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T A K E O U R R E A D E R S U R V E Y: S E E PAG E 2 F O R D E T A I L S

Celebrating Your Health & Lifestyle

June 2016

The Sun Health Way

LOOK INSIDE:

Healthy U page 12

A Legacy of Generosity

Meet Sun Health Foundation Legacy Leaders

FALLING A Slippery Slope for Seniors

For our community friends

Aging Gracefully, Successfully Sun Health residents share their personal stories

Planning for the Future

Sun Health at Home provides security to member


Welcome to LiveWell A magazine produced specifically for you

T

he secret to healthy and happy golden years isn’t so secret at all. Staying active — both physically and mentally — is the key. And that’s what we’re talking about in this issue of LiveWell.

First, I hope you’ll check out our article on falls. For older adults, a simple fall can be dangerous, affecting a This month we person's ability to live the invite you to active life they desire. In fact, take part in our 20 percent of falls in adults Reader Survey. 65 and older affect their ability to live independently. You’ll learn about the importance of balance and fall-proofing your home, among other tips. Want some inspiration for healthy aging? Look no further than Dutch and Dolores Svoboda. The longtime Sun City couple (he's 90, she's 88) practically wrote the book on active adult living and community support. You’ll also meet Sun Health Senior Living residents who actively incorporate socially, intellectually, physically and spiritually fulfilling activities into their lives. You might even discover something you’ll wish to try in your own life. And finally, we’re starting something new this month. In our recurring Sun Health at Home feature, we’ll regularly share information about this new program. This month, you’ll hear the story of Susan Young, the program’s inaugural member. This month we invite you to take part in our Reader Survey. Please go to SunHealth.org/survey to access the questionnaire. It should take no more than 5 minutes to complete. Your feedback and suggestions regarding our LiveWell magazine and Sun Health is very important to us — and I thank you in advance for taking the time to provide us with your valuable input. As always, you can email us at information@sunhealth.org anytime. Stay Healthy,

Ronald D. Guziak President & CEO, Sun Health

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Inside

SUN HEALTH AT HOME

LiveWell

June 2016, Issue 10 SUN HEALTH 14719 W. Grand Avenue Surprise, AZ 85374 623.832.5350 information@sunhealth.org sunhealth.org SUN HEALTH FOUNDATION 623.832.5330 sunhealthfoundation.org SUN HEALTH SENIOR LIVING 623.236.3767 sunhealthseniorliving.org  randview Terrace  G Bhakti Gosalia, Exec. Dir. 623.975.8014  L a Loma Village Susan Davis, Exec. Dir. 623.537.7521  T he Colonnade Barbara Foster, Exec. Dir. 623.236.3770 SUN HEALTH at HOME Terri Cluff, Exec. Dir. 623.227.HOME (4663) sunhealthathome.org CENTER FOR HEALTH & WELLBEING 623.832.WELL (9355) sunhealthwellbeing.org SUN HEALTH LEADERSHIP Ronald Guziak, President and CEO Bill Sellner, Exec. VP and CFO Joe La Rue, Exec. VP Sharon Grambow, Exec. VP and COO Sun Health Senior Living Jennifer Drago, Exec. VP-Population Health Sharon Thornton, E xec. VP and Chief Philanthropy Officer Ron Austerlade, Chief Marketing Officer

SUN HEALTH MARKETING Ken Reinstein, Marketing Dir. John Tucker, Public Relations Jennifer Alexander, Design Danielle Kuskowski, Programs

Susan Young (left), Sun Health at Home member, with Terri Cluff, executive director.

