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Livingwell A SPECIAL PUBLICATION CREATED BY REPUBLIC MEDIA CUSTOM PUBLISHING

a-z

HEALTHCARE NEWS YOU CAN USE FOR YOUR WHOLE FAMILY

JUNE 2014

IN THIS ISSUE | 2 Food allergies | 3 Monsoon safety | 4-5 Events & support groups | 6 Dehydration SENIOR CAREGIVING

Dealing with finances

What men need to know about staying healthy

M lb By Debra Gelbart

By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

en’s health is multi-dimensional, of course, and it’s not possible to cover all aspects of it in a single article. So this month we’re zeroing in on prostate health, male menopause, testicular cancer nd erectile il dysfunction (commonly known as ED). and

Editor’s note: This article is part of a series related to senior caregiving. In our resource area, we’ve listed just a few of the many agencies and organizations available to help seniors and caregivers with everything from finances to meals to palliative care. Each organization can provide information on many more resources than we are able to list.

PProstate function f

a is a walnut-sized gland located between the The prostate bladder and n the penis just in front of the rectum. It has two functions: (1) to produce the fluid that protects and nourishes sperm m and (2) to house the urethra. The urethra is situated in n the center of the prostate, extends from the bladder to o the penis and lets urine leave the body.

F

irst, did you know: Brett Petersen, director of caregiver services for Duet, a local non-profit organization, said it’s no secret that the medical bills that accompany a chronic disease can be a financial burden for more than just the patient. He said that according to a study done by AARP in 2007, caregivers spent an average of $5,331 out-of-pocket for caregiving expenses each year; long-term caregivers spent more, or $8,728.

MALE WELLBEING “The h prostate st is important to a man’s overall wellbeing it’s intimately associated with sexual funcng because a tion,” said s d Gregory Maggass, M.D., a radiation oncologist sa with Arizona rizo Center for Cancer Care. And if the prostate becomes een enlarged — a common condition that can affect up to half o off m men in their 50s and up to 90 percent of men in their 70s 0 — it can press on the urethra and increase the frequency off ur urination, Maggass said. e

PSA testing in

The prostate ta is susceptible le to cancer because it is affected by b testosterone production uccti throughout life — even as hormone production slows, Maggass explained. o s, M a That’s why h many urologists and oncologists hy gistss like Maggass rrecommend yearly testing beginningg at at age agg 50, including i a digital rectal exam by a physician and da blood testt to ma make PSA level akee ssure urre a man’s man ns P SA A lev vel (pro ((prostatepro ostaate specific antigen) isn’t elevated. “If a man has a family history of prostate cancer, I recommend he start getting tested at age 40,” Maggass said. He acknowledged that these recommendations are considered controversial by some experts because the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in 2012 recommended against routine PSA testing in healthy men of all ages. “But prostate cancer occurs on a spectrum, from something very slow-growing to something that’s rapidly growing and aggressive,” he said. “Not screening PSA can allow aggressive cancers to spread.” The National Cancer Institute says there is no specific normal or abnormal level of PSA in the blood. In the past, most doctors considered PSA levels of 4.0 ng/mL (nanograms per milliliter) and lower as normal. But more recent studies have shown that some men with PSA levels below 4.0 ng/mL have prostate cancer, while it’s not infrequent that men with higher levels do not have prostate cancer. Therefore, it’s important for each man to determine, with the help of a health professional, what is a normal PSA for him.

Radiation, surgery, surveillance

If cancer is found, a variety of treatments are available including radiation or surgery to remove the prostate. “The field is always evolving,” said Mark Hong, M.D., a urologist with Affiliated Urologists in Phoenix, “as does our understanding of who needs treatment and who doesn’t, based on an evaluation of the seriousness of a cancer that’s detected. Sometimes all that may be needed is active surveillance. We have gotten a lot

Add up work days that many caregivers have to miss because of their caregiving commitments, or even the jobs they have to quit because of them, and the financial toll can be catastrophic.

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Saving money: Glen Spencer, benefits assistance program director at the Area Agency on Aging in Phoenix, said that one way to possibly save money is to call the Area Agency on Aging and see if the patient qualifies for Medicare’s ‘Extra Help’ program, which saves enrollees money on prescription drugs. As many as 20 percent of eligible beneficiaries are not enrolled, he said, adding that another program with different rules may also be of assistance and save qualifying individuals up to $105 per month. Support groups: In addition to personal finances, caregivers often have many common areas of concern, including safeguarding patients’ finances from others who may wish to take advantage of them. “It can be very helpful to discuss these and all concerns in a caregiver support group,” Petersen said. “Caregivers can learn how others have dealt with similar problems, while also receiving personalized guidance.” There are a number of caregivers’ support groups listed in the calendar of events in every issue of Living Well (see pages 4 and 5).

