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Livingwell A SPECIAL PUBLICATION CREATED BY REPUBLIC MEDIA CUSTOM PUBLISHING

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HEALTHCARE NEWS YOU CAN USE FOR YOUR WHOLE FAMILY

APRIL 2014

IN THIS ISSUE | 2 Donate Life Month | 3 Health camps for kids | 4-5 Seniors: falls & caregiving | 6-7 Events & support groups

Buttonbatteries

The tiny batteries can be dangerous — or even deadly

T

New hope for children with heart failure | 8

By Meghann Finn Sepulveda

echnology today has become more compact than in the past, requiring smaller batteries to operate items like remote controls, hearing aids, car-key fobs, toys and even some greeting cards. Coin-shaped lithium button-batteries, when swallowed by a young child (or anyone else, for that matter…), pose a true medical emergency if the battery gets lodged in the esophagus. Burning can occur, causing severe and possibly permanent damage.

Two-hour window

The National Capital Poison Center estimates more than 3,500 people swallow button-batteries each year in the United States. While the majority of these batteries pass through the body and are harmless, they can sometimes get stuck in the esophagus, especially in children age 6 and younger.

If a child swallows a button-battery, “the clock is ticking. The quicker we can get the battery out, the less extensive the damage.”

— Gary Silber, M.D., division chief, pediatric gastroenterology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

“The flat shape and size of a button-battery, when lodged in the esophagus or the nose, creates a circuit between the tissue and causes burning,” said James Reingold, M.D., medical director, pediatric emergency department, Banner Children’s at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa. “There is a two-hour window of time for treatment before permanent damage and scarring occurs.”

Possible symptoms

Among other issues, possible symptoms of battery-swallowing include nausea, chest pain and gastrointestinal inflammation. “If the battery is stuck high in the esophagus, we sometimes see drooling and vomiting,” Reingold said. “When a child doesn’t respond to treatment or seems to be getting progressively worse, we order an X-ray.”

Emergency treatment

Medical attention should not be delayed if there is even a remote possibility that a child swallowed a button-battery. “The clock is ticking,” said Gary Silber, M.D., division chief, pediatric gastroenterology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, “The quicker we can get the battery out, the less extensive the damage.” Silber added that children may have complications for weeks or months after surgery and will most likely require dietary restrictions and additional procedures to remove scar tissue.

Resources

Banner Good Samaritan Poison Center: bannerhealth.com; 800-222-1222 National Capital Poison Center: poison.org; 202-625-3333

Emmett’s story

In 2010, a button-battery nearly took the life of a 1-year-old Arizona boy named Emmett when he swallowed a button-battery that burned through his esophagus. To help educate parents, grandparents and others about the danger of button-batteries, the young boy’s family launched Emmett’s Fight (EmmettsFight.com). The website contains not only Emmett’s story, but also information and resources related to button-battery ingestion.

New hope for hhelping your

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heart

Updates and advances in heart-related medications and technology | Story by Debra Gelbart • Photos by Rick D’Elia Here’s a startling statistic: an estimated 80 million Americans (one in three adults) have one or more types of heart disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). To find out what’s new in heart disease-related medications and technology, we spoke with several local experts; here’s what they had to say.

New cholesterol guidelines

"The leads may allow the introduction of infection into the heart, settling on and destroying the heart valves,” said Andrew Kaplan, M.D., a cardiac electrophysiologist with Banner Heart Hospital in Mesa, adding that the leads may break, requiring replacement or removal. A new subcutaneous (below the skin) implantable defibrillator system is now available. The S-ICD™ System eliminates transvenous leads (those that go through a blood vessel into the heart), “so we can avoid potential complications,” Kaplan said.

The CDC says up to 40 million Americans have high cholesterol, and last November, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association revised their guidelines for cholesterol management. “We’re no longer looking only at total cholesterol levels,” said Suzanne Sorof, M.D., a cardiologist in Mesa. “We’re taking a broader approach to who should be treated. It’s now recommended that all people with diabetes and everyone with any cardiovascular disease — regardless of their cholesterol levels — be prescribed a statin medication,” she said. She recommends that if your total fasting cholesterol is above 199, discuss with your doctor whether taking a statin medication is right for you.

Medications and medical devices

For the estimated 6 million Americans who suffer from heart failure (when the heart muscle can’t pump enough blood to the body to meet the body’s needs), “three or four common, affordable prescription medications taken daily can let most patients live with a high quality of life for another 20 to 30 years,” said Nancy Sweitzer, M.D., Ph.D., chief of cardiology and director at the Sarver Heart Center at The University of Arizona in Tucson. The medications include an ACE inhibitor, a beta blocker, an aldosterone blocking agent that blocks the effects of the steroid hormone aldosterone, and a diuretic such as Lasix. Heart failure can result from other forms of heart disease, Sweitzer said, including blockages of the arteries that can cause heart attacks, valvular disease or a serious virus that affects the heart. Symptoms of heart failure may include shortness of breath, fatigue and weakness, and swelling of the legs, ankles and feet, she said. Many heart failure patients may also need one of two medical devices to alleviate their symptoms, Sweitzer said. One is an implantable defibrillator that restarts the heart if it stops beating effectively; the other is a special cardiac resynchronization pacemaker that can “correct disordered contraction of an enlarged heart,” she said.

Subcutaneous defibrillators

Traditional implantable defibrillators for the prevention of cardiac death require the placement of ‘transvenous leads’ which are soft wires that carry signals from the heart and deliver shock energy to the heart.

AcardiacelectrophysiologistwithBannerHeartHospitalinMesa, Dr.AndrewKaplanrecentlyimplantedanewMRI-compatiblepacemakerin patientShirleyFleet.Here,heshowsherwhatthepacemakerlookslike.Kaplanisa principalinvestigator inaclinicaltrialevaluatingthepacemaker.

MRI-compatible pacemakers

Kaplan is also a principal investigator in a clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new MRI-compatible pacemaker. Conventional pacemakers aren’t compatible with MRI scanners because they’re made out of metal that interferes with the way magnetic resonance imaging operates. “Elderly patients are twice as likely to need MRIs as younger patients. This is also the population most likely to have a condition requiring pacemaker implantation,” he said. Data from the clinical trial is expected to be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for consideration within a year. “We hope to move toward replacing traditional pacemakers with this one if it receives FDA approval,” he said. „ continues on page 8

a-z H E A LT H C A R E N E W S B R I E F S

Banner MD Anderson opens outpatient addition Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center recently opened the second phase of its outpatient facility, a major addition that expands specialty cancer treatment services and prevention programs in Arizona. The three-story addition includes The James M. Cox Center for Cancer Prevention and Integrative Oncology, additional clinic and infusion space, a separate hematology/stem cell transplant clinic and expanded radiation oncology space. More info: BannerMDAnderson.com

Chandler Regional named Level 1Trauma Center Chandler Regional Medical Center has been designated as a provisional Level I Trauma Center by the Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center Trauma System. Previously, critically injured patients in the East Valley were transported to Phoenix or Scottsdale for treatment. The trauma team includes specialists such as anesthesiologists, emergency physicians, hand surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons, trauma critical care surgeons, nurses and ancillary services. Chandler Regional Medical Center

More info: ChandlerRegional.org


2 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, April 2, 2014

†5

frequently asked questions

about organ donation

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April is National Donate Life Month

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Sixteen years ago, Robert Scanlan thought he was healthy — until his wife made an off-the-cuff comment about the roundness of his belly. Days later, a physician determined Scanlan’s liver was failing and before he knew it, his world was turned upside down: he needed a liver transplant. Ten years later, when that liver failed, he was fortunate enough to receive a second organ, plus a new kidney. Scanlan said he is eternally grateful to the donors whose life-saving organs gave him not only the time to pen a book about his life’s experience, Tigers Under My Bed: Life Lessons Tamed During Three Organ Transplants, but also the opportunity to meet his grandchildren. “You’re talking to the luckiest guy you’ll ever meet,” he said. — Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

Livingwella-z

M

By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

ore than 47 percent of Arizona residents are registered organ donors, according to Jacqueline Keidel, spokeswoman for Donor Network of Arizona, the sole non-profit, federally designated organ procurement organization in the state and the organization behind Donate Life Arizona. “The nearly 500 individuals [who received organ donations last year] are people who now get to watch their children grow up, go back to work or spend time with their grandchildren,” Keidel said, noting that the state’s five transplant centers are the Mayo Clinic, The University of Arizona Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Medical Center and Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center. “Organ donation is truly a generous and selfless act,” she added. It turns out that now is the perfect time to register as an organ donor. That’s because April is National Donate Life Month, an annual celebration to honor those who have made the choice to donate organs, tissue, marrow or blood, and a great opportunity for organ procurement organizations to encourage more folks to sign up.

