Robert Morris. She is also a member of the Illinois CPA Society, the AICPA, the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting, and the National Association of Black Accountants. Barrera, also received her degree - an Associate’s in Applied Science - from Robert Morris and has spent the last 25 years working in the financial industry. She is certified in Series 3, 6,

63, 66, and 7, all of which have allowed her to work for some of the top investment firms in the United States. She currently works for Merrill Lynch as a Client Associate. The third speaker, Laura Zumdahl, Ph.D., received her degree from Cardinal Stritch University, RMU’s partner university, and currently holds a Vice President position with Nonprofit Services at Donors Forum. In 2010, she was named an Emerging Nonprofit Leadership Fellow by the Chicago Community Trust. After all 3 gave their presentation, the Forum was then open to a Q & A session which allowed students to connect with them on a better level. In all, the goal of this Forum and every event in the future is to get students to connect with fellow Eagles that have moved on to bigger and

brighter things. It gives current students a quality perspective of what may come with earning a degree and the amount of success one can set themselves up for post-graduation. Liz Wheeler, who is spearheading the Alumni Initiative, said “it’s important to have alumni back here on campus. We want them to encourage our future graduates to actively participate in their university so they too can give back like [the Forum speakers] have.” You heard it here first, Eagles - the foundations for success start now. v

While Robert Morris University expands on the new Alumni Initiative, which aims to connect its current students to its extensive network of alumni in the professional world, an important part of that process is to highlight how these successful people reached where they are today. Monja Dereta’s journey began in 2009, when she emigrated from Serbia to attend RMU on a tennis scholarship. In addition to exceling on the tennis courts, Dereta was an exceptional student during her time at RMU, where she majored in Business Administration and Management. Her devotion to her studies earned Dereta high enough marks to make the Dean’s List all eight quarters she attended RMU, and allowed her to be inducted into the Sigma Beta Delta International Honor Society for Business Management in 2010. She has held several jobs since graduating, including working as an International Account Executive for the Chicago Toy & Game Group, a Special Events Director for FIAT Chicago, and she is currently working for Northwest Medical and Urgent Care Center’s Marketing Division. Impressed yet? She’s also f luent in Serbian and conversational in French, Latin, and Italian. While all of this is beyond impressive, it is all a precursor to Dereta’s real passion – her love for books. This

deep passion has led her to start the Serbian Book World, a company that imports and sells Serbian books and educational games for Serbians living in the United States. The company features two programs – Serbian Book Club and Serbian Book Club for Kids. Dereta, who currently serves as the company’s CEO, said, “I have to thank Doctor [Jay] Jiwani who, this past summer, told me about this business competition that I should apply for, and that’s how everything started … the Serbian population in the United States is the largest outside Serbia, and majority of those people are actually in Chicago.” Dereta has been in the business since 2003, when she began working for Dereta Publishing Company in Serbia, which also happens to currently be Serbian Book World’s exclusive partner. The recurring message of the Alumni Initiative is that a connection needs to be established between current and former Eagles. Dereta is one of the many examples of the success one can achieve with a quality education from RMU. If there is any indication that success comes from within, it is Monja Dereta. v

It is pretty safe to say that Robert Morris University has worked for an incredibly long time to get it’s students every advantage possible for the coming adult world. One such advantage, which is being expanded to epic proportions, is RMU’s use of partnerships with other educational institutions. As of now, RMU has partnerships with many different institutions; the Institute of Clinical Social Work, Cardinal Stritch University, and countless community colleges and hospitals to name a few. To top it all off, a new partnership has been formed with John Marshall Law School. To many, this partnership offers a great deal of incentive to go to Robert Morris. To others, it may be considered a complete mystery as to what the partnership means and how it affects the student body. So what do these partnerships mean to us? For one, they can save students money. As for law school, there is a great deal of schooling involved to get the proper degrees. With the new partnership, students are given the opportunity to take three years at Robert Morris, and then finish their last three years at John Marshall Law. In doing this, students are able to spend less on their classes while still getting viable and usable degrees. “Students will earn both a bachelor’s and JD after completion of law school,” said

