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My

MONSTER The Human-Animal Hybrid

RMIT Gallery Exhibition 29 JUNE - 18 August 2018

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IMAGE: Kate Clark, Gallant, 2016 (detail).


My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery, Foyer and Xenos gallery, installation image by Mark Ashkanasy.

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FOREWORD Academic research is generally not envisaged as a

of human and deer, spoke beautifully to the notion

collection of art works or an idea articulated with

of the hybrid fiction and stopped us in our tracks as

material culture, however, like the best academic

we entered the gallery each day. Having her on site

inquiry, good exhibitions have strong, logical nar-

was a joy – she shared her experience and wealth of

ratives, cultural relevance and in-depth research.

knowledge with us all.

They are ideal models for knowledge transfer. Working with researchers to conceptualise an exhibition

Sincere thanks also go to the institutions and private

pushes ambitious conversations across disciplines

collectors who kindly shared major works of art with

and departments.

us including: The Art Gallery of Ballarat, Latrobe University Art Collection, MONA, Heide MOMA and Royal

RMIT Gallery’s exhibition program focuses on show-

Australia & New Zealand College of Obstetricians and

casing the best of RMIT University research from

Gynecologists. At RMIT University we would like to

both university staff and higher degree students.

thank Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Innova-

RMIT Gallery’s Senior Communications and Outreach

tion and Vice President Professor Calum Drummond

Advisor Evelyn Tsitas has embraced this opportunity

and Jane Holt, Executive Director Research and

to build upon her PhD research into a meticulously

Innovation for their support and trust that enables

researched exhibition of engaging art works that

RMIT Gallery to showcase the best of RMIT Univer-

resonate with the main themes of her thesis.

sity research; as well as Professor Paul Gough, Pro Vice Chancellor and Vice President for his encour-

To our delight the exhibition was resoundingly

agement and enthusiasm hosting our opening night

embraced by both the student cohort and the wider

event along with guest speaker Professor Barbara

public. The opening night garnered large audiences

Creed, whose insightful remarks located the exhibi-

supporting the gallery’s new programming. For stu-

tion historically, culturally and politically.

dents, the gallery offers new impactful and enduring experiences, connections and pathways to learning

Finally I would like to thank Evelyn Tsitas, whose

in a welcoming environment.

commitment to the broader impact of her research made this exhibition possible. The very long hours

I would like to thank all the artists, both locally and

she worked to transform a creative writing thesis into

internationally, who generously delved into their

the practicalities of a visual art exhibition was appre-

studio or archives to source the right work or devel-

ciated. I wish to congratulate all the staff of RMIT

oped a new work for the exhibition. Many artists

Gallery; Nick Devlin, Jon Buckingham, Mamie Bishop,

contributed to our diverse public program of stand-

Meg Taylor, Maria Stolnik, Valerie Sim and Vidhi Vidhi

ing-room only artist talks. A selection of edited

who worked supportively and collaboratively to

transcripts from these events are reproduced in this

assist the complex production of this exhibition.

catalogue. I thank the artists for taking the time and sharing their love of this engaging topic. New York

Helen Rayment

based taxidermy artist Kate Clark travelled to Mel-

Acting Director

bourne to speak alongside Julia deVille and attend

RMIT Gallery

the opening. Kate’s impressive work Gallant, a fusion

Opening night images by Vicki Jones

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INTRODUCTION ‘We are also animals’ Professor Barbara Creed Exhibition opening address

I am delighted to open this wonderful exhibition My

in Australian universities teach HAS subjects, the

Monster: The human-animal hybrid curated by Evelyn

tertiary sector has been comparatively slow in

Tsitas whom I first met at the Minding Animals con-

responding to this field of research, despite the fact

ference in Utrecht, 2012.

that Australians committed to the goals of animal liberation have played a leading role in the estab-

I mention this conference by way of an introduction

lishment of the area world-wide. These include the

to My Monster. The Minding Animals Conference,

philosopher Peter Singer, author of the still-contro-

held bi-annually, is one of the largest and most

versial and iconic book Animal Liberation (1975) and

thought-provoking conferences I can recall attend-

Christine Townend who founded Animal Liberation

ing. The conference runs over four days with sessions

(1976) an animal rights organisation based in Sydney.

running from early in the morning until late in the

Despite the lull in academic programs, Australian

evening. Presenting speakers came from across all

activists, authors, artists, filmmakers and scholars,

disciplines, such as: humanities, science, philosophy,

alongside their overseas counterparts, play a key part

medicine, literature, art history, cultural studies and

in the global movement through publishing, research

film.

and community outreach as well as artistic practice and the organisation of conferences, seminars, and

The Nobel Laureate J.M. Coetzee opened the con-

reading groups. RMIT Gallery is to be congratulated

ference by reading from his manuscript that features

for contributing such a forward-thinking exhibition

his alter ego, Elizabeth Costello, a controversial aca-

such as My Monster to the field.

demic who gives defends animals, arguing that, like us, they are sentient beings who have the right to live

The curatorial statement for My Monster states “the

out their lives freely and free from cruelty.

desire to merge human and animal into one creature has fascinated artists for 40,000 years, with

Contemporary human-animal studies (HAS) which

the hybrid constantly updated and reinvented from

inspired the Minding Animals conference has inspired

century to century, from Greek classical myths and

this exhibition. HAS subjects are now taught at many

European folktales through to popular culture.” The

major Western universities. The Animals and Society

aim of the exhibition is “to explore our complex

Institute (ASI), a scholarly organisation whose aim is

relationship with ourselves, other species and the

to expand knowledge in the field of human-animal

environment.”

studies, lists on its website that over 160 universities in North America offer courses in animal studies with

A major reason for our fascination with the human-an-

over 22 dedicated HAS postgraduate programs.

imal hybrid over the centuries is that we do not believe what mainstream institutions and academic

While some humanities and social-science courses

discourses such as philosophy, science and religion

OPPOSITE: Janet BECKHOUSE Summoning the Muse, (detail) 2004, stoneware, glaze, Perspex, 67 x 70 x13cm, courtesy of the artist.

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have been telling us about ourselves over the years,

experimental and challenging - they are not afraid to

that is, that we humans are an exceptional or special

speak out about the crisis of the animal.

species, more developed and of greater importance that all other species. Philosophers, religious schol-

My Monster explores a key question in human-ani-

ars and scientists have gone to great lengths over

mal studies; what does it mean to be human in the

the centuries to emphasise our difference from other

21st Century? There is now an increasing body of sci-

animals. They have argued throughout human history

entific evidence that challenges the traditional view

(not species history) that we are superior to all other

that the human subject is an exceptional being whose

species because we are more intelligent, we possess

intelligence sets it apart from all other species. Even

a soul, we show empathy, we are altruistic, we have

Charles Darwin challenged human exceptionalism

speech and we experience emotions. The Enlight-

which earned him the ire of many influential people

enment rationalist philosopher RenĂŠ Descartes

and institutions, such as the Church.

asserted that what separates humans from animals is that animals do not feel emotions. He argued that

Scientific research today is demonstrating that both

if you hurt an animal and it yelps in pain, this was

human and non-human animals share the character-

simply a reflexive response, just as if you hit a piano

istics of sentience, intelligence, empathy and altruism.

keyboard it will emit sound. Today, Descartes’ theory

When living in their own communities, non-human

is difficult to accept but it was used by scientists for

animals communicate with each other, live according

centuries to operate on animals without sedation or

to social rules, raise their young, express emotions,

anaesthetic.

show empathy and even altruism.