April 2014 | Vol. 4, No. 4

Living Well A-Z publishes on the first Wednesday of the month. From A to Z, we tackle a broad range of health issues and offer resources to find more specific information. For questions concerning content in this publication, please contact Editor Paula Hubbs Cohen.

This year’s big awareness event for Donate Life Arizona is the April 11 game between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Los Angeles Dodgers, where donors’ family members, as well as organ and tissue recipients, will be recognized during a special ceremony. On-site organ donor registration will also be available. If you can’t make it to the game, organ donors can also register three other ways: • Online at donatelifeaz.org • Call 800-94-DONOR (36667) • Check the organ donor box when applying for a state ID card or driver's license

Specialty license plates

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Last year, 180 organ donors saved the lives of 492 people in Arizona The luckiest guy

Can someone be too old to donate? The criteria for donation are changing constantly. Today, anyone can be considered for organ and/or tissue donation, regardless of age or illness. No one should exclude him/herself from the possibility of donating on the basis of age or medical history. Is there a cost to the donor family for donation? There is no cost to the donor’s estate or insurance company for anything related to donation. What can be donated? Organs that can be donated include the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, pancreas and small intestine. Tissues include skin, bones, veins, heart valves, tendons, ligaments and corneas. Can organs be given to different racial and ethnic groups? While organ size is important to match donor and recipient hearts, livers and lungs, genetic makeup between kidney and pancreas donors and recipients can be more critical. For example, an Hispanic person may‘match’better with a kidney donated from another Hispanic person, but this is not always the case. What about funeral arrangements? Donation does not affect customary funeral arrangements.

Keidel said there’s another way to drive home the importance of organ donation: buy a specialty license plate to support the cause. In Arizona, purchasing a ‘Donate Life’ license plate is available to all motorists, with $17 of the $25 application fee going to the New Life Society, a nonprofit charity that supports organ transplant recipients and their caregivers. The specialty plate has an annual renewal fee of $25. “We support the donor side and their families,” Keidel said, “and New Life supports the other end — the recipient of that gift.”

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Source: Donor Network of Arizona; dnaz.org; 602-222-2200

Additional resources Arizona Department of Transportation (for information regarding specialty license plates): • servicearizona.com • 602-255-0072 (Phoenix) • 520-629-9808 (Tucson) • 800-251-5866 (elsewhere) Donate Life Arizona: donatelifeaz.org; 602-222-2200; 800-94-DONOR (36667) New Life Society: newlifesociety.org, 602-277-2661

A division of The Arizona Republic, 200 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ 85004. For general advertising inquiries, contact Republic Media at 602-444-8000. General Manager: CAMI KAISER ckaiser@republicmedia.com Creative Development Director: ISAAC MOYA imoya@republicmedia.com

Editor: PAULA HUBBS COHEN paula.cohen@cox.net; 602-444-8658 Contributing Editor: JIM WILLIAMS jlwilliams@republicmedia.com

Senior Managing Art Director: TRACEY PHALEN tphalen@republicmedia.com Design: CRAIG KURTZ craigrkurtz@gmail.com

Editorial Coordinator: NICK KOSTENKO nkostenko@republicmedia.com Advertising: RHONDA PRINGLE rpringle@republicmedia.com; 602-444-4929

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 3

Happy campers!

†

A sampling of health-related summer camps for kids

Contact camps directly for detailed information on registration, program details, costs (if applicable) and requirements.

Health-related camps let kids be kids and not patients

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By Nick Kostenko

eing a kid is hard enough. But when your child or grandchild has a traumatic injury, chronic disease or disability, it can get even tougher. Luckily, Arizona is home to a number of summer camps that allow kids with similar health issues to let loose, build confidence and become part of a social circle whose members understand that who you are as a person is not based on your past diagnosis. Many of the camps are held in northern Arizona, where the mild summer weather allows campers to escape the Valley heat. Others, such as Camp Soaring Eagle, for children diagnosed with serious illnesses, offer trips to out-of-state locations such as Connecticut and Kentucky. Camps range from a long weekend to an entire week and offer a variety of traditional and non-traditional camp activities. One such camp is Lions Camp Tatiyee, located at an elevation of about 7,000 feet above sea level on the Mogollon Rim in Pinetop-Lakeside. The 88-acre camp was started so that kids with special needs could escape to the mountains and meet new friends.

“The most incredible part for our kids is being with other people who are going through the same things they are, and realizing they are not going through it alone,” she said. “The other essential aspect is that they have a chance to get out from under any stigmas, which allows them to soar and build confidence. I don’t think you can put a price on that.”

Wide range of camps

There are numerous camps in Arizona that offer similar programs designed to help children with a wide range of diagnoses, including diabetes, cancer and asthma. Every camp (see sidebar) has its own registration guidelines. Some, such as Camp Tatiyee, are free, while others charge a fee that can sometimes be subsidized through scholarships. To learn more about these programs, contact the group directly, or seek out an opinion from your healthcare provider or from a support group dedicated to your child’s particular diagnosis. Visit acacamps.org for a complete list of summer camps that are accredited by the American Camp Association.

CAMP SOARING EAGLE A non-profit that provides camps for kids diagnosed with cancer, HIV/AIDS, hemophilia and many other serious illnesses Ages: 7–17 When: Variety of dates Where: Camp Verde as well as out-of-state trips Info: 928-284-9393; campsoaringeagle.org CAMP TATIYEE By the Lions Foundation for kids and adults diagnosed with a variety of special needs Ages: Varies When: Variety of dates Where: Pinetop/Lakeside Info: 480-380-4254; arizonalionscamp.org CAMP PAZ By Stepping Stones of Hope for kids who have lost a loved one Ages: 6–18 When: April 26–27 Where: Payson Info: 602-264-7520; steppingstonesofhope.org

CAMP CANDLELIGHT By the Epilepsy Foundation of Arizona for kids diagnosed with epilepsy Ages: 8–15 When: May 25–31 Where: Prescott Info: 602-406-3581; epilepsyaz.org CAMP NOT-A-WHEEZE By the American Lung Association for kids diagnosed with asthma Ages: 7–14 When: May 31–June 6 Where: Prescott Info: 602-258-7505; lungarizona.org CAMP AZDA By the Arizona Diabetes Association for kids diagnosed with diabetes Ages: 8–16 When: June 7–14 Where: Prescott Info: 602-861-4731; diabetes.org

CAMP COURAGE By the Arizona Burn Foundation for kids who are/have been burn patients Ages: 6–15 When: June 8–14 Where: Prescott Info: 602-230-2041; azburn.org SUNRISE SIDEKICKS By the American Cancer Society for siblings of kids diagnosed with cancer Ages: 8–16 When: July 12–18 Where: Payson Info: 602-778-7629; azcampsunrise.org CAMP SUNRISE By the American Cancer Society for kids diagnosed with cancer Ages: 8–16 When: July 20–26 Where: Payson Info: 602-778-7629; azcampsunrise.org

For the kids

“All the activities are accommodated for the kids,” said Pam Swanson, executive director for Lions Camp Tatiyee. “We do a lot of traditional activities, like art, science and outdoor recreation. But there is also a facility next door that allows us to bring the kids go-karting.” The program, Swanson said, helps campers make connections with fellow children. Many of the kids often do not have opportunities to express themselves in a safe, welcoming environment. And that, Swanson said, makes all the difference.