Bob Gowens of Phoenix walks daily to look after his health. He is grateful for the improvements he’s seen since he had GreenLight laser surgery to open the passage through his enlarged prostate. | Rick D’Elia smarter about who needs surgery.” If surgery is needed, Hong added, the vast majority of prostatectomies these days are performed with help from a robotic device called the da Vinci, significantly reducing bleeding and allowing a much quicker recovery. „ MEN’S HEALTH, continued on page 5

†Senior resources

Area Agency on Aging: aaaphx.org; 602-264-2255; 888-783-7500 Arizona Caregiver Coalition: azcaregiver.org; 888-737-7494 Benevilla: benevilla.org; 623-584-4999; TTY 711 Duet: duetaz.org; 602-274-5022 Hospice of the Valley: hov.org; 602-530-6900

a-z H E A LT H C A R E N E W S B R I E F S

St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center opens in Glendale

Located near the Loop 101 and Glendale Avenue, Dignity Health recently opened St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center, the first phase of a 35-acre medical campus in Glendale that will initially employ 120 staff members. St. Joseph’s Westgate includes: • 24 in-patient beds • A 12-bed emergency department with an online waiting service • Two operating rooms • Diagnostic services St. Joseph’s Westgate will also offer inpatient general surgery as well as in-patient services related to orthopedics, urology, gastrointestinal and endoscopy. Info: DignityHealth.org

Dignity Health

Many of these agencies and organizations offer information and/or services related to: Ÿ Respite care programs or vouchers Ÿ Home-delivered meals Ÿ Assistance with daily living Ÿ Workshops, support groups and seminars Ÿ Referral services for help in finding suitable living arrangements Ÿ Palliative home care Ÿ And many other issues related to senior caregiving


2 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Food allergies on the rise

Cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts and fish are common – and serious – culprits

A

By Meghann Finn Sepulveda

food allergy is a common yet potentially very serious medical condition affecting an estimated 15 million people in the United States, according to Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE), a nonprofit organization that works on behalf of those with food allergies, including those at risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis. FARE (FoodAllergy.org) was formed in 2012 as the result of a merger between the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network and the Food Allergy Initiative. As defined by FARE, a food allergy is ‘IgE mediated’, meaning the body produces large amounts of the antibody immunoglobulin E (IgE), attacking food allergens by releasing histamine and other chemicals, which trigger the symptoms of an allergic reaction. Reactions can range from hives and sneezing to chest pain and anaphylaxis, a life-threatening condition that often occurs within minutes of exposure.

Common food allergies

The most common food allergies are related to cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, shellfish and fish. Others include apples, melons and bananas, which are foods that are often associated with oral allergy syndrome, a type of food allergy. While food allergies typically develop in infants and children, many are outgrown. “There is a good prognosis for most kids who are allergic to cow’s milk and eggs,” said Cindy Bauer, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. “As a child ages, an oral food challenge may be considered if testing and clinical history support the allergy has been outgrown.” “Children with peanut, tree nut, fin fish and shellfish allergies are more likely to maintain the allergy throughout adulthood,” Bauer said. “Those [children who are] allergic to eggs and cow’s milk can

Livingwella-z

†Celiac disease

Celiac disease, an auto-immune disease often mistaken as a food allergy, is a growing concern, especially among children. Symptoms typically include gastrointestinal pain, abdominal bloating and weight loss. Carrie Toppenberg, founder of the Raising Our Celiac Kids (R.O.C.K.) Phoenix chapter, has two children with celiac disease. Some of her tips for living a gluten-free lifestyle include: Ÿ Understand there will be hurdles, especially at social functions Ÿ Look for hidden ingredients that may include gluten such as in arts and crafts products, glue and envelopes Ÿ Create a safe home and school for your children Ÿ Seek support by visiting websites such as phoenixrock.org and celiac.org

Depending on the severity of the allergic reaction, treatment can vary. “The most common sympives, toms affect the skin such as hives, ated and, if seen alone, can be treated with an antihistamine,” Bauerr said. mergenccy if “It is considered a medical emergency d another organ system is also affected such as if someone begins to vomit or have shortness of breath. This would be consistent with anaphylaxis and require treatment with an epinephrine auto-injector.” Medical experts suggest carrying two epinephrine auto-injectors to treat anaphylaxis until medical responders arrive.