Mablene Krueger, RMU Provost. As well, with the transference of credits, students have the opportunity to test out of certain classes they would have to take again. In doing so, students can save a fourth of a year to a full year of schooling. That is saving time as well as money. One obvious question that I came up with is this; what do these other institutions get out of the deal, besides a better reputation? For each institution, different goals are achieved. For the Institute of Clinical Social Work, for example, a partnership with Robert Morris offers them a higher ability to recruit students. Since this institution offers no undergraduate degrees, having an affiliation with Robert Morris means that any student looking to go beyond undergrad programs can easily transfer from Robert Morris with no problems whatsoever. On top of that, students also have a more vast selection of degree types from which the Institute of Clinical Social Work may not offer. Partnerships also build the reputation of the University. Think about it this way; the better established our University gets, the more seriously our degrees are taken. As students come from Robert Morris to succeed in schools like John Marshall Law School, other Universities and Career Specified Institutions will be joining the bandwagon to get out of our school what these other affiliates are already gaining. v


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SPORTS & HEALTH Next Stop, the AHIHA

By Jon Neville and Aaron Wilson Robert Morris students hail from all over the United States and Canada, and one doesn’t have to look far for achievements made while in the classroom or in the business world after graduation. There are some astounding accomplishments made in the sporting arenas, too. One notably is Brandon Neville, a business student at the RMU-Peoria branch where he is a member of the Eagles hockey team. Brandon has had hearing loss since childhood, but he never let it interfere with

his athletics. He tried out for the AHIHA (American Hearing Impaired Hockey Association) team June 2012. His dedication and skill earned him a spot on the team with which he played in the World Deaf Hockey Championships, a tournament with countries from all over the world. They come together to compete, and all participants have some kind of hearing impairment. In March 2013, he left for New York to practice, and then he traveled to Finland for 3 weeks of competition. His team fought 4 hard matches overseas, winning one match and ending up with a fourth place in the championships. Brandon finished the tournament 14th in points with one goal and 5 assists. Team USA would have liked to have had more luck during play, but they are all ready to compete in the Deaflympics in two years, which is scheduled to be held in Vancouver. Brandon credited his mother for first teaching him how to skate when he was 3 years old. From then on, he played on several youth teams through high school, where he graduated Peoria Notre Dame. He also played two years for the Peoria Mustangs, a team that competes on the highest level of hockey under a player receiving a salary.

Two of a Kind By Brandi Bradley Reid and Trey David are brothers who played for Robert Morris University’s Mens’ Basketball team. The David brothers played on the same team during the 2011-2012 season. That year, Trey received All-American recognition, and award players receive based on their level of play and statistics throughout the season. Trey said winning the All-American award required work and effort: “It took hard work and it took support from a lot of great people. My mom and dad have always been my biggest supporters. They put in so much time and effort to make sure I always had the best opportunities.” Making the move from high school to college—when the rules and the pace of the game change, when adding the shot clock, and highly skilled players increases the competition—might have presented challenges at first, but for Reid, playing basketball was a must. “I love playing the game; it is something

I have always had a passion for and always try to do my best. It was difficult going from high school to the college level. I do think I was well prepared for what was ahead of me and I was able to become a better player.” Two short years after Trey’s All-American recognition, Reid received the same

Brandon’s achievements are surefire proof of how large feats are always branched from unique angles. Playing hockey with a hearing impairment offers unique challenges, but playing with the AHIHA gave Neville skills he carried over to the RMU-Peoria hockey team. Neville is currently the second leading goal scorer on the team and doing everything he can to help his team win a National Championship at the ACHA D3 level. AHIHA brings hearing-impaired hockey players to Chicago for a week in the summer. This is a unique experience because a lot of the players don’t get the opportunity to play with other hearing-impaired people until they come to the summer camp. Neville has attended this camp for three years and was selected to represent the U.S.A. in the Hearing-Impaired Olympics in Finland this coming April. This is a great honor because only thirty people out of a few hundred are selected to this team. People are always curious as to how completely hearing-impaired people can play a fast paced, contact sport like hockey. With few a modifications to the game, everyone can play. One of the biggest changes is the whistles that are used to stop play. Most players cannot hear the whistle so

award. As the younger of the two, Reid was always compared to Trey because they played on the same team. For Reid, winning the award was an accomplishment and honor, even if his brother had already earned the same title. “Well it is something that I have had to deal with my whole life so I am pretty used to it. It did put a lot of pressure on me when he got the award, because there is a huge rivalry between us in everything we do. I knew I had to get the award sometime in my college career. Although, playing with Trey was a great honor and was a lot of fun, even though he is lazy on defense.” When Trey heard Reid received the All-American award he was excited. “I am so proud of him. He may not know it but I am his biggest fan. He has the ability to do anything if he applies himself. It shows that the work he has put in has paid off.” Many people don’t realize the pressure and amount of time dedicated to the game, but these two brothers, both with impeccable talent, have managed the pressure, the sport, and their education and have earned a great honor. v

