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Livingwell A SPECIAL PUBLICATION CREATED BY REPUBLIC MEDIA CUSTOM PUBLISHING

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HEALTHCARE NEWS YOU CAN USE FOR YOUR WHOLE FAMILY

MARCH 2014

IN THIS ISSUE | 2 Valley fever | 3 Emergency rooms | 4-5 Events & support groups | 6 Adaptive and assistive devices

a-z N E W S B R I E F S Donors needed to replenish Red Cross blood supply

The American Red Cross needs blood and platelet donors to help restock the blood supply. Severe winter weather across much of the country forced the cancellation of 1,500 Red Cross blood drives, resulting in about 50,000 uncollected blood and platelet donations. There is an urgent need for blood types O positive, O negative, A negative and B negative. Eligible donors with these blood types are strongly encouraged to make an appointment at their earliest convenience.

Did you know

• On average, the Red Cross must collect about 15,000 units of blood every day for patients at approximately 2,700 hospitals and transfusion centers across the country. • Platelets, a key clotting component of blood often needed by cancer patients, must be transfused within five days of donation, so donations are constantly needed. Red blood cells, the oxygen carrying component of blood, are the most widely transfused blood product and must be transfused within 42 days.

Nicole and Brady Bruce of Waddell keep an eye on their day-old son, Hudson, who was born at Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center in Sun City West.

Great expectations

How to donate

For more information or to make an appointment to donate, call 1-800-REDCROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org.

Expecting? Grand-expecting? A look at what’s new in hospital maternity care Story by Debra Gelbart • Photos by Rick D’Elia

LPGA Founders Cup defending champion Stacy Lewis. Scottsdale Healthcare

Founders Cup to benefit Scottsdale Healthcare

Scottsdale Healthcare has teamed up with the LPGA Founders Cup to donate 100 percent of the proceeds made from Good Any Day Tickets and Weekly Badges purchased for the LPGA Founder’s Cup. The charity ticket program is offering a 25 percent discount on the Good Any Day Tickets and the Weekly Badges. The event will be held from March 18–23 at Wildfire Gold Club at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort and Spa. Tickets purchased through ScottsdaleHealthcareTickets.org will benefit patient care in the nonprofit Scottsdale Healthcare hospitals. Other proceeds will go toward the LPGA Foundation and LPGA-USGA Girls Golf. Among the events being held during the week is Scottsdale Healthcare Day. On Saturday, March 22, Scottsdale Healthcare staff will be on hand to offer free skin cancer and heart-health checks as ticket holders enter the grounds.

Whether you’re ‘expecting’ or ‘grand-expecting’, you’ll feel more comfortable about ‘the big event’ if you know the scoop on hospital maternity care. Well-baby nurseries, for example, have all but disappeared in hospitals, said Karon Ford, the director of women’s and infant services at Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center in Sun City West, a facility that serves residents of nearby Surprise, El Mirage, Peoria, Waddell and surrounding areas. The vast majority of newborns stay with their moms in a setting called ‘couplet care’, she said. Couplet care emphasizes skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby just moments after birth, said Robin Shepherd, the chief nurse officer at Arrowhead Hospital (an Abrazo Health facility) in Glendale. For the most part you’ll only find infants away from their mothers if they require a procedure such as a circumcision, said Lori-Ann Satran, the nurse manager of OB couplet care at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. “Through most of the 20th century, healthcare didn’t focus on what was necessarily better for moms and babies,” Ford said, “but what was easier for the staff — keeping newborns all in one place, for example. Now we know that partnering with new parents works tremendously well” [to help parents successfully transition to taking care of the newest addition to their family].

Maternity nurse Elizabeth Gregory, RN, checks in with Nicole Bruce and baby Hudson. At many hospitals, including Banner Del E. Webb, most newborns stay in their mom’s room, not in a separate nursery.

What you need to know

EDUCATION: Many hospitals offer both pre- and post-birth classes. For example, ‘daddy boot camp’ classes, taught by new fathers and intended just for dads-to-be, are a place for new dads to learn about caring for mom and baby. It’s also a place where they can feel comfortable asking sensitive questions they may have about childbirth and new parenting, said Stacey Piccinati, a certified nurse midwife and the birth consultant for St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. Meanwhile, programs like ‘Moms on the Move’ at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea and Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn offer support, social interaction and information for new parents. „ Great expectations, continued page 8

For more info

ScottsdaleHealthcareTickets.org

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2 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Valley fever:

“Two-thirds of all valley fever cases in the United States are found in Arizona, and most are along the ‘valley fever corridor’ that runs along Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Tucson.

a major health problem

Funding, awareness needed to beat ‘Arizona’s disease’ By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

Valley fever — or coccidioidomycosis, the medical term for the disease — is endemic to northern Mexico and the southwestern United States, with about half of the cases originating in Maricopa County alone. The mildest form of the disease is pneumonia, but the more dangerous form, cocci meningitis, can be deadly and requires lifetime therapy. Symptoms of valley fever, which usually appear within three weeks of exposure but can last weeks or months, include: • Cough • Difficulty breathing • Pneumonia • Fatigue

• • • •

Chest pain Fever Night sweats Weight loss

DID YOU KNOW? Canines and valley fever When it comes to valley fever, dogs are similar to people in terms of how many get the disease and what specific level they get. Because of that, Galgiani and Lisa Shubitz, D.V.M., a veterinarian and University of Arizona associate research professor, and others are working on a valley fever vaccine they hope to get approved to try on dogs and then eventually take to the human population. Pet owners can face costly bills if their pup gets a valley fever diagnosis. In fact, Shubitz estimates that dog owners in Arizona spend about $60 million each year to diagnose and treat their canine companions suffering from valley fever.

Livingwella-z

People who contract valley fever also can be asymptomatic, according to John Galgiani, M.D., director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence. The Center is a partnership between St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, The University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix and the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, which has two locations – one in Tucson and one in Phoenix on St. Joseph’s campus.

Dust storms one culprit

The Valley of the Sun’s countless — and occasionally epic — dust storms likely are contributing to an increase in valley fever cases. Leno Thomas, M.D., a pediatric pulmonologist with Banner Children’s Specialists, said while no one dust storm can be attributed to an infection, it’s best to stay indoors when a dust storm is approaching. If that’s not possible, he suggested using a mask or scarf to limit inhalation of dust and ‘cocci’ spores or, if inside a vehicle, using the air conditioner’s recirculation feature to limit exposure to outside irritants.

