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RAMPANT

LINES

Male  Cheerleaders  defy  high  

AP  Music  Theory

Editorial:

school  stereotypes  and  engage sports  fans. p17

New  advanced  placement   music  theory  class  brings   challenges  to  Rose.  p9

Ode  to   the  Breakfast   Special.  p6

Inside NEWS

Teachers  say  goodbye Long  time  Pitt  County  Schools  teachers   and  staff  member  retire  after  a  combined   68  years  of  service. By  Cameron  Teaney  pg.4

Rose  staff  goes  healthy Teachers   begin   weight   loss   challenge   by  walking  the  halls  of  Rose  in  order  to   live  healthier  lifestyles. By  Seth  Singleton  pg.5

OPINION

How  to  lose  a  girl In  

ten  days.   Most   common   mistakes   girls  make  that  turn  guys  away.   By  Remegio  deVente  pg.  8

FEATURES

Acess  denied Students   explain   their   views   on   Pitt   County   School’s   internet   censroship     and  SOPA.   By  Mattie  Cavanagh  and  Austin  Bryan  pgs.  11-­12

ENTERTAINMENT

Review:  Through  My  Eyes Tim   Tebow   writes   inspirational   and     autobiographical  book  about  his  life  and   carreer  for  his  fans.   By  Patrick  Moloney  pg.  

SPORTS

Rose  featured  on  CNN “Big  Hits,  Broken  Dreams�  gives  Rose   spotlight  on  CNN  news.   By  Esther  Fisher  pg.  18

Editorial:  Tim  Tebow  gets  his   spotlight Up   and   coming   football   player   wins   hearts  of  fans. By  Emily  Clark  pg.  19

Motocross  provides  thrills Rose   students   take   dirt   biking   to   the   next  level. By  Chandler  Kunzi  pg.  19

photo  by  meghan  moloney

 Students  sang,  danced  and  painted  in  the  talent  showcase  to  raise  money  for  senior  Alexis  White  and  heart  health  awareness.

Talent showcase benefits hearts by meghan moloney

staff  writer The Rose gospel choir recently hosted a Showcase of 7DOHQWWREHQHÀWKHDUWDZDUHQHVV On Saturday, Feb. 11, a group of students gathered to perform dances, sing songs and paint pictures for friends and family, with the hope of raising money for charity. Senior Marcus McNeill,

director of the gospel choir, organized the event for his senior project with the help of art teacher Randall Leach. “I wanted to do heart awareness because my grandmother died of heart failure, and I wanted to know more about it,� McNeill said. “So I decided to plan a heart awareness event that will give back, not in memory of people that have already passed, but also to be a blessing

to someone that is yet living, Ă€JKWLQJEDWWOLQJHYHU\GD\Âľ McNeill decided to honor senior Alexis White, a current Rose student who is battling a heart condition. Many members of the gospel choir are friends with White, and they wanted to do something for her. “I’ve known Alexis for many years,â€? McNeill said. “So I decided, why not honor her?â€? White was diagnosed with

brugada syndrome in 2011, a condition which may cause her heart to stop. She and McNeill met in middle school, where they sang in chorus together. White said that she was surprised when she found out that the Showcase of Talent would be performed in her honor. “I’ve never had anyone do something like this for me,� White said. “I was really touched.� (continued on page 2)


2 RAMPANT NEWS

News Briefs NHS The National Honor Society is working on their project for the 2011-2012 school year. Members of the club must contact Mrs. Hutchinson concerning the upcoming community garden project. 6LJQXSVRRQRUÀQGRXW more information at the next monthly meeting.

SGA The Student Government Association will be starting the annual “Pennies for Pasta” drive on Februrary 13. The SGA invites all classes to participate. Students can donate any money they have to offer during their 4th period class. The highest average of money donated from each student will win a delux meal provided by Olive Garden. This fundraser will end on March 9th.

Relay for Life Students at Rose are encouraged to take part in Relay for Life this year, which will be in honor of Mrs. Upton. To be apart of this fundraiser students are encouraged to register online under Rose High School. Do so before signing up is too late.

Yearbook Yearbook advertisements are still open for all students interested in running an ad for the upcoming 2011-2012 addition. Seniors must inform Mr. Scott Childress of any interest in running a Senior Ad in the near future. If any senior is entending to run an ad in the yearbook this year they have the opertunity to edit and organize all ad’s to their desire. Come to Mr. Childress’s class room located in room 815 during the yearbook class period or during said students lunch period.

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

Talent show  warms  hearts  (Continued  from  page  one)     All the proceeds earned from the showcase will be donated in White’s name to benefit heart awareness. Although it was organized by the gospel choir, the showcase displayed talents of many others. Performers included solo and group singers, a French horn instrumentalist, a rapper, the step team, actors and models. Leach also put together a group performance. The showcase began with the national anthem sung by sophomore Jonathan Spell and a prayer by McNeill. Sophomore Chelsey Foggs welcomed the audience, and then the gospel choir opened

with a short selection. Senior Quawshawn Conley and Alexander Daniels performed two solos. Leach’s group performance was a collaboration of many different art forms. While band members played the music and a group of students sang the lyrics, junior Brooke Einbender and senior Holton Welch painted in the background. Then their canvases were revealed at the end of the song. While the other students were singing and painting, there were also dancers who choreographed a dance to the song. The dancers were juniors Elizabeth Romary, Kiley Doyle and Cassidy Hallow and seniors

Lindsay Peden and Whitley Pollard. Leach and senior Walker Gaddis danced along as well. After a short intermission, the program continued with a skit and a solo by senior Leslie Morning. After this, vocal groups N-Tune, Team Generation and Prophetic Sound each sang a few pieces. A second skit was performed, followed by a parade of models. Senior Kamira Crenshaw rapped an original song, H.Y.P.E. The step team performed and senior Octavia Givens sang a solo as well. “They were all very good,” White said.