strobe lights are set up around all around the rink. These players can play the same game using other senses. With hockey being such a fast paced game, these players really have to keep their head on a swivel, utilizing a heightened sense of sight. Since they cannot hear the swish of the skates on ice as others skate behind them, looking at the reflections in the glass is the best way to view the opponent. Hearing-impaired hockey players play the same game with the same rules; they just use different senses. The AHIHA was founded in 1973 by hockey hall of fame member Stan Mikita and Chicago businessman Irv Tiahnybik. It provides quality events for the players to show off their skills. Traveling to Finland and playing on a hand selected team is an outstanding opportunity that few people get, and the AHIHA is making it possible for one RMU Eagle. Funding for athletes is provided by the American Hearing Impaired Hockey Association through private donations and support from the USA Hockey Foundation. v

Winter 2012

Bulls and Blackhawks Gear Up for the Postseason By Dan Ciaglia It’s the most wonderful time of the year... for Chicago sports fans at least. For starters, baseball season is officially in full swing (pun intended). However, aside from where your loyalties lie with the White Sox or Cubs, one place Chicago fans can find a happy medium sits on Madison Street - the United Center. Since its completion in 1994, the Bulls and Blackhawks have shared the arena through their ups and downs and with seasons such as this past one, there’s no argument against the fact that playoff time in the Madhouse on Madison is one of the most exciting times in Chicago. So, with that said, the reality of the postseason for any professional sport is that anything can happen. For example, think back to last season when the Bulls

were poised for a championship run, only to be left standing in silence with their stomachs in their throat watching Derrick Rose clutching his torn knee. That couple horrifying minutes is the testament to you never know what’s going to happen. Oddly enough, “you never know” is the best way to describe the Bulls’ playoff hopes for this year. While they have steadily maintained their spot in the middle of the pack, just about every NBA analyst agrees that the Bulls are a nightmare matchup for anyone, including the loaded Miami Heat. I’d love to put my Chicago bias first, but realistically I can’t see this banged up Bulls squad advancing far. They’ll likely get through their 1st round matchup but could end up facing Miami or the New York Knicks in the 2nd round. The Bulls have proven they can beat both of those teams, but lingering injuries and lack of a dominant scorer to

match LeBron James or Carmelo Anthony give the Bulls far less of a chance to beat either in a 7-game series. All roads to the NBA Finals go through Miami in the Eastern Conference, and they’ll more than likely contend for another title. On the ice, the Blackhawks have spent this entire shortened season proving to everyone that they are one of the top teams in the NHL. They were the first team to clinch a postseason spot and have proved countless times that they are very difficult to beat. However, it all depends on who’s hot at the right time. The Los Angeles Kings hoisted the Stanley Cup last year as an 8-seed, so there really is no telling what might happen. Despite the uncertainty of postseason play and even with Chicago bias aside, I still see the Blackhawks advancing out of the Western Conference to the Stanley Cup Finals. They’ve proven themselves

enough against the other top teams and are much like the Heat in the NBA where it’s somewhat difficult to imagine a team beating them 4 times in a 7-game series, especially with the raucous crowd that packs the UC every game. The Anaheim Ducks have proven a worthy foe in the season and could possibly set up a great series down the stretch, but we’ll have to wait and see. The key to the Blackhawks’ success will lie solely in Goalie Corey Crawford’s ability to elevate his game for the fast paced playoff atmosphere. I really like their chances to win another Cup, but don’t jump the gun on prepping the confetti and parade routes just yet. The beauty of sports, as it has been implemented throughout this article, is anything can happen anywhere at any time. As loyal fans, all we can do is sit back, relax, and enjoy. v

Sports Report

Men’s Sports Feb 3, 2013 -Men’s Hockey Gold-CH Fourth ranked Eagles sweep seventh ranked Lindenwood. Eagles defeat Lions 5-3 & 5-2 to honor seniors Josh Kaebel & Brett Moser! Feb 2, 2013-Men’s Basketball-CH Eagles take down Ashford 69-64 to even record at 12-12. Brian Bradley scored a game high 28 points & Kashaune McKinney added 25 points and 11 rebounds.