Living with an allergy

While there is no cure, lifestylee mpact changes can make a positive impact es. when dealing with food allergies. d “Read food labels and avoid sometimes begin to tolerate them in a baked cross-contamination,” Garrettt form as the allergy is being outgrown — said. “Dining out can be this can allow introduction of foods such as challenging but overcome cookies, muffins or cake.” if you do some research to review the menu or speak to Testing and diagnosing the restaurant in advance.” “If a food allergy is suspected, it is often ry One Valley chef and culinary recommended to keep a food and beverage rnutrition specialist is pioneerjournal,” said Tracy Garrett, a registered ing a comprehensive training dietitian with the Sun Health Center for nts program to educate restaurants Health & Wellbeing. “It will help you record on how to accommodate diners rs with h everything consumed as well as any sympognize and food allergies and how to recognize toms that develop.” rs. respond if an allergic reaction occurs. Experts advise that you should also “People can’t be afraid of food,” consider scheduling an appointment with n said MoniQue Shaldjian, a Le Cordon an allergist. Bleu-trained chef and owner of “There is a lot of information to review Qapproved. “It’s who we are and a at the first visit,” Bauer said. “We put huge part of our culture.” together an anaphylaxis action plan, Shaldjian recently launched provide information on how to read food Qapproved.com, providing a list labels, discuss tips on dining out and of safe restaurants as well as tips eating at school, review the need for an for diners, allergy news and online epinephrine auto-injector and medical ht support. Her mission is to give weight identification, and list useful resources.” to the severity of food allergies.

June 2014 | Vol. 4, No. 6

Living Well A-Z publishes on the first Wednesday of the month. From A to Z, we tackle a broad range of health issues and offer resources to find more specific information. For questions concerning content in this publication, please contact Editor Paula Hubbs Cohen.

Treating a reaction

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Monsoon safety 101

Summer in Arizona often includes heavy rain, major dust storms

S

By Alison Stanton

Thinkstock

Monsoon †Awareness Week Gov. Brewer has designated the week of June 9th as Monsoon Awareness Week. That week, the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT), the National Weather Service, the Department of Public Safety and the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety will launch a dust storm awareness campaign called Pull Aside – Stay Alive. The public service campaign is designed to provide drivers with information related to what to do if they encounter a dust storm while driving. Some of the experts’primary advice includes: Ÿ Don’t stop in a travel lane or the emergency lane Ÿ Look for a safe place to pull completely off the paved portion of the roadway Ÿ Turn off all vehicle lights, including emergency flashers More info: PullAsideStayAlive.org

Resources

ADOT traveler info (road closures and restrictions): az511.gov; 511 American Red Cross: RedCross.org; 800-733-2767 Arizona Emergency Information Network: azein.gov; JustInCaseArizona.com; 602-464-6347 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA): ready.gov; FEMA.gov; 800-621-FEMA (3362); TTY 800-462-7585

ince 2009, June 15 through September 30 has been declared the official monsoon season, said Ken Waters, warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Phoenix. While the more readily apparent dangers of monsoon season include flash flooding, blinding dust storms and strong winds, Waters said additional threats include the spread of respiratory diseases such as valley fever, damaging hail, and rarely, the possibility of tornadoes.

‘Red Cross Ready’

Christopher Marder, an AmeriCorps volunteer with the American Red Cross, said that in order to be ‘Red Cross Ready’ for monsoons, the organization recommends using this three-step guide:

1

Get a kit. Marder advises people to consider ‘The Five P’s’. “These include people and pets, prescriptions, personal documents, personal computers and personal pictures,” he said. Because a loss of power and/or flooding are likely possibilities during a monsoon, Marder said people should also keep flashlights and extra batteries on hand, in addition to a camera to document any damage.

2

Make a plan. “Consider evacuation routes and an emergency communication plan,” Marder said, noting that everyone in the family should know where they are going and how they are getting there. “Try to identify at least two evacuation routes from your home or even from your place of work should a severe storm get in the way of you getting home,” he said.

3

Be informed. “For example, a ‘watch’ would mean that the environmental and atmosphere conditions are of the sort that, should they continue, a monsoon could develop,” Marder said. “With a ‘warning’, these same conditions are actively combining to produce a storm readily on the horizon.”

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4 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, June 4, 2014

JUNE

Take advantage of opportunities to meet others with similar issues and learn more about various aspects of your health — from A to Z. Allgroupsandeventsarebelieved, butnotguaranteed,tobefreeunless otherwisestated.Everyefforthasbeen madetoverifyaccuracy,butpleasecall beforeattendingtoconfirmdetails.

FOOT & ANKLE SEMINAR June 19, 6–7 p.m. West Valley Hospital 13677 W. McDowell Rd., Goodyear abrazohealth.com/Ortho

WELLNESS

ARTHRITIS & JOINT SEMINAR June 26, 6–7 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix abrazohealth.com/Ortho

AQUATIC FITNESS CLASS Various dates, 9 a.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale 602-865-5830 MEDICATION CHECKS St. Luke’s, 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix Tempe St. Luke’s, 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe Call for appointment: 877-351-WELL (9355) WALKING GROUPS Various dates & locations, 9–10 a.m. By Humana; 480-325-4707 FARMERS MARKET June 4, 10 a.m.–noon Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 ASK THE NATUROPATHIC EXPERT June 4, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

PAIN HOPE FOR TODAY June 10, 17 & 24, 3:30–4:30 p.m. By Chronic Pain Anonymous at Temple Chai Shalom Center House 4635 E. Marilyn Rd., Phoenix cpa-az@cox.net; chronicpainanonymous.org