To conclude the showcase, the Gospel Choir sang a song for White as they presented her with a bouquet of flowers. McNeill spoke about White’s condition and the friendship that the two have formed. He thanked the audience for their support of White, the Gospel Choir, and heart awareness. “[We wanted] to let [White] know that everybody still loves her and that we’re here to support her,” McNeill said. “Overall, I think it went well.” The showcase of talent was an opportunity for students, parents, friends and teachers to gather together to share talents and raise money to benefit heart awareness.

Students participate  in  the    Teen  Leadership  conference by stephanie cervi news  editor Five students have had the opportunity to participate in the Teen Leadership Conference. This is a program that allows sophomores and juniors to learn about different careers, in order to help them figure out what they might want to do in the future. They also learn life skills, such as how to do an interview and how to get involved in community activities. The five students that were chosen to participate from Rose are juniors Caroline Clark and Jun Chou as well as sophomores Erin Naziri, Rob McCarthy and Melanie McMillan. In order to be considered, they each had to fill out an application and submit an essay about why they would be a good candidate for the program. “I heard about the program on the announcements one morning,” Clark said. “I was interested in the program and talked to my counselor about it.” Each high school in Pitt County selected four or five students they wanted to represent their school. “We learn how to meet new people and associate with other

schools,” Clark said. “It’s a small group of students but this way we get to know the other people and it is easier to make friends.” They meet once every month, for five months from 8am until 3pm. They go to different places for each meeting and listen to lectures by the people that work there. “The first time we went to ECU, an attorney talked to us about his college experience and how he worked to achieve his career goals,” Clark said.“Then we went to the detention center. The speaker there was an officer and told us what it was like to work in law enforcement.” They traveled to East Carolina University during their first meeting and listened to professors speak about their own life experiences. “They shared their experiences on the subject they taught and how they got to be where they were,” sophomore Erin Naziri said. At the end of the program in April, each group of students is required to do a service project for their school. The program requires each group to identify a problem they see in their school and try to plan a project to fix that. The project is expected

to be something that all the students can get involved in. “We chose apathy,” Chou said. “When it comes to the students, our school seems to have much of this, and we think it is something that we can work to change.” To do this the students are planning service projects that all

“We learn the truth about the jobs people have and also get to practice skills, such as interviewing, that will help us in the future.” Caroline Clark, junior the Rose students can participate in. One idea is to participate in a community-wide project called Homeless Correct. This is held at the Greenville Convention Center. Money, socks, hand

warmers and other necessities are collected for the homeless by the program. The conference members also hope to have incentives, such as a jeans or t-shirt days, to motivate students to contribute to the charity. “We were thinking that maybe all the students could help contribute by bringing in something that we could donate to the cause,” Chou said. “This way not only would our school benefit by helping others, but also the rest of the community.” Next month they will be going to the hospital to talk to practicing doctors. At the hospital they will also be learning different types of interview skills. “This is one of the major things I like about the program,” Clark said. “We learn the truth about the jobs people have and also get to practice skills, such as interviewing, that will help us in the future.” Clark feels that she benefits from the program. “At first I was not too excited about the program,” Clark said. “But I have realized that it has opened doors and helped me to start thinking about what kind of career I might be interested in.“


3 RAMPANT NEWS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

Facial hair  and  a  clean  shave  are  new  ideas  for  a  school  fundraisier   by marie payne staff  writer Competitions and contests are frequently found throughout the halls of Rose, but most of these do not end with students being able to shave off their teacher ’s beard. A beard contest between history teacher Steven Hill and English teacher Joseph Dowless will start at the end of February and end at the spring pep rally in April. The contest will double as a fundraiser for new technology for the school. Students can buy raffle tickets for which teacher ’s beard they would prefer to shave. In the spring it will be revealed which teacher earned the most money for the school. “I went and talked to Mr. Hill and thought it would be a good idea to let our beards grow out all crazy, and start selling raffle tickets around April or May,”

Dowless said. “Then at the pep rally we can pull a name out of a box and that person can come and shave our beards.” Dowless approached assistant principal Patrick Greene with the fundraising idea earlier in the year and asked him what items the school needed extra money to purchase. Dowless and Greene decided on using the money to buy a flat screen television for the library or commons to display important announcements. “Money that comes from [the academic boosters] has to go to things that physically help the students in the classroom,” Dowless said. U s u a l l y a c a d e m i c boosters money goes towards f i x i n g computers, books and buying items neccesary for a classroom

environment “I wouldn’t call [the television] frivolous, but it isn’t really something the school is justified to buy. Me and Mr. Hill thought it would be a great idea to use [the contest] to get Mr. Greene the money that he needs,” Dowless said. Both men have had beards since young ages. Dowless started with a goatee in the tenth grade and has continued growing it out ever since “because it’s awesome.” He now trims it only when necessary. Hill, on the other hand, did not start growing his beard until he was 24 because he was not allowed to have facial hair while in the military. “Having facial hair was an outward sign of my independence after six years of being told what to do and when to do it,” Hill said on his featured page at beards.org. Hill is a beard model and has a featured beard for the web site beards.org. The creator of the site saw pictures of Hill on flickr and contacted him to take pictures of his beart. Dowless, however, does not share Hill’s good fortune. “I’ve never been in the right place at the right time,” Dowless said. At the end of the fundraiser,

RAMPANT LINES

Published since 1969 by J.H. Rose High School Students

Rachel Finley and Sarah C. Smith Co-Editors-In-Chief Stephanie Cervi, News Editor Seth Singleton, Assistant News Editor AJ Parker, Opinion Editor Mattie Cavanagh, Features editor Austin Bryan, Features Editor. Alex Theus and Mathew Hopkins, Entertainment editors Jordan Alread and Emily Clark, Sports editors Maddie Lewis, Lead photographer

Austin Bryan, Web master Fareeha Mustafa, Lab manager Remigio Devente, Lab manager Patrick Maloney, Web Apprentice Brice Edwards, Rampant Rants Allie Davenport, Chandler Kuenzi, Marie Payne, Cameron Teany, Meghan Moloney, Katey Stanley, Erin Walden, staff writers.