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Take Our Reader Survey Go to www.sunhealth.org/survey

Planning for the Future

Meet Susan Young

4   Aging Gracefully, Successfully

Sun Health Senior Living residents share their stories

8  A Legacy of Generosity

Meet Legacy Leaders Dutch and Dolores Svoboda

10  Falling: A Slippery Slope for Seniors

Don’t let a fear of falling keep you from being active

12   Healthy U

8

Sun Health Community Education class listings, events & activities

Please follow us on:

15   Healthy U Calendar

June classes & events at a glance

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CREATED FOR SUN HEALTH

On the Cover: Sun Health exercise physiologist and certified health coach Rhonda Zonoozi

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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SENIOR LIVING

Sun Health Senior Living residents share their personal stories By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

Aging

Gracefully,

Successfully

TM

Learn more about successful aging at Sun Health Senior Living, by calling 623-326-3767 or going to SunHealthSeniorLiving.org/masterpieceliving. You can also watch a message by Dr. Roger Landry at SunHealth.org/live-well-june 4 LiveWell

• The Sun Health Way

KAI and DIANNE REPSHOLDT Residents of Grandview Terrace since 2011 Kai and Dianne Repsholdt — married nearly 38 years — embody the tenets of Masterpiece Living through their active life, which regularly includes working out, dining with fellow residents and facilitating a Biblestudy group. “We were already doing these things,” says Kai, a submarine officer for 30 years before he retired as a Navy captain. “I never heard of the (Masterpiece Living) concept or principle, but I just sort of lived my life that way.” The on-the-go duo was introduced to the initiative a few years ago and now fully supports it. Kai says he gets a big spiritual boost from being a tutor for staff who want to improve their English-speaking skills. "It feels good meeting others' needs," Kai says. Dianne, a stay-at-home mom who also served in the Air Force, says she gets a nice dose of social interaction plus intellectual stimulation through a sewing club, where she makes clothes for her grandchildren and others, along with other projects. “It’s a real sense of accomplishment,” she says.

BRAD REED

W

e’re all getting older, but how many of us can say we’re aging successfully — that is, seeking growth and productivity as time goes by? Many of the residents at Sun Health Senior Living’s three Life Care communities can, because they are able to incorporate socially, intellectually, physically and spiritually fulfilling activities into their well-rounded lives. Those are the four principles of successful aging as advocated by Masterpiece Living , a nationally recognized program and research-based way of life that seeks to change the experience and perception of aging and is embraced by residents and staff at Grandview Terrace in Sun City West, La Loma Village in Litchfield Park and The Colonnade at Sun City Grand in Surprise. While this concept may be new to some, many Sun Health residents are longtime devotees of an active lifestyle. We asked a few of them to share how they do it. What we heard was inspiring.


MARY ANNE POGGENBURG

JEAN BONDE

ALLEN BUTLER

Resident of La Loma Village since 2014 Resident of The Colonnade since 2014 Mary Anne Poggenburg used to worry she might not have “I’m a senior, my husband’s a senior, and I enough activities to keep her busy once she retired. That want to stay as active and healthy as I can — seems “laughable” now. both of us do,” says Jean Bonde, who lives at “There’s just too much to do,” she says, adding that The Colonnade with her husband, Les. having social, intellectual, physical and spiritual activities A retired nurse and current certified in one’s life is "old news in a way" to her but "news well water-aerobics instructor, Jean knows the worth repeating." benefits of healthy eating and regular exercise When she’s not playing ponytail by heart, but she says she's still canasta or partner pinochle, Mary learning new ways to keep her “It is so Anne might be found Wii bowling, entertaining and mind and body active. While practicing Tai Chi, water walking in the she may have slowed down a bit moving to hear indoor pool, singing in her church choir, in the water, she finds time to their memories,” attend lectures on subjects such attending the on-site lifelong learning program called La Loma University or Mary Anne says. as chaos theory and Winston enjoying an adult coloring-book session Churchill, and she is an active with a group called Art 99. A retired director of education church-goer who also has taken mission and training who sits on several resident committees, trips. Jean enjoyed reading "Live Long, Die Mary Anne has also recently taken up gardening. La Loma Short," the book by Dr. Roger Landry, the has a small, raised garden bed, and even though she had president of Masterpiece Living, and she never planted a seed in her life, Mary Anne is now raising recently attended a conference on aging. She vegetables. sees many active, involved residents at The She also enjoys participating occasionally in a memoir Colonnade. However, she’d like to see even group, where she relishes hearing others’ stories. more learn about successful aging. “It is so entertaining and moving to hear their memories,” she “I think most of us would like to live long, says. “That’s so much more rewarding than writing my own.” and die short,” Jean says.