The more we

learn, the more we realise that we are also a species Today, philosophers such as Jacques Derrida, Kelly

of animal, different, but ultimately an animal.

Oliver, Cary Wolf, Lori Gruen and Peter Singer are working to dispel these myths of human superiority

Despite the overwhelming evidence pertaining to

and the supposed lack of animal sentience. It is rem-

animal sentience, they remain objects of human

nants of these beliefs that animals feel no pain and

exploitation. Governments of many countries have

lack sentience that has contributed to society’s cur-

passed legislation recognising animal sentience,

rent treatment of animals. Human superiority allows

however, they must now accept that measures need

us to excuse our harsh treatment of animals, even

to be taken to attend to their welfare. The most

if this involves animal suffering in scientific labora-

recent tragedy, concerning the live export trade of

tories, factory farms or the live animal export trade.

animals from Australia in which over 3,000 sheep suffered from heat exhaustion and perished in their

Human-animal studies confronts one the most

own waste, we need such legislation more than ever.

profound issues of our time, also a theme of this

The majority of animals on earth (as with modern

exhibition, the coming of the Anthropocene. For

human slaves) remain commodities of exchange,

the first time, we are experiencing a human-made

exploited commercially for human benefit, denied

geological age distinguished by climate change,

the right to live out their lives according to their nat-

the mass extinction of species, and the loss of both

ural needs and desires.

animal and human habitat. Human-animal studies

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explores the Anthropocene along with anthropocen-

This state of affairs exists because of the way in

trism, that is, an approach to life that always puts

which human beings are able to live, in fact, thrive in

the human first. Human-animal studies also explores

states of contradiction. One of the major contradic-

the rights of non-human animals and the future of

tions of the human condition is that we deny our own

ethical thinking. Artists, writers and film makers also

animality. This is the central theme of My Monster;

explore these and related issues in works that are

the artists in this exhibition all set out to explore the


human-animal divide. Their works explore this issue

BELOW: Geoffrey RICARDO

from the perspective of the animal and the human.

Tall Tales, 2008

The various artists do not adopt an anthropocentric,

Copper

or human-centred, point of view as so often happens

190 x 96 x 80 cm

when artists, such as Damien Hirst, use animal in their

Collection of the artist

works to pose questions of the human condition. The artists have used a range of techniques to explore the human-animal hybrid: painting, photography,

film,

taxidermy,

biotechnology,

and

multi-sensory sound installations. Their works are exciting, thoughtful, challenging, sometimes abject and sometimes beautiful. This exhibition, a tribute to Evelyn Tsitas’ powerful vision, explores the contradiction inherent in calling ourselves ‘human’ through its focus on the human-animal hybrid. My Monster argues that we are also animals and as such we need to take responsibility for the plight of all other creatures, our kin, as well as the planet herself.

Barbara Creed is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor at the University of Melbourne and an Honorary Professorial Fellow. Creed is the author of five books on feminism, sexuality, film and media including the feminist classic The Monstrous-Feminine: Film, Feminism, Psychoanalysis (1993). Her recent research is on animal studies, the inhuman and social justice issues; and her latest publication Stray: Human–Animal Ethics in the Anthropocene (2017) explores the relationship between human and animal in the context of the stray.

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CURATORIAL STATEMENT One of the oldest-known examples of figurative art was created about 40,000 years ago in the shape of a hybrid. The Löwenmensch figurine, or Lion-man, fuses human and animal elements. It was discovered in a German cave in 1939, and is the first known example of humanity’s endless fantasy of the animal and human fused into one being. The hybrid form is repeated throughout mythology, folklore, figurative art, fiction, comics, cinema and computer games. Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein is the first science fiction novel in which the human-animal hybrid appears. This is a cautionary tale about science without moral or social responsibility, heralding in the now well recognised portrayal of the mad scientist. From the Lion Man to Dr. Frankenstein’s creature, the hybrid being imagined by artists and writers forces us to acknowledge our connection to the non-human animal with whom we inhabit this world. The original inspiration for my research is Greek mythology. I was strongly influenced by the amazing tales my Papouli (Greek grandfather) told me, as well as the cautionary, Gothic stories of the Brothers Grimm, and the German classic children’s book Der Struwwelpeter, read to me endlessly by my Omi (Baltic German grandmother). The deliberate use of specific Greek words for the different sections of the exhibition – xenos (foreigner, stranger); mythos (stories/tales/narrative); tokos (childbirth/reproduction); eros (erotic love); kosmos (the world/universe) - takes into account the chapters of my PhD research exploring the lifecycle of the human-animal hybrid in fiction.

Dr Evelyn Tsitas Exhibition Curator RMIT Gallery

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Kate CLARK Gallant, 2016 Fallow deer hide, antlers, clay, foam, thread, pins, rubber eyes, wire 140 x 140 x 55 cm Courtesy of the artist

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XENOS Gallery 1

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XENOS stranger / foreigner

The semi-human mythological creatures from Greek

From Greek classical myths to European folktales and

mythology, such as the Centaur (upper body of a hu-

fairy tales; from stories of werewolves and vampires to

man and the lower body of a horse); the Siren (half

superheroes with animal powers; the hybrid is alive and

bird and half woman) and the Chimera (fire-breath-

well and flourishes in literature, cinema, visual arts and

ing creatures composed of the parts of multiple an-

popular culture.

imals) have been the subject of art and literature for centuries.

The artists in this space use the hybrid as a varied and powerful metaphor. These works explore our complex

Mythological hybrid creatures can be understood as

relationship with maternity and domesticity; segregation

reflections of the uninhibited, strong and instinctual

and alienation; freedom and oppression; fractured rela-

animal within us, as well as the socially responsible

tionships with the natural environment and other animals,

and repressed aspect of the human upon the natural

as well as struggles with our public and private personas.

world. Hovering above the gallery, Indonesian artist Heri Dono’s The hybrid is a creature that is constantly updated

angels (inspired by Flash Gordon comics) are a meta-

and reinvented across the centuries. With her combi-

phor for freedom and dreams; but flying trapped in a co-

nation of human and animal features, the frightening

coon, these hybrid creatures take on a social and political

Medusa from Greek mythology is a Gorgon monster

meaning as well.

who can turn people into stone with a single glance. In the 20th Century, Medusa was adopted by many women as a symbol of female rage.

THIS PAGE: Geoffrey RICARDO Untitled, 1993

Bronze sculpture 18 x 15 x 6 cm Courtesy of the artist OPPOSITE: Eko NUGROHO Trap Costume for President Z, 2011 Embroidered rayon thread on fabric backing 190 x 146 cm Collection of Konfir Kabo, Melbourne

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Rona GREEN Pascal, 2017, The Surgeon, 2010, Dusty Rhodes, 2011, Dutch, 2009, hand coloured linocut prints, courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries.

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Ronnie VAN HOUT Madness, 2001, Self, 2001, Sculpt d. Dog, 2001, print on archival museum rag paper, 81 x 51 cm each, courtesy of the artist

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Barthi KHER Family Portrait, 2004, Feather Duster, 2004, The Hunter and the Prophet, 2004, Chocolate Muffin, 2004, Angel, 2004, diasec prints, courtesy of the artist.