Rampant Lines is published by the journalism class at J. H. Rose High School. The newspaper will inform and entertain its audience in a broad, fair, and accurate manner on all subjects that affect readers. The newspaper seeks also to provide a forum for the opinions of the J. H. Rose High School Rampant Lines staff, the faculty, the school and district administration and people in the community. The purpose of such a forum is to encourage an exchange of ideas and opinions on issues of prominence to the readers. Unsigned staff editorials represent the views of the editorial board. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Letters should be limited to 300 words or fewer and should be signed. They can be mailed to 600 W. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27834.

when students shave Dowless’s and Hill’s beard, it will be a monumental change not only for their appearance, but for how the student body views them. “I haven’t had a clean shaved face in two years,” Hill said. Dowless has gone a few more. “I have not shaved it completely since 2003,” Dowless said. Although it will be different, both men agreed that their beards will eventually grow back. Hill and Dowless are hoping to have mini contests in between February and the spring pep rally where if a certain amount o f

money is raised each week they will both do something crazy to their beard, for instance dyeing it blue or green. If the initial competition becomes popular enough, Dowless plans to start a separate fund where students can donate to the “save the beard foundation” to include students who are adamant against the men shaving their beards as well. If there are more votes against Dowless and Hill shaving, they will instead do things to their bead such as clip in flowers or tie in ribbon bows. What Dowless believes to be one of Roses most entertaining and interactive competitions is fast approaching. Let the battle of the beards begin.


4 RAMPANT NEWS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

Longtime staff  members  say  goodbye  Rose  and  hello  retirement   by cameron teaney staff  writer After years of service, three faculty members are retiring. Dennis Gibson, Jerry Carawan and Judy Clark are retiring. Jan. 31 was Clark and Carawan’s last day of work at Rose. Clark, a Rose alumnus, has served as the school’s administrative assistant for the past 16 years. Clark said that she will miss Rose, especially the people with whom she has worked, but she is also excited about pursuing new opportunities. “I’m at the retirement age,” Clark said. “There are other things I want and need to do. I want more time to spend with my family, painting, and at my mountain cabin.” Other staff members have been showing their support these past few months. “[Clark} is a very dear friend and very good co-worker,” secretary Wendy Little said. “I leave knowing Rose is one of the best high schools in the state of North Carolina and our students should be very proud to be Rose High students and graduates,” Clark said. Gladys Yates, who formerly worked as the administrative assistant for lockers and parking, is filling Clark’s position as the administrative assistant. Carawan has served Rose as a chemistry and astronomy teacher for 18 years. He said that he will also miss working at Rose, but is excited about experiencing new challenges. “It’s just time,” Carawan said. “It’s not that I really want

to leave. It’s just that time in my life to do new things and adventures that I would not be able to do while teaching.” Carawan’s last day had some surprises. First, all the teachers in the science department wore vests over a button down shirt, Carawan`s work uniform of choice. “Well I saw everyone with vests, but didn’t think much of it since I wear them all of the time, so I just thought they were cold; it was a nice gesture to show unity,” Carawan said. “Great group of folks.” Then the science department surprised him with lunch. Mid-lunch, Clark brought Carawan to the end of the science hall where Principal Charlie Langley, the office staff members and the school choir greeted him. The choir sang a song to Carawan, which was followed by Langley presenting him with a plaque. The plaque read ‘Jerry Carawan’s chemistry classroom January 31, 2012’ and is hanging outside Carawan’s classroom in honor of his years dedicated to Rose. “I did break down on that one; got a little misty-eyed,” Carawan said. “It’s a great place at Rose High, great people. I tell my students good things happen to good people, so I must be a little good because it’s been a good day for me because of what the faculty, staff and students have done: come together and wish me the best.” Carawan and his wife Alicia Carawan (also a science teacher) have worked together for 12 years.

“As far as teaching, nothing will be different [for us], but it’s weird because we always rode to and from school together, and ate lunch together, but it’s good because when I get home, everything is clean,” Carawan said, “I like having a house husband.” Carawan’s students will also miss him teaching at Rose. “If you weren’t doing well, he would offer to stay after school to help you,” sophomore Abby Needell said. “I could tell a total difference after the intern finished teaching and Mr. Carawan started teaching; I enjoyed chemistry so much more because of his teaching style.” New teacher Amy Mann is replacing Carawan’s position. Physical education teacher Gibson, who also coaches Roses cross country and track team, has been teaching and coaching at Rose since the fall of 1978. He plans to retire on Feb. 29. “I’m not quitting work,” Gibson said, “I’d like to take a lateral move while I’m still considered a legend. I don’t want to be considered obsolete.” After teaching for almost 34 years, Gibson has always kept in touch with what he believes to be the most important part of school. “[I love ] the classroom, the change in generations,

SKRWRE\UDFKHO¿QOH\

0UV&ODUNDQG0U&DUDZDQVD\WKHLU¿QDOJRRGE\HWR5RVH new generations and new kids,” Gibson said. “Now I am teaching my old students’ kids.” Gibson will begin working more hours as a mortician, a job he holds part time currently. He said that it is a big change to move from working at a school to a funeral home. After six months of retirement, he hopes to coach track and cross country again for club or Rose. He also wants to start a nonprofit junior high track program for public middle schools. Gibson is looking forward to the future but will also miss his job, particularly the students.

“By far [I will miss] the kids; being with them,” he said, “I will still see them, but miss everyday involvement,” Gibson said. Sophomore Maija Smith will miss Gibson coaching cross country. “For the past two years, he has been “coach” [to me], so not having him around as often saddens me,” Smith said. “The best part of having Gibson as a coach is that he is funny without even trying to be.” Clark, Carawan and Gibson are retiring after a combined 68 years of service to Rose.