Anti-fungal medications

Clarisse Tsang, an epidemiologist with the Arizona Department of Health Services, said a number of valley fever patients will require an anti-fungal medication such as the drug fluconazole, a pill that’s taken orally. In recent months, Galgiani noted, that drug has spiked in price, leading to additional strain for patients. Those folks might be glad to hear that Galgiani is working on a new drug treatment called nikkomycin Z, or ‘NikZ’. Initially developed by the Bayer AG pharmaceutical company in the 1970s, NikZ was originally intended to suppress fungal growth on oranges by inhibiting an enzyme in the fungus, Galgiani said. The drug was later licensed to a second

March 2014 | Vol. 4, No. 3

Living Well A-Z publishes on the first Wednesday of the month. From A to Z, we tackle a broad range of health issues and offer resources to find more specific information. For questions concerning content in this publication, please contact Editor Paula Hubbs Cohen.

People that have lived in Phoenix for 12 years have a 50-50 chance of already being infected whether they know it or not.” —John Galgiani, M.D., director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence

Thinkstock

pharmaceutical company which began initial safety trials but then went bankrupt. In 2005, The University of Arizona assumed sponsorship of NikZ.

not-too-distant future. “We’re at a tipping point,” Galgiani said, “and there are all sorts of ways to improve things if we can find the funding.”

Research money needed

More info

Arizona Department of Health Services: Galgiani said the Valley Fever Center for azdhs.gov, 602-542-1025 Excellence has captured $7 million in grant proposals and has been given Valley Fever Center for Excellence: $2.4 million from a New York-based founvfce.arizona.edu, 602-406-8253, dation, but he estimates needing at least valleyfevercenter@dignityhealth.org $40 million to see the drug make it to the Arizona Victims of Valley Fever: consumer marketplace. arizonavictimsofvalleyfever.org. In the meantime, he and his team have This all-volunteer nonprofit organization conducted multi-dose safety trials, but offers free seminars about the disease. their supply of the drug has run out. With Contact Pat White (623-584-8331; assistance from the National Institutes of Health, Galgiani said they should get more pat-valleyfever@live.com) or Marvin manufactured this year and are looking Freeman (602-242-9527; forward to enrolling patients in clinical mmfcreate@aol.com). trials in spring of 2015. The organization is working on a docuExperts remain hopeful they can mentary about valley fever and is looking change the course of the disease in the to interview individuals with the disease.

A division of The Arizona Republic, 200 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ 85004. For general advertising inquiries, contact Republic Media at 602-444-8000. General Manager: CAMI KAISER ckaiser@republicmedia.com Creative Development Director: ISAAC MOYA imoya@republicmedia.com

Editor: PAULA HUBBS COHEN paula.cohen@cox.net; 602-444-8658 Contributing Editor: JIM WILLIAMS jlwilliams@republicmedia.com

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 3

4 helpful hints to de-stress an Emergency Department visit

1

Create a folder with the following information: your current medications and dosages; allergies; your doctor’s contact information; emergency contact information; past medical history; Advanced Healthcare Directives (if you have them); insurance information; and a neighbor’s phone number if you need them to take care of your animals or make phone calls for you.

2

Keep this folder readily accessible and take it with you if you ever have to go to the ED. Put a note on your refrigerator with the location of this folder for paramedics, in case your condition prevents you from getting it.

3

It’s always nice to have something to occupy your mind and fill the time while waiting for test results, so consider packing reading materials or music on headphones or puzzle books. Be prepared to send personal items and anything of value home if you are admitted to the hospital.

4

Ask a friend or loved one to go with you. If you can’t, ask emergency personnel to phone someone on your behalf — a relative, neighbor or friend. Spending time in the emergency department can be overwhelming and it’s difficult to pay attention, especially if you are in pain. Having someone by your side to advocate on your behalf can reduce your stress and calm your nerves.

Navigating a hospital

Emergency Department

How to lessen wait times, be prepared and be your own advocate By Meghann Finn Sepulveda

“Traditionally, most people refer to the Emergency Department as the ‘ER’, or Emergency Room. But technically, Banner Health and many other hospitals refer to the Emergency Department as a whole — i.e., the Emergency Department, or ED. When we use the term ‘emergency room’, we’re referring to one of the many patient treatment rooms within the department.”

Seasonal influenza, non-emergent medical issues and psychiatric patient boarding all contribute to busy Arizona emergency departments. While you can’t predict an emergency, there are ways you can plan ahead — at least a little bit — and make your visit as hassle- and stress-free as possible, given the situation.

Online check-in

Several local hospitals have implemented online check-in technology which allows patients to view projected treatment times and check-in at an emergency department, or ED. This gives patients the opportunity to wait at home until closer to the time they can be seen by a medical provider. For example, Abrazo Health recently launched InQuicker online waiting system,

intended for patients with emergencies that are considered non-life-threatening. Of course, people are strongly discouraged from delaying care if symptoms of chest pain, stroke or another debilitating medical condition arise. “It’s almost impossible to know if a symptom of chest pain is life-threatening without seeking care from an emergency medicine professional,” said Rodney Altman, M.D., Abrazo system medical director, emergency services.

Be prepared

If you do need to take a trip to the ED, be sure to bring a list of your current medications. “It is so important for patients to be knowledgeable of their medical history, including the name of the medication they are currently taking,” said Ashley Bergeron, RN, clinical manager, ED, Banner Baywood Medical Center in Mesa. “Care will be rendered based on that information.”

Be your own advocate

Experts encourage patients to ask questions and become proactive about their healthcare. “Patients are truly their own best advocate,” Bergeron said. “Inquire about test results and ask the staff and physicians to explain the next steps.”

—Corey Schubert, public relations specialist, Banner Health

DID YOU KNOW? Using ‘fast-track’ areas to expedite care

Many larger hospital EDs feature fast-track areas for patients with minor illnesses and injuries. “The fast-track area is an innovative pathway to care, with dedicated staff that allows us to effectively treat and discharge patients faster,” said Rodney Altman, M.D., Abrazo system medical director, emergency services. “When necessary, we can easily move a patient to the main emergency department if there is a need for additional tests or treatment.”

Source: Ashley Bergeron, RN, clinical manager, Emergency Department, Banner Baywood Medical Center in Mesa

Most common reasons for ED visits include:

• Abdominal pain • Chest pain • Fever • Headache • Back problems • Shortness of breath

Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2010 Emergency Department Summary Thinkstock

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4 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, March 5, 2014

MARCH

Take advantage of opportunities to meet others with similar issues and learn more about various aspects of your health — from A to Z. Allgroupsandeventsarebelieved, butnotguaranteed,tobefreeunless otherwisestated.Everyefforthasbeen madetoverifyaccuracy,butpleasecall beforeattendingtoconfirmdetails.