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4 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, April 2, 2014

The very real dangers of falling †

Safety tips for

fall-proofing your home

‘I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!’ is no joke for seniors

“There are several senior exercise programs in the Valley that cater to fall prevention and building muscle strength.”

By Alison Stanton With additional reporting by Susan Fuchs

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— Sonja Smith, MSW, outreach program manager on injury prevention, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Trauma and Emergency Services

ccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of injury death among adults aged 65 and older. “In 2005, over 15,000 Americans age 65 and up died from injuries related to falling and this number has gone up significantly over the last few years,” said Beth Tucker, computer coordinator for Duet: Partners In Health & Aging, a nonprofit founded by the Church of the Beatitudes to improve the quality of life for Valley seniors. Darrel Christenson is vice president for community integration for Arizona Bridge to Independent Living (ABIL), an advocacy and assistance organization for people of all ages with disabilities. Christenson, who also serves as a member of the Arizona Fall Prevention Coalition, said that in Arizona in 2012, falls led to 32,615 emergency department visits, 11,605 inpatient stays (of which 5,500 were due to hip fractures) and 676 deaths.

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Prevention is key

“Healthcare professionals look at balance, flexibility and strength, which are all important in fall prevention,” Tucker said. “A lot of elderly people do not exercise

regularly and around 35 percent over age 65 do not participate in any physical activity.” Regular exercise improves both strength and balance. “I spend a lot of time working with older clients to strengthen the dorsi flexors (the muscles that lift the front of the foot up, i.e., the toes toward the shin) in their feet,” Beard said. “These are key muscles that, when weak, can lead to shuffling. Strengthening these muscles improves walking and helps prevent tripping and falls.” It is also important for seniors to speak with their doctors and pharmacists about over-the-counter and prescribed medications, Smith said. “Ask about side effects and interactions between multiple

also works with other state and federal agencies to connect people with financial ability with reputable contractors who can complete necessary renovations professionally and cost-effectively. In addition to professional installation of durable medical equipment such as Fall-proofing a home grab-bars, it is essential that individuals Duet offers qualified individuals a home and their caregivers know how to safety survey that identifies hazards properly use the equipment, said Dorothy based on a checklist developed with SRP, Kelly, caregiver services coordinator Tucker said. “We can help make minor modifications for improved safety. We can with the Foundation for Senior Living. “We have a demonstration lab where refer people to other organizations that we train family caregivers. We teach how make major modifications.” to modify bathrooms, bedrooms and “For qualified homeowners in Phoenix, Mesa, Glendale and Peoria, ABIL has federal kitchens to improve safety, and how to correctly assist their loved ones in using funding to provide home modifications the items,” she said. to prevent falls,” Christenson said. ABIL medications that may cause dizziness or drowsiness,” she said. In addition, annual eye exams are important, Smith said. Changes in vision can occur quickly and can lead to a fall.

We offer support and guidance every stepalong the way.

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Dr. Ian Komenaka is the director of the Breast Center at Maricopa Medical Center. He specializes in Breast Surgical Oncology and performs genetic cancer risk assessment. Dr. Komenaka received his education at the University of Hawaii and completed his fellowship at Columbia University in New York, NY.

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Dr. Burke received his medical degree from the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Burke is Board Certified in Cardiology, and Echocardiography. Dr. Burke has special interests in the areas of cardiac imaging, echocardiography, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, preventive cardiology and sports cardiology.

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Dr. Fintelmann provides excellence in care of corneal disease, cataract and vision correction surgery (including LASIK and ICL). He performs a range of procedures including partial, full thickness and laser assisted corneal transplants (DSAEK, DMEK, DALK). In addition, he teaches residents and medical students.

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Resources Area Agency on Aging: aaaphx.org, 602-264-4357 (HELP) Arizona Bridge to Independent Living: abil.org, 602-256-2245 Arizona Fall Prevention Coalition: azstopfalls.org, 602-264-4357 (HELP) Foundation for Senior Living: fsl.org, 602-285-1800

Who is at risk

At greatest risk of falling, said Sonja Smith, MSW, outreach program manager on injury prevention for Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Trauma and Emergency Services, are “seniors who have poor upper and lower body strength, may be on several medications, have poor vision and balance, safety hazards in their home and a history of falls.” “Fear is also a factor,” said Cristina Beard, lead physical therapist for the Foundation for Senior Living. “Lack of confidence affects posture. It causes people to curl forward and shrink their range of motion, which leads to muscle weakness and imbalance. That makes it more difficult to recover if someone trips.”

• Place all items used daily on an easy-to-reach shelf • Improve everyday lighting, inside and outside tUse night-lights in hallways, bathrooms, stairways and doors tAdd grab-bars inside and outside the tub; do not rely on towel racks • Place non-slip mats in the tub and on the shower and bathroom floors tIn case you do fall, consider subscribing to a ‘medic alert’ system and/or always keep a phone close to you in case of an emergency tBe aware of and keep track of pets so you don’t trip over them • Get properly trained in the use of durable medical equipment • Remove or secure all throw rugs • Rearrange furniture to create wider pathways • Make sure wires and cords are out of the pathways • Remove clutter from doorways, hallways and by stairs

MARICOPA INTEGRATED HEALTH SYSTEM 2601 E. Roosevelt St. Phoenix, Arizona 85008 www.MIHS.org 602-344-5011 AR-0008186354-01


Wednesday, April 2, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 5

†

A sampling of resources

M

By Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell

Area Agency on Aging aaaphx.org; 602-264-2255; 888-783-7500 • Senior Adult Independent Living program (provides assistance with daily living) • Care Partners Reaching Out workshops (helps caregivers develop skills for caring for those with dementia or memory loss) Arizona Caregiver Coalition azcaregiver.org; 888-737-7494 • Lifespan respite voucher • Caregiver training and education Benevilla benevilla.org; 623-584-4999 (TTY: 711) • Adult day centers; caregiver support groups • Home-delivered meals; in-home volunteer services Duet duetaz.org, 602-274-5022 • Volunteer respite assistance • Workshops, support groups and seminars Hospice of the Valley hov.org, 602-530-6900 • Arizona Palliative Home Care (for patients with late-stage chronic illnesses who may still be getting treatment) • Senior Placement Service (referral service that helps family caregivers find suitable living arrangements) • Palliative Care for Dementia (for patients not yet eligible for hospice services)

aybe you find yourself helping your mom, who needs help preparing meals and getting around. Or perhaps your childhood sweetheart of 50 years requires round-the-clock care. Whatever the situation, chances are good that many folks will, at some point in their lives, be caring for an aged loved one. What’s more, it’s not unusual for caregivers to be older, too. But no matter their age, experts say, caregivers need to be aware of the physical, emotional and financial toll this difficult and often selfless work can exact on an individual. Recognizing the risks is critical and can be, literally, the difference between life and death — for the caregiver.