5 RAMPANT NEWS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2011

Teachers  walk  to  lose  weight  and  get  healthier  lifestyles by seth singleton assistant  news  editor A grant from Community Schools and Recreation is allowing our school to start a teacher Ă€WQHVV SURJUDP ,QFHQWLYHV LQFOXGHWKHFRPSHWLWLRQLWVHOIDQG SUL]HV LQFOXGLQJ JLIW FDUGV DQG EHWWHUKHDOWKIRUWHDFKHUV “We got a grant from Community Schools and 5HFUHDWLRQ>WRVWDUWWKHSURJUDP@ and we are trying to get the staff WR OHDG D KHDOWKLHU OLIHVW\OHÂľ 3ULQFLSDO&KDUOLH/DQJOH\VDLG 7KH SURJUDP ZKLFK EHJDQ in January and continues until the HQG RI WKH VFKRRO \HDU UHZDUGV teachers for walking miles in the school hallways during their SODQQLQJ SHULRG ,W DOVR UHZDUGV WHDFKHUVIRUORVLQJZHLJKW ´7KLV SURJUDP ZLOO KDYH WHDFKHUV HDWLQJ EHWWHU PRYLQJ PRUH DQG ZLOO LQFUHDVH VXSHUYLVLRQ >RI VWXGHQWV@ VLQFH ZH ZLOO KDYH PRUH WHDFKHUV ZDONLQJ LQ WKH KDOOV ´ /DQJOH\ VDLG 6RIDUSDUWLFLSDWLRQKDVEHHQ

growing quickly among faculty DQGVWDII ´2YHU  WHDFKHUV KDYH VLJQHG XS IRU WKH ZDONLQJ SURJUDPDQGVRPHRIWKHPKDYH DOVR VLJQHG XS IRU D ZHLJKW ORVV FKDOOHQJHÂľ VDLG $&(6 WHDFKHU DQGĂ€WQHVVSURJUDPGLUHFWRU-RKQ 7KRPDV ´7KHUH DUH SUL]HV IRU ZDONLQJPLOHVLQWKHKDOOZD\DQG WKHUHDUHSUL]HVIRUZHLJKWORVVÂľ (YHQ WKRXJK PDQ\ WHDFKHUV GLG QRW VLJQ XS LQLWLDOO\ WKH LQWHUHVWKDVJURZQ “The fact that so many WHDFKHUV KDYH VLJQHG XS LV OLNH SHHU SUHVVXUH IRU WKH RWKHUV WR MRLQ SHHU SUHVVXUH LQ D JRRG ZD\´7KRPDVVDLG 6FKRRO QXUVH /HVKD 5RXVH DOVR EHOLHYHV WKDW WKH SURJUDP ZLOO EH EHQHĂ€FLDO WR WKH WHDFKHUV LQYROYHG ´, WKLQN WKDW WKLV ZLOO PDNH SHRSOH PRUH FRQVFLRXV RI WKHLU Ă€WQHVVOHYHOÂľVDLG5RXVH´:KHQ SHRSOH FRPH WR ZHLJK LQ DQG they see how much they actually ZHLJK KRSHIXOO\ WKDW ZLOO PRWLYDWHWKHPWRPRYHPRUHÂľ $&(6WHDFKHU8YRQGD:LOOLV said that she is glad that the

staff  writer 7KH5RVHWKHDWULFDOFRPSDQ\ ZDV VFKHGXOHG WR SHUIRUP WKH musical Aida DW WKH HQG RI$SULO IRUWKHLUDQQXDOVSULQJPXVLFDO There was not enough GLYHUVLW\ DPRQJ WKH SHRSOH ZKR DXGLWLRQHG WR SHUIRUP WKH VKRZ DFFRUGLQJ WR WKHDWUH WHDFKHU 0RQLFD (GZDUGV 7KLV FDOOHG (GZDUGV WR UHHYDOXDWH WKH GLUHFWLRQ IRU WKH VSULQJ SURGXFWLRQ  (OWRQ -RKQ DQG 7LP 5LFH¡V PXVLFDO Aida, is a story about a IRUELGGHQORYHEHWZHHQD1XELDQ SULQFHVVDQGDQ(J\SWLDQVROGLHU The audition turnout was so SRRUWKDWWKHUHZHUHQRWHQRXJK VWXGHQWV ZKR FRXOG SRUWUD\ D FKDUDFWHU RI 1XELDQ GHVFHQW ZKLFK ZRXOG KDYH EHHQ YLWDO WR WKHPXVLFDO ´, FRXOG KDYH PRUH WKDQ

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>>  EMILY  KRAGEL   Student  Body  President

photo  by  marie  payne.

Ms.  Dunham,  Ms.  Iorizzo  and  Ms.  Noles  walk  through  Rose.   SURJUDPLVEHLQJRIIHUHG ´, DP GRLQJ LW WR PHHW PRUH IDFXOW\DQGWRJHWLQVKDSHÂľ:LOOLV VDLG ´, DOVR WKLQN WKDW LW ZLOO VHW DJRRGH[DPSOHIRUVWXGHQWVVLQFH ZHDVWHDFKHUVDUHUROHPRGHOVÂľ Social studies teacher Clay Medlin also looked forward to SDUWLFLSDWLQJ “This is a good way to get LQ VKDSH DQG GR \RXU KDOO GXW\Âľ 0HGOLQ VDLG ´:H ZLOO EH NLOOLQJ WZR ELUGV ZLWK RQH VWRQH 7KH SUL]HV DUH DOVR D ERQXV DQG KRSHIXOO\WKH\DUHJRLQJWRPDNH

HYHU\RQHZRUNDOLWWOHKDUGHU¾ With all of the attention WKDW WKH SURJUDP LV QRZ JHWWLQJ /DQJOH\ VDLG WKDW KH LV H[FLWHG DERXW WKH RYHUDOO LPSURYHPHQW that our school will see resulting IURPDKHDOWKLHUIDFXOW\DQGVWDII ´7KLV LV JUHDW IRU ÀWQHVV VXSHUYLVLRQ FRPSHWLWLRQ DQG VFKRROVSLULW¾/DQJOH\VDLG ´:H DUH KDYLQJ D ORW RI SDUWLFLSDWLRQDQGDORWRILQWHUHVW DVZHOODVQLFHSUL]HVDQG,WKLQN that this is going to be a good WKLQJ¾

