Page 36

Continued From Page 23

STUPID SCAMMER

about the bike other than “its current condition,” which was fully described in the ad. We knew it was a scam, but we thought we’d have a little fun with “Roy” while pointing him out to law enforcement. We replied with a quick scam test: Hi Roy - There has been so much interest in the posted item, I was forced to raise the price to $350. Interested?

“Roy” didn’t even flinch at the extra $100 - pretty much confirming the scam. The Advisor even used the last name, “Ontou” (On - To - You!), but “Roy” never caught on: Hello, Thanks for the response,I really appreciate it and am ready for its purchase . I Would have love to come over for viewing but I’m afraid that might not be possible due to my work frame.I am willing to pay you via cashier check.I don’t mind adding an extra $30 for you to take the advert down from Craigslist, so that I can be rest assured that am in hand of the bike. I’ll be responsible for the pick-up and the movers fee will be included in your payment to avoid delay. My movers will move down to your place for the pick up as soon as the check clears and you have the cash in hand. Hope to read from you soon so we can proceed with the details needed for the check. You can ignore this message Thanks, Roy

And that’s the scam in a nutshell. “Roy” is going to send a (fake) cashier’s 36

check that will include $350 payment for the bike, an extra $50 to take the ad down and extra $ for the “movers.” I’m supposed to deposit it and hand cash to the movers along with the bike. We continued to reel him in: Hi Roy -Sounds like a deal. When will you be sending the cashier’s check? What will be the exact amount? Please send to: Post office Box XXXXXX Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420 Best, Mr. Ontou

And “Roy” responded in his now familiar, awkward fashion: Thanks,do get back to me with your details in the form below to facilitate the mailing of the payment. Full name to be on the check: Full contact address with your apt#: Contact numbers: Zip code: Once again, I will like you to know that you will not be responsible for shipping of this bike. I’ll be responsible for the pickup and the movers fee will be included in your payment to avoid delay. My Mover will move down to your place for the pick up as soon as the check clear.

Roy

Shortly thereafter, “Roy’s” check for $2,900 showed up in my post office box. In a series of text exchanges, “Roy” explained that I was to cash the check, deduct the $400 for the bike, and have $2,500 cash ready to hand to his “movers” when they arrived to pick up the bike. The minute I had the cash ready, “Roy” was ready to grab it - and he texted me every hour to see when that happy moment arrived. “Roy’s” check came from a Washington State tractor equipment business - which didn’t quite match his NJ area code or the Kansas City location in which he mailed his check - all more evidence

Table of Contents

revealing the obvious scam. The clincher came during a conversation with the tractor equipment company where they revealed that their checking account had been hacked, several fake checks had been presented without success and they had subsequently closed and replaced the account. The Advisor had also contacted the U.S. Postal Inspector which opened an investigation as well as the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s office Economic Crimes Unit - who also took a report and opened an investigation. Law enforcement informs, in the classic version of this scam, the scammer never attempts to pick up the “posted item,” but sends a courier to pick up the cash. But this was the fun part as The Adviser’s text exchange reveals: Advisor: Hi Roy - ok - was able to get $2500 cash quick due to good relationship with bank. “Roy:” Okay good, good. So the cash is with you now? Advisor: No there is a small problem. “Roy:” What is the problem? Advisor: I used the money to buy cruise tickets for me and my girlfriend. Haven’t been on vacation in a long time... “Roy:” What? I don’t think I understand you? Where is my money? Advisor: I’ll have to owe you. Sorry Roy. You shouldn’t be so trusting. Putting all that cash in the hands of a perfect stranger is just not smart. Haven’t you heard about all those Internet scams? “Roy:” So what’s gonna happen to the kayak? The Underwriter’s Insider

Profile for The Underwriter's Insider

The Underwriter's Insider July 2013  

America's Largest Exclusively Online Insurance Magazine! Stay informed and entertained with the Insider's coverage of insurance, politics,...

The Underwriter's Insider July 2013  

America's Largest Exclusively Online Insurance Magazine! Stay informed and entertained with the Insider's coverage of insurance, politics,...

Profile for rmanera
Advertisement