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OPPOSITE: Jane ALEXANDER Post Conversion Syndrome (in captivity), 2003, Post Conversion Syndrome (in the wild), 2004, courtesy of the artist and gordonschachatcollection, South Africa. BELOW: Peter BOOTH Untitled, 2002 Bronze sculpture 15 x 14 x 16 cm high Courtesy of the artist and Chris Deutscher

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Janet BECKHOUSE ABOVE LEFT: Mermaid Bowl 2017 Stoneware, glaze, lustre 28 x 9 x19cm Courtesy of the artist ABOVE RIGHT: Reptile Woman, 2017 Stoneware, glaze, lustre 20 x 14 x 14cm Courtesy of the artist Cat Candelabra 2017 Stoneware, glaze, lustre 41 x 25 x17cm Courtesy of the artist

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OPPOSITE & ABOVE: Peter BOOTH Untitled, 1988, Untitled, 2008-2018, courtesy of the artist and Chris Deutscher Gallery.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Geoffrey RICARDO Bigfoot, 1997, Match, 1997, Another Otherwise, 2014, Courtesy of the artist.

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Jane ALEXANDER BELOW L-R: Song, 2018, Promise, 2017, Harbinger with Rainbow, 2004, Landscape with transmitter, 2007, Missing, 2004, Post Conversion Syndrome (in captivity), 2003, Post Conversion Syndrome (in the wild), 2004, courtesy of the artist and gordonschachatcollection, South Africa.

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Sam JINKS Medusa (Beloved), 2016, silicone, pigment and resin, La Trobe University Art Collection

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Heri DONO Flying in Cocoons, 2001, fibreglass, acrylic, papier mâchÊ, cast iron, gauze, chicken wire, bulb, metal string, mechanical and electrical devices, 210 x 110 x 110 cm each, Private Collection, Melbourne.

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TOKOS

Gallery 2

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My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery, Tokos gallery, installation image by Mark Ashkanasy.

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TOKOS Childbirth / reproduction

Charles Darwin’s revolutionary book On the Origin

gawa imagines that a woman could gestate and give

of Species (1859) introduced the theory that pop-

birth to a baby from another species in her video

ulations evolve through natural selection through

work In I Wanna Deliver a Dolphin.

common descent. The unassailable belief that humans were unique and unrelated to other animals

Just as in Mary Shelley's time, there is still enormous

was shattered. There was also the fear that if man

debate and discussion about what technological ad-

evolved from animals he could degenerate back to

vances and rapid changes in reproductive medicine

animal.

mean for humanity, throwing into question the very essence of what we know to be ‘natural’. Franken-

Humans and animals have never been known to

stein’s creature was created, not born, and therefore

reproduce naturally, despite many recorded inci-

treated as a commodity rather than an individual

dents of bestiality over the centuries. This has not

with a soul, free will and inherent rights. This is the

stopped artists, scientists and writers from imagin-

same anxiety felt by many as we ponder the future

ing that the merging of biological identities would

of our species.

result in improvements for both species. The English physician John Maubray, the author In the early 20th Century, Soviet biologist Ilya Ivanov

of The Female Physician (1724), was an advocate

carried out experiments to create hybrid human-pri-

for ‘maternal impression’. This was the widely held

mates using artificial insemination techniques. He

belief that pregnant women who were regularly in

tried and failed to create human-ape hybrids insem-

the presence of certain animals could give birth to

inating female primates with human sperm. Later

children bearing the same characteristics as those

he devised an experiment to inseminate female

animals.

volunteers with orang-utan sperm. However the orang-utan died before these procedures could be

Like many doctors of his era, Maubray proposed that

carried out.

it was possible for women to give birth to sooterkins, small mouse-like creatures. Maubray was involved in

In 2017, scientists from the Salk Institute (USA)

the case of Mary Toft, who appeared to vindicate his

announced that they had created hybrid human-pig

theory. In 1726 Toft claimed that she gave birth to

foetuses. These contained human cells in multiple

rabbits, a hybrid procreation medically supported by

tissues, but were not allowed to develop to term.

eminent physicians of the day.

Despite these safeguards, public anxiety at crossing the species barrier remains high.

The scam seems ridiculous in the 21st Century, but an echo of the medical establishment’s belief in ‘mater-

Slovenian

artist

Maja

Smrekar

developed

her

award-winning performance project K-9_topology in

nal impression’ can be seen in text books printed less than 130 years ago.

order to question current biotechnological possibilities in reproduction. She lived in seclusion for three

Alice B. Stockham, a highly regarded obstetrician

months with her dogs and manipulated her body to

and gynaecologist from Chicago, published her in-

be able to breastfeed them. On another occasion,

fluential Tokology: A Book for Every Woman in 1886.

one of her emptied ova was used as a host for a

In this book she stated: "The probabilities are that

somatic cell of her dog Ada. The resulting cell was

it will eventually be proven that the parent whose

not intended to become a hybrid.

mental forces previous to, and at the time of conception, are most active and vigorous, controls the

In another hybrid fantasy, Japanese artist Ai Hase-

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sex of the child."


ABOVE: Ai HASEGAWA

BELOW: Mithu SEN

I wanna deliver a dolphin, 2011-2013, digital

In our hands‌Nothing (Egon and Me) 1,

video, duration: 02:39, courtesy of the artist.

2010, mixed media on handmade paper, 70 x 100 cm, Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris and Brussels.

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Maja SMREKAR with Manuel VASON ‘K-9_topology: Hybrid Family’, 2016 digital performance-based photography, courtesy of the artists

Maja SMREKAR with Manuel VASON ‘K-9_topology: Hybrid Family’, 2016 digital prints: performance-based photography, courtesy of the artists.

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Top Row, L-R: Smellie’s Forceps, c.1750 obstetric forceps; iron, leather, metal sheet coating, Courtesy of RANZCOG, Melbourne Julia DeVILLE Peter, 2012 Rabbit, antique sterling silver goblet 2.15g (925), 17 x 1 5 x 21 cm Courtesy of the artist and Sophie Gannon Gallery, Melbourne Bottom Row, L-R: William MADDOCKS A portrait of Mary Tofts, date unknown, stipple engraving with watercolour, image reproduced courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK Robert GRAVE Portrait of Nathaniel St. AndrÊ, date unknown, line engraving, Image reproduced courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK

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Hybrid Births

valuable, meaning body snatching became a major

The strange case of Mary Toft

problem. It is no wonder that women have played a central

The obstetric forceps (c.1750) displayed alongside

role in animal advocacy since the 19th century when

Julia deVille’s taxidermy rabbit sculpture Peter pays

neither women nor animals had legal rights. Women

homage to the strange case of Mary Toft and her

felt that, just like animals, they were mistreated by

hybrid birth. This early example of ‘fake news’ has

the medical establishment. Women’s rights groups

lived on in William Hogarth’s satirical engraving.

of that era, such as the Suffragettes, were at the forefront of moves to stop experimentation on live

In 1726 Mary Toft, a peasant woman from a country

animals for medical research, known as vivisection.

town in England, convinced not just her local male midwife, but also King George I’s physician Nathaniel St André that she had given birth to rabbits...many, many rabbits.

A literary response Frankenstein (1818) by Mary Shelley and Gor Saga (1981) by Maureen Duffy are the two influential books

Toft was taking advantage of the widespread belief

which formed the basis of my PhD research into the

held by the medical profession had that women were

lifecycle of the scientifically created human-animal

able to give birth to hybrid monsters because of their

hybrid in fiction.

aberrant imaginations.

Both speculative fiction novels explore the ethical consequences of what happens when the ‘natural’

André examined Toft and not only was he convinced

boundaries of science and reproductive technology

about the hybrid births, he claimed he helped with

are pushed. The novels can be understood to question

the delivery of a fifteenth rabbit. He went on to

what happens when established understandings of

opportunistically publish A Short Narrative of an

motherhood are disrupted.