Rampant  theatre  production  changed,  but  not  cancelled by katie stanley

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EHLQJ FDQFHOOHG¾ 6WXUJLV VDLG ´(YHU\RQH ZDV ORRNLQJ IRUZDUG WRLW¾ Junior Tara McKinnon was DOVR XSVHW ZKHQ VKH KHDUG WKDW WKH PXVLFDO Aida,was no longer EHLQJSHUIRUPHG ´,ZDVGLVDSSRLQWHG,WKLQN HYHU\RQH ZDV GLVDSSRLQWHG¾ 0F.LQQRQVDLG  (GZDUGV VDLG WKDW VKH ZDV GHWHUPLQHG WR PDNH WKH VSULQJ WKHDWULFDO SURGXFWLRQ KDSSHQ and she did not want to let any of WKHGHYRWHGWKHVSLDQVGRZQ 7KHUH ZHUH VHYHUDO LGHDV GLVFXVVHG ZKHQ (GZDUGV ZDV deciding on what new musical or SOD\ FRXOG EH SHUIRUPHG LQ WKH SODFHRIAida (GZDUGV KDV SXW WRJHWKHU D PXVLFDO IRU WKH VSULQJ WKHDWULFDO SURGXFWLRQHYHU\\HDUH[FHSWIRU  ,W KDV EHHQ GHFLGHG WKDW WKHQHZSOD\ZLOOEHJack Against the Ogre, D VWUDLJKW SOD\ ZKLFK

VWUD\V IURP WKH W\SLFDO VSULQJ musical. Jack Against the Ogre is DQXSGDWHGYHUVLRQRIWKHFODVVLF VWRU\Jack and the Bean Stalk. ,WLV DOVR D FKLOGUHQ¡V SOD\ ZKLFK LV a genre of theatre that has not EHHQSHUIRUPHGDW5RVHIRUPDQ\ \HDUV ´, WKLQN LW VKRXOG EH JRRGÂľ 0F.LQQRQ VDLG ´3HUIRUPLQJ Jack Against the OgreZLOOKHOSXV JHW PRUH SHRSOH LQ WKH DXGLHQFH because it is such a well known SOD\Âľ (GZDUGV LV FRQĂ€GHQW WRR that Jack Against the Ogre will be D FURZGSOHDVHU DQG WKDW HYHQ though the audience will be much \RXQJHU WKDQ WKH XVXDO FURZG WKHUHZLOOEHDJRRGWXUQRXW “The lesson here is that VRPHWLPHV WKH EHVWODLG SODQV KDYH WR EH FKDQJHGÂľ (GZDUGV VDLG ´6R ZH DUH JRLQJ WR FKDQJH RXU SODQ EXW ZH DUH QRW DEDQGRQLQJLWÂľ

The second semester has EHJXQ DQG , KRSH FODVVHV DUH JRLQJ ZHOO IRU HYHU\RQH  7KH 3HQQLHV IRU 3DWLHQWV FDPSDLJQ KDV VWDUWHG   6WXGHQWV DQG teachers can donate any extra FKDQJH WKH\ PD\ KDYH  7KH SURMHFWZLOOHQG0DUFK The North Carolina Association of Student Councils 6WDWH &RQYHQWLRQ ZLOO EH KHOG this March 24 through the     ,I DQ\RQH LV LQWHUHVWHG LQ attending they can talk to Zach $OGULGJH 3URP LV DOVR FRPLQJ XS VRRQ  7KLV \HDU SURP ZLOO EH KHOGRQ6DWXUGD\$SULODWWKH &RQYHQWLRQ&HQWHU7KHWKHPH this year will be “A Night on WKH7RZQÂľ7RUDLVHPRQH\IRU SURP WKH MXQLRU FODVV LV JRLQJ WRKROGD6DGLH+DZNLQVGDQFH ,WZLOOFRVWĂ€YHGROODUVWRDWWHQG WKHGDQFH  5HOD\ IRU /LIH LV$SULO   2XU WHDP QDPH LV ´- + 5RVH 5DPSDQWVÂľ DQG LI \RX DUH LQWHUHVWHG LQ SDUWLFLSDWLQJ \RX FDQ VLJQ XS RQOLQH   7KH UHJLVWUDWLRQ IHH LV WHQ GROODUV 7KH HYHQW ZLOO EH KHOG DW WKH South Central track and will EHJLQ DW  30  ZHOFRPH WR SDUWLFLSDWH  /DVWO\ WKHUH LV D 6WXGHQW *RYHUQPHQW PHHWLQJ WKLV )ULGD\ DW  $0 LQ WKH /HFWXUH +DOO   :H ZLOO EH SODQQLQJ DQG GLVFXVVLQJ WKH XSFRPLQJHYHQWV+RSHWRVHH you there!


6 RAMPANT OPINION

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

An ode to the Breakfast Special sandwich by aj parker

opinion  editor Four times a week on my way to school, I stop, place an order, DQG WHQ WR ÀIWHHQ PLQXWHV ODWHU , KDYHLQP\KDQGVRQHRIWKHPRVW GHOLFLRXV EUHDNIDVWV WKDW PRQH\ can buy. Boulevard Bagel, a homey restaurant that has been in *UHHQYLOOH IRU DV ORQJ DV , FDQ remember, has been supplying VWXGHQWV ZLWK RQH RI WKH EHVW EUHDNIDVW LWHPV NQRZQ WR PDQNLQGWKH%UHDNIDVW6SHFLDO , DP D KXJH DGYRFDWH RI bagels in general. Come to my KRXVH XS DW IRXU LQ WKH PRUQLQJ with a Boulevard bagel with cream cheese, and I’ll be just about the KDSSLHVW SHUVRQ WKLV VLGH RI WKH Mississippi. Honestly though, you