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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SUN HEALTH AT HOME

Executive Director Terri Cluff (L) chats with Sun Health at Home member Susan Young (R) in her living room.

Planning for the Future W

Susan Young finds security through Sun Health at Home

hen Susan Young retired from the Maricopa County Department of Transportation, she decided to move back to New York to be closer to her daughter. “She loved having me there but it was difficult to fit into the life of a young mother after being away for so many years,” Susan says. “I felt like a visitor, and my old friends were either gone or not available. There were few interesting options for retirees in that area as well.” Shortly afterward, a girlfriend invited Susan to return to Phoenix for a visit. It was March, a month typically boasting terrific weather. “It was the perfect time to come,” Susan reminisces. “I was in this nice car and we drove to

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Patagonia, Ariz. to see my dad. The windows were down, it was wonderful outside, and I thought, ‘Why did I ever move to New York?’” It was that trip that convinced Susan to move back to the Valley in 2002. And, she hopes to live in the Sun City condo she calls home for as long as she can. “You go through life and you have a plan,” she says. “You retire and think, ‘So now what am I doing with my life?’ When Sun Health at Home launched earlier this year, I felt like it provided me with a strategy for the autumn of my life that gives me more direction and security.” Susan recently became the program’s inaugural member. Sun Health at Home offers members many benefits, including providing a lifetime guarantee of care at a

ALLEN BUTLER

By Ken Reinstein


fraction of the cost of “pay-as-you-go” plans, protection for hard-earned assets, coordination of care, as well as fees that may be tax-deductible as prepaid medical expenses. These benefits are backed by the five-decade history of Sun Health as a local nonprofit organization that provides quality health, wellness and senior living services. “I like it here and I want to stay in this house where I can have my cats and be comfortable in my own surroundings,” says Susan, whose only family in Arizona is a sister in Prescott. “I feel more secure now since I know now that if something happens I will be taken care of.” The lifetime guarantee of care was an important factor for Susan. “It seemed almost too good to be true,” she says. “If I run out of money, Sun Health is not going to say, ‘Too bad.’ I know they will continue to provide the care coordination and long-term care services that are covered under my plan.” Having Sun Health back the program was also a key factor. “The name ‘Sun Health’ provides me with a sense of security,” Susan says. “Plus, I really like all of

Join us for a Discovery Seminar To learn more about Sun Health at Home, join us for a free no-obligation discovery seminar. Make your reservation by calling 623-227-HOME (4663) or visiting SunHealthatHome.org/seminar. Thursday, June 2, 10 a.m. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing, Surprise Wednesday, June 8, 10:30 a.m. Foothills Recreation & Aquatics Center, Glendale Thursday, June 16, 10:30 a.m. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing, Surprise Wednesday, June 29, 1 p.m. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing, Surprise

the wellness and social activities I can do including meeting with exercise physiologist Rhonda Zonoozi for a fitness assessment, and the opportunity to take Tai Chi and other exercise and educational programs through the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing.” Susan recently told her daughter about the program and its flexibility. “I said, ‘I’m joining the Sun Health at Home program and you won’t ever have to worry about me because they are going to come into my home and take care of me as I age and when I have needs.’ And, with the portability of the program’s benefits, if she wants me to come back to New York, I can.” She also shared it with friends locally, who think about their future but in a more abstract way. “They don’t think they need to do anything,” Susan says. “Long-term care insurance plans are expensive, and are not secured. People think, ‘I have enough money in the bank and they can just coast along until something happens.’ But for me, as a single woman with a daughter across the country, I wanted to know that I would be taken care of and have my Sun Health at Home wellness coordinator as my advocate to help coordinate services that I need as I age.” Terri Cluff, executive director of Sun Health at Home, is excited to have Susan as the inaugural member. “She is a wonderful person,” Terri says. “We have had a great time getting to know her and learning about how we can help her age successfully in her own home.”