Extraordinary Delivery of Rabbet. Dr Frankenstein’s unnamed creature was created Shortly afterwards, Toft confessed to the event

from the corpses of ‘the dissecting room and the

being a fraud when a thorough internal medical

slaughter-house’. Duffy’s hybrid ‘Gor’ was the result

examination was demanded of her.

his father’s desire to create a new species by using his sperm to secretly inseminate a Gorilla.

Looking at the Smellie forceps, it is easy to see why admitting the truth would seem preferable

The authors give a voice to the hybrid creature

to submitting oneself to a medical obstetric

cruelly cast aside by their creator, and pose the

investigation of that era.

question of what makes us human, and what it is that distinguishes the hybrid from both humans and

Such was the anxiety about the medical profession

animals.

that by the 1750s even the brilliant obstetrician William Smellie was accused of multiple murders of

Shelley’s novel draws on a long tradition that links

pregnant women in order to gain access to corpses.

monstrosity with maternal aberration and launches an ongoing examination in fiction about the scientific

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By the time Frankenstein was published in 1818, the

impulse to create hybrids. In the 20th Century, Duffy,

study of anatomy across Europe was so popular that

a vocal animal right activist, uses the hybrid Gor to

viable cadavers were becoming rare and increasingly

explore social justice, animal rights and gender issues.


William HOGARTH Mary tofts appearing to give birth to rabbits in the presence of several surgeons and man-midwives sent from London to examine her, 1726, etching, image reproduced courtesy of the Wellcome Collection, UK.

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Art and Science During

the

1800s,

when

Mary

Shelley

wrote

Frankenstein, the distinction between scientist and artist was much more fluid. Shelley’s husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, experimented with electricity (once terrorising his sisters with his experiments). Mary was well aware of the scientific procedures of her time, such as Giovanni Aldini and Luigi Galvani’s experiments and theories on animal electricity. The artists in this space explore the interface of art and science, and art and technology in their examination of the human-animal, highlighting the importance of the creative arts in bioethical debates. Deborah Klein’s half-woman, half-insects are pinned down, resembling specimens in natural history collections. Kira O’Reilly and Jennifer Willet’s uncanny laboratory flips our expectations of animal experimentation. As we absorb the animal into us, via pig insulin, or pig valves and bovine cardiac tissue routinely used in heart surgery, where do we draw the line at ‘us’

ABOVE: Deborah KLEIN

and ‘them’? The transplantation of animal organs

Ladybird Woman, 2014, watercolour, 41.9 x 29.7 cm.

into humans (xenotransplantation) is on the horizon.

Image courtesy of the artist.

The first genetically edited pig-to-human organ transplants could occur before 2020. Beth Croce’s modern fable is a symbolic narrative about animal sacrifice and medical progress.

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BELOW: Beth CROCE The Pig Prince; A Xenographic Tale, 2018, 11 sheets: intaglio print with hand coloured watercolour and letterpress, courtesy of the artist.

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Beth CROCE The Pig Prince; A Xenographic Tale (detail), 2018, 11 sheets: intaglio print with hand coloured watercolour and letterpress, courtesy of the artist.

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ABOVE: Patricia PICCININI Belly, 2011, silicone, fibreglass, human hair, 70 x 70 x 7 cm, Heide Museum of Modern Art, purchased with funds from the Truby and Florence Williams Charitable Trust, ANZ Trustees 2013 RIGHT: Deborah KLEIN European Wasp Woman, 2015, Ladybird Woman, 2014, Actinus Imperialis Beetle Woman, 2014, all works: watercolour, courtesy of the artist. NEXT SPREAD: Kira O’REILLY & Jennifer WILLET Untitled, 2009, digital print in convex glass frame, courtesy of the artists

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My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery, Tokos gallery -‘Maternal Impression’ vitrine, installation image by Mark Ashkanasy.

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EROS

Gallery 3

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Lisa ROET Humanzee pt. 2 from the series ‘When I laugh, he laughs with me’, 2014 Type-C photograph, edition 1 of 3 103.5 x 145 cm Photographic support: James Geer

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My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery, Eros gallery, installation image by Mark Ashkanasy.

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EROS erotic love

Historically, human society has evolved in close

The offspring issuing from such mythical unions are

proximity with animals. It is not surprising that our

hybrids, like the tortured Minotaur with the head of

myths, folklore and the visual arts have embraced

a bull and the body of a man, who was conceived by

the erotic fantasies between human and animal in the

Queen Pasiphae and a white bull while she was under

form of the hybrid creature. This can be seen from

a curse from Poseidon.

representations of the well-endowed and insatiable satyrs of mythology to the sexually charged King

Animal sexuality is seen as forceful, driven by primal

Kong movies.

instinct and unhindered by human anxieties, and this is the lure of the hybrid creature in erotic fantasies. In

Humanity’s perceived uniqueness and dominance

the 17th century, the satyr legend came to be asso-

over the natural world was defined by its separation

ciated with stories of the orang-utan, a great ape

from the animal, and still lingers; witness our current

now found only in Sumatra and Borneo. We see the

obsession with body hair removal. This idea is pow-

echo of this bestial fantasy in Lisa Roet’s highly sex-

erfully challenged by Deborah Kelly’s hairy women,

ualised imagery of the woman and ape. Sam Leach’s

reminding us that depilation aside, we cannot deny

eroticised portrayal of animal dominance forces us

our animal bodies.

to confront the historical idea of viewing humans as superior to animals. His ongoing investigation

Greek mythology is rich in bestial themes, such as

of the relationship between humans and animals is

Leda and the Swan, a story in which the god Zeus

informed by art history, science, and philosophy.

assumes the form of a swan in order to seduce Leda. This myth has been an inspiration for artists and

What is confronting about the work by Oleg Kulik is

poets for hundreds of years. For instance 'Leda and

the reversal of consent, and how it forces the viewer

the swan’ was imagined by the 18th Century French

to ponder our own animal nature. Are we more upset

artist Louis Garreau, after an earlier work by 17th

by the notion of an animal taking charge sexually of

Century Dutch artist Jan Verkolye. In My Monster, Monster

a human, or vice versa – and why?

the myth is explored by Sidney Nolan’s 20th Century depiction of the erotic scene, which is filled with energetic and implied sexual imagery.

Unknown artist (attributed to Nicola HICKS) Minotaur, c. 20th century Bronze sculpture 24.5 x 40 x 24 cm Collection of Jennifer Shaw, Melbourne

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Sam LEACH

Pedestal 2, 2018, oil on canvas, 101 x 92 cm, courtesy of the artist

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L-R: Norman LINDSAY Afternoon of a Faun, c.1920; Desire, 1919, etchings, Private Collection, Sydney.

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L-R: Sidney NOLAN Leda and Swan, 1960, synthetic polymer paint on composition board, 121 x 121 cm, Art Gallery of Ballarat: The William, Rene and Blair Ritchie Collection, Bequest of Blair Ritchie, 1998 : 1998.19; Rayner HOFF Faun and Nymph, 1924, bronze, 26.5 x 29 x 13 cm, Private Collection, Sydney

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L-R: Deborah KELLY The Magdalenes (Penitence), 2012, The Magdalenes (Praise), 2012, archival prints on hahnemulle photorag with paper collage and matte varnish, Private Collection, Melbourne; Unknown artist, Untitled (Minotaur), c.20th century, bronze, 24.5 x 40 x 24 cm, Private Collection, Melbourne; Lisa ROET, Humanzee pt. 2, 2014, Blond Venus 1932, 2014, type-C photographs, Courtesy of the artist.