FDQQRWJRZURQJZLWKDIUHVKEDJHO IURP %RXOHYDUG  ,W¡V HYHQ D ORFDO UHVWDXUDQW QRW DQ HYLO IUDQFKLVH like Panera or Bruegers. 7KH %UHDNIDVW 6SHFLDO WDNHV EDJHOV WR D FRPSOHWHO\ GLIIHUHQW OHYHO,WFRQVLVWVRIWZRHJJVDQG \RXU FKRLFH RI PHDW RQ ZKDWHYHU bagel you choose. 7KHUH DUH PDQ\ GLIIHUHQW ways you can customize your %UHDNIDVW6SHFLDODQGHDFKRIWKHP is divine in its own way. I have my

RZQFXVWRPL]HG%UHDNIDVW6SHFLDO WKDWLI\RXDUHZLOOLQJWRWU\ZLOO be the best thing you have ever HDWHQLQ\RXUOLIH )LUVW RII , VWDUW ZLWK D blueberry bagel. I have had some bad blueberry bagels in my OLIH %DJHOV WKDW DUH RYHUà RZLQJ ZLWK  QDVW\ EOXHEHUU\ à DYRU EXW Boulevard does the bagel justice. It’s not an overpowering taste, it compliments the bagel well. 2I FRXUVH \RX KDYH WR JHW \RXU bagel toasted. Only noobs don’t toast their bagels. This helps melt all the ingredients together and allows the bagel to be served hot. Also, toasting a bagel adds a little crunch when you sink your teeth into the greatness that is the %UHDNIDVW6SHFLDO Cheese and meat are the next choice you have. The obvious

FKRLFH IRU FKHHVH LV PR]]DUHOOD :KLOHPR]]DUHOODLVRQHRIWKHEHVW tasting cheeses in the world, it also adds a melty, almost liquid texture to the sandwich. There is no greater sight to see in the morning WKDQ ZKHQ \RX SXOO D %UHDNIDVW 6SHFLDO DSDUW DQG VHH DOO RI WKDW FKHHVH MXVW VXVSHQGLQJ IURP RQH KDOIWRWKHRWKHU 7KHEUHDNIDVWPHDWKDVJRWWR be bacon. Bacon is nature’s candy IRU DOO RI PDQNLQG WR HQMR\  ,I you don’t like bacon than you’re probably a liberal and no one likes \RX DQ\ZD\  %DFRQ LV RQH RI WKH EHVW SDUWV RI WKH VDQGZLFK DQG adds a crunchy texture along with a great taste. Most people would stop here, but this is the point where P\%UHDNIDVW6SHFLDOVXUSDVVHVDOO RWKHU ODPH %UHDNIDVW 6SHFLDOV  ,

DGG FUHDP FKHHVH  6RPH SHRSOH say this is just simply too much on one sandwich, but there can never be too much on the greatest EUHDNIDVW\RXZLOOHYHUKDYH I can not put in words how passionate I am about this sandwich. I have told the owners RI %RXOHYDUG PDQ\ WLPHV WKDW LI , GLH WKH RQO\ WKLQJ , ZDQW LV IRU WKHP WR SXW P\ %UHDNIDVW 6SHFLDO RQ WKH PHQX DQG QDPH LW DIWHU PH  ,I \RX¡UH IHHOLQJ D OLWWOH cray cray one morning, I would highly advise that you try it, with FKRFRODWHPLONRIFRXUVH %XW LI \RX DUH QRW adventurous and do not want to try my sandwich, go get your own. &UHDWH\RXURZQ%UHDNIDVW6SHFLDO and share with me the greatest thing you will ever put in your mouth.

How  to  lose  a  guy  in  ten  days:  three  things  that  make  boys  run  away by remigio devente

staff  writer Now that Valentine’s Day has passed, the roses have died and WKDW IDQF\$ODVNDQ ÀUH FKRFRODWH has gone to your thighs, your ER\IULHQG KDV SUREDEO\ GLVSRVHG RI\RX:K\":K\\RXDVN":HOO I can tell you it’s not entirely due WR WKH IDFW WKDW WKH FKRFRODWH KDV gone to your thighs, but because your annoyances have run him RII Girls, do you want to know ZKDW UHDOO\ GULYHV XV JX\V RII

WKH HGJH" :KHQ \RX EHJ IRU compliments. You don’t literally UXQ DURXQG DVNLQJ SHRSOH IRU compliments, but you say things like, “Oh my God, I look so rough today.â€? You do this even though \RX NQRZ \RX ZRNH XS DW Ă€YH

DPMXVWWRJHWGUHVVHGIRUVFKRRO You are just begging to hear another girl disagree so you can VWDUWWKHEDFNDQGIRUWK´QR\RX¡UH prettier� war. And while I’m on the subject, let me let you in on a little secret: guys don’t care! We don’t notice WKH IDFW WKDW \RX VWUDLJKWHQHG your hair today. We don’t notice that your chic nail polish matches your new Toms. The only people who notice these are other girls. You dress to impress each other. $QGZKHQRQHJLUOKDVDGLIIHUHQW choice in wardrobe, the hyenas

from the halls

ULSKHUWRSLHFHV:KRDUHK\HQDV" Hyenas are those girls who are always whispering to each other LQWKHEDFNRIWKHFODVVURRP´ZKDW LV VKH ZHDULQJ"¾ RU ´LV VKH UHDOO\ ZHDULQJDEOXHVFDUIZLWKDJUHHQ WRS"¾RU´VKH¡VRQO\ZHDULQJWKRVH leggings to make her butt look big.� Guys do not like hyenas. %XW E\ IDU WKH PRVW aggravating thing that girls can QHYHU VWD\ DZD\ IURP LV DOO WKH drama. The she-said he-said war WKDW FRXOG EH VROYHG ZLWK D ÀYH PLQXWH IDFH WR IDFH FRQYHUVDWLRQ but never is. It starts with a tweet then wiggles its way into

Facebook where it then turns LQWR OXQFKURRP JRVVLS %HIRUH you know it, it’s an all out war EHWZHHQWZRJURXSVRIFDGG\H[ IULHQGVWLFNHGDWHDFKRWKHURYHU absolutely nothing. I do realize that not every girl at Rose possesses these ridiculous qualities. I applaud those who DUHQ¡W VXFNHG LQWR WKH IDNHQHVV DQG LQVLQFHULW\ RI WHHQDJH SUREOHPV DQG GUDPD EXW LI \RX DUH RQH RI WKHVH JLUOV LW¡V WLPH WR change. It doesn’t matter how rough you look on the outside, as long as you’re not aggravating, SHRSOHZLOOOLNH\RXIRU\RX

What did you do for Valentine’s Day?