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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SUN HEALTH FOUNDATION

A Legacy of

Meet Sun Health Foundation Legacy Leaders Dutch and Dolores Svoboda inety-year-old Dutch Svoboda and Dolores, 88, his wife of 68 years, have always been “get-up-and-go” people. Not long ago, you’d likely find them roller skating or riding bikes through the streets of Sun City, or dancing 10 hours straight at various festivals. Although age and health issues have slowed them down a bit, their commitment to each other and the community remains strong. They both grew up during the Depression on neighboring farms in the small town of Walford, in east-central Iowa. “We came up the hard way,” Dutch says, recounting the endless chores it took to scratch out a living on the farm. Dolores remembers feeling real hunger. “Sometimes suppers were mighty skimpy,” she says. They also remember the warm friendships their families shared and how they managed to have fun in the midst of hard times. Their faces shine when they talk about the barn dances their families attended. The dance floor is where the sparks first ignited between Dutch and Dolores. It began innocently enough. When they were 8 and 7, the two often danced together. “I always made it a point to catch him at school dances because he was a good dancer,” Dolores says. They began dating in high school. Then came World War II and Dutch was drafted into the Navy. He was assigned to the USS Uhlmann, a destroyer that patrolled the South Pacific. While the war was on, To learn more Dolores attended the about leaving a University of Iowa to legacy gift, visit become a teacher. She SunHealthFoundation. kept in close touch org/plannedgiving for with Dutch, writing sample language you him nearly every day. can use to provide They married after the a gift in your will. war. Dolores’ first teaching 8 LiveWell

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ALLEN BUTLER

By John Tucker


ALLEN BUTLER

job was in a one-room school house. She taught for 27 years, mostly kindergarten. After the war, Dutch went to work in a friend’s dry-cleaning business. Their son Dean was born in 1953. Ten years forward, Dutch launched his own dry-cleaning plant, Duchess Dry Cleaners, and built it into a successful enterprise. Dolores worked at the plant after school and on weekends. When he was older, Dean also worked there. Business success allowed Dutch and Dolores to retire early. They moved to Sun City in 1972 and bought a house they still call home. “Retirement” was a misnomer for them. They immersed themselves in the community’s smorgasbord of activities. Their “to-do” list included helping neighbors in need and supporting Sun Health, which they have faithfully given to over the years. Dutch and Dolores are Sun Health Foundation Legacy Leaders, which means they provided a gift from their estate to the Foundation. “We got involved, because we knew how important Sun Health was to the community, and that they have helped so many people over the years,” Dutch says. “They helped this community grow and prosper.” Dutch and Dolores still take a keen interest in life. They are very “I always made close to their son, it a point to catch two granddaughters him at school and their families dances because which include four he was a good great-grandchildren. dancer.” They also enjoy short Dolores Svoboda getaways to Laughlin, Nevada, going to church and visiting friends. “We’re happy as clams,” Dolores says. “Dutch’s and Dolores’ generosity has been incredible,” says Pamela Gralton Kohnen, Sun Health Foundation senior development director. “With their help, Sun Health has been able to ensure that we have superior health care in the West Valley.” To watch the Sun Health Foundation Donor Stories video about Dutch and Dolores, go to SunHealth.org/live-well-june For more information about supporting Sun Health Foundation, visit SunHealthFoundation.org or call 623-832-5330.

FOUNDATION NEWS

Follow the Path to Giving

A

By Sharon Thornton, Exec. VP and Chief Philanthropy Officer

s your appreciation for Sun Health’s mission grows, you may be looking for ways to make more of an impact. If we’ve influenced your life, consider including us in your estate plans so that future generations can benefit from the same experience. Here are three ways to make a charitable impact by naming Sun Health Foundation a beneficiary:

1. Retirement plan assets. When you leave your retirement plan assets to an individual they will be subject to income taxes when a distribution is made from the account. But a tax-exempt organization such as ours can inherit the assets without paying taxes. Why it’s smart: Your most heavily taxed assets become tax-free while making a difference in the lives of the people we serve. 2. A life insurance policy. Your need for life insurance most likely declines with age, increasing its popularity as a charitable gift. Why it’s smart: We receive a generous gift in the future without you giving up assets today. You can also adjust your plans at any time. 3. A bank account. Most states allow you to designate loved ones and favorite causes to benefit from your bank account after you are gone. For Sun Health Foundation to benefit from your account, you must place a designation on the account to make it payable* to us. Why it’s smart: You can continue using the money in the accounts. The option also avoids legal hassles and provides our organization more resources for the future. A gift made payable to Sun Health Foundation or by beneficiary designation gives others the chance to benefit from our mission in the future. EXPLORE THE PATH OF GENEROSITY