ATRIAL FIBRILLATION & STROKE March 19, 10:30 a.m. Banner Del E. Webb 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City 623-524-4000

WELLNESS

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP March 19, 1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crimson Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

MEDICATION CHECKS Call for personal appointment St. Luke’s 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix Tempe St. Luke’s 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) WALK-ERCIZE CLASS Various dates, 9–9:45 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 SURGICAL SOLUTIONS FOR KNEE PROBLEMS March 11, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crimson Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) PREVENTIVE EXAMS FOR WOMEN March 12, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crimson Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) NUTRITIONAL COOKING CLASS March 12, 6–7:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events MAKOPLASTY HIP REPLACEMENT SEMINAR March 20, 6 p.m. Arrowhead Hospital 18701 N. 67th Ave., Glendale 855-292-9355

CAREGIVERS CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP March 10, call for time St. Joseph’s Outpatient Rehab 114 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6688 CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP March 12, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crimson Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP March 15, 10 a.m.–noon Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com CAREGIVING SUPPORT GROUP March 21, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

GRIEF GRIEF SUPPORT Various dates, times & locations Hospice of the Valley 602-636-5390; hov.org/grief-support-groups DROP-IN GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP March 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2–3:30 p.m. Banner Heart Hospital 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa Info: Cindy Darby, 480-657-1167; cindy.darby@bannerhealth.com

DIABETES TAKING CONTROL OF DIABETES Various dates, 6–7 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2040 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix 602-841-5505; pastoralcareaz.org HEALTHY DIET March 5, 9:30 a.m. Banner Del E. Webb 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City 623-524-4000 DIABETES & VISION March 6, 6:30–7:30 p.m. By Midwestern University at Phoenix Juniper Branch Library 1825 W. Union Hills Dr., Phoenix 602-262-4636 DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP March 6, 7–8 p.m. The Nutrition Professionals 2158 N. Gilbert Rd., Mesa RSVP (limited seating): 480-216-1635; Nicole@nutritionpro.net DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP March 10, 3 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crimson Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) DIABETES HEALTH MANAGEMENT March 19, 10–11 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707

ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA FOR CAREGIVERS: AFTER DEMENTIA DIAGNOSIS March 6, 4–5:30 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850 ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT GROUP March 7, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org LEWY BODY DEMENTIA & RELATED CONDITIONS March 7, 12:30–2 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850 PLANNING AHEAD CLASS FOR CAREGIVERS March 10, 4–6 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-230-CARE ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT GROUP March 11, 18 & 25, 10 a.m.–noon By Benevilla at Faith Presbyterian Church 16000 N. Del Webb Blvd., Sun City 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP March 6 & 20, call for time St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-3275

ALZHEIMER’S PREVENTION DIET WITH DR. MARWAN SABBAGH March 14, 10:30 a.m.–noon Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert 602-230-CARE

LIVING WITH LOSS March 11 & 25, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP March 16, 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Huger Mercy Living Center 2345 W. Orangewood Ave., Phoenix 602-406-5600

LIVING WITH GRIEF & LOSS March 19, 9:30 a.m. Banner Del E. Webb 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City 623-524-4000 GRIEF BEFORE LOSS March 26, 10–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

PAIN

CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP March 17, 1:30–3 p.m. By Tempe St. Luke’s at Pyle Adult Recreation Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) FOR CAREGIVERS: AFTER THE DEMENTIA DIAGNOSIS March 26, 10–11:30 a.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

KNEE PAIN: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW Various dates, times and locations By St. Luke’s Medical Center Register: 877-351-WELL (9355)

LEWY BODY DEMENTIA March 27, 1–2:30 p.m. Arbor Rose Senior Care 6033 E. Arbor Ave., Mesa 480-641-2531

CHRONIC PAIN ANONYMOUS March 11, 18 & 25, 3:30–4:30 p.m. Temple Chai Shalom Center House 4635 E. Marilyn Rd., Phoenix cpa-az@cox.net; chronicpainanonymous.org

BREAST CANCER

HEEL PAIN March 18, 6:30–7:30 p.m. By Midwestern University at Glendale Foothills Library 19055 N. 57th Ave., Glendale 623-930-3868

BOSOM BUDDIES SUPPORT GROUPS Various dates, times & locations Ahwatukee/Chandler: 480-893-8900 East Valley: 480-969-4119 Northwest Valley: 623-236-6616 West Valley: 623-979-4279

HEART/STROKE

YOGA FOR RECOVERY March 5, 12, 19 & 26, 6–7:30 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19841 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix 602-780-4673; bhrc@jcl.com

MENDED HEARTS March 6, 6–7 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19829 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix 623-879-5583; alice.montoya@jcl.com

SUPPORT GROUP March 10, 2–4 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

a-z TOP EVENTS

Please call to confirm reservations and cost (if any).

MARCH 5 & 26 COMMUNITY HEALTH FORUM WHAT: Meet leaders of the new regional behavioral health system, participate in health screenings and learn about area health organizations. WHEN/WHERE: March 5: People of Color Network, Comunidad Site, 1035 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix March 26: Partners in Recovery, 4330 E. University Dr., Mesa TIME: 3–6 p.m. PRESENTED BY: Mercy Maricopa Integrated Care COST: Free INFO: MercyMaricopa.org

COST: Free REGISTER: 623-466-6246; 623-388-6837; AzMyelomaNetwork.org

March 10, 18, & 27: Spinal, Knee and Hip Replacement Surgery panels

MARCH 22 COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORSHIP SYMPOSIUM WHAT: Learn about treatment options, lifestyle issues that enhance survivorship and the latest research. WHERE: Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River Project, 5201 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale TIME: 7:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. PRESENTED BY: AZ Chapter of the Colon Cancer Alliance COST: Free REGISTER: (By March 17) 602-359-5995; CentralAZcca@gmail.com

MARCH 8 WOMEN’S CANCER CONFERENCE WHAT: Experts will discuss clinical trials, breast cancer basics, genetic risk factors, nutrition, innovative approaches to gynecological cancers and when someone you love has cancer. WHERE: UA Cancer Center at St. Joseph’s, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix TIME: 9 a.m.–2 p.m. PRESENTED BY: The University of Arizona Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s COST: Free; open to the public REGISTER: 877-602-4111