Senior caregiving Valuable work, but it can take a toll

“It’s incredibly important to find out about available resources and to ask for help,” said Becky Feola, owner of a Valleybased assisted living counseling service. “It’s more common than people think that caregivers become ill and die before their care recipients.”

Put your needs first

Some of caregiving’s most brutal aspects, Feola noted, are the inherent physical challenges. One might need to lift a loved one in the event of a fall, for example, or transfer him from the bed to the toilet several times a day. For a younger, able-bodied person, these tasks can be demanding, but for an older person, they can be nearly — or completely — impossible. In addition, Feola said, caregivers often become so caught up in providing care for someone else that they neglect their own health. It’s not unusual for them to forego their own doctor and medical appointments because caregiving duties get in the

way. Nothing could be worse, Feola said. They, in particular, should get regular exercise, eat well-balanced meals and take care of their own medical needs. David Besst, caregiver support specialist with the Arizona Department of Economic Security’s Division of Aging and Adult Services, said caregivers need to think of the scenario used by the airline industry: to best assist others in the event of an emergency, you first have to put on your own oxygen mask. The same concept is true for caregiving. “You have to take care of yourself first before you can help anyone else,” he said.

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However, do your due diligence first, she suggested, and: • tour the care center you’re interested in, meet the staff, learn about services and activities, and gauge if your loved one will feel comfortable • verify that caregivers are statecertified and that the facility is licensed by the state • ask for and follow up on references

Feelings of isolation

Feelings of isolation can also be part of the caregiver experience. Kathy Melamed is clinical communication director for Hospice of the Valley. She said that when a diagnosis is first given, families typically rally around a patient Respite care important and direct their energy to the immediate Perhaps the most important resource that crisis. But as time goes on, and particumany caregiving specialists recommend larly if the illness is a chronic one with an to caregivers is respite care. This tempoextended duration, people’s involvement rary short-term aid, which may be offered naturally subsides. either in-home by a hired employee or at “Kids who have come into town to help a facility, allows a caregiver to get a much- go back to their homes, and friends who needed break from their responsibilities. want to help have other demands in their Adult day care is another option for life,” Melamed said. caregivers in need of a breather. Feola said this kind of situation is also good Tempers can flare inasmuch as it brings a set of “new eyes” It’s important to be aware of and recogto a situation and offers different mental nize the emotions that come into play stimulation from the usual care setting. when family members have different

viewpoints about what’s best for their loved one. Tempers can flare, for example, if siblings residing in different parts of the country disagree with their mother’s local caregiver. Melamed said Hospice of the Valley support teams work to help families understand what’s happening to their loved one, physically and otherwise, and aim to keep everyone on the same page. “It’s not unusual for a remote loved one to be critical of the patient’s caregiver,” Melamed said. “We may suggest regular phone or online meetings so that everyone is getting regular communication. We help people anticipate the issues.” Editor’s note: In a future issue of Livingwell, we'll address additional topics related to senior caregiving including financial stressors, medical power of attorney and recognizing the need for assisted care.

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6 | Livingwell a-z | Wednesday, April 2, 2014

APRIL

Take advantage of opportunities to meet others with similar issues and learn more about various aspects of your health — from A to Z. Allgroupsandeventsarebelieved, butnotguaranteed,tobefreeunless otherwisestated.Everyefforthasbeen madetoverifyaccuracy,butpleasecall beforeattendingtoconfirmdetails.

WELLNESS MEDICATION CHECKS Call to schedule an appointment. St. Luke’s Medical Center, 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital, 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) FITNESS & WELLNESS PROGRAM Various dates, 1–2 p.m. Paradise Valley Hospital 3805 W. Bell Rd., Phoenix 602-923-5648 WALK-ERCIZE CLASS Various dates, 9–9:45 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 ATHLETES INJURY PREVENTION & TREATMENT April 3, 6:30–7:30 p.m. By Midwestern University at Phoenix-Juniper Library 1825 W. Union Hills Dr., Phoenix 602-262-4636 NUTRITIONAL COOKING CLASS April 9, 6–7:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events BREAST HEALTH April 10, 9:30 a.m. Banner Del E. Webb 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City 602-230-2273 INTIMACY & HORMONES April 10, 10:30 a.m. Banner Del E. Webb 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City 602-230-2273 HEALTHY FEET April 12, 10 a.m.–noon By St. Luke’s at Hilton Phoenix Chandler 2929 W. Frye Rd., Chandler Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) BONE HEALTH April 16, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 AFFORDABLE MEAL PLANNING April 23, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 VITAMINS, NUTRIENTS & WELLNESS April 30, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

CAREGIVERS CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP April 9, 2:30 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) CAREGIVER SUPPORT April 14 St. Joseph’s 114 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-406-6688 CAREGIVING SUPPORT GROUP April 18, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP April 19, 10 a.m.–noon Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

GRIEF LIVING WITH LOSS April 8 & 22, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org GRIEF SUPPORT April 10 & 24 St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-406-3275 GRIEF BEFORE LOSS April 25 10–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

KNEES, HIPS & SPINE KNEE PAIN: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW April 2, 3–4 p.m. By St. Luke’s at Foothills Golf Club 2201 E. Clubhouse Dr., Phoenix Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) ROBOTIC KNEE SURGERY PRESENTATION April 7, 6–7:30 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Scottsdale Orthopedic Institute 20401 N. 73rd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; azkneereplacement.com

INNOVATIVE TREATMENTS FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS April 9, 6 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) HIP REPLACEMENT PRESENTATION April 17, 6–7:30 p.m. By Scottsdale Healthcare at Scottsdale Orthopedic Institute 20401 N. 73rd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; azhipreplacement.com SPINAL SURGERY PRESENTATION April 28, 6–7:30 p.m. Scottsdale Healthcare 7400 E. Thompson Peak Pkwy, Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; scottsdalespinesurgery.com

PAIN JOINT PAIN CLUB April 21, 10 a.m. Banner Boswell 10401 W. Thunderbird Rd., Sun City 623-832-5710

HEART/STROKE STROKE PREVENTION & SCREENING April 9, 5:30–7:30 p.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale 602-230-2273 STROKE SUPPORT GROUP April 16, 1 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

a-z TOP EVENTS

Please call to confirm reservations and cost (if any).

STARTS APRIL 610 GRIEF RECOVERY OUTREACH PROGRAM WHAT: Twelve-week program guides adults as they return to a full life after suffering a significant emotional loss including, but not limited to, loss through death. WHEN/WHERE: April 6–June 15 Sundays: 6:30–8:30 p.m. Banner Thunderbird 5555W.ThunderbirdRd.,Glendale April 7–June 16 Mondays: 6:30–8:30 p.m. Banner Gateway 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert April 8–June 24 Tuesdays: 6:30–8:30 p.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa April 9–June 25 Wednesdays: 10 a.m.–noon Banner Heart 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa April 9–June 25 Wednesdays: 6:30–8:30 p.m. Messinger Mortuary 7601 E. Indian School Rd., Scottsdale April 10–June 26 Thursdays 1–3 p.m. Banner Del E. Webb 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City West PRESENTED BY: Banner Hospice COST: Event is free; $15 for The Grief Recovery Handbook (may be purchased in advance or at meeting) INFO/REGISTER: 480-657-1167; cindy.darby@bannerhealth.com

EXERCISE & CARDIAC HEALTH April 22, 10:30–11:30 a.m. Banner Boswell 13180 N. 103rd Ave., Sun City 623-832-5650