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Deborah KELLY Venus of Beeness, 2017, Mervenus, 2017, silk banners, courtesy of the artist

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Rayner HOFF Faun and Nymph, 1924 Bronze sculpture 26.5 x 29 x 13 cm Private collection, Sydney

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Oleg KULIK Family of the Future, 9, 1997, digital print: performance based photography, 136 x 150 x 5 cm, Collection of the Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania

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M Y THOS

Gallery 4

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My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery, Mythos gallery, installation image by Mark Ashkanasy.

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M Y THOS stories / tales / narrative

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein launched a new strand

Fur Can’t Fly (The Mourning of the Fur)

of Gothic horror genre that established the human body as the site of power and control. These

‘I went to Oro Preto one day, in the mist, in a bus,

concerns are explored in cinema’s preoccupation

around the winding mountains. And I saw a kite,

with both the mad scientist and the transformed

flying high above the forest. And for the first time

human, whose mutating human-animal body pushes

in my life I knew I could leave, I could walk into the

the boundaries of nature.

steep misty streets, I could buy a kite, I could fly a kite, I could fly.

Cinema has also embraced mythical hybrid creatures which owe their metamorphoses to a curse or

I asked people all around the world, what is art to

mutation, such as the werewolf, vampire, mermaids

them and why do they love it? And those that love

or cat people. We invite you to linger in the hybrid

it said, in dozens of languages, art is freedom, art

narrative, and watch the movie trailer showreel.

is transporting, art doesn’t tell you how to arrive or when to arrive but it will take you nonetheless.

Stories of werewolves continue to resonate as they

So I decided art was a raptor, rapture, physically,

represent both human and something profoundly

spiritually, emotionally transporting you from one

other that operates on impulse and instinct.

place to another.

Jazmina Cininas’ exploration of the female werewolf throughout history provides us with powerful

I saw a hummingbird in the mountains, unexpectedly,

narratives of aberrant femininity in the form of the

when I was buying a ticket, hovering, flying

hybrid creature.

backwards, its wings moving so fast I saw a jewelled blur. Then it disappeared, and I was left behind on

Peter Ellis builds on the Surrealist tradition of tapping

the ground.

into the subconscious mind; his hybrids appear to exist simultaneously in the human world, the fantasy

Angels, birds, showgirls, goddesses, gods; they can

dreamscape and the animal existence.

all fly, they can all ascend, they can all transcend. Everyone knows creatures of the fur can’t fly. Some

Birds feature in many hybrid stories, perhaps

can, but they are freaks. Yet we all dream of it as

expressing the human desire to fly. Angels, found in

children, and those that continue to dream are saints,

religions and mythologies, are believed to guide and

angels, maniacs, polymaths, visionaries and lunatics.

protect humans, while the Harpy and Siren of Greek But here in this room, in this chair, the fur can fly.’

mythology are dangerous creatures. In the enduring Greek myth of Daedalus and Icarus, father and son tried to escape their island home by

Created by: Moira Finucane & Darrin Verhagen

making wings, but Icarus flew too close to the sun,

Text & Voice: Moira Finucane

and his wings melted.

Score: Shinkjuku Thief Hummingbird Diorama: Rose Agnew

Let your imagination take flight in The Rapture/

Vibration, Movement & Light: Darrin Verhagen &

Fur Can’t Fly.

Thomas Dahlenburg

Created by Melbourne’s iconic

provocateur Moira Finucane with digital artist and symphonic composer Shinjuku Thief, this hybrid multisensory

installation

allows

participants

to

immerse themselves in a magical hybrid world of birds, angels, redemption, ascension, transformation and rapture.

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System: Jay Curtis


Rose AGNEW Prayer at the Temple of Flora, 2018, mixed media, 30 x 25 x 48.8 cm, courtesy of the artist Installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery

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Moira FINUCANE with Shinjuku THIEF The Rapture/Fur Can't Fly, 2018, sound, feathers, armchair, eyelid projection, vibration, motion code, duration: 00:04:48, courtesy of the artists and AkE Lab, RMIT University.

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My Monster: the Human-Animal Hybrid, RMIT Gallery, Mythos gallery, installation image by Mark Ashkanasy.

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Peter ELLIS Artworks L-R: Chimera, 2017, Minotaur, 2017, Vacuum, 2018, Alien, 2017, Actaeon, 2017, Ghost, 2018, Shower, 2018, Cursed Changeling with Pipe, 2017, A Girl and Her Slug, 2017, Dreaming Monster, 2017, Lion with Sword, 2017, She Searched Him for the Cutlery (2), 2017, Woman with Snake, Christmas Eve, 2017, Young Faun in Forest, 2018, They Inhabit the Night, 2018, The Smoking Spine, 2002, Courtesy of the artist.

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Jazmina CININAS Arline of Barioux, Auvergne 1588, 2008, Angela Prefers the Company of Wolves, 2005, Blood Sisters, 2016, Rahne Dreams of Saving the World, 2006, Lydia's Humanity is Mostly Prosthetic, 2009, White Fell's Eye Turned (Green), 2010, Courtesy of the artist. quaecae. Nequas delique acimpostiam abo. Et debitiuntior sunt.

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Flesh & Fur: The Hybrid in Cinema, 2018

First Born, directed by Philip Saville (British Broadcasting Company, 1988), Episode 1: 0:00 - 4:20

Movie trailer showreel compilation

The Return of the Fly, directed by Edward Bernds

Duration: 01:05:55

(20th Century Fox, 1959), theatrical trailer

Concept, development & research: Evelyn Tsitas

Mansquito, directed by Tibor TakĂĄcs (Syfy, 2005),

Research assistant: Megan Taylor

theatrical trailer

Editing: Karen McPherson

Frankenstein, directed by James Whale (Universal

Producer: Timothy Arch

Pictures, 1931), theatrical trailer

Additional images: courtesy of Wellcome Collection,

The Fly, directed by Kurt Neumann (20th Century

UK

Fox, 1958), theatrical trailer Frankenstein, directed by Danny Boyle (originally presented at the National Theatre, London, 2012),

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Film credits

promotional trailer

Victor Frankenstein, directed by Paul McGuigan

The Fly II, directed by Chris Walas (20th Century

(20th Century Fox, 2015), theatrical trailer

Fox, 1989), theatrical trailer

Chimera, directed by Maurice Haeems (Praxis Media

The Curse of the Fly, directed by Don Sharp (20th

Ventures, 2018), theatrical trailer

Century Fox, 1965), theatrical trailer

Splice, directed by Vincenzo Natali (Warner Bros.