MARCH 10, 18 & 27 SPINAL, KNEE AND HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY WHAT: Experts will discuss the latest advancements in these areas. WHEN/WHERE: March 10, Spine: Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, 7400 E. Thompson Peak Pkwy, Scottsdale March 18, Hip Replacement; March 27, Knee: Scottsdale Orthopedic Institute, 20401 N. 73rd St., Scottsdale TIME: 6–7:30 p.m. COST: Free REGISTER: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events

MARCH 11, 19 & 21 PREVENTING AND RECOGNIZING GYNECOLOGICAL CANCERS WHAT: Learnaboutreproductive systemcancersincluding symptoms,diagnosisand treatmentoptions. WHEN/WHERE: March 11: Banner Desert, 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa March19:BannerBaywood, 6644E.BaywoodAve.,Mesa March 21: Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert

MARCH 23

Thinkstock

TIME: 6–8 p.m. COST: Free INFO: 602-230-CARE

MARCH 13 DEMENTIA FAMILY CAREGIVER SEMINAR WHAT: Learn about the impact caregiving has on family caregivers as well as the ethical considerations involved in medical decision-making for loved ones with dementia. WHERE: MayoEducationClinic, 5777E.MayoBlvd.,Phoenix TIME: 8:30 a.m.–noon PRESENTED BY: Hospice of the Valley SPEAKERS: Maribeth Gallagher, dementia program director at Hospice of the Valley; ethicist Carol Taylor, a professor at Georgetown University Medical Center COST: Free INFO: 602-636-5392; events7@hov.org

MARCH 13 MEDICAL MYSTERY TOUR WORKSHOPS WHAT: Families and teens/adults have the opportunity to tour Midwestern University simulation labs and participate in hands-on medical activities. WHERE: Midwestern University, 19555 N. 59th Ave., Glendale TIME: 4–7 p.m. COST: Free INFO: 623-572-3298

a-z I N F O R M AT I O N O N L I N E

ABRAZO HEALTH CARE: AbrazoHealth.com AZ Heart Institute and AZ Heart, Arrowhead, Maryvale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix Baptist and West Valley hospitals BANNER HEALTH: BannerHealth.com BARROW NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE: TheBarrow.org CARDON CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER: BannerHealth.com CHANDLER REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER: ChandlerRegional.org JOHN C. LINCOLN HOSPITAL: JCL.com MAYO CLINIC: MayoClinic.com

MERCY GILBERT MEDICAL CENTER: MercyGilbert.org MOUNTAIN VISTA MEDICAL CENTER: MVMedicalCenter.com PHOENIX CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL: PhoenixChildrens.com SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE: SHC.org ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER: StJosephs-Phx.org ST. LUKE’S MEDICAL CENTER: StLukesMedCenter.com TEMPE ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL: TempeStLukesHospital.com THRIVE YOUNG SURVIVORS March 11, 6–8 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19646 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix 602-780-4673; bhrc@jcl.com LEARN & SUPPORT March 13 & 27, 6–8 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19646 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix 602-780-4673; bhrc@jcl.com BREAST BUDS SUPPORT GROUP March 15, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. MidFirst Bank Conference Room 6508 W. Bell Rd., Glendale 480-657-0500; breastbuds.org COOKING FOR WELLNESS March 18, 6–8 p.m. John C. Lincoln 19646 N. 27 Ave., Phoenix RSVP: 602-780-4673; bhrc@jcl.com TRIPLE NEGATIVE SUPPORT March 26, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

CANCER SUPPORT GROUPS CHAIR YOGA March 5, 12, 19 & 26, 10–11 a.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com ORAL, HEAD & NECK CANCER SUPPORT March 5, 3–4:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com MULTIPLE MYELOMA SUPPORT March 6, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org GENERAL CANCER SUPPORT March 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2–4 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT March 6, 6–7:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

MARCH 18 & 25 MORRIS K. UDALL SYMPOSIUMS FOR PARKINSON’S WHAT: For people with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers. Topics include exercise, vision, music therapy and cognition. WHEN/WHERE: March 18: Arizona Broadway Theatre, 7701 W. Paradise Ln., Peoria March 25: Sheraton Phoenix Airport Hotel, 1600 S. 52nd St., Tempe TIME: Check-in: 8:30 a.m. (light breakfast provided); Conference: 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. PRESENTED BY: The Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center COST: $20 (includes lunch) REGISTER: 602-406-6903

MARCH 22 LIVING WITH MYELOMA CONFERENCE WHAT: Open to patients, families, friends, caregivers, researchers, healthcare professionals, others. WHERE:ChaparralSuites,5001N. ScottsdaleRd.,Scottsdale TIME: Registration and continental breakfast: 8–9 a.m.; Conference: 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. SPEAKERS: Invitedexpertsarefrom theMayoClinic,DanaFarber CancerInstituteinBoston,The UniversityofArizonaMedical Center,TGen,BannerMDAnderson CancerCenter,Scottsdale Healthcare,CancerTreatment CentersofAmericaandlocal oncologygroups.

MY FEST YOUTH FESTIVAL WHAT: Live music, entertainment, skateboard exhibitions, art, food, a dance battle, low-rider car show and information about resources and services from a variety of youth and family-based organizations. Learn about mental health, substance abuse and foster care. WHERE: Tempe Beach Park, 80 W. Rio Salado Pkwy., Tempe TIME: Noon–5 p.m. COST: Free PRESENTED BY: Magellan of Arizona INFO: MagellanOfAZ.com

MARCH 29 CANCER SURVIVORS DAY CELEBRATION WHAT: Pancake breakfast, head/neck screenings, face painting, Tai Chi demonstrations, raffles and more. WHERE: Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers, 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler TIME: 8–11 a.m. PRESENTED BY: Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers; Dignity Health Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert medical centers COST: Free INFO: IronwoodCRC.com

MARCH 30 “KEEP IT ROLLIN’ THROUGH THE COLON” WHAT: In recognition of National Nutrition Month and Colon Cancer Awareness Month, the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center presents this educational event featuring speakers and health vendors. WHERE: Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale TIME: 6–7:30 p.m. COST: Free REGISTER: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events

LYMPHOMA SUPPORT March 8, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

COLORECTAL CANCER PREVENTION March 12, 6–7:30 p.m. Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert 602-230-CARE