APRIL 12

APRIL 16 & 23

BAEHR CHALLENGE FAMILY FUN OBSTACLE COURSE RACE WHAT: 5K obstacle course, food, music and more to create awareness of fitness as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease while also funding scientific research. WHERE: Aviano Park at Desert Ridge, 22500 N. Aviano Way, Phoenix TIME: 8 a.m.–noon COST: Varies INFO/REGISTER: 480-951-6363; baehrchallenge.org

COMMUNITY HEALTH FORUM WHAT: Meet leaders of the new regional behavioral health system, participate in health screenings and learn about area health organizations. WHEN/WHERE: April 16: Partners in Recovery, 5625 W. Bell Rd., Glendale April 23: Mountain Health and Wellness, 625 N. Plaza Dr., Apache Junction TIME: 3–6 p.m. PRESENTED BY: Mercy Maricopa Integrated Care COST: Free INFO: 602-453-6021; MercyMaricopa.org

APRIL 12 COMMUNITY WELLNESS DAY WHAT: Family-centric event includes giveaways and health screenings. WHERE: AdelanteCommunityHealth Center, 1705 W. Main St., Mesa TIME: 8 a.m.–noon PRESENTED BY: A.T. Still University and Adelante Healthcare COST: Free INFO: 480-219-6015

APRIL 26

RECENT ADVANCES IN PEDIATRIC EPILEPSY WHAT: For parents of children with seizure disorders. WHERE: Phoenix Children’s Hospital, 1920 E. Cambridge Ave., Phoenix TIME: 8 a.m.–12:30 p.m. COST: Free INFO/REGISTER: 602-406-5921; phoenixchildrens.org/events

CHILDREN OF INCARCERATED PARENTS WHAT: Workshop to provide resources and assist grandparents raising grandchildren with answering questions children may have regarding visitation and communication with their incarcerated parents. WHERE: Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church, 918 S. Litchfield Ave., Goodyear TIME: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. PRESENTED BY: Duet COST: Free INFO/REGISTER: Required by April 18; 602-274-5022

APRIL 15

APRIL 26

APRIL 12

EYES & DISEASE DIAGNOSIS WHAT: How eye exams can help diag gnose diabetes, high blood diagnose pres ssure, high cholesterol, etc. pressure, WHERE: E: Glendale Foothills Library, 1905 055 N. 57th Ave., Glendale 19055 TIME: 6: 6:30–7:30 p.m. PRESEN NTED BY: MidwesternUniversity PRESENTED COST: Free INFO: 623-930-3868

INFERTILITY AWARENESS SEMINAR WHAT: How to become healthyy enough to get pregnant; also, the various causes of infertility.

WHERE: Banner Thunderbird, 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale TIME: 9 a.m.–noon COST: Free INFO/REGISTER: 602-230-2273

APRIL 26 HEALTH & RESOURCE FAIR WHAT: Information plus screenings for glucose, blood pressure, pregnancy, height and weight. Also ask-a-doc and nutritional education. WHERE: South Central Family Health Center (part of the Maricopa Integrated Health System/MIHS), 33 W. Tamarisk, Phoenix TIME: 9 a.m.–noon COST: Free INFO: 602-344-1897; MIHS.org

MAY 4 CYCLE FOR THE CURE WHAT: Two-hour stationary-cycling (spinning) event. Funds raised go for cancer research. WHERE: • Gainey Village Health Club & Spa, 7477 E. Doubletree Ranch Rd., Scottsdale • DC Ranch Village Health Club & Spa, 18501 N. Thompson Peak Pkwy., Scottsdale • Studio 360, 3627 E. Indian School Rd., Phoenix • Camelback Village Racquet and Health Club, 4444 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix PRESENTED BY: Translational GenomicsResearchInstitute(TGen) COST: $200 (tax-deductible) INFO/REGISTER: 602-343-8572; tgenfoundation.org/cycle

DIABETES TAKING CONTROL OF DIABETES Various dates, 6–7 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Hospital 2040 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix 602-841-5505; pastoralcareaz.org DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP April 3 & May 1, 7–8 p.m. The Nutrition Professionals 2158 N. Gilbert Rd., Mesa Register: 480-216-1635; Nicole@nutritionpro.net DIABETES HEALTH MANAGEMENT TALK April 14, 10:15–11:15 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP April 14, 3 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) Thinkstock

ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT GROUP April 4, 9–11 a.m. By Benevilla at Birt’s Bistro 16752 N. Greasewood St., Surprise 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org LEWY BODY DEMENTIA & RELATED CONDITIONS April 4, 12:30–2 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

LEWY BODY DEMENTIA April 24, 1–2:30 p.m. Arbor Rose Senior Care 6033 E. Arbor Ave., Mesa 480-641-2531 MEMORY SCREENING EVENT April 25, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

BREAST CANCER

ALZHEIMER’S & MEMORY SUPPORT GROUP April 8, 15, 22 & 29, 10 a.m.–noon By Benevilla at Faith Presbyterian Church 16000 N. Del Webb Blvd., Sun City 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

BOSOM BUDDIES SUPPORT GROUPS Various dates, times & locations Ahwatukee/Chandler: 480-893-8900 East Valley: 480-969-4119 Northwest Valley: 623-236-6616 West Valley: 623-979-4279

COMMUNICATION TIPS TO AVOID ARGUMENTS April 10 & 16, 11:30 a.m. Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT April 14, 2–4 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

PLANNING AHEAD CLASS FOR CAREGIVERS April 14, 10 a.m.–noon Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850

BREAST BUDS SUPPORT GROUP April 19, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. MidFirst Bank Conference Room 6508 W. Bell Rd., Glendale 480-657-0500; breastbuds.org

ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVERS April 15, 12:30–2 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix Register: 602-274-5022 FOR CAREGIVERS: AFTER THE DEMENTIA DIAGNOSIS April 17 & 21, various times Banner Alzheimer’s Institute 901 E. Willetta St., Phoenix 602-839-6850 ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP April 20, 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Huger Mercy Living Center 2345 W. Orangewood Ave., Phoenix 602-406-5600 ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP April 21, 1:30–3 p.m. By Tempe St. Luke’s at Pyle Adult Recreation Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355)

TRIPLE NEGATIVE SUPPORT April 23, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community AZ at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

CANCER SUPPORT GROUPS CANCER SUPPORT FOR CHILDREN April 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30, 10 a.m. Banner Desert 1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa 480-412-5578 CANCER SUPPORT INFO MEETING April 2, 16 & 30, 10–11 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org ORAL, HEAD & NECK CANCER SUPPORT April 2, 3–4:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers

685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

LOOK GOOD, FEEL BETTER April 7, 4–6 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-855-2224; ironwoodcrc.com

MULTIPLE MYELOMA SUPPORT April 3, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

SURVIVING & THRIVING April 8 & 22, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

GENERAL CANCER SUPPORT April 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2–4 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER SUPPORT April 9, 6–7:15 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT April 3, 6–7:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org

NON-HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA SUPPORT April 10, 6–8 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events LYMPHOMA SUPPORT April 12, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org PANCREATIC CANCER SUPPORT April 12, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 7

I N F O R M AT I O N O N L I N E

ABRAZO HEALTH CARE: AbrazoHealth.com AZ Heart Institute and AZ Heart, Arrowhead, Maryvale, Paradise Valley, Phoenix Baptist and West Valley hospitals BANNER HEALTH: BannerHealth.com BARROW NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE: TheBarrow.org CARDON CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER: BannerHealth.com CHANDLER REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER: ChandlerRegional.org JOHN C. LINCOLN HOSPITAL: JCL.com MARICOPA INTEGRATED HEALTH SYSTEM: mihs.org MAYO CLINIC: MayoClinic.com MERCY GILBERT MEDICAL CENTER: MercyGilbert.org MOUNTAIN VISTA MEDICAL CENTER: MVMedicalCenter.com