“Went  out  to  eat  with  my   “Watched  ‘Paranormal   Activity  3’  with  Alexis  Briley� mom� Khalil  Smith,  10 Jessica  Everette,  12

“Cooked  dinner  for  my   girlfriend� Sutton  Lee,  11

“Talked  on  the  phone  and   chilled  with  my  Valentine� Teonda  Spruill,  9

“Coach  Peacock  cooked   me  dinner� Ms.  Upton


7 RAMPANT OPINION

RAMPANT LINES, FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Letter to the Editor: Dear Editor, The new school spirit, especially by the Rowdie Rampants at basketball games, is really great. It’s good to see everyone getting together as a big group and cheering for our school when in the past years we have rarely done anything like that. Fan support is a great way to get the students together and have something fun to do on the weekdays too. This traditional will live on through baseball season too, with the Rowdie Rampants transforming into the Left Field Lunatics. And even next year, we will do our best

to keep this school spirit alive. As Davis Fussell puts it: “we’ve started a dynasty here. Keep up the good work.” The tailgating worked really well too, with special thanks to our principal Charlie Langley for providing us with hot dogs, hamburgers, chips, drinks and cookies. We had a blast out there, playing cornhole, disc golf, and a new game, disc pong. And it wasn’t just the normal crowd. There was a multidude of Rose students tailgating. Truly, everyone had a great time. If you didn’t attend of the basketball games, you really missed out on something

“The new school spirit...is really great” great. All of the students at the home games are incedibly loud, pumping the team up and, for lack of a better word, getting everyone rowdy. I really think that Rose has to be one of the hardest places to play, because of our student section. I would hate to play agasint Rose at home. Anyone who didn’t come out to one of the basketball games, I recommend you get yourself into the Left Field Lunatics and join us at the baseball games. Sincerely, Jordan Frazier

Who is  your   favorite   American  Idol?

&KLFN¿OD or Bojangles   breakfast?

What is  your   Temple  Run   high  score?

“Close.”

“Carrie Underwood.”

³&KLFN¿OD´

“636,360.”

“Entertaining.”

“Scotty McCreery.”

“Bojangles.”

“250,000.”

“Good.”

“Fantasia.”

“Bojangles.”

“100,000.”

“Fun.”

“Carrie Underwood.”

³&KLFN¿OD´

“84,000.”

The Superbowl   was... Taylor  Hall-­Brown

Junior Will Young

Freshman Travon Joyner

Sophomore Erin Skinner

Senior


8 RAMPANT OPINION

RAMPANT LINES, February 23 , 2012

Sadie Hawkins inspires creativity

This year, to raise money for prom, Rose will be hosting its very own Sadie Hawkins dance. But before the crimping irons are busted out from your bottom drawer and the khaki pants are donned, girls must gather the courage to ask boys to the dance. Some girls have been super creative this year in asking their potential dates, but other girls may need some help in deciding what is an appropriate way to ask a boy to Sadie hawkins and what is not. This month your editors have come to the rescue by establishing a list of things WRGHĂ€QLWHO\QRWLQFOXGHLQ\RXU proposals. 1. Surprises are fun, but

hiding in someone’s closet and waiting to “surpriseâ€? them after they fall asleep is just creepy. Also creepy; popping out of the backsteat of someones car when they begin their caffeine driven trek to Starbucks. 2. Do not involve mommy. Asking potential date`s parents for permission is Ă€QH DQG GDQG\ EXW GR QRW XVH his parents to pop the question. Nobody wants to be asked out by his mom. Try and make sure that you are the one asking someone to the dance, not your photo  by  your  secret  admirer mom. If your mom wants a date, she can ask someone herself; it is Suzie  gets  crafty  with  her  invitation  to  Billy  Bob  to  join  her  as  her  date  at  the  dance.  Or  else...     a Sadie Hawkins dance after all. he doesn’t agree to go, you will Sadie Hawkins proposal, you 3. Do not include any sort of there. bodily function or part in your 4. Pranks can be a cute way physically harm him, is also a might want to reevaluate your proposal. This includes using to ask a boy to Sadie Hawkins, bad idea. Threats of physical approach. Keep it sweet, keep it their hair to spell out “you + just as long as they are not over violence are frowned upon by creatative, but most importantly me, Sadie Hawkins?â€? on their the top. Telling your future date law enforcement in most states. keep it non-creepy. If you are shower walls. Collecting their that his car got keyed and then Knives are cute when they are absoulety void of any creative used gum to make a sculpture of leaving a cute note under his used to cook a romantic meal ways to ask a guy, try Pintrest, their head to gift to them is also windshield wiper is cute. Egging in the kitchen, but they aren`t or watch the Laguna Beach prom gross, as well as time consuming. his house and then leaving a exactly attractive when they are episode. A simple phone call This should be a given, but we note cut out of magazine letters, held up to someone`s throat. might not be the most exciting Ladies, if your considering thing, but it’s better than writing Ă€JXUHG ZH VKRXOG LQFOXGH WKLV serial killer style, is not. point for all you weirdos out 5. Telling someone that if any of these factors in your it out in your own blood.