Women’s Sports Feb 4, 2013-Women’s Outdoor Track & Field-CH Eagles Compete in Trine Invitational, with Yarisel Mata taking third place and setting the School record in 1600 meters with a record time of 5:29 Feb 3, 2013-Women’s Soccer Six Individuals & one team inducted into the RMU Athletic Hall of Fame. Al Bruehl, Mavis Danso, Othyus Jeffers, Katie McFadden, Kurt Melcher, Kulu Yahaya, and the 2004 Women’s Soccer team become the fourth class to enter!

Photos by Anthony May and courtesy of Urbanworks.

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ARTS & CULTURE New Music

Feature: Summer Preview

Fall Out Boy: Save Rock and Roll

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2013 is becoming a year of many surprises in the music world, with one of the biggest being the return of pop-punk superstars, Fall Out Boy. Many fans were crushed when the band announced a hiatus in 2009, and almost everyone thought this meant the end of Fall Out Boy altogether. Yet, just two and a half years later, Fall Out Boy has returned with a vengeance, announcing a worldwide tour and the release of their fifth studio album, Save Rock and Roll. The surprising return of the group brought both excitement and criticism. Fall Out Boy has always had a strong fanbase, which showed its support more than ever. Tickets to the announced concerts sold out within minutes for most dates, as fans of all ages rejoiced at the return of one of the most iconic bands of the mid-2000s. At the same time, those who never understood the cult-like popularity of the quartet, began to criticize the return, believing that the

band would only continue its teenage punk sound, failing to deliver any sense of maturity. Save Rock and Roll pushes all such criticism aside, as the band leaves behind its signature pop-punk sound and embraces a modern pop production through eleven genre-changing tracks. Fall Out Boy brings forth intensity, excitement, and vigor with the intro track, “Phoenix”, instantly capturing the listener’s attention and drawing out curiosity for the remainder of the album. “Phoenix” succeeds in being the band’s manifesto, barring all inhibitions, and conveying a message of an intrepid homecoming. The track conveys the title’s theme of rebirth, as the group manages to blend its signature energy with melodious pop overtones. “Phoenix” is followed by the band’s first single from the album, “My Songs Know What You Did In the Dark (Light ‘Em Up)”. The single follows the same headstrong theme as “Phoenix”, while at the same time creating the pace for the remainder of the album with its beyond

catchy chorus, natural buildup, and calculated progression. Fall Out Boy manages to shock avid listeners with the first two tracks, showing that the band has clearly embraced a pop direction, leaving any hints of sounding like From Under the Cork Tree in the dust. The album features collaborations with several unexpected artists, which work well with the idea of a pop feel, but manage to confuse the sound of the album at the same time. “Just One Yesterday” features backing vocals from UK pop singer, Foxes, making the track sound ridiculously close to Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep”. Big Sean provides a love and lust themed generic rap verse on “The Mighty Fall”, taking away the satisfaction of Patrick Stump’s darker melodic chorus. “Rat A Tat” becomes one of the weakest tracks on the album due to Courtney Love’s senseless introductory rant. Elton John provides the most successful celebrity cameo on the title track, effectively slowing down the album to an end.

Save Rock and Roll successfully brings Fall Out Boy back to the music scene, but only through distinct moments. The band seems to almost take on too many directions with the sound of the album, attempting to tie together pop, rock, and hip-hop. The band definitely grew up, but this is not entirely a good thing. None of the tracks on the album convey a sense of becoming anthems, unlike the band’s infamous “Dance, Dance” and “This Ain’t a Scene It’s an Arms Race”. Upon first hearing Save Rock and Roll, many will become disappointed that the young punk energy no longer encompasses Fall Out Boy. Yet, these changes do not come as a surprise, as the band had been changing its style towards a more pop feel with the release of Folie à Deux. Fall Out Boy may not truly save rock and roll with this album, but they did successfully return to the scene. Catch Fall Out Boy at The Riviera on May 16th and find Save Rock and Roll at your nearest record store. v

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CUISINE The

Thunderball

By Tyson Bosco

As the title to of this drink implies, The Thunderball is as exotic as it is deadly. Known for it’s almost lightening-infused look, this drink is made out of some pretty tasty ingredients. Although originally sweet in nature, these flavors are balanced with just the right amount of Whiskey. It is the sort of drink that takes a bit of experimentation to master concocting, but the end result is well worth it. Order this drink if you dare; it’s the closest to thunder and lightening that you are ever going to get. Unless you get struck by lightening, of course.