If you are inspired by our work, learn more about the various ways to give that do not require cash by contacting us at 623-832-5330 or visit SunHealthFoundation.org. *State laws govern payable on death accounts. Please consult with your bank representative or investment advisor if you are considering this gift. Information provided by The Stelter Company

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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Rhonda Zonoozi leads an evidence-based education and exercise program called A Matter of Balance.

WELLNESS

BELOW; Mathew Lynch, M.D., checks out a patient in the Banner Del E. Webb emergency room

Don’t let a fear of falling keep you from being active By Kristine Burnett

F

A Slippery Slope for Seniors

or seniors, even a seemingly minor fall can have frightening consequences. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in three adults age 65 and older falls each year. One in five of those results in a serious injury that directly impacts a person’s ability to live independently. William Mostow, M.D., medical director of the Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center Emergency Department, says he and his colleagues treat fall-related injuries daily. “My impression is that many of the falls we see are preventable,” he says. “People stumble over loose gravel while walking to the mailbox, trip over their dogs, or get caught up in household obstacles like throw rugs.” Unfortunately, balance issues have a lot to do with it. In fact, Dr. Mostow says vision, balance and overall

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Blood thinners pose another threat. “So many seniors are on blood thinners, which makes them more susceptible to bleeding after a fall,” Dr. Mostow warns. “Even a minor bump on the head can cause bleeding in the brain.” Recovering from a fall is another concern for older adults. Matthew Lynch, M.D., medical director of the Trauma Department at Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center, which recently was elevated to a Level III trauma center, cites osteoporosis as a key reason why falling is so dangerous for older adults. (Please see our cover story about osteoporosis in the May issue of LiveWell.) “Because osteoporosis makes bones more fragile, older people usually can’t sustain the same impact as younger individuals,” he says. “It’s why we see so many rib fractures, broken hips and broken wrists from a fall that may not have had the same degree of severity for a younger person.”

ALLEN BUTLER

Falling

coordination often suffer with age, leading to slower reflexes and general unsteadiness. All of this, he says, makes seniors more susceptible to falling. “Issues with balance and such may not affect a person until they’re pushed beyond their limits,” he said. “A fall can sometimes be the first sign of an underlying medical problem.” Additionally, many medications used by seniors increase the risk and consequences of a fall. “Dehydration, drowsiness and sensory impairment are side effects of many common medications for the senior population,” Dr. Mostow says.


Nutrition

FALL PREVENTION It’s ‘A Matter of Balance’

F

Healthy, Green

Smoothies

ear and falling often go hand in hand. To help adults age 65 and up overcome their fear and learn fall-prevention strategies, Sun Health hosts an evidence-based education and exercise program called A Matter of Balance.* Rhonda Zonoozi, Sun Health’s exercise physiologist and certified health coach, leads the interactive eight-week program. Participants attend weekly two-hour classes that include group discussion and problem solving. Low-intensity exercise begins in the third week. “It’s about reducing a person’s fear of falling, increasing their activity level and empowering them to view falls as preventable,” Rhonda says. “Not being active is a risk factor for falling.” Rhonda says the series is best suited for someone who has fallen in the past or who has a fear of falling. A Matter of Balance summer sessions are scheduled to begin in June at La Loma Village in Litchfield Park and the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing in Surprise. To register, go to SunHealthWellbeing.org/education or call 623-207-1703.

*Developed at the Roybal Center at Boston University, A Matter of Balance is endorsed by the National Council on Aging, the U.S. Administration on Aging, the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging and other organizations.

Older adults also tend to have more difficulty healing, so a single fall can become a slippery slope leading to a decline in overall health. “As we age, our reserve to weather an injury, infection or other medical problem decreases,” Dr. Lynch says. “Those with the best outcomes from falls are healthier and more active individuals who are eager to get back to playing golf, pickleball or whatever it is they like to do as part of their independent life.” Dr. Mostow and Dr. Lynch both agree that fall prevention is paramount. Stay active, safeguard your environment as much as possible, and don’t be afraid to use assistive devices like canes or walkers when needed. Most important, don’t let a fear of falling keep you off your feet.