The Shape of Water, directed by Guillermo del Toro

Pictures, 2009), theatrical trailer

(Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2017), theatrical trailer

Chimera, directed by Lawrence Gordon Clark (A&E

Siren, created by Eric Wald and Dean White,

Networks, 1991), theatrical trailer

(Freeform Original Productions, 2018), promotional

Rise of the Planet of the Apes, directed by Rupert

trailer

Wyatt (20th Century Fox, 2011), theatrical trailer

HISSS, directed by Jennifer Lynch (Millennium

Mary Shelley, directed by Haifaa al-Mansour (ICF

Entertainment, 2010), theatrical trailer

Films, 2018), theatrical trailer

Cat People, directed by Paul Schraber (Universal

Tusk, directed by Kevin Smith (A24 Films, 2014),

Pictures, 1982), theatrical trailer

theatrical trailer

Manimal, created by Glen Larson and Donald Boyle

The Island of Dr. Moreau, directed by John

(20th Century Fox Television, 1983), promotional

Frankenheimer (New Line Cinema, 1996), theatrical

trailer

trailer

An American Werewolf in London, directed by John

The Frankenstein Chronicles, directed by Benjamin

Landis (Universal Pictures, 1981), theatrical trailer

Ross (ITV Encore, 2015), theatrical trailer

Wolf, directed by Mike Nichols (Columbia Pictures,

The Fly, directed by David Cronenberg (20th

1994), theatrical trailer

Century Fox, 1986), theatrical trailer

Catwoman, directed by Pitof (Warner Bros. Pictures,

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, directed by Kenneth

2004), theatrical trailer

Branagh (TriStar Pictures, 1994), theatrical trailer

When Animals Dream, directed by Jonas Alexander

The Island of the Lost Souls, directed by Eric

Arnby (Nordisk Film Distribution, 2015), theatrical

Kenton (Paramount Pictures, 1932), theatrical trailer

trailer


Cat People, directed by Jacques Tourneur (RKO Radio Pictures Inc., 1942), theatrical trailer Ginger Snaps, directed by John Fawcett (Motion International, 2000), theatrical trailer Nosferatu the Vampyre, directed by Werner Herzog (20th Century Fox, 1979), theatrical trailer Beauty and the Beast, directed by Bill Condon (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, 2017), theatrical trailer Beauty and the Beast, created by Ron Koslow (CBS Television Distribution, 1984), opening credits, 00:00-- 01:44 Penelope, directed by Mark Palanksy (Momentum Pictures, 2006), theatrical trailer I Think I’m an Animal, director unknown (Blue Ant International, 2015), 0:00 – 1:15 Fursonas, directed by Dominic Rodriguez (Gravitas Ventures, 2016), promotional trailer Animal Imitators, directed by Justin Pemberton (Natural History New Zealand, 2003), 0:00 – 0:50

Image credits Theodor von HOLST Frankenstein observing the first stirrings of his creature, engraving, date unknown. Published by W. Chevalier, 1831. Image courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK Artist unknown, The Peruvian harpy: a harpy with two tails, horns, fangs, winged ears, and long wavy hair, coloured etching, date unknown. Published by Ednauis et Rapilly, c.1700. Image courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK

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KOSMOS

Gallery 5 93


(((20hz))) and the Sensible World, three-channel digital video with audio soundtrack, duration: 00:03:17 Narration: Darrin Verhagen, Sound Design: Darrin Verhagen & James Paul, Image: Richard Grant, System: Thomas Dahlenburg & Nick Devlin

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KOSMOS The world / universe / order

One of the main standards by which humans have asserted dominance and difference over non-human animals has been language. It is the failure to communicate across the species barrier that allows humans to justify exploitation of animals for food, clothing, labour, and even sexual gratification. Frankenstein’s creature was somewhat unique in his articulate grasp of written and spoken language; even the hybrid in Hans Christian Anderson’s The Little Mermaid had to sacrifice her tongue and voice to live on land with human legs. Fiction generally provides us instead with examples of hybrids utilising animals’ sensory range, strength and endurance as a marker of difference with the human, such as werewolves and vampires. Yet humans actually exist in a world in a limited capacity compared to many animals (let alone monsters), able to access different parts of the information in the environment in which we inhabit. How can humans and animals speak the same language when we don’t experience the same reality? Inspired by the work of ethologist Jacob Von Uexküll, and more recently, neuroscientist David Eagleman, (((20hz))) enters My Monster with The Sensible World, an ode to the Umwelt (an organism’s subjective experience of its environment). In this gallery space, audiences are invited in to a journey of the entire electromagnetic spectrum, briefly alighting on the narrow band of frequencies humans can detect as vision. By so doing, (((20hz))) identifies the monstrous scale of the maelstrom we are immersed in, yet ultimately oblivious to.

(((20hz))) and the Sensible World, three-channel digital video with audio soundtrack, duration: 00:03:17 Narration: Darrin Verhagen, Sound Design: Darrin Verhagen & James Paul, Image: Richard Grant, System: Thomas Dahlenburg & Nick Devlin

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Catherine CLOVER, In a manner of speaking, 2017-2018, audio recording and vinyl lettering on glass, duration: 08:33, courtesy of the artist.

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In a manner of speaking In a manner of speaking is an audio recording, score and vinyl lettering on glass by sound artist Catherine Clover. Her work is a speculative attempt at considering language across species in the urban context. This score was constructed using attentive listening in central Melbourne, with a focus on considering common urban birds as language users. These are the birds we hear around us daily - such as ravens, wattlebirds, pigeons, silver gulls, rainbow lorikeets, willie wagtails, swallows, blackbirds, common mynas, noisy miners, spotted turtledoves, Australian magpies, grey butcherbirds, pied currawongs, starlings, sparrows, and magpie-larks. Like a textual echo of the sounds commonly heard in Melbourne, Clover’s work is focused on listening to the mix of bird and human voices in the city, as well as seeing and reading urban texts such as traffic signs, advertising, street names, business names and graffiti. As part of the exhibition, RMIT Gallery hosted a participatory performance for visitors to collaboratively perform Clover’s bird songs. There were no expectations of skill or ability with this voicing. As Clover said, ‘It is not about virtuosity or accuracy, nor is it about deceiving the birds; it is about listening, improvisation and imagination. All are welcome!’

Catherine CLOVER In a manner of speaking, 2017-2018, audio recording and vinyl lettering on glass, duration: 08:33, courtesy of the artist. Exhibition Entrance views.

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List of works

J. BARKER Untitled (The Hog-Faced Gentlewoman), c.1640 Engraving

(((20hz))) and the Sensible World

20 x 13 cm

Digital video with audio soundtrack

Image reproduced courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK

Duration: 00:03:17 Narration: Darrin Verhagen

Janet BECKHOUSE

Sound Design: Darrin Verhagen & James Paul

Born and lives Melbourne, Australia

Image: Richard Grant

RMIT University Alumni

System: Thomas Dahlenburg & Nick Devlin

Cat Candelabra 2017 Stoneware, glaze, lustre

Rose AGNEW

41 x 25 x17cm

Born Grahamstown, South Africa, lives Melbourne,

Mermaid Bowl 2017

Australia

Stoneware, glaze, lustre

Prayer at the Temple of Flora, 2018

28 x 9 x19cm

Mixed media

Reptile Woman, 2017

30 x 25 x 48.8 cm

Stoneware, glaze, lustre

Courtesy of the artist

20 x 14 x 14cm Summoning the Muse, c.2004

Jane ALEXANDER

stoneware, glaze, perspex

Born and lives Johannesburg, South Africa

67 x 70 x13cm

Missing, 2004

Courtesy of the artist

Pigment print on cotton paper, AP3 from an edition of 12 45 x 60.5 cm

Peter BOOTH

Harbinger with rainbow, 2004

Born Sheffield, United Kingdom, lives Melbourne, Australia

Pigment print on cotton paper, AP3 from an edition of 12

Untitled, 1988

45 x 54.5 cm

Oil on canvas

Post Conversion Syndrome (in the wild), 2004

198 x 111 cm

Pigment print on cotton paper, AP3 from an edition of 12

Untitled, 2008 - 2018

45 x 66.5 cm

Oil on canvas

Post Conversion Syndrome (in captivity), 2003

51 x 71.5 cm

Pigment print on cotton paper, AP3 from an edition of 12

Untitled, 2002

45 x 65 cm

Bronze sculpture

Landscape with transmitter, 2007

15 x 14 x 16 cm high

Pigment print on cotton paper, AP3 from an edition of 12

Courtesy of the artist and Chris Deutscher

45 x 60.5 cm

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gordonschachatcollection, South Africa