Ingredients:

Directions:

• • • • • •

1. Fill glass with crushed ice.

Crushed ice 2 parts Bacardi Dragonberry 1 part Blue Curacao 1 part Bourbon Whiskey 2 parts Sprite 1 Wedge of Orange or Lemon

2. Pour in Bacardi Dragonberry, Blue Curacao, Bourbon Whiskey and Sprite. 3. Pour in splash of Green Apple Pucker. 4. Add Orange or Lemon wedge and a straw. 5. Enjoy

Culinary Symposium On Friday, April 19th, 2013 Robert Morris University's Culinary department held thier 6th Annual Culinary Symposium on the 8th floor of the Chicago Campus. The keynote speaker was Chef Mario from Google. I left the future chef's at RMU with a little parting wisdom, "If you want your staff to buy in, you have to let them weigh in." Check the photos from the event, courtesy of the Culinary Symposium Facebook Page.


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COMMENTARY He Says // She Says

Cigarette Tax Increases

On March 1st of this year, the tax on cigarettes went up by $1 in Cook County, making Chicago the second city in the US for the highest cigarette taxes. Residents of Chicago now have to pay a total of $6.67 in taxes per pack of cigarettes, which is just 19 cents below that of New York City, where cigarette taxes are the highest in the nation. The tax hike is expected to bring in $25.6 million in revenue this year, but there are significant challenges facing this target. One of the main issues with the expected tax revenues is that they are not guaranteed. Some smokers may choose to quit, meaning that they will not contribute to the expected tax revenue. At the same time, many smokers may decide to purchase cigarettes from other jurisdictions where cigarette taxes are much lower. States surrounding Illinois, such as Indiana and Missouri, have much lower cigarette taxes, causing many residents to smuggle cigarettes from these areas. Whether smokers decide to quit or choose to travel to other areas to purchase their cigarettes, the county’s projected tax revenues will not be reached. A negative effect of the higher cigarette taxes is the gradual creation of a sort of “black market” for selling cigarettes. People with access to cheap

cigarettes are beginning to sell loose cigarettes, making substantial profits from the sales. For example, if a pack of cigarettes is purchased in Missouri for $5 and the buyer sells the cigarettes for $1 apiece in the city of Chicago, he or she is able to make $15, or a 300% profit. As the taxes on cigarettes keep increasing, such illegal sales are becoming more prominent and play a factor in the current crime rate in Chicago. The illicit sale of cigarettes calls for an increase in the expenditures on law enforcement, which in part cancels out the additional tax revenue that will come from higher cigarette taxes. Cigarette taxes are highly regressive, meaning that people with lower incomes pay a much higher percentage of the tax than those with higher incomes. The higher the tax, the more regressive it becomes. Due to this, economists suggest that the size of the tax be determined by the total damage done to nonsmokers, such as extra medical care and environmental smoke exposure. Currently, the negative external effects of cigarette smoking are covered by other taxes, meaning that the tax increase is not necessary to cover costs. As the government aims to curb smoking, more and more smokers find ways around the punishing legislation. Whether smokers decide to quit or participate in illicit cigarette smuggling, the fact of the matter is that the current increases in cigarette taxes create more harm than good. Cigarette tax revenues plummet each year, causing legislators to focus increases in taxation on other personal habits within our society. Crime rates increase due to illicit cigarette smuggling and sales around the city, creating more costs for the local government. Legislators need to focus on more sustainable forms of revenue creation than cigarette taxation, leaving personal choices to be determined by the citizens, not laws. v

Adrian Saucedo

VS.