This smoothie formula provides protein, calcium, vitamin D, healthy fats including Omega-3, plus other nutrients essential for muscle and bone health.

Suggested by Susan Welter, registered dietitian at the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing

1/2 cup of liquid Low-fat milk, water (plain or coconut), or calcium- and vitamin D-fortified nondairy milks, including almond, rice or soy 1 cup of frozen bananas For a natural sweet base 1/2 cup of frozen fruit Pineapple, mango, berries, grapes or cherries 1/3 cup of protein Greek yogurt (nonfat or plain), cottage cheese or tofu 1 cup of greens Kale or baby spinach 1 Tbsp. of extras Chia seed, flaxseed, hemp seed, peanut butter or almond butter Optional Up to 2 tsp. of liquid sweetener, maple syrup, honey or agave Blend Mix all the ingredients together in a blender 30-60 seconds

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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Healthy U

June 2016

Classes & Events REGISTRATION REQUIRED!

SPACE IS LIMITED, SO REGISTER EARLY.

Register online Visit sunhealthwellbeing.org and click “Education”

Register by phone 623-207-1703 except where noted CLASS SIZES ARE LIMITED. Events with fewer than

10 reservations are subject to cancellation. If you are unable to make a class you are registered for, contact us within two business days prior.

 Classes with this icon have an associated fee.

BONE & JOINT HEALTH Nutrition and Pain Management Monday, June 20; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Key Lam, Pharm.D., from Key Health Pharmacy and Compounding will discuss how poor nutrition can cause chronic pain. He will review supplements that are the key to staying healthy. La Loma Village Health and Rehabilitation Center 14260 Denny Blvd., Litchfield Park BRAIN HEALTH Be Brain Smart Friday, June 10; 10 to 11 a.m. John Denboer, Ph.D., clinical neuropsychologist from HealthGrades, will present strategies for keeping the brain active. Participants will learn how to identify new patterns and pathways for maintaining brain health. La Loma Village Health and Rehabilitation Center 14260 Denny Blvd., Litchfield Park

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Strengthening the Domains of Your Brain Wednesday, June 15; 9:30 to 11 a.m. Your brain is so much more than memory. Join Heather Mulder from Banner Alzheimer’s Institute to learn about the different domains of your brain, such as cognition, language and memory. This brain-health class can act as your “personal trainer” to strengthen the domains that need improvement. The Colonnade, Recreation Village 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise Meditation for Healthy Living Meditation is commonly used for relaxation and stress reduction, plus a growing body of scientific research supports the health benefits of this activity. Learn how to incorporate meditation into your everyday life. Monday, June 6; 1 to 2 p.m. Faith Presbyterian Church 16000 N. Del E. Webb Blvd., Sun City Tuesday, June 28; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Grandview Terrace Health and Rehabilitation Center 14505 W. Granite Valley Drive, Sun City West CANCER CARE Healthy Meal Preparation for Cancer Wednesdays, June 1 & 15; 9 to 10 a.m. Chef Madelyn Pryor demonstrates how to make easy, nutritious meals. June topics will be healthy dinner and desserts. Open to cancer survivors, family and friends. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise Provided in partnership with the Cancer Support Community Arizona


DIABETES CARE

MEMORY CARE

Diabetes Self-Management Education This eight-week course provides the guidance needed to help prevent complications from diabetes and improve overall health. This series is taught by Tracy Garrett and Susan Welter; registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators, and Rhonda Zonoozi, exercise physiologist and certified health coach. Call 623 832-WELL (9355) to register and inquire about insurance coverage. The fee for this series is covered by insurance and requires a physician referral. Register at least one week prior to the start of the series. Starts Tuesday, June 21; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise Starts Wednesday, June 22; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. La Loma Village Health and Rehabilitation Center 14260 Denny Blvd., Litchfield Park Starts Thursday, June 23; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Banner Boswell Medical Center, Support Services Chapman Room, 2nd Floor 13180 N. 103rd Drive, Sun City HEART HEALTH Taking Care of Your Heart – Hands-Only CPR Tuesday, June 14; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Most people who experience cardiac arrest at home, work or in a public location die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene. As a bystander, don’t be afraid. Your actions can only help. Join Anthony Martinez, RN, from Banner Boswell Medical Center to learn hands-only CPR. Banner Boswell Medical Center, Support Services Juniper Room, 2nd floor 13180 N. 103rd Drive, Sun City