PANCREATIC CANCER SUPPORT March 8, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org CARCINOID SUPPORT March 8, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org LUNG CANCER SUPPORT March 8, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org FACING FORWARD (FOR WOMEN UNDERGOING CANCER TREATMENT) March 10, 4–6 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events LOOK GOOD, FEEL BETTER March 10, 4–6 p.m. 1432 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa March 17, 4–6 p.m. 3645 S. Rome St., Gilbert March 24, 4–6 p.m. 6111 E. Arbor Ave., Mesa By American Cancer Society at IronwoodCancer&ResearchCenters Register: 480-855-2224; ironwoodcrc.com

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER SUPPORT March 12, 6–7:15 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com NON-HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA SUPPORT March 13, 6–8 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events COLORECTAL CANCER SUPPORT March 15, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org OVARIAN CANCER SUPPORT March 15, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT March 17, 4–5:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

SURVIVING & THRIVING March 11 & 25, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

LEUKEMIA, LYMPHOMA & MYELOMA SUPPORT March 19, 3–4:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

SPANISH-SPEAKING CANCER SUPPORT March 12, 10 a.m.–noon Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-540-2610; ironwoodcrc.com

COLON CANCER SUPPORT March 20, 6–7 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com


Wednesday, March 5, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 5

LYMPHEDEMA SUPPORT March 24, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events METASTATIC CANCER SUPPORT March 26, 3–4:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com GENERAL CANCER SUPPORT March 27, 4:30–5:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 3645 S. Rome St. Gilbert Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

PARKINSON’S ART, DANCE, EXERCISE, SINGING, TAI CHI & YOGA Various dates, times & locations Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center Register: 602-406-6903 EDUCATION, ART, SINGING & EXERCISE (SPANISH) Various dates, times & locations Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center Register: 602-406-2453 FOR PATIENTS & CAREGIVERS (IN-DEPTH) Variousdates,locations;10a.m.–noon Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center Register: 602-406-6903 PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP Various dates, 10–11 a.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-4931 EDUCATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED March 13, 1:30–3 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-406-3840 PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP March 18, 3–5 p.m. By Benevilla at Shepherd of the Hills United Methodist Church 13658 Meeker Blvd., Sun City West 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

SENIORS WILL YOUR WILL BE KNOWN By Duet Various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022; DuetAZ.org HEALTHY COOKING DEMONSTRATION March 5, 10–11 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 HYPERTENSION & THE DASH DIET March 14, noon–1 p.m. Tempe St. Luke’s 1500 S. Mill Ave., Phoenix Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) WARNING SIGNS OF STOKE March 21, noon–1 p.m. By Tempe St. Luke’s at Tempe Public Library 3500 S. Rural Rd., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355)

BACK PAIN & SPINAL DISORDERS March 27, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) HIP PAIN TREATMENTS April 2, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

GASTROINTESTINAL INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS SUPPORT GROUP March 9, 2 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix 602-349-4611

PARENTING/ GRANDPARENTING GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN By Duet Various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022; DuetAZ.org CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION March 5 & 12, 6:30–9 p.m. Maryvale Hospital 5102 W. Campbell Ave., Phoenix 855-292-WELL; azhealthyhours.com SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS (S.T.O.P.) March 6, 13, 20 & 27, 7–9 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 161 N. Mesa Dr., Mesa 623-846-5464; SupportThroughOtherParents.org MOTHER-TO-MOTHER SUPPORT March 7 & 28, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 877-602-4111

OSTOMY SUPPORT March 16, 2–4 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 161 N. Mesa Dr., Mesa 480-812-0324

INFANT BRAIN DEVELOPMENT March 8, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Tempe St. Luke’s 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe Register: 480-784-5588

RESPIRATORY

SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS (S.T.O.P.) March 11, 18 & 25, 7–9 p.m. Larkspur Christian Church 3302 W. Larkspur Dr., Phoenix 623-846-5464; SupportThroughOtherParents.org

BETTER BREATHERS CLUB March 10, 2–4 p.m. By the American Lung Association at The Colonnade 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise 623-524-4048; breatheeasyaz.info LUNG TRANSPLANT SUPPORT GROUP March 11, 11:45 a.m.–1 p.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-7009 BETTER BREATHERS CLUB March 19, 2–3 p.m. By the American Lung Association at Chandler Regional Medical Center 1955 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 480-728-5655; breatheeasyaz.info

GUARDIANSHIP CLINIC March 14, 3–5 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix Register: 602-274-5022, ext. 31 SHARING DOWN SYNDROME PARENT GROUP March 27, 7–9 p.m. Mesa Student Services Building 1025 N. Country Club Dr., Mesa 480-926-6500; sharingds.org

WEIGHT LOSS

BETTER BREATHERS CLUB March 20, 5:30–7 p.m. By the American Lung Association at Gateway Community College 5090 N. 40th St., Phoenix 602-286-8507; breatheeasyaz.info

WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINARS Various dates, times & locations Bridges Center at St. Luke’s Register: 800-248-5553 Webinar: BridgesAZ.com

BRAIN

BARIATRIC SUPPORT GROUP April 1, 5–6:30 p.m. Bridges Center at St. Luke’s 555 N. 18th St., Phoenix Register: 602-251-8828

YOUNG ADULT BRAIN INJURY March 12, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-996-1396 or 602-406-6688 PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY SUPPORT GROUP March 15, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale 602-920-4632; tsebastiani@cox.net BRAIN ANEURYSM SUPPORT GROUP March 19, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 760-333-7658; Kimberly@ JoeNiekroFoundation.org BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP March 25, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 623-205-6446 BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP March 27, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-508-8024 or 602-406-6688

BREASTFEEDING BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP Various dates, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-4954

SPINAL CORD INJURY/ DISABILITY SPINAL CORD INJURY WOMEN’S DISCUSSION GROUP March 19, 6–7:30 p.m. DEC-Disability Empowerment Center 5025 E. Washington St., Phoenix Info: twocats345@msn.com MEN’S DISCUSSION GROUP March 20, 5:30–7 p.m. DEC-Disability Empowerment Center 5025 E. Washington St., Phoenix 602-980-3232; donp@abil.org

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT GROUPS HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE March 17, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-402-1774

Thinkstock

DOTTIE KISSINGER CHILDREN’S BEREAVEMENT CAMP

Helping children deal with the grief of losing a loved one

By Nick Kostenko

Established in 1999 and named after philanthropist Dorothy Kissinger, the Children’s Bereavement Camp is a free program sponsored by Banner Hospice. Held in the spring and fall just outside of Payson, the camp features activities and programs that help parents and children start the conversation about grief and loss. The camp takes place over a three-day weekend and features a number of activities involving the whole family, according to Rev. Cindy Darby, Banner Hospice Bereavement Coordinator. Banner staff and volunteers who are specialists in the area of grief lead the children during the program. The activities cover a wide range of interests including art, music and recreation.