Stacy Zamskaya

Last year, Illinois approved a cigarette tax increase that brought the total state tax from $0.98 to $1.98 per pack of cigarettes; making Chicago the city with the second highest cigarette tax rates in the United States behind New York City. Illinois residents are not satisfied with the new law proposed by Pat Quinn to bring down Illinois’ budget deficit. Those who are against the cigarette tax increase argue that such imposition will damage local retailers more than help the local economy. They also argue that instead of bringing the deficit down, it will only hurt Illinois residents because they will either spend more money on cigarettes and less money on something else or cross state boundaries to buy cigarettes. Either option will not benefit the state of Illinois in terms of bringing the deficit down or encouraging economic growth. People like to blame the government for their problems, but the reality is that we are the government. If someone is against the cigarette tax increase, then propose an alternative that will benefit both smokers and nonsmokers. The state tax increase is a movement to promote a healthier lifestyle, and those who disagree will have to pay a little more than they would like. That’s all. In the long run, it is better to experience tax increases on unnecessary things or luxury items than to have important programs cut off for lack of money. Even if you consider smoking a necessity, would you consider it equivalent to getting an education or having food on your table? Let’s not be judgmental and disregard the health hazards of smoking, such as how children with asthma and other respiratory conditions suffer terribly from second-hand smoke. Lets forget how uncaring we can be with others, the environment, and ourselves. Lets just assume smoking is a lifestyle; not a good or bad one, just a lifestyle. Smokers should pay the price and assume the consequences of being a smoker. In reality, it is the tobacco companies who seek to reap profit from their sales that pass their taxes on to the consumers, so why blame the government? If they want to continue to profit and you want to continue smoking why not let the government benefit as well? Everyday life requires us to make certain adjustments to our way of living depending on our living conditions, job position, educational background, and other aspects. The cost of living, according to our lifestyle, is always going to change depending not only on our income, but also on other variables. If you value your lifestyle and it doesn’t exactly accommodate to your economic situation, set priorities. If you don’t have sufficient money to keep up with your smoking habits, smoke less. If you want to continue smoking the way you do, give that money back to the community and not elsewhere. Is it not better to know that the extra money you are paying for your pack of cigarettes helps keep programs such as Illinois grants and scholarships accessible to you or friends and family? v

Class: Worth it's Weight By Aaron Wilson The value of a college degree has lately come under close scrutiny. With more employers demanding a college degree for entry-level qualification and legislation being introduced to make college more attainable, many are carefully considering the pros and cons of actually taking out time and financial liabilities in hopes of becoming skilled workers in positions that land them better wages. A changing and still volatile economy seems to be the biggest concern for many. Also, students wonder if the amounts of money borrowed for tuition will pay off once their courses are completed. Surveys say that college degrees yield good returns on their investment. By numbers alone, a recent national poll of just over two thousand individuals showed 35 percent as having received good value, another 42 percent thinking fair of their investment return, and 15 percent feeling poorly. At the same time though, 86 percent of college graduates said getting a degree was a great personal investment, according to a telephone survey. It has been estimated that adults with college degrees, on average, earn 60 percent or $20,000 more per

year, than those without college degrees. Unemployment rates go from around 8% for high school graduates to a little over 3% for Bachelor’s degree graduates. Even so, the whole idea of taking on heavier financial obligations before entering a career still does not sit well with some. Nearly three quarters of the public look at college as being out of reach from their pockets altogether. To help with some of the skepticism that probably comes naturally to any high-cost charge today, there are now cost-to-income analyses calculated and published online to predict how much money students are likely to make after graduating. Some experts also project how much students should borrow while attending college. HumanCapitalScore.com generated a 10-year range of students’ likely post-graduation income based on test scores, high school and college attended, grades, and major. Many experts say total student loans should not exceed a graduate’s first-year income after leaving college. Regardless of what forum the numbers are placed in, they can appear to be scary to anyone working towards being able to make even the first payment against a principle still building. But is college all about the numbers? In some ways, of course. However, considering some of the attributes of being a college student can make the money mean more. College provides certain intangible benefits that, quite frankly, cannot be obtained any

other way. With all employment factors being as they are, two of the most sought after basic skills are communication and the ability to network. College is all about developing these skills. Over time spent in school, students must develop proficiency in these qualities when dealing with each other, administrators, and even those from the public sector. A vocal and written confidence instantly sets graduates apart from other potential job candidates. Time management skills have to also be considered. A big asset often overlooked by some students is practical interaction with many different experts from already up and running professions. Executives understand college to be a tell-tale vector of markets they work in. Because of that, many willingly offer students a bird’s eye view of what actually goes on within their employment communities. Some actually sharpen

their own strategies through the drives of present students. Another point worth mentioning is how these situations present opportunities for students to see if they actually fit well in jobs they are working towards. Information is not always a sure-fire sign of settings. Graduates who consider the right fit for jobs tend to make themselves more qualified, spend more time in their career classifications, and perform better going in to jobs and over their careers. Now, with more global influence and advancement in technology, college degrees have become geared more towards specialized skill-set training. Most industries now have good indications of what is needed to maintain stable growth going forward. Current students actually have some advantages to walking right into newly formed positions that are built around skills thought to be just customary to college classes. High investment tends to work that way. Yes, advanced education just happens to be the one true gold standard around. Bar none, great things just do not seem to come without it, even though more can seem like less at times. v