Jazmina CININAS

Promise, 2017

Born and lives Melbourne, Australia

Pigment print on cotton paper

RMIT University Alumni

14 x 12 cm

Lydia's Humanity is Mostly Prosthetic, 2009

Song, 2018

Linocut reduction

Pigment print on cotton paper

22 x 22.2 cm

7.55 x 10 cm

Blood Sisters, 2016

Courtesy of the artist and the South African National

Linocut reduction

Research Foundation

69.5 x 56 cm


Rahne Dreams of Saving the World, 2006

An unsound heart

Linocut reduction

Seeds of an idea

54 x 56.5 cm

Love is everything

Angela Prefers the Company of Wolves, 2005

The operation

Linocut reduction

Love was saved

49.5 x 47 cm

The heart she fostered

White Fell's Eye Turned (Green), 2010

Her mother’s stories of love and loss

Linocut reduction

From the series ‘The Pig Prince; A Xenographic Tale’, 2018

20 x 15 cm

Intaglio print with hand coloured watercolour and

Ann's Invisible Greyhound is Most Bewitching, 2017

letterpress

Reduction linocut with second block and letterpress on

All works ed.1 of 8

Somerset White 300gsm

All works 35.5 x 25 cm

61.5 x 41 cm

Collection of the artist

Courtesy of the artist Arline of Barioux, Auvergne 1588, 2008

Julia DE VILLE

Linocut on paper

Born Washington

65 x 48 cm (image), 76 x 56 cm (sheet)

Born New Zealand, lives Melbourne, Australia

Purchased through the RMIT Art Fund, 2013

Peter, 2012

RMIT University Art Collection

Rabbit, antique sterling silver goblet 2.15g (925)

Accession no: RMIT.2013.46

17 x 1 5 x 21 cm Courtesy of the artist and Sophie Gannon Gallery,

Kate CLARK

Melbourne

Born and lives New York, USA Gallant, 2016

Heri DONO

Fallow deer hide, antlers, clay, foam, thread, pins, rubber

Born and lives Yogyakarta, Indonesia

eyes, wire

Flying in Cocoons, 2001

140 x 140 x 55 cm

Fibreglass, acrylic, papier mâché, cast iron, gauze, chicken

Courtesy of the artist

wire, bulb, metal string, mechanical and electrical devices, automatic timer, transformer, foot switch, cable.

Catherine CLOVER

210 x 110 x 110 cm (x2)

Born London, United Kingdom, lives Melbourne, Australia

Collection of Konfir Kabo, Melbourne

RMIT University Alumni In a manner of speaking, 2017-2018

Peter ELLIS

Audio recording, vinyl lettering on glass, printed score

Born Sydney, Australia, lives Melbourne, Australia

Duration: 08:33

RMIT University Alumni, RMIT University Staff

Courtesy of the artist

The Smoking Spine, 2002 Synthetic polymer emulsion, oil on canvas 182.88 x 121.92 cm

Beth CROCE

She Searched Him for the Cutlery (2), 2017

Born Washington, USA, lives Melbourne, Australia

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

Title Page

21 x 15 cm

Letterpress print, ed.1 of 8

Dreaming Monster, 2017

There was once a Prince

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

One evening he chanced upon her

21 x 15 cm

Fate is fickle

Ghost, 2018

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Ink, gouache on Arches 300 gsm paper

Duration: 00:04:48

21 x 15 cm

Text and Voice: Moira Finucane

They Inhabit the Night, 2018

Music: Darrin Verhagen

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

Light & motion: Darrin Verhagen & Thomas Dahlenburg

21 x 15 cm

System: Jay Curtis

A Girl and Her Slug, 2017

Hardware courtesy of Audiokinetic Experiments (AkE)

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

Lab, RMIT University

21 x 15 cm Woman with Snake, Christmas Eve, 2017

Rona GREEN

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

Born and lives Victoria, Australia

21 x 15 cm

The Surgeon, 2010

Alien, 2017

Hand coloured linocut

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

108 x 76 cm

21 x 15 cm

Dusty Rhodes, 2011

Young Faun in Forest, 2018

Hand coloured linocut

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

76 x 56 cm

21 x 15 cm

Dutch, 2009

Vacuum, 2018

Hand coloured linocut

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

45 x 38 cm

21 x 15 cm

Pascal, 2017

Minotaur, 2017

Hand coloured linocut

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

57 x 57 cm

21 x 15 cm

Courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries, Melbourne

Chimera, 2017 Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

Robert GRAVE

21 x 15 cm

England 1798–1873

Cursed Changeling with Pipe, 2017

Portrait of Nathaniel St. AndrĂŠ, date unknown

Ink, gouache on cardboard

Line engraving

21 x 15 cm

25.7 x 16 cm

Actaeon, 2017

Image reproduced courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper 21 x 15 cm

Ernst HAECKEL

Lion with Sword, 2017

Prussia 1834-1919

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

Anthropogenie (comparative embryos of hog, calf, rabbit

21 x 15 cm

and man), 1874

Shower, 2018

Line engraving

Ink on Arches 300 gsm paper

30 x 20 cm

21 x 15 cm

Image reproduced courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK

Courtesy of the artist Ai HASEGAWA

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Moira FINUCANE with SHINJUKU THIEF

Born and lives Tokyo, Japan

Born Perth, Australia, lives Melbourne, Australia

I wanna deliver a dolphin, 2011-2013

The Rapture/Fur Can't Fly, 2018

Digital video

Sound, feathers, armchair, eyelid projection, vibration,

Duration: 02:39

motion code

Courtesy of the artist


James HODGES

The Magdalenes (Penitence), 2012

Diagrams of a foetus and medical instruments, 1751

Archival print on hahnemuelle photorag with paper

Line engraving

collage, UV protective matte varnish

24 x 16 cm

206 x 112 cm

Collection of the British Library, London

The Magdalenes (Praise), 2012

Image reproduced with permission of the British Library,

Archival print on hahnemuelle photorag with paper

London

collage, UV protective matte varnish 206 x 112 cm

Rayner HOFF

Private Collection, Melbourne

United Kingdom and Australia 1894-1937 Faun and Nymph, 1924

Bharti KHER

Bronze sculpture

Born London, United Kingdom, lives New Delhi, India

26.5 x 29 x 13 cm

The Hunter and the Prophet, 2004

Private collection, Sydney

Photographic print on aluminium composite panel 76.2 x 114.3 cm

William HOGARTH

Feather Duster, 2004

England 1697-1764

Photographic print on aluminium composite panel

Mary Tofts appearing to give birth to rabbits in the presence

76.2 x 114.3 cm

of several surgeons and man-midwives sent from London to

Angel, 2004

examine her, 1726

Photographic print on aluminium composite panel

Etching

76.2 x 114.3 cm

52 x 70 cm

Chocolate Muffin, 2004

Image reproduced courtesy of the Wellcome Collection, UK

Photographic print on aluminium composite panel 76.2 x 114.3 cm

Sam JINKS

Family Portrait, 2004

Born Bendigo, Australia, lives Melbourne, Australia

Photographic print on aluminium composite panel

Medusa (Beloved), 2016

76.2 x 114.3 cm

Silicone, pigment and resin

Courtesy of the artist

71 x 49 x 29 cm Collection of Latrobe Art Institute, Bendigo

Deborah KLEIN Born and lives Victoria, Australia

Deborah KELLY

European Wasp Woman, 2015

Born Melbourne, Australia, lives Sydney, Australia

Watercolour on on Khadi rag paper.