Activities

One of the first activities involves the creation of a family memory mobile, where children cut out family pictures and introduce their family members. In addition, children are given the opportunity to make bird-feeders and share a fun story about their loved one.

BANNER GOOD SAMARITAN Poison & Drug Information Center Hotline: 800-222-1222

Participation

Participation is open to all children in the community who have suffered the loss of a family member. For more information on how to participate in this free event, call Rev. Darby at 480-657-1167 or email cindy.darby@bannerhealth.com.

Dates

Next session: April 4–6, 2014 (full; waiting list names are being taken) Fall camp: Oct. 24–26, 2014 More info: BannerHospice.com

PLAN AHEAD: APRIL

Grief Recovery Outreach Program What: Offered by Banner Hospice, this 12week Grief Recovery Outreach Program guides adult participants as they return to a full life after suffering any significant emotional loss including, but not limited to, loss through death.

Locations/dates: Various dates, times and locations, starting in April Cost: Free ($15 for handbook) Register: Rev. Cindy Darby, 480-657-1167 or cindy.darby@bannerhealth.com More info: BannerHospice.com

MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS

WOMEN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS March 29, 10 a.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 480-829-6563

POISON CONTROL

For other exercises, children and parents are separated. The kids are taken to paint memory boxes in honor of those who have died. During the first two nights and the final day of the camp, the children gather in a group circle, where they are able to share what they’re going through, oftentimes through songs. “Music is an important part of the camp. Often these songs mention death, remembering someone, or missing a loved one,” Darby said. “In discussing the lyrics, the children share their emotions. It provides an opening to talk about a difficult topic.”

Power of Prevention Event celebrating the expansion of Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center. Saturday, March 22, 9am-1pm US 60 & Higley Road

&".2).,2"... +++154(6*#%!%0163'/-3%$6!4

RSVP by calling (602) 230-CARE For seminar times visit BannerMDAnderson.com/Events

You can choose one doctor.

Or you can choose Mayo Clinic.

At Mayo Clinic, teams of experts work together to focus on one patient at a time. Each year, more than 75,000 Arizonans choose Mayo Clinic, and many health insurance plans include in-network coverage. Learn more at mayoclinic.org/arizona or call us at (800) 446-2279. PHOENIX/SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA | ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA | JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

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Learn About Medicare Advantage HMO Plans from Cigna. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 855.298.4382 (TTY 711).

WEEKLY

morning and afternoon seminars are available WHERE: Cigna Medical Group locations throughout the valley COST: Free seminar, receive a free no obligation gift

REGISTER: 855.298.4385

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ORAL, HEAD & NECK CANCER SUPPORT March 20, 6:30–8 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale 602-439-1192

NUTRITION & COOKING DEMONSTRATION March 26, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

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ESOPHAGEAL CANCER SUPPORT March 20, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org


6 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Mobility matters

Navigating the world of adaptive, assistive devices

Adaptive sports and fitness

By Kristine Burnett

One of the prevailing stereotypes surrounding physical disabilities is that individuals who rely on adaptive and/ or assistive devices are — or eventually become — inactive. Jennifer Longdon, a peer mentor for the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation who is living with paralysis due to a spinal cord injury, counters that thought saying, “For many of us, we remain active, sometimes even more than before. Mobility devices liberate us and allow us to live the full lives we choose to live.”

What to consider

While wheelchairs, scooters, walkers, canes and crutches are often top of mind, today’s mobility device market offers much more. Erika Feinberg, chief executive officer of Active Forever, a medical, safety, fitness and productivity products provider, highlights the importance of understanding the true functionality of a device before making what is often a significant financial investment. Included in her list of the most beneficial mobility devices are: • Rollators (lightweight walkers equipped with larger wheels and brakes) • Power chairs (motor-driven wheelchairs that are smaller and more portable) • Forearm crutches (crutches with arm braces for enhanced comfort and practicality) • Knee walkers (alternative to crutches for those with lower leg, ankle or foot injuries) When choosing a device, it is important to consider such things as: • Expected duration of disability (temporary or permanent) • Type of disability • Age and overall health status • Desired functionality (indoor, outdoor, terrain, portability, etc.) • Budget, including insurance coverage

Where to start

So where do you start? Feinberg suggests consulting an occupational or physical therapist. “They often know about the latest and greatest devices on the market, how they function and who is an ideal candidate for each,” she said. “For

“Physicallimitations donotmean yourlifeneeds toshrink.”

Jennifer Longdon

example, an athlete in his or her 30s will have very different needs and wants than a senior citizen with impairments. It’s about figuring out what’s right for each person and offering qualified guidance.”

How to find help

When it comes to covering the cost of mobility devices, insurance providers will sometimes cover only the basics. For example, while insurance may provide a manual wheelchair, someone who wants a power chair that may better suit their lifestyle could be left to pick up the tab. With coverage for mobility devices sometimes lacking, it’s important to know there are organizations that will rent or loan devices at low-cost and even no-cost. One prominent source for statewide information is Community Information and Referral Services (CIR). The organization’s website, cir.org, features a menu of resources in categories such as disability-related services, domestic violence, mental health, housing, senior services, transportation and more. You can also call the CIR hotline at 211 (yes, just 211…) to access a recorded list of services or to speak with someone who can provide you with additional information.

SpoFit is the Virginia G. Piper Sports and Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities at the Disability Empowerment Center, Arizona Bridge to Independent Living. It is located at 5031 E. Washington Street in Phoenix. | Arizona Bridge to Independent Living From ballroom dancing to skiing, golfing, cycling and more, physical activity is good for everyone, but requiring adaptations can present challenges. Fortunately, some cities, municipalities, foundations and nonprofit organizations offer programs that can help. For example, the City of Phoenix Adaptive Recreation department offers programs in adaptive swimming, golfing and more, while SpoFit is the Virginia G. Piper Sports and Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities at the Disability Empowerment Center, Arizona Bridge to Independent Living. SpoFit features a fitness center with universally adaptive fitness equipment, wheelchair-accessible weight machines, an aquatic area equipped with lifts and elevators, accessible locker rooms and more.