HEART/STROKE STROKE SURVIVOR June 12, 2:30–4 p.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414 STROKE SUPPORT GROUP June 18, 1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

DIABETES

UNDERSTANDING LUPUS June 17, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

TAKING CONTROL OF DIABETES Various dates, 6–7 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2040 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix 602-841-5505; pastoralcareaz.org

CONTACT LENSES FOR ALL AGES June 17, 6:30–7:30 p.m. By Midwestern University at Glendale-Foothills Branch Library 19055 N. 57th Ave., Glendale 623-930-3868

DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP June 5 & July 3, 7–8 p.m. The Nutrition Professionals 2158 N. Gilbert Rd., Mesa RSVP: 480-216-1635; Nicole@nutritionpro.net

FAD DIETS EXPOSED June 27, noon–1 p.m. By Tempe St. Luke’s at Tempe Public Library 3500 S. Rural Rd., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355)

DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP June 9, 3 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

CAREGIVERS CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP Various dates, times & locations By Duet; 602-274-5022; duetaz.org CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP June 9 St. Joseph’s Outpatient Rehab 114 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-406-6688 CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP June 11, 2:30 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) ONLINE NETWORKING (DUET) June 14, 9–10:30 a.m. Register: DuetAZ.org (Events tab) 602-274-5022 CAREGIVING SUPPORT GROUP June 20, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999

GRIEF GRIEF SUPPORT On-going support groups By Banner Hospice Info: Rev. Cindy Darby; 480-657-1167; BannerHospice.com GRIEF SUPPORT Various dates, times & locations By Hospice of the Valley hov.org/grief-support-groups DROP-IN GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP June 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2–3:30 p.m. Banner Heart Hospital 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa Info: Rev. Cindy Darby; 480-657-1167; BannerHospice.com

DIABETES 101 June 16, 10–11 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 DIABETES PUMPERS GROUP June 17, 7–8 p.m. Rome Towers 1760 E. Pecos Rd., Gilbert 877-728-3535 CARB-COUNTING WORKSHOP June 25, 11 a.m.–noon Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707

Please call to confirm reservations and cost (if any).

MAYSEPTEMBER BANNER HOSPICE GRIEF RECOVERY OUTREACH PROGRAM WHAT: Twelve-week program offers adults a step-by-step approach to healing from significant emotional loss including, but not limited to, loss through divorce or death. LOCATIONS/DATES: • May 19–Aug. 4 (Mon. 1–3 p.m.): Sun West Building, Suite W107, 5757 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale (open to new participants through June 9) • June 29–Aug. 24 (Sun. 6:30– 8:30 p.m.): Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale (open to new participants through July 13) • July 1–Sept. 16 (Tues. 6:30–8:30 p.m.): Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa (open to new participants through July 22) • July 2–Sept. 17 (Wed. 10 a.m.–noon): Banner Heart, 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa (open to new participants through July 23) • July 2–Sept. 17 (Wed. 6:30– 8:30 p.m.): Messinger Mortuary, 7601 E. Indian School Rd., Scottsdale (open to new participants through July 23) • July 10–Sept. 25 (Thurs. 1–3 p.m.): Banner Del E. Webb, 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City West (open to new participants through July 31) COST: Free, except for $15 for handbook INFO/REGISTER: Rev. Cindy Darby; 480-657-1167; BannerHospice.com

BREAST CANCER BOSOM BUDDIES SUPPORT GROUPS Various dates, times & locations Ahwatukee/Chandler: 480-893-8900 East Valley: 480-969-4119 Northwest Valley: 623-236-6616 West Valley: 623-979-4279 METASTATIC BREAST CANCER SUPPORT June 4, 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Phoenix 480-412-4673

ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA

BREAST BUDS SUPPORT GROUP June 21, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. MidFirst Bank Conference Room 6508 W. Bell Rd., Glendale 480-657-0500; breastbuds.org

NEXT STEPS: FOR CAREGIVERS June 5, 12:30–2:30 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT June 24, 5–6:15 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Phoenix 480-412-4673

ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT June 6, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999

TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER SUPPORT June 25, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

LEWY BODY DEMENTIA & RELATED CONDITIONS SUPPORT June 6, 12:30–2 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850 PLANNING AHEAD CLASS: FOR CAREGIVERS June 9, 10 a.m.–noon Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP June 5 & 19 St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-406-3275

ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT June 10, 17 & 24, 10 a.m.–noon By Benevilla at Faith Presbyterian Church 16000 N. Del Webb Blvd., Sun City 623-584-4999

LIVING WITH LOSS June 10 & 24, 1–2:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

STRATEGIES FOR CONTROLLING BEHAVIORS June 13, 10:30 a.m.–noon Banner Sun Health Research Institute 10515 W. Santa Fe Dr., Sun City 602-230-CARE

GRIEF BEFORE LOSS June 25, 10–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999

ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP June 15, 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Dignity Health’s Huger Mercy Living Center 2345 W. Orangewood Ave., Phoenix 602-406-5600