Good News in Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment Wednesday, June 1; 10 to 11:30 a.m. Join Edward Zamrini, M.D., from Banner Sun Health Research Institute to learn about the new era of Alzheimer’s disease treatment and care. As leaders in Alzheimer’s disease prevention and treatment research, some of the most exciting advances are happening in Arizona. The Colonnade, Recreation Village 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise NUTRITION Cooking with Kale Wednesday, June 22; 3 to 4 p.m. Please join Sun Health’s registered dietitians for tips on preparing healthy foods with kale. We will prepare some recipes to sample. *Sun Health will be filming this class, primarily from the back of the room. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise Low-Sodium Eating Monday, June 20; 3 to 4 p.m. Have you even been told to eat less salt or follow a low-sodium diet? Registered Dietitian Tracy Garrett provides simple steps to take when implementing this healthy eating style. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise Food Safety Are you at risk for foodborne illness? Join Sun Health Registered Dietitian Susan Welter as she discusses practical strategies to keep your foods from making you ill. Friday, June 3; 10 to 11 a.m. Banner Boswell Medical Center, Support Services Chapman Room, 2nd floor 13180 N. 103rd Drive, Sun City Friday, June 24; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The Colonnade, Recreation Village 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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Healthy U

June 2016

Transportation made simple

PHYSICAL FITNESS  ll Physical Fitness classes are held at: A Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise Chair Yoga Mondays, June 6, 13, 20 & 27; 8 to 9 a.m. Wednesdays, June 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29; 8 to 9 a.m. & 1 to 2 p.m. Chair yoga incorporates all of the benefits of a traditional yoga class with the added support of a chair. Tai Chi Mondays, June 6, 13, 20 & 27; 11 a.m. to noon Wednesdays, June 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29; 11 a.m. to noon Fridays, June 3, 10, 17 & 24; 11 a.m. to noon Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese martial art shown to improve strength and balance, and help with stress reduction and relaxation. Yoga for Optimal Health Mondays, June 6, 13, 20 & 27; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Yoga helps you move easier and feel less stiff or tired by improving flexibility and building upper body, core and lower body strength while also helping reduce stress. Participants must be able to stand independently and to safely get up and down from the floor unassisted. Strength Training for Health Mondays, June 6, 13, 20 & 27; 1 to 2 p.m. This low-intensity class uses bands, body weight and other items to train the upper- and lower-body muscle groups. Beginners are welcome. Yoga for Relaxation and Posture Wednesdays, June 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Yoga involves paying attention to your breath, which can help you relax and feel less stressed, and improve posture. Participants must be able to stand independently.  Yogalates Fridays, June 3, 10, 17 & 24; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. This class emphasizes breathing through yoga poses and building core strength with Pilates to help improve sleep, decrease anxiety and help you feel restored. Participants must be able to stand independently. 14 LiveWell

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NorthwestValleyConnect.org

(623) 282-9300

SAFETY Reduce Your Risk of Falls Monday, June 6; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. As we get older, our risk for falling increases and falls can be devastating to our health. Find out more about the personal risk factors, and how to protect yourself and reduce your fall risk in your home and surroundings. The Colonnade, Recreation Village 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise A Matter of Balance Are you concerned about falling or have you fallen in the past? Have you restricted activities because of the fear of falling? This eight-week evidence-based series is designed to reduce falls and the fear of falling while increasing activity levels among older adults. A Matter of Balance includes a variety of activities such as group discussion, problem solving, skill building, assertiveness training and sharing practical solutions in a small-group setting. Starts Thursday, June 9; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. La Loma Village Health and Rehabilitation Center 14260 Denny Blvd., Litchfield Park Starts Friday, June 10; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise

Family Safety Event - For All-Ages Saturday, June 11; 9 a.m. to noon Tour the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing’s “Safety House,” an all-ages event featuring interactive models on how to avoid safety hazards and how to be safe in the home.  Presented by Sun Health and community partners Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center, as well as police, fire and posse representatives from Surprise, Sun City West and Maricopa County. Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise


June Classes & Events At-A-Glance Mon

Tue

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Thu 1

REGISTRATION REQUIRED, CLICK OR CALL TODAY! Register online

Register by phone

Sunhealthwellbeing.org and click “Education”

623-207-1703 *except where noted

• Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Healthy Meal Prep; 9 to 10 a.m. • Yoga for Relaxation; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Good News in Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment; 10 to 11:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Chair Yoga; 1 to 2 p.m.

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• Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Reduce Your Risk of Falls; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Yoga for Optimal Health; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Meditation for Healthy Living; 1 to 2 p.m. • Strength Training for Health; 1 to 2 p.m.

• Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Yoga for Relaxation; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Chair Yoga; 1 to 2 p.m.

13 • Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Yoga for Optimal Health; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Strength Training for Health; 1 to 2 p.m.

14 • Taking Care of Your Heart: Hands-Only CPR; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

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• Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Nutrition/Pain Management; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Yoga for Optimal Health; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Strength Training for Health; 1 to 2 p.m. • Low-Sodium Eating; 3 to 4 p.m.

21 • Diabetes Self-Management; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. (1 of 8)

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27 • Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Yoga for Optimal Health; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Strength Training for Health; 1 to 2 p.m.

• Diabetes Self-Management; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. (2 of 8) • Meditation for Healthy Living; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

Fri

15 • Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Healthy Meal Prep; 9 to 10 a.m. • Yoga for Relaxation and Posture; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Strengthening the Domains; 9:30 to 11 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Chair Yoga; 1 to 2 p.m.

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• Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Diabetes Self-Management; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. (1 of 8) • Yoga for Relaxation; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Chair Yoga; 1 to 2 p.m. • Cooking with Kale; 3 to 4 p.m.

29 • Chair Yoga; 8 to 9 a.m. • Diabetes Self-Management; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. (2 of 8) • Yoga for Relaxation; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Chair Yoga; 1 to 2 p.m.

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3 • Yogalates; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Food Safety; 10 to 11 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon

9 • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (1 of 8)

10 • Yogalates; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Be Brain Smart; 10 to 11 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (1 of 8)

16 • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (2 of 8)

17 • Yogalates; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (2 of 8)

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23 • Diabetes Self-Management; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. (1 of 8) • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (3 of 8)

30 • Diabetes Self-Management; 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. (2 of 8) • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (4 of 8)

• Yogalates; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Food Safety; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Tai Chi; 11 a.m. to noon • Matter of Balance; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (3 of 8)

Sa tu r d

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J u ne 1 y 1 Family Safety Event 9 a.m. to noon

June 2016 • sunhealth.org

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NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID LONG BEACH, CA PERMIT NO.2297

14719 W. Grand Avenue Surprise, AZ 85374 623.832.5350 information@sunhealth.org www.sunhealth.org

Your Wellbeing, Your Plan, Your Home Sun Health at Home™, a new “continuing care at home” program offering highly personalized support and coordinated services to help you remain in your home safely and confidently as you age. A New Approach to Plan For Long-Term Needs Protection From the Rising Cost of Long-Term Care Highly Personalized Support and Services Peace of Mind for You and Your Family Multiple Options to Fit Your Needs An Established, Trusted and Reliable Partner

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H AT H O M E

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H AT H O M

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To attend a no-obligation Discovery Seminar, call 623-227-HOME (4663) or click SunHealthatHome.org.

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*Medical and financial eligibility must be completed by June 30, 2016.

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If you are thinking about joining Sun Health at Home, now is the time! Founding members will receive 5% off their membership fee plus other exclusive gifts and benefits.

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Become a Sun Health at Home Founders’ Club Member


Sun Health - LiveWell- June 2016