Beastliness, 2011

41.9 x 29.7 cm

Digital animation from paper collages

Ladybird Woman, 2014

Duration: 03:17

Watercolour on on Khadi rag paper.

Animation: Christian J Heinrich and Chris Wilson

41.9 x 29.7 cm

Original Score: The Brutal Poodles

Actinus imperialis Beetle Woman, 2014

Venus of Beeness, 2017

Watercolour on Khadi rag paper.

Paper collage reproduced in pigment inks on silk banner

41.9 x 29.7 cm

100 x 200 cm

Courtesy of the artist

Mervenus, 2017 Paper collage reproduced in pigment inks on silk banner

Oleg KULIK

100 x 200 cm

Born Kiev, Ukraine, lives Moscow, Russia

Courtesy of the artist

Family of the Future, 9, 1997

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Digital print, performance based photography

Embroidered rayon thread on fabric backing

136 x 150 x 5 cm

190 x 146 cm

Collection of the Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania

Collection of Konfir Kabo, Melbourne

Sam LEACH

Kira O’REILLY & Jennifer WILLET

Born Adelaide, Australia, lives Melbourne, Australia

Kira O’REILLY Born Ireland, lives Finland

RMIT University Alumni

Jeniffer WILLET Born and lives Ontario, Canada

Pedestal 2, 2018

Untitled from the ‘Pig Tales and Show Girls Protocol’

Oil on canvas

series, WAAG Society, the Netherlands, 2009

101 x 92 cm

Photographer: Bernd Bohm

Courtesy of the artist

Digital print in convex glass frame 40.6cm x 50.8 cm

Norman LINDSAY

Courtesy of the artists

Australia 1879-1969 Desire, 1919

Patricia PICCININI

Etching

Born Freetown, Sierra Leone, lives Melbourne, Australia

56 x 50 cm

Belly from the ‘Hair Panels’ series, 2011

Private collection, Sydney

Silicone, fibreglass, human hair

Afternoon of a Faun, c.1920

70 x 70 x 7 cm

Etching

Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne Purchased with

21.5 x 21.5 cm

funds from the Truby and Florence Williams Charitable

Private collection, Sydney

Trust, ANZ Trustees 2013

William MADDOCKS

Geoffrey RICARDO

A portrait of Mary Tofts, a woman who pretended that she

Born and lives Melbourne, Australia

had given birth to rabbits, date unknown

Match, 1997

Stipple engraving with watercolour

Lithographic print

22 x 16 cm

30 x 42 cm

Image reproduced courtesy of Wellcome Collection, UK

Another Otherwise, 2014

Sidney NOLAN

Intaglio print

Australia and United Kingdom 1917-1992

50 x 50 cm

Leda and Swan, 1960

Bigfoot, 1997

Synthetic polymer paint on composition board

Intaglio print

121 x 121 cm

15 x 18 cm

Collection of the Art Gallery of Ballarat. The William, Rene

Tall Tales, 2008

and Blair Ritchie Collection. Bequest of Blair Ritchie, 1998;

Copper sculpture

1998.19

190 x 96 x 80 cm Untitled, 1993

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Eko NUGROHO

Bronze sculpture

Born and lives Yogyakarta, Indonesia

18 x 15 x 6 cm

Trap Costume for President Z, 2011

Courtesy of the artist


Lisa ROET

Collection of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of

Born and lives Melbourne, Australia

Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Melbourne

RMIT University Alumni Humanzee pt. 2 from the series ‘When I laugh, he laughs

Maja SMREKAR with Manuel VASON

with me’, 2014

Born and lives Ljubljana, Slovenia

Type-C photograph, edition 1 of 3

Untitled from the performance ‘K-9_topology: Hybrid Family’,

103.5 x 145 cm

2016

Photographic support: James Geer

Documentary film

Blond Venus 1932 from the series ‘Bride of the Gorilla’,

Duration: 00:04:35

2014

Untitled from the performance ‘K-9_topology: Hybrid Family’,

Type-C photograph, edition 1 of 3

2016

163 x 116 cm

Digital print, performance based photography

Photographic support: James Geer

Three images; 82 x 122 cm each

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artists Unknown artist (attributed to Nicola HICKS)

Mithu SEN

Minotaur, c. 20th century

Born West Bengal, India, lives New Delhi, India

Bronze sculpture

In our hands…Nothing (Egon and Me) 1, 2010

24.5 x 40 x 24 cm

Mixed media on handmade paper

Collection of Jennifer Shaw, Melbourne

70 x 100 cm Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris and Brussels

Ronnie VAN HOUT Born Christchurch, New Zealand, lives Melbourne, Australia

William SMELLIE (obstetrician and designer)

Monkey Madness, 2001

Scotland 1697-1763

Digital print on archival museum rag paper

Smellie’s Forceps, c.1750

82 x 122 cm

Obstetric forceps; iron, leather, metal sheet coating

Self, 2001

4 x 30.5 x 11 cm approx.

Digital print on archival museum rag paper 82 x 122 cm

Deborah KELLY Beastliness, 2011, digital animation from paper collages, duration: 03:17, courtesy of the artist

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My Monster: The Human-Animal Hybrid ISBN: 978-0-6484226-1-7 My Monster: The Human-Animal Hybrid Curated by Evelyn Tsitas RMIT Gallery 29 June – 18 August 2018 Acknowledgements: Special thanks to the participating artists and designers for their generous support, insight and commitment to the exhibition. Appreciative thanks also to Professor Calum Drummond, DVC R&I; Professor Paul Gough, PVC DSC; Jane Holt, Executive Director R & I; Evelyn Tsitas would also like to thank Jane Holt, Executive Director R & I for making this exhibition possible; RMIT Gallery Acting Director Helen Rayment for her unwavering commitment and support of the exhibition and her guidance in all matters of exhibition co-ordination; Nick Devlin for his generous support during installation; Jon Buckingham for sourcing work from the RMIT Art Collection and Meg Taylor for her assistance and enthusiasm for the project. Acting Director & Senior Exhibition Coordinator: Helen Rayment Senior Advisor Communications & Outreach Evelyn Tsitas Exhibition Installation Coordinator: Nick Devlin Installation Technicians: Fergus Binns, Beau Emmett, Robert Bridgewater, Ford Larman Collections Coordinator: Jon Buckingham Collections Assistant: Ellie Collins Gallery Operations Coordinator: Mamie Bishop Exhibition Assistant: Meg Taylor Administration Assistants: Sophie Ellis Valerie Sim Maria Stolnik Thao Nguyen Vidhi Vidhi RMIT Gallery Interns & Volunteers: Natalie Vella Simon Aubor RMIT Gallery / RMIT University www.rmitgallery.com 344 Swanston Street Melbourne Victoria 3000 Tel: +61 3 9925 1717 Fax: +61 3 9925 1738 Email: rmit.gallery@rmit.edu.au Gallery hours: Monday-Friday 11-5 Thursday 11-7 Saturday 12-5. Closed Sundays & public holidays. Free admission. Lift access available. Catalogue published by RMIT Gallery December 2018 Graphic design: Karen Scott Catalogue editor: Evelyn Tsitas Catalogue research: Evelyn Tsitas Catalogue photography: Mark Ashkanasy

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Acknowledgement of Country RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.

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My Monster: The Human-Animal Hybrid  

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