MUHAMMAD ALI PARKINSON CENTER: TheBarrow.org/NeurologicalServices PHOENIX CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL: PhoenixChildrens.org SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE: SHC.org ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER: StJosephs-Phx.org ST. LUKE’S MEDICAL CENTER: StLukesMedCenter.com TEMPE ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL: TempeStLukesHospital.com CARCINOID SUPPORT April 12, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org LUNG CANCER SUPPORT April 12, 1–2:30 p.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register: 602-712-1006; rsvp@cscaz.org LEUKEMIA, LYMPHOMA & MYELOMA SUPPORT April 16, 3–4:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org COLON CANCER SUPPORT April 17, 6–7 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com ESOPHAGEAL CANCER SUPPORT April 17, 6–7:30 p.m. By Cancer Support Community AZ at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org ORAL, HEAD & NECK CANCER SUPPORT April 17, 6:30–8 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center 10460 N. 92 St., Scottsdale 602-439-1192 COLORECTAL CANCER SUPPORT April 19, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org OVARIAN CANCER SUPPORT April 19, 10–11:30 a.m. Cancer Support Community AZ 360 E. Palm Ln., Phoenix Register:602-712-1006;rsvp@cscaz.org PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT April 21, 4–5:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com METASTATIC CANCER SUPPORT April 23, 3–4:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com GENERAL CANCER SUPPORT April 24, 4:30–5:30 p.m. Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 3645 S. Rome St. Gilbert Register: 480-340-4013; ironwoodcrc.com

LIVING WITH LYMPHEDEMA April 28, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare 10460 N. 92nd St., Scottsdale Register: 480-882-4636; shc.org/events

PARKINSON’S ART OF MOVING Various dates, 2:30–3:30 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 FOR PATIENTS & CAREGIVERS Various dates and locations, 5:30–7:30 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center Register: 602-406-6903 JAVA & JABBER Various dates, 10–11 a.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-4931 MATTER OF BALANCE Various dates, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 PARKINSON’S DANCE Various dates, 1:30–2:30 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 PWR!MOVES™ Various dates, 1:15–2:15 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 TAI CHI Various dates, 2–3 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 VOICE CLASS Various dates, 11 a.m.–noon Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903 YOGA Various dates, 2–3 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-6903

DOCTOR TALK: PARKINSON’S April 7, 10–11 a.m. Humana Guidance Center 5943 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa 480-325-4707 PARKINSON’S CAREGIVERS April 7, 1:30–3 p.m. By Duet at Red Mountain Multi-Generational Center 7550 E. Adobe St., Mesa 602-274-5022; DuetAZ.org PARKINSON’S CAREGIVERS April 9, 1:30–3 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix 602-274-5022; DuetAZ.org EDUCATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED April 10, 1:30–3 p.m. Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center 240 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-406-3840 PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP April 15, 3–5 p.m. By Benevilla at Shepherd of the Hills United Methodist Church 13658 Meeker Blvd., Sun City West 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org

SENIORS CAREGIVERS By Duet; Various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022; DuetAZ.org HIP PAIN TREATMENTS April 2, 2:30 p.m. Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) COMMON SLEEP CONDITIONS April 11, noon-1 p.m. By Tempe St. Luke’s at Tempe Public Library 3500 S. Rural Rd., Tempe Register: 877-351-WELL (9355) VARICOSE VEINS April 14, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355) STROKE RISK & PREVENTION May 7, noon Mountain Vista Medical Center 1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa Register: 877-924-WELL (9355)

GASTROINTESTINAL OSTOMY SUPPORT April 3, 2 p.m. Banner Boswell 13180 N. 103rd Dr., Sun City 602-678-4441 OSTOMY SUPPORT April 8, 6 p.m. Elite Home Healthcare Services 2140 W. Greenway Rd., Phoenix 602-246-8221 OSTOMY SUPPORT April 13, 2–4 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 161 N. Mesa Dr., Mesa 480-812-0324 OSTOMY SUPPORT April 17, 12:30 p.m. La Casa de Cristo Lutheran Church 6300 E. Bell Rd., Scottsdale 623-580-4120

RESPIRATORY CAREMORE BETTER BREATHERS CLUB April 10, 1:30–2:30 p.m. By the American Lung Association at Banner Boswell 10401 W. Thunderbird Blvd., Sun City 602-286-8507; breatheeasyaz.info

CAREMORE BETTER BREATHERS CLUB April 15, 10:30–11:30 a.m. By the American Lung Association at Scottsdale Care Center 5225 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale 480-395-0792; breatheeasyaz.info LUNG TRANSPLANT SUPPORT GROUP April 15, 11:45 a.m.–1 p.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-7009

5777 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix Register: 602-406-3581; epilepsyaz.org/programs

555 N. 18th St., Phoenix Register: 800-248-5553; webinar: BridgesAZ.com

BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP April 22, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 623-205-6446

HEARING LOSS

BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP April 24, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-508-8024 or 602-406-6688

BETTER BREATHERS CLUB April 16, 1–2 p.m. By the American Lung Association at HealthSouth East Valley 5652 E. Baseline Rd., Mesa 480-567-0350; breatheeasyaz.info

YOUNG ADULT BRAIN INJURY April 24, 6–7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-996-1396 or 602-406-6688

BREASTFEEDING

BETTER BREATHERS CLUB April 16, 2–3 p.m. By the American Lung Association atChandlerRegionalMedicalCenter 1955 W. Frye Rd., Chandler 480-728-5655; breatheeasyaz.info

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP Various dates, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-406-4954

CAREMORE BETTER BREATHERS CLUB April 22, 10:30–11:30 a.m. By the American Lung Association at West Phoenix Care Center 2330 N. 75th Ave., Phoenix 602-300-5672; breatheeasyaz.info

PARENTING GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN By Benevilla Various dates, times & locations 623-207-6016; Benevilla.org

BRAIN, EPILEPSY, MORE

GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN By Duet Various dates, times & locations 602-274-5022; DuetAZ.org

FLAGSTAFF EPILEPSY EMPOWERMENT GROUP April 10, 6–7 p.m. By Epilepsy AZ at North Country Healthcare 2920 N. 4th St., Flagstaff Register: 602-406-3581; epilepsyaz.org/programs

SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS (S.T.O.P.) April 3, 10, 17 & 24, 7–9 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 161 N. Mesa Dr., Mesa 623-846-5464; SupportThroughOtherParents.org

SYRINGO/CHIARI SUPPORT April 12 St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix Call for time: 602-504-0883

MOTHER-TO-MOTHER SUPPORT April 4 & 25, 10–11:30 a.m. St. Joseph’s 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 877-602-4111

PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY SUPPORT GROUP April 12, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Pyle Adult Recreation Center 655 E. Southern Ave., Tempe 480-966-3391; aludwig@asu.edu

SUPPORT THROUGH OTHER PARENTS (S.T.O.P.) April 8, 15, 22 & 29, 7–9 p.m. Larkspur Christian Church 3302 W. Larkspur Dr., Phoenix 623-846-5464; SupportThroughOtherParents.org

CENTRAL PHOENIX EPILEPSY GROUP April 14, 6:30–8:30 p.m. By Epilepsy AZ at Banner Good Samaritan 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix Register: 602-406-3581; epilepsyaz.org/programs

GUARDIANSHIP CLINIC April 11, 3–5 p.m. By Duet at Church of the Beatitudes 555 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix Register: 602-274-5022, ext. 31

BRAIN ANEURYSM SUPPORT GROUP April 16, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 760-333-7658; Kimberly@ JoeNiekroFoundation.org