ARTHRITIS & ORTHOPEDICS

a-z T O P E V E N T S

AQUATIC ARTHRITIS & FIBROMYALGIA CLASS Various dates, 8 a.m.–noon Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale 602-865-5830

ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP June 16, 1:30–3 p.m. By Tempe St. Luke’s at Pyle Adult Recreation Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355)

TREATMENTS FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS June 5, 6 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVERS GROUP June 17, 12:30–2 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix 602-274-5022; duetaz.org

SHOULDER PAIN SEMINAR June 12, 6–7 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix abrazohealth.com/Ortho

LEWY BODY DEMENTIA June 26, 1–2:30 p.m. Arbor Rose Senior Care 6033 E. Arbor Ave., Mesa 480-641-2531

CANCER SUPPORT GROUPS NEWLY DIAGNOSED: FINDING MEANING & HOPE June 4, 11, 18 & 25, 3–4 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-4141 PROSTATE LEARN & SUPPORT June 5, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org MINDFULNESS PRACTICE June 6, 13, 20 & 27, 3–4 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-4141

JUNE 11

JUNE 11

PASSPORT TO YOUR NERVOUS SYSTEM WHAT: Experts offer information to help understand neurological diseases. WHERE: Banner Del E. Webb, 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City West TIME: 2–4 p.m. COST: Free INFO/RSVP: 602-230-2273

PALLIATIVE CARE: WHAT IS IT? WHAT: Learn how palliative care can improve quality of life for you or a loved one during a life-threatening illness. Led by Bridget Stiegler, D.O., a certified palliative care physician. WHERE: Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale TIME: 5:30–7 p.m. COST: Free INFO/RSVP: 602-230-2273

PRESENTED BY: Phoenix Children’s Hospital COST: Free INFO/RSVP: 602-933-0914

JUNE 21 BABYSITTER TRAINING WHAT: Course for adolescents to learn how to care for infants and children. Includes basic CPR and first-aid. WHERE: St. Joseph’s, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix TIME: 9 a.m.–3 p.m. PRESENTED BY: Dignity Health & United Phoenix Fire Fighters Association COST: $40 REGISTER: 877-602-4111

JUNE 23

Babysitter Training, presented by Dignity Health & United Phoenix Fire Fighters Association, June 21 at St. Joseph’s. Thinkstock

JUNE 19 WORLD SICKLE CELL DAY WHAT: Educational program and panel discussion regarding sickle cell. WHERE: George Washington Carver Museum & Cultural Center, 415 E. Grant St., Phoenix TIME: 2–4 p.m. ESOPHAGEAL LEARN & SUPPORT June 19, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

TARGETED DRUGS FOR TREATMENT June 11, 6–7:30 p.m. Banner Gateway 1920 S. Higley Rd., Gilbert 602-230-CARE NAVAJO CANCER CONFERENCE June 14, 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Navajo Nation Museum Highway 264 & Postal Loop Rd., Window Rock 623-466-6246; azmyelomanetwork.org

ORAL, HEAD & NECK SUPPORT June 19, 6:30–8 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale 602-439-1192

LYMPHOMA LEARN & SUPPORT June 14, 10–11:30 a.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

COLORECTAL LEARN & SUPPORT June 21, 10–11:30 a.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

PANCREATIC LEARN & SUPPORT June 14, 10–11:30 a.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

OVARIAN LEARN & SUPPORT June 21, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

CARCINOID LEARN & SUPPORT June 14, 1–2:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

PROSTATE SUPPORT June 23, 7–9 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Phoenix 480-412-4673

LUNG LEARN & SUPPORT June 14, 1–2:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

PARKINSON’S PARKINSON’S EXERCISE CLASS June 4, 11, 18 & 25, noon Banner Thunderbird Rehab Center 5605 W. Eugie Ave., Glendale 602-865-5830

CAREGIVER EDUCATION & SUPPORT June 17, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-4141

TAI CHI June 4, 11, 18 & 25, 1:30–2:30 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 JAVA & JABBER June 5, 12, 19 & 26, 10–11 a.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-4931

ORAL, HEAD & NECK SUPPORT June 18, 4:30–6:30 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-6444

NUTRITION DURING & AFTER CANCER TREATMENT WHAT: Amanda Naylor, a registered dietician, will discuss nutrition for a healthy recovery. WHERE: Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale TIME: 5:30–7 p.m. COST: Free INFO/RSVP: 602-865-5450

JUNE 24 GRANDPARENTS, GRANDCHILDREN & GRIEF WHAT: Grandparents will be provided with tools to help their grandchild identify feelings and express emotions when faced with loss and grief. WHERE: Care 1st Avondale Family Resource Center, 328 W. Western Ave., Avondale TIME: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. PRESENTED BY: Duet COST: Free; includes lunch and childcare with advance notice INFO/RSVP: 602-274-5022, ext. 28 YOGA June 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2–3 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 VOICE CLASS June 10, 17 & 24, 11 a.m.–noon Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 PWR!MOVES™ June 10, 17 & 24, 1:15–2:15 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 NEWLY DIAGNOSED June 12, 1:30–3 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-3840

SENIORS HEALTHY COOKING June 4, 10 a.m.–noon Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 DOCTOR TALK: OSTEOPOROSIS June 9, 10–11 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 MEN’S HEALTH ISSUES June 19, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

GASTROINTESTINAL CELIAC DISEASE FOUNDATION June 4, 7 p.m. Paradise Valley Retirement Center 11645 N. 25th Pl., Phoenix phoenixceliac.org

We Love Our Seniors!