School  lunch  overhaul  provides  opportunity  to  improve  student  health by seth singleton news  assistant  editor In the past, the phrase “school lunch� has not always belonged in the same sentence as “healthy.� First Lady Michelle Obama and Congress members have recently announced plans to overhaul school nutrition by adding more fruits and vegetables, requiring more whole grains and lowering fat content. This could be an effective way to battle the rising childhood obesity epidemic in our country. However, if several factors are ignored, the plan will not have a chance to make a difference. While I agree that healthy ingredients should be used in school lunches, if these new recipes taste bad, students will avoid the new food like the plague. Several major school districts across the

nation have found that when healthy but unappealing foods are served in lunchrooms, most of the food ends up in the trash, wasting money, food and time spent on improving nutrition plans. Then children would most OLNHO\ ÀOO XS RQ MXQN IRRG ODWHU HOLPLQDWLQJ DQ\ EHQHÀW WKH QHZ food could possibly have. If this overhaul is to work, it must keep in mind that kids will not eat what they do not like. Innovation is required in order to make healthy

food appealing, or there will be more complaining than there is trash on the lunchroom tables. One part of the new plan that I feel will cause much more harm than good is the newfound ability to regulate a la carte items (preprepared foods think the boxes of chicken nuggets) and drink machines Students should learn to make nutrition choices for themselves. Simply taking away choice does not teach decision making. School is not the only place that a student can buy a soda. Not offering soda may keep students from (gasp) drinking a soda during the school day, but school is not the only place we can get a soda, and the soda that could have so tragically been consumed at school will just be consumed before or after school or brought to school. Vending machine raids will not teach

students long term good habits Offering information about nutritional information while keeping vending machines in school teaches students to drink sodas in moderation for a lifetime. We should not train our students for health 180 days of the year but for lifetime health. The only way to learn to make choices is to have WKHPRUHOVHWKLVSODQZLOOEDFNĂ€UH OLNH SHDV PLVĂ€ULQJ RII RI D IRUN launcher. One more problem is that this legislation only deals with what goes into your body, not getting your body moving. Nutrition really makes no difference without exercise. Without any activity, even moderate portions will make you gain weight. But with a high level of exercise, eating large portions will barely affect your weight. 30 minutes of physical education is just not enough. In

our culture of TV, computer use, 24/7 texting, hour and a half long classes of sitting still and hours of homework, would allowing a 30 minute walk break during the day be so bad? Or perhaps a weekly class trip to a greenway or park? Yes, it would cost time and money. But our time and money on nutrition will go to waste if we ignore physical activity. When you sit like a slug for most of the day, eating well won’t help you much. I fully support better nutrition in our school cafeterias. But if taste, choice and exercise are left out of this plan, all of this new funding and planning will be wasted, causing poor health and taxpayer anger. Here’s to hoping the government uses this chance to address the real issues and not raid vending machines, send taste to the curb and keep students in couch potato mode.


9 RAMPANT FEATURES

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

AP MUSIC theory class

STRIKES A CHORD

photo  by:  marie  payne

by allie davenport staff  writer Not many students get to do what they love during the school hours, but for senior John Dixon this is not the case. Rose offers a long list of AP classes for its students, from human geography to art history, but now there is a new addition to the list: AP music theory. Senior Jarrett Ozimek said that he realized that the class is harder than he thought it would be. “Don’t take it if you think it`s just going to be an easy AP, because it’s something that requires a lot of effort and it’s not something that a lot of people grasp easily,â€? senior Kim Bowman said. Bowman is a clarinet player in the marching and jazz bands so AP music theory is just another music class in her repetoire “I was expecting it to be a little challenging, and it has lived up to that expectation,â€? Dixon said. “It’s really more in depth than I thought it would be.â€? Dixon plays the trumpet in marching and jazz band and wants to continue playing music in college. Music theory at the college level causes many college students to drop their music major, but Dixon said that so far, the class is not stopping him GHVSLWH WKH GLIĂ€FXOWLHV WKDW LW brings. AP music theory teacher Russel Knight said that the class

has a very tough curriculum. The AP music theory class is equivalent to two semesters of college music classes crammed into one high school semester. Throughout the class, students are asked to view music in a variety of ways. “Students are working on being able to hear music and write it down based on what they heard,â€? Knight said. This is part of what Knight calls the “ear-training lab,â€? during which students pay particular attention to the chordal progression of whichever song they are listening to. Knight said that in addition to the theory and dictating of music, students will also be asked to sight sing. The students will be recorded singing different intervals and scales that will be graded. “I wasn’t expecting sight singing,â€? Jarret Ozimek said. Ozimek is a trumpet player in jazz band who said that he felt SUHWW\FRQĂ€GHQWFRPLQJLQWRWKH class, but felt awkward singing. Even though the students do not have to sing in front of their fellow students, Bowman said that singing alone in a room with only a recording device can be just as uncomfortable. For junior Matti Thompson, this is perhaps the easiest part of the curriculum. Thompson is a choral student, who has applied for acceptance at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts

(UNCSA) next year. Thompson is taking music theory in hopes of preparing for a year at UNCSA. “I knew it was going to be GLIĂ€FXOW EHFDXVH , KDYHQ¡W KDG much training beforehand, but I didn’t know it was going to be that hard,â€? Thompson said. Thompson said that the hardest part of the class for her is the major and minor intervals. Knight said that he expected these types of reactions from students. “If you’re a student who has always been an ‘A’ student, this is a different class,â€? Knight said. “If you don’t have the natural ear to hear certain things, you might do well on the written portion where you can look at music and analyze it at sight, but when it comes to actually hearing it and actually analyzing it and dictating it, that’s a different skill set.â€? Knight said that this class will undoubtedly challenge those students who may have easily made their ways through most classes at Rose. “It’s not something you can study,â€? Thompson said. “It’s like math where you have to know how to do it. You can’t just read [the] book.â€? Reading the two textbooks that the music theory students are given is still recomended. Just like other AP classes at Rose, music theory students