More info

City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation, Adaptive Recreation: phoenix.gov/parks/adaptiverec; 602-262-6861 River of Dreams: river-of-dreams.org; 602-290-0214; info@river-of-dreams.org SpoFit: spofit.org; 602-386-4566

Additional resources

Active Forever: activeforever.com; 480-767-6800; 800-377-8033 Arizona Bridge to Independent Living: abil.org; 602-256-2245 Arizona Spinal Cord Injury Association: azspinal.org; 602-507-4209; 888-889-2185 Arizona Statewide Independent Living Council: azsilc.org; 602-262-2900 (voice/TTY) Arizona Technology Access Program: For those looking for outdoor advenaztap.org; 602-728-9534; ture, River of Dreams is a local nonprofit 800-477-9921 operated in collaboration with the Christopher & Dana Reeve City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Foundation: christopherreeve.org; department; it operates in the SpoFit 800-225-0292 Center and offers programs such as River Rampage and Daring Adventures.

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER? Feel better soon with a quick visit to one of our urgent and immediate care locations. No appointment needed. Most insurance accepted. Five convenient locations. Extended hours including evenings and weekends.

Call 623-580-5800 JCL.com/minoremergencies

Affiliates of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network AR-0008154917-01

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Abrazo Health’s Meals To Go makes healthy meals a breeze

Being on the go doesn’t have to mean forgoing your health

Originally created for individuals with diabetes or heart conditions, Abrazo Health’s Meals To Go program has proven to be a hit with anyone looking for a healthy, affordable meal that you just pop in the microwave. Developed with guidance from hospital dietitians, each meal consists of approximately 500 calories.

Menu items

• • • • • • • •

Almond Chicken Beef Pot Roast Grilled Chicken Breast Fajitas Herb Baked Cod Roasted Red Pepper Pesto Penne Roasted Turkey Rosemary Pork Loin

• Fresh Spinach Walnut Salad • Whole Wheat Spaghetti with Marinara and Meatballs • Orange Chicken • Shrimp, Pork or Vegetable Chop Suey • Southwestern Salad or Wrap • Chicken Caesar Salad or Wrap • Homestyle Meatloaf

How to order

• Call 602-923-5660 or visit abrazohealth.com/mealstogo • Make your meal selections • Pay online or at time of pickup • Meals must be ordered 24 hours in advance • Meals can be picked up at any of six Abrazo hospitals Valley-wide • Cost: $7 per meal, including tax

CATARACT & REFRACTIVE SURGERY Scott A. Perkins, MD

As a nationally recognized ophthalmologist with Barnet Dulaney Perkins Eye Center, Dr. Perkins has performed over 50,000 cataract surgeries and over 10,000 vision correction procedures. As an innovator in the field of ophthalmology, he has participated in over 25 clinical trials for both pharmaceutical and ophthalmic devices. AR-0008169480-01

By Paula Hubbs Cohen

BARNET DULANEY PERKINS EYE CENTER Locations throughout Arizona www.GoodEyes.com 800-966-7000

FAMILY MEDICINE Vivek Kesara, MD

Dr. Kesara is a board-certified family practice physician who promotes early detection and the prevention of disease. He is also experienced in treating high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, asthma, COPD and depression. Dr. Kesara received his medical degree from the Ross University School of Medicine in the West Indies.

‘Healthy’ and ‘pizza’ in the same sentence? You bet! CHEESE

DOUGH • Use wheat flour or whole grain flour to make your dough; they add more fiber than white flour. For gluten-free dough, use brown rice flour or tapioca flour. • Go ‘thin crust’ to cut back on calories. SAUCE

• To make a simple homemade sauce,

use fresh tomatoes, garlic, oregano, parsley, onions and olive oil; salt and pepper to taste. • Healthy premade sauces are available in grocery stores, just be careful of the fat and sodium content.

• Use part-skim cheeses like ricotta

and mozzarella rather than whole milk cheeses. TOPPINGS

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While most people probably wouldn’t associate the word ‘pizza’ with ‘healthy’, Juan Carranza, the operations manager of foodservice for Paradise Valley Hospital and Abrazo Health’s Meals To Go, offers the following tips on how to make tasty, healthier homemade pizza:

Banner Health Center 1435 South Alma School Road, Chandler www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterChandler 480-668-1600

• Use lots of fresh veggies — spinach,

mushrooms, peppers of all colors, red onion, artichokes, eggplant and/or tomatoes are all great options. • Use chicken sausage or turkey sausage; both have less fat and sodium than pork sausage. Thinkstock

GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS Frank Fara, MD

Dr. Fara is dedicated to women’s health and wellness. He is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology and is affiliated with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr. Fara is a graduate of the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

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By Alison Stanton

Banner Health Clinic 13995 West Statler Blvd., Surprise www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterSurprise 623-478-3100

HOSPITALS John C. Lincoln Physician Network

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John C. Lincoln Physician Network and Scottsdale Healthcare have five locations for immediate and urgent care. Designed with convenience in mind, our walk-in centers treat illnesses and injuries that are urgent, but not life threatening. Our board-certified physicians help you get back to your best quickly. More information at JCL.com/minoremergencies. JOHN C. LINCOLN HEALTH NETWORK Health Care Provider 2500 West Utopia Rd. Suite 100, Phoenix JCL.COM 623-580-5800

An affiliate of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network

INTERNAL MEDICINE David Berrey, DO

Dr. Berrey specializes in chronic disease management, preventive medicine and weight management. Dr. Berrey is a graduate of the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Missouri. He completed his internship in West Virginia at Charleston Area Medical Center and his residency at Oklahoma State University Medical Center in Tulsa.

Working toward the same end.

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Knowing that everyone’s in this together.

Banner Health Center 1917 South Crismon Road, Mesa www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterEastMesa 480-610-7100

PAIN RELIEF Dr. Theodore Manos

Like combining 4 hospitals, an integrated network of physician practices and a health insurance organization with many plan options.

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Into one network. With one goal: Your good health.

Dr. Manos is a Board Certified Specialist in Anesthesiology and Pain Management. Specializing in procedures that can relieve lower back pain and help improve patient’s daily comfort level. Whether it’s arthritis, a herniated disc, sciatica or spinal stenosis of the lower back, his treatments can help patients regain mobility and functionality.

CIGNA MEDICAL GROUP Outpatient Surgery Center 3003 N. 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, Phoenix, AZ 85012 602.282.9600

PRIMARY CARE

Then giving you access to the entire network.