Bards in the Front, Shrews in the Back // A Flanuer's Turtle Post By Jenny Jocks Stelzer, English Faculty “You’re a feminist; how could you be into Shakespeare, what with all of the ‘witches’ and the ‘shrews?’” Um, I’m pretty sure I never heard that question in grad school or at any point in my academic experience. It’s pretty much understood that, despite the disinheritance of a less-than-compliant daughter, the taming of an obstinate wife, and the inevitable insanity of the power-hungry femme fatale, it’s cool for a feminist to be into Shakespeare, because he’s good. He’s THAT good. However, I am continually posed with that question in my current intellectual pursuit: “You’re a feminist; how could you be into rap, what with all of the ‘bitches’ and the ‘hos?’” Because, I say, like any art, when rap is good, it’s THAT good. Why is it totally acceptable to give Shakespeare props for his skills, despite his apparent misogyny, but not, say, Ice Cube? I think it has something to do with who gets to define art. While our cultural reverence for Shakespeare stems from the way that he kicks ass with English (Sound

and fury? Damn right.), it is made unquestionable by our acceptance of his stories as universal and his skill as peerless. His cultural position is dominant, white, male. However, we, even feminists, let him speak for us, because he does it so good. So, Ice Cube brings a perspective that is not just different from that of theaccepted universal, it is downright unsettling, to understate the matter. It is unsettling in that it doesn’t fit nicely into the cultural definition of art. It can’t. It comes from an angry, black dude, and that angry, black dude could not possibly represent the universal, according to the dominant (white, male) definition. So, we dis it. It is violent. It is misogynistic. It disturbs the shit that makes us comfortable. Guess what? That’s art. And, guess what else? When it’s done by the likes of Cube, it’s peerless: the man can rap. Yes,

he is THAT good. Let’s take a look at some examples: When Hamlet accosts his mother and mind-trips his girlfriend, it’s totally cool because Gertrude’s tumble into “incestuous sheets,” means that Ophelia is sure to be Hamlet’s 100th problem. Yeah, go ahead and mess with your girlfriend’s head to fulfill your revenge fantasy against your mother: “Frailty, thy name is woman.” When Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassidy blast through America and the “awfully dumb…sweet little girl[s],” we are quick to forgive their youthful indiscretions because they are rebelling against the stifling square-ness of the 1950's, and because Kerouac does it with such frantic, insanely sexy lyricism: “…I knew there’d be girls, visions, everything…” When Anna Karenina finally offs herself, the only thing she CAN do in Tolstoy’s Russia (she did cheat on her husband, after all, and he’s got a rep and a fortune to defend, yo), we praise the beauty of the tragic love story: “Sensual desire indulged for its own sake is the misuse of something sacred.” That is, if it’s a woman’s indulgence. Now, I’m not saying we shouldn’t go

mad for these writers. They are amazing, and they tell stories of the human condition in ways that challenge and move us. My point is, though, that this power of (seemingly universal, but, almost always white and male) art is not found only within literature; it is found in a good rapper’s flow. When Ice Cube claims that “Life ain’t nothin’ but bitches and money,” he is, as a matter of fact, speaking from the same misogynist universal as all the rest of these dudes, it just happens to arise from the culturally oppressed, rather than the culturally dominant. More importantly, his flow is so urgent, so angry, and so damn smooth against Dre’s hard-driving, irresistible beat, that his mastery is undeniable. So, I give him much respect: “Even saw the lights of the Goodyear blimp, and it read ‘Ice Cube’s a pimp.’” As for my take on Norman Mailer and Eminem, I’d really like to claim that I represent as a feminist, but, like Jay-Z says, ���Ladies is pimps, too.” v

Visit www.theflanuersturtle.com for more articles like this one!


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ODDS & ENDS

The Comic Strip by Kyle Ashley

2012

Ugh...

2013

Damn you Mother Nature!

Meanwhile...

Hahahaha! Now freeze! Now burn! Now famine! Now plague! Eesk dabgribblnostoptofjordgrrrr!?!!


The Eagle - Summer 1 2013 - Issue 1