DOWN SYNDROME PARENTING SUPPORT April 24, 7–9 p.m. By Sharing Down Syndrome AZ at Mesa Student Services Building 1025 N. Country Club Dr., Mesa 480-926-6500; sharingds.org

EAST VALLEY EPILEPSY GROUP April 17, 6:30–8:30 p.m. By Epilepsy AZ at IHOP 2100 S. Power Rd., Mesa Register: 602-406-3581; epilepsyaz.org/programs NE VALLEY EPILEPSY GROUP April 21, 7–9 p.m. By Epilepsy AZ at Mayo Hospital

HEARING LOSS SUPPORT GROUP April 23, 2–4 p.m. By the AZ Chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America at Fountain Hills Community Center 13001 N. La Montana Dr., Fountain Hills 301-657-2248; hearingloss.org, kfonville@fhfh.az.gov HEARING LOSS SUPPORT GROUP April 24 1:30–3:30 p.m. By the AZ Chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America at Lions Foundation Campus 9451 N. 99th Ave., Peoria 301-657-2248; hearlingloss.org, melanie.orourke@gmail.com

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT GROUPS INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SUPPORT April 18, 9:30–10:30 a.m. By Benevilla at Lakeview United Methodist Church 10298 W. Thunderbird Blvd., Sun City 623-584-4999; Benevilla.org HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE April 21, 6–8 p.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 602-402-1774 WOMEN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS April 26, 10 a.m. St. Joseph’s Barrow 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix 480-829-6563

SPANISH PARKINSON’S EDUCATION, ART, SINGING & EXERCISE Various dates, times & locations Muhammad Ali Parkinson Wellness Center Register: 602-406-2453 INFANT BRAIN DEVELOPMENT CLASS April 12, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Tempe St. Luke’s 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe Register: 480-784-5588 CANCER SUPPORT April 21, 10 a.m.–noon Ironwood Cancer & Research Centers 685 S. Dobson Rd., Chandler Register: 480-540-2610; ironwoodcrc.com

VALLEY FEVER INFO AZ VICTIMS OF VALLEY FEVER ArizonaVictimsOfValleyFever.org 623-584-8331; pat-valleyfever@live.com 602-242-9527; mmfcreate@aol.com

WEIGHT LOSS

VALLEY FEVER CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE 602-406-8253; vfce.arizona.edu ValleyFeverCenter@dignityhealth.org

WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINARS Various dates, times & locations Bridges Center for Surgical Weight Management at St. Luke’s Medical Center

BANNER GOOD SAMARITAN Poison & Drug Information Center Hotline: 800-222-1222

POISON CONTROL

MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS

Learn About Medicare Advantage HMO Plans from Cigna. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 855.298.4382 (TTY 711).

Join us for an open discussion on puberty and becoming a woman at the Spirit Girls and Mom, Too event.

WEEKLY

morning and afternoon seminars are available WHERE: Cigna Medical Group locations throughout the valley COST: Free seminar, receive a free no obligation gift

REGISTER: 855.298.4385

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a-z

Saturday, April 12 9:30 - 11:30am Banner Baywood Medical Center 6644 E. Baywood Ave.

RSVP at (602) 230-CARE (2273) AR-0008165179-02

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All of my big plans were put on hold when I thought I had a bad cold and it turned out to be heart failure. After a heart transplant, I feel lucky to be here. My answer was Mayo Clinic. Adam Janusz

At Mayo Clinic, Adam was diagnosed with giant cell myocarditis, a devastating disease that ,?M@- 04@BM# 6,L->1 ,M=@$:<#@ =@0;M=6 *@,*;@2 C@ :0# ,LM83@A :<M= 0 %<F'@-M$<BL;0$ )##<#M !@I<B@ E%')!D 0-A :0# 0/;@ M, >, =,.@ M, :0<M ?,$ =<# -@: =@0$M2 J,$ .,$@ <-?,$.0M<,- ,$ M, #B=@AL;@ 0- 0**,<-M.@-M1 I<#<M .06,B;<-<B2,$>G0$<5,-0 ,$ B0;; (F9++F""KF&&H72

Visit mayoclinic.org/arizona

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Dr. John Nigro discuses the Heartmate II, a left ventricular assist device, implanted on Brett Wallick, 16, with the teen and his dad, Scott, at Phoenix Childrens Hospital. The device allows the patient to go home rather than staying in the hospital attached to an artificial heart pump while waiting for a new heart. Using the device on so young a patient is a relatively new and rare practice. | Photo Rick D'Elia

FAMILY MEDICINE, GERIATRICS Shalini Singh-Karnik, MD

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A graduate of Ross University School of Medicine, Dr. Shalini Singh-Karnik completed her residency internship at Medical Center of Central Georgia affiliated with Mercer University. Dr. Singh-Karnik specializes in women’s health, adolescent health and geriatric medicine.

New hope for children with heart failure

Banner Health Center 144416 W. Meeker Blvd., Building C, Suite 200, Sun City West www.bannerdelewebb.org 623-876-3980

GYNECOLOCY, OBSTETRICS Crista Johnson-Agbakwu, M.D.

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Dr. Johnson-Agbakwu is an Obstetrician/Gynecologist at Maricopa Integrated Health System & Founding Director of the Refugee Women’s Health Clinic (refugeewomensclinic.org). Dr. Johnson received her undergraduate degree from Johns Hopkins University, medical degree from Cornell University and completed her Obstetrics and Gynecology residency at the George Washington University Medical Center. MARICOPA INTEGRATED HEALTH SYSTEM 2601 E. Roosevelt St. Phoenix, Arizona 85008 www.MIHS.org 602-344-5011

Teresa Malcolm, MD

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With a sincere belief that each woman has unique needs and deserves compassion and respect, Dr. Malcolm works to provide clear explanations of tests, diagnoses and therapies. She specializes in gynecology and obstetrics and is a graduate of the Tulane University School of Medicine. Banner Health Clinic 13995 West Statler Blvd., Surprise www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterSurprise 623-478-3100

HOSPITALS John C. Lincoln Physician Network

John C. Lincoln Physician Network and Scottsdale Healthcare have five locations for immediate and urgent care. Designed with convenience in mind, our walk-in centers treat illnesses and injuries that are urgent, but not life threatening. Our board-certified physicians help you get back to your best quickly. More information at JCL.com/minoremergencies. AR-0008169644-01

implanted the Heartmate II for the first time in a teen. “This device has generally been used only in adults,” he explained, “but by implanting it in a 16-year-old patient, we were able to discharge him home to wait for a new heart without his being required to be hooked up continuously to an artificial heart pump.”