Janette Reeves, DO

Dr. Janette Reeves is a family physician, providing comprehensive primary care to patients ages 4 to over 100. She specializes in promoting overall health and wellness, by incorporating physical/ emotional/nutritional health. Dr. Reeves is a member of the Arizona Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians and Arizona Osteopathic Medical Association.

IASIS HEALTHCARE ARIZONA. Putting together the right kind of care, integrated network of physician practices and a health insurance organization with many plan options and services, all working together toward one goal your good health. In these uncommon times, it’s common sense health care. To

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at the most convenient time, in the most convenient place. With four hospitals, an

CIGNA MEDICAL GROUP 7000 N. 16th Street, #130, Phoenix, AZ 85020 602-567-1901

find out more, call 1-877-740-WELL (9355) or log onto yourAZhealth.com.

Quality. Caring. Close by.

Stay healthy and live well! Make an appointment today to visit any one of these quality health experts.

In Partnership with Physician Owners

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8 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Great expectations

Higher levels of care for newborns

„ continued from the cover

By Debra Gelbart

MIDWIVES: More and more women are

choosing a certified nurse midwife to care for them during pregnancy and delivery. Women can choose a midwife through their obstetrician’s office, independently, or through their delivery hospital. Each hospital system approaches midwifery differently. At Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center, for example, certified nurse midwives who work in an obstetrician’s office deliver the babies of a number of patients at the hospital, Ford said. “Certified nurse midwives get to know their patients very well,” she said, “and provide more individualized care, helping patients avoid medical interventions unless absolutely necessary.” At two Abrazo Health-owned facilities — Phoenix Baptist Hospital and Maryvale Hospital — partnerships with local midwifery groups help connect pregnant patients with certified nurse midwives, Shepherd said. St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center maintains a facility-based program with four certified nurse midwives on staff, Piccinati said. “Our midwife program gives patients the opportunity for a completely unmedicated natural delivery,” she added, noting that the midwives at St. Joseph’s average between 20 and 30 deliveries every month. (For more info on midwives, visit midwife.org.)

DOULAS: More pregnant women are choosing to have a ‘doula’ — a professional birthing coach who helps the mother through labor but doesn’t provide medical care — with them throughout the birthing process. “Evidence shows that doulas may reduce the likelihood of C-section by up to 28 percent,” Piccinati said. “I encourage all couples to consider having a doula attend their birth.” (For more info on doulas, visit dona.org.) PARTNERS: Partners are encouraged to stay with mom and baby overnight in the same hospital room, Shepherd said, so parents can learn together how to recognize baby’s cues for feeding, cuddling and diaper-changing. “When there are issues with soothing the baby or getting him to sleep or feed, they are more easily identified when mom, dad and baby are together in one room,” Ford said. JETTED TUBS AND MORE: Many hospitals offer jetted tubs in the bathrooms of birthing suites or

The March of Dimes estimates that 10 percent of all babies born in the U.S. every year are either premature or have a medical problem requiring care in a hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Stacey Piccinati, certified nurse midwife and birth consultant at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, talks with expectant mother Mindy Raisor of Gilbert about some of the various tools and techniques, such as using a therapy ball, that can make labor more comfortable. | Rick D’Elia

labor-delivery-recovery (LDR) rooms. “Our patients don’t deliver in those tubs,” Ford said, “but if the tub can relax a mom-to-be so that the only muscle in her body that’s working is her uterus, her labor time is often decreased.” Hospitals offer a variety of additional ways to help moms get through labor and deliver more comfortably, including therapy balls and more.

LEVEL II NICU: Some hospitals, such as Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center in Sun City West, can provide intermediate-level (called ‘Level II’) care for a newborn, said Karon Ford, the hospital’s director of women’s and infant services. “We are able to take care of infants at 32 weeks gestation,” Ford said. “We can handle respiratory issues, infections (and jaundice-related) issues.” If the baby was born before 32 weeks, or “if the baby needed surgery or long-term care, the infant may be transferred to a higher level of care facility.”

BABY CARE: Baby’s first well-checkup is typically conducted right in mom’s hospital room, creating the opportunity for the pediatrician to immediately explain the findings while also educating the parents about what to expect in the coming days, Satran said. Piccinati said most nursing care for the baby — including bathing, hearing screenings, medications and blood tests — can also be done bedside in mom’s hospital room. CELEBRATION MEALS: Celebration meals are offered to new parents at some hospitals, including Paradise Valley Hospital in Phoenix. “We offer a special meal at no charge that includes steak or shrimp once mom has transferred to postpartum care,” said Jean Revard, food service director for Paradise Valley Hospital, which is part of Abrazo Health. • Editor’s note: Where to give birth is a personal choice between parents-to-be and their healthcare provider. While we recognize that some parents are choosing to deliver at home, the focus of this article is on hospital birthing options. We intend to cover home-birthing options, resources and caveats in a future issue of Livingwell.

Andrea Sharfner (left), clinical nursing manager and NICU Parent Boot Camp instructor at St. Joseph’s, works with Maria Garcia, whose son was born prematurely. | Rick D’Elia

LEVEL III NICU: A woman whose pregnancy is considered high-risk likely will be advised to arrange to give birth in a hospital with a Level III NICU, such as Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center, said LoriAnn Satran, the nurse manager of OB couplet care at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea.

Increasingly, said Stacey Piccinati, a certified nurse midwife and the birth consultant for St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center (which also has a Level III NICU), parents of NICU babies are offered classes specifically tailored to their needs. There is a separate ‘boot camp’ class at St. Joseph’s, for example, just for families whose babies have been in the NICU, she said. At St. Joseph’s, about 600 babies are admitted to the NICU every year.

AFTER THE NICU: Any baby who spends at least five days in a NICU in Arizona qualifies to have home visits from a community health nurse through the Newborn Intensive Care Program, a program funded by the Arizona Department of Health Services and delivered through contracted agencies such as Southwest Human Development, a nonprofit organization that provides families with comprehensive early childhood services. During home visits, the nurse helps parents check their baby’s physical and developmental progress and gives them information about resources such as early intervention, financial assistance and counseling. There is no charge for this service. “Because this can be an extremely difficult time for families,” said Trudi Murch, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, director of services for children with disabilities at Southwest Human Development, “they really appreciate having someone who can be there to help them once they leave the safety of the NICU.”

More info:

Southwest Human Development: swhd.org/nicp, 602-266-5976 March of Dimes Arizona chapter: marchofdimes.com/Arizona, 602-266-9933

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LivingWell AZ March 2014