CHEMOTHERAPY CLASS June 9, 3–4 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-4141

Memory Care

SURVIVING & THRIVING June 10 & 24, 1–2:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org GYNECOLOGICAL SUPPORT June 10, 5–6:15 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Phoenix 480-412-4673 WOMEN SURVIVORSHIP GROUP June 10, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Banner MD Anderson 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert 480-256-4141

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 5

a-z I N F O R M AT I O N O N L I N E

ABRAZO HEALTH CARE: AbrazoHealth.com AZ Heart Institute and AZ Heart, Arrowhead, Maryvale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix Baptist and West Valley hospitals BANNER HEALTH: BannerHealth.com BARROW NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE: TheBarrow.org CARDON CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER: BannerHealth.com CHANDLER REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER: ChandlerRegional.org JOHN C. LINCOLN HOSPITAL: JCL.com MARICOPA INTEGRATED HEALTH SYSTEM: mihs.org MAYO CLINIC: MayoClinic.com MERCY GILBERT MEDICAL CENTER: MercyGilbert.org MOUNTAIN VISTA MEDICAL CENTER: MVMedicalCenter.com MUHAMMAD ALI PARKINSON CENTER: TheBarrow.org/NeurologicalServices PHOENIX CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL: PhoenixChildrens.org SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE: SHC.org ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER: StJosephs-Phx.org ST. LUKE’S MEDICAL CENTER: StLukesMedCenter.com TEMPE ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL: TempeStLukesHospital.com

OSTOMY SUPPORT June 5, 2 p.m. Banner Boswell 13180 N. 103rd Dr., Sun City 602-678-4441 OSTOMY SUPPORT June 10, 6 p.m. Elite Home Healthcare Services 2140 W. Greenway Rd., Phoenix 602-246-8221 OSTOMY SUPPORT June 19, 12:30 p.m. LaCasa de Cristo Lutheran Church 6300 E. Bell Rd., Scottsdale 623-580-4120

RESPIRATORY BETTER BREATHERS/ COPD SUPPORT Various dates, times & locations By the American Lung Association 602-429-0005; breatheeasyaz.info BETTER BREATHERS CLUB June 5, 5:30–6:30 p.m. By the American Lung Association at Wickenburg Community Hospital 520 Rose Ln., Wickenburg 928-684-5421; breatheeasyaz.info BETTER BREATHERS CLUB June 18, 1–2 p.m. By the American Lung Association at HealthSouth East Valley Rehab Hospital 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa 480-567-0350; breatheeasyaz.info BETTER BREATHERS CLUB June 18, 2–3 p.m. By the American Lung Association at Chandler Regional Medical Center 1955 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 480-728-5655; breatheeasyaz.info CAREMORE BETTER BREATHERS CLUB June 24, 10:30–11:30 a.m. By the American Lung Association at West Phoenix Care Center 2330 N. 75th Ave., Phoenix 480-395-0792; breatheeasyaz.info BETTER BREATHERS CLUB June 26, 1:30–3 p.m. By the American Lung Association at John C. Lincoln 9202 N. Second St., Phoenix 602-870-6060; breatheeasyaz.info

BRAIN INJURY VISUAL TREATMENT OPTIONS June 5, 6:30–7:30 p.m. By Midwestern University at Phoenix-Juniper Branch Library 1825 W. Union Hills Dr., Phoenix 602-262-4636 PROGRESSIVE SUPRA NUCLEAR PALSY SUPPORT GROUP June 14, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Pyle Adult Recreation Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe 480-966-3391; aludwig@asu.edu

BRAIN ANEURYSM SUPPORT GROUP June 18, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 760-333-7658; Kimberly@JoeNiekroFoundation.org BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP June 24, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 623-205-6446 BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP June 26, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-508-8024 or 602-406-6688 YOUNG ADULT BRAIN INJURY June 26, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-996-1396 or 602-406-6688

BREASTFEEDING BREASTFEEDING June 4, 11, 18 & 25, 11 a.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414 BREASTFEEDING June 6, 13, 20 & 27, 10 a.m. Mercy Gilbert 3555 S. Val Vista Dr., Gilbert 877-728-5414 BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP June 9, 16, 23 & 30, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-4954 BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP June 17, 6–7 p.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale 602-865-5555