Heart „ continued from the cover

GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS

JOHN C. LINCOLN HEALTH NETWORK Health Care Provider 2500 West Utopia Rd. Suite 100, Phoenix JCL.COM 623-580-5800

When a child or teen is suffering from heart failure so severe that he or she requires a heart transplant, a new left ventricular assist device called Heartmate II is improving the patient’s quality of life while he or she awaits a transplant. John Nigro, M.D., heart transplant program director at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, recently

more difficult, or they are sedentary. “If any of those factors are present, they should Treatments for valve disease talk to their doctor about possibly getting a The American Heart Association reports stress test,” she said. that more than 5 million Americans are A stress test monitors how oxygenated diagnosed with heart valve disease each blood will travel to the heart muscle year. “This has been historically treated through the arteries before, during and with open-heart surgery,” Sweitzer said. after exertion. If someone is unable to “But more recently, we’ve been able to walk on a treadmill, they can undergo perform what’s called a ‘transcatheter what’s known as a ‘nuclear stress test’ aortic valve replacement’ (TAVR) through that uses contrast agents to mimic the groin artery without open heart exertion. If they don’t want that kind of surgery. It’s a terrific procedure that can test, Sorof said, they can have only an restore life expectancy to what it was ultrasound of the heart, known as an before the patient developed echocardiogram. “We’ve figured out valve disease.” how to administer a stress test to almost everyone, no matter what their individual Stress tests circumstances are,” she said. Many people assume because they don’t have classic symptoms of heart disease Resources (chest pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, American Heart Association: heart.org; etc.) that they don’t have anything to worry 800-AHA-USA-1 (800-242-8721); about. But Sorof worries for them if they Spanish 888-474-VIVE (8483) have any family history of heart disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: they’re post-menopausal, they’ve ever cdc.gov; 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636); smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifeTTY 888-232-6348 time, they are clinically obese, their blood National Library of Medicine/ pressure is higher than 120/80, any normal National Institutes of Health: activity for them at any age is suddenly nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus

An affiliate of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network

INTERNAL MEDICINE Ben Muscha, MD

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Dr. Muscha earned his medical degree from the University of North Dakota School of Medicine in Grand Forks. He then completed his residency at the University of North Dakota Family Practice Center in Bismark. A board certified family medicine physician, Dr. Muscha is committed to disease prevention, health maintenance and patient education. Banner Health Center 1917 South Crismon Road, Mesa www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterEastMesa 480-610-7100

“My third floor balcony offers a majestic view of our courtyard.” -Gordon Wahlberg, Fellowship Square resident

PAIN RELIEF Dr. Erlinda Rodriquez

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Dr. Erlinda Rodriquez is a family physician, specializing in Diabetes care. Dr. Rodriquez is board certified in Family Medicine and Urgent Care and has been recognized by the NCQA for her care in Diabetes and Heart/Stroke. Dr. Rodriquez is a graduate of the University of Arizona and member of the American Board of Family Medicine as well as the American Academy of Family Practice.

CIGNA MEDICAL GROUP 1717 W. Chandler Blvd. | Chandler 480.821.7565

PRIMARY CARE Dr. Bernadette Arnecke

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Dr. Bernadette Arnecke is a family physician, specializing in Internal Medicine. She provides comprehensive primary care to patients ages 18 and over. Dr. Arnecke is a graduate of the University of Texas, Galveston Texas and Fellow of the American College of Physicians. CIGNA MEDICAL GROUP 10900 North Scottsdale Road, Suite #606 | Scottsdale 480.368.2500

Welcome to independent living – the freedom to pursue the life you want, and freedom from the things you don’t. Take up a hobby, stay active and form new friendships. Enjoy each day to its fullest in a community that shares your values – at Fellowship Square. ENJOY A CAREFREE LIFESTYLE • Park-like grounds & paths • Healthy gourmet meals • Fitness & therapy programs

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Stay healthy and live well! Make an appointment today to visit any one of these quality health experts.

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Call us at (602) 943-1800 or visit FellowshipSquarePhoenix.org. 2002 W Sunnyside Dr, Phoenix, AZ 85029

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 | Livingwella-z | 9

OBGYNs answer 4 important questions

Experts offer answers and advice

By Meghann Finn Sepulveda

T

here are many issues that a woman should discuss with her OBGYN, including (but not limited to) birth control, family planning and fertility, common safety risks and new screening guidelines. Our experts offer advice on just a few of the most important topics related to female healthcare.

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Is it safe to take birth control pills? “Birth control pills are not only effective, but safe,” Swarup said. Does age affect The birth control the chances pill is the most of getting studied medicapregnant? tion in the world, Yes. The American according to the Congress of American Congress Obstetricians and of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Gynecologists. In (acog.org) cites age addition, for more alone as having an than 50 years, the impact on fertility. pill has been used “Women need to for contraception, know that once but decades of they reach 30, it can research have get more difficult proven it has many to become pregother significant nant,” said Monte health benefits. Swarup, M.D., “We prescribe partner, Arizona the pill to treat OBGYN Affiliates. heavy or painful “Statistics begin cycles,” Swarup moving slowly not said. “It also in a woman’s favor diminishes the as she gets older, chance of ovarian and miscarriage and endometrial risks increase.” cancer.”

What are some pregnancyrelated safety issues? Alcohol intake, substance abuse and quitting smoking are common pregnancy safetyrelated topics, but something that isn’t talked about as often is the importance of sleep — as well as what not sleeping well might mean in regards to overall health. “I want to know if my pregnant patients aren’t sleeping properly, which could be a sign of a more serious issue like a mood disorder or depression,” said Maria Manriquez, M.D., vice chair, department of obstetrics and gynecology, Maricopa Integrated Health System.

If women are healthy, do they still need to see their OBGYN every year? Yes, Manriquez said. “We want to promote healthy behaviors and remove any barriers for patients to get preventable care. If a woman has negative pap and HPV test results, we don’t screen again for two to three years,” she said, adding that an annual well-woman visit is still recommended to address any health concerns such as abnormal weight gain, mental health issues and optimal pregnancy planning.

‘‘Chronotherapy is the administration of medication in coordination with the body's circadian rhythms to maximize

effectiveness and minimize side effects.”

A

— Merriam-Webster dictionary

By Susan Fuchs

s with most things in life, timing can be everything. “Most drugs depend on achieving a steady state in the bloodstream for maximum effectiveness,” said Asia Quan, Pharm.D., at Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix. “It doesn’t matter as much when you take the prescription as long as you take it at the prescribed intervals and you don’t skip a dose.” However, for some specific medications, she said that timing does indeed make a huge difference.

“The risk or symptom intensity for certain diseases varies predictably with the time of the day,” Storjohann said. “In these cases, it may be beneficial to match the time a drug is most active in the body with the time in the patient’s circadian cycle when the drug is most needed.”

When

Chronotherapy is especially important, Quan said, for medications associated with cortisol, a natural steroid whose production peaks in the morning and helps us respond to stress. “Artificial steroids such as prednisone, Advair® or Medrol® should be taken first thing in the morning, as they mimic the Why Some drugs take different amounts of time to reach maximum body’s natural cortisol levels,” Quan said. “Medicines that manage cholesterol, such as Zocor® or Lipitor®, need to be potency in the body, explained Tara Storjohann, Pharm.D., taken at night due to circadian variations.” assistant professor at Midwestern University College of Pharmacy in Glendale. Note: This information is not intended to replace instructions from your Storjohann said because the body’s metabolism rises and falls at different times of day and night, circadian rhythms are healthcare provider. Experts advise that you always follow your providalso associated with different levels of risk for some diseases. er’s recommendations regarding the timing of taking your medications.

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER?

1 in 3 adult deaths each year are caused by heart disease and stroke. Are you at risk? Schedule a low-cost heart health assessment at Scottsdale Healthcare. Remember to also

Feel better soon with a quick visit to one of our urgent

schedule your annual physical.

and immediate care locations. No appointment needed.

To know your risk factors, visit:

Most insurance accepted. Five convenient locations. Extended hours including evenings and weekends.

Call 623-580-5800 JCL.com/minoremergencies

SCOTTSDALE HEALTHCARE Heart & Vascular Services Affiliates of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network AR-0008174004-01

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Because our community depends on us...

M

IHS operates the Maricopa Medical Center, one of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most

esteemed hospitals for trauma and burn care. Our multidisciplinary team is ready for any emergency. MIHS offers the only Trauma Center in Arizona verified by the American College of Surgeons to provide both adult and pediatric trauma care. That means we keep families together in their hour of need. And the Arizona Burn Center, one of the largest burn centers in the country, stands ready to provide world-class services when fire causes serious injuries. At MIHS, you can count on us to care.

Learn more about how our community depends oI MIHS at

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Livingwell AZ April 2014