PARENTING GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN Various dates, times & locations By Benevilla; 623-207-6016; benevilla.org GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN Various dates, times & locations By Duet; 602-274-5022; duetaz.org SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS June 5, 12, 19 & 26, 7–9 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 161 N. Mesa Dr., Mesa 623-846-5464; SupportThroughOtherParents.org

MOTHER-TO-MOTHER SUPPORT June 6 & 27, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 877-602-4111 POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION June 6, 13, 20 & 27, 1–2:30 p.m. Chandler Regional 1875 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 877-728-5414 POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP June 10 & 24, 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale 602-865-5555 SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS June 10, 17, 24 & July 1, 7–9 p.m. Larkspur Christian Church 3302 W. Larkspur Dr., Phoenix 623-846-5464; SupportThroughOtherParents.org GUARDIANSHIP CLINIC June 13, 3–5 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix Register: 602-274-5022, ext. 31 INFANT BRAIN DEVELOPMENT June 14, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Tempe St. Luke’s 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe Register: 480-784-5588

WEIGHT LOSS BARIATRIC INFO SEMINAR Various dates, times & locations By Banner Health; 480-543-2606 WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINAR Various dates & times By Bridges Center for Surgical Weight Management at St. Luke’s Medical Center 555 N. 18th St., Phoenix Register: 800-248-5553; webinar: BridgesAZ.com

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT GROUPS INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS June 8, 2 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix 623-349-4611; HeatherBarrowBrown@gmail.com HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE June 16, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-402-1774 WOMEN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS June 28, 10 a.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 480-829-6563

SPANISH PARKINSON’S EDUCATION, ART, SINGING & EXERCISE Various dates, times & locations Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-406-2453

VALLEY FEVER INFO AZ VICTIMS OF VALLEY FEVER ArizonaVictimsOfValleyFever.org; 623-584-8331; pat-valleyfever@live.com; 602-242-9527; mmfcreate@aol.com VALLEY FEVER CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE 602-406-8253; vfce.arizona.edu; ValleyFeverCenter@dignityhealth.org

POISON CONTROL BANNER GOOD SAMARITAN Poison & Drug Information Center Hotline 800-222-1222

Michael Duarte of Phoenix gets a blood draw to check his progress after a recent successful surgery in which Dr. Mark Hong used a GreenLight laser to deal with Duarte’s enlarged prostate. Duarte offered Dr. Hong his tremendous gratitude for the results of the surgery. Diana Berdoza prepares to draw the blood. | Rick D’Elia

Men’s health

„ continued from the cover

Male menopause: myth or reality?

Menopause among men isn’t quite the life event it is for women, yet most men experience a dwindling of hormones sometime in their 50s or 60s, said Sheila Sudhakar, M.D., an internal medicine physician with Cigna Medical Group in Chandler. While the actual age at which hormones start to slow will vary from person to person, this slowdown may be delayed by staying active and preventing or controlling high blood pressure, diabetes and elevated cholesterol, she said. Symptoms of diminished hormones include difficulty sleeping, decreased libido and reduced ability to build muscle mass, Sudhakar said. Like hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women, HRT for men has pros and cons. The additional hormones may make a man feel better, but some treatments can carry more risks and cause more side effects than others, she said. “Other preparations — such as those that are topical — don’t increase risk substantially,” Sudhakar said, and she advises men to discuss what may be best for them with their primary care physician.

if the disease has been caught early, no further treatment may be needed. If the disease has spread, however, chemotherapy, radiation or further surgery might be indicated. Wong said there is no clear role for routine selfexam or screening, “because risks can include false positives, with associated anxiety. There are also risks and costs associated with diagnostic tests and procedures.” But if you happen to discover a lump or lesion, he said, it’s important to bring it to your physician’s attention right away. “Any growth that has not been noticed before needs to be evaluated,” he emphasized.

Erectile dysfunction

The problem that arguably many men might say is one of the worst they could confront — erectile dysfunction, or ED — affects about 40 percent of men at least once beginning at age 35, doctors say. By the time a man reaches 80, he has about an 80 percent chance of having experienced some degree of erectile dysfunction. “If erectile dysfunction happens to you it’s a big deal, but it’s incredibly common,” Hong said. “It’s damaging to relationships and to a man’s self-esteem because the message has been communicated that a man should

be able to have an erection every single time he wants to, no matter what.” But many factors can affect erections, he said, including overall health, psychological well-being and substances that may have been ingested.

ED and heart disease

“It’s commonly known that ED is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease,” said Jack Wolfson, D.O., an integrative cardiologist in Phoenix. “One of the causes of ED is poor circulation in the artery that supplies the penis, and it may indicate poor circulation in the heart’s arteries, too.” “Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel symptom of vascular disease,” agreed Joseph Worischeck, M.D., a private practice urologic surgeon who practices at Banner Baywood Medical Center in Mesa. “Because ED is so closely correlated with heart disease, we recommend that a man who has ED be screened for heart disease.”

Treatments vary widely

In addition to pharmaceuticals, treatment options for ED include an improved diet, natural supplements or a penile prosthesis, which Hong said is easy to use and can help a man achieve a spontaneous erection.

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer primarily occurs in younger men, said Bryan Wong, M.D., a medical oncologist with Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert, but it can strike older men, too. A diagnosis is usually made through ultrasound imaging and blood tests, Wong said. Treatment typically consists of surgical removal of the affected testicle, he said, and

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6 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, June 4, 2014

DEHYDRATION HEAT EXHAUSTION HEAT STROKE

Serious medical issues, and not just in the summer

F

By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

eeling hot, thirsty and maybe a bit fatigued? Just make sure, doctors say, that the effects you’re experiencing aren’t related to dehydration or its more severe forms, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. All three conditions can come on faster in this climate than one might think, and while summer seems to amp up their frequency, they can strike anyone all year ‘round, particularly the young, the elderly and individuals with compromised health.

Dehydration symptoms

Dan Quan, D.O., an attending physician in the emergency department at Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix, said common signs of dehydration include: • Dry mouth • Thirst • Headache • Muscle cramps, aches or spasms • Dizziness • Fatigue • Nausea

‘Eight by eight’

The best advice to avoid becoming dehydrated is simple: drink plenty of water. Aim to follow the ‘eight by eight rule’ which calls for an adult to drink eight, eight-ounce glasses of water each day, said Brent Nelson, D.O., area medical director for NextCare Urgent Care in Phoenix. Also, monitor your urine output and be sure it stays a light yellow color — dark yellow or amber-colored urine indicates dehydration.

Replenish water, nutrients

Adults who find themselves experiencing symptoms of dehydration should immediately start drinking water and may also want to replenish lost nutrients with a sports drink and fruit like bananas or citrus. Extra care should be taken with children, including consulting with a medical professional about possibly offering an electrolyte solution.

“Young kids need to be watched closely,” Quan noted. “They can’t say that they’re not feeling well, so make sure they are acting normally. If they’re not, they may be dehydrated.”

Advance preparations

As with many things in life, thinking ahead can help. Stave off dehydration by preparing in advance for outdoor activities such as a hiking trip or a day of yard work. Hydrate yourself ahead of time, avoid caffeine and take into account any underlying health conditions, Quan said, such as: • Obesity • Asthma • Skin conditions like eczema or psoriasis • Hyperthyroidism • Psychiatric issues The reason? Prescription medications for such conditions can exacerbate dehydrams such as confusion. tion, causing problems

“Once you start feeling thirsty, you’re already dehydrated.” —Dan Quan, D.O., emergency department attending physician, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix

the heat, get rehydrated, decrease the body’s core temperature and bolster its evaporative cooling abilities by placing cold cloths around the neck. In addition, cooling the body with a fan can also help bring down the core temperature. A trip to the emergency department for some intravenous (IV) fluids might also be in order, particularly if symptoms persist beyond one hour. “Get professional help, especially if the patient has a rapid heart rate or is feeling extremely hot,” Nelson said. “If you’re getting nausea and are vomiting, you’re going to need some fluids dumped into you pretty quickly, and it’s better to err on the side of caution.”

hydration isn’t Nelson said that if dehydration attended to, the next step in the condition’s xhaustion. progression is heat exhaustion. Patients suffering from heat exhaustion may have many of thee same symptoms of y may also experience: dehydration, but they • dry, flushed skin • decreased output of sweat • vomiting • disorientation on said, it’s At this point, Nelson tient to get out of important for the patient

Thinkstock

“In Arizona, it’s so dry here, the air just sucks the water out of your body. People should follow the ‘eight by eight rule’, which calls for an adult to drink eight, eight-ounce glasses of water each day.” —Brent Nelson, D.O., area medical director, NextCare Urgent Care, Phoenix

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The third and final stage of dehydrationrelated illness is heat stroke, and it’s a medical emergency, the doctors said. The patient’s probably going to feel very hot and have a high core body temperature. Typical symptoms include: • Lack of sweat • Central nervous system dysfunction • Changes in mental status • Confusion • Inability to keep fluids down for a sustained period of time Quan said using a damp washcloth on the patient’s body or lightly spraying the patient’s face with water can help the body start to cool down, but a patient should never be drenched in water because that can make the person shiver and increase their core temperature even more. The bottom line with heat stroke symptoms? “Get the patient to a doctor,” Quan said.

Heat exhaustion

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Dr. Oldham is an experienced internist with more than three decades spent treating patients and providing them with optimal primary healthcare. He received his medical degree from the University of Arkansas in Little Rock and completed his residency at St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center in Phoenix, AZ.

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VASCULAR SURGERY Hammad Amer, MD

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Livingwell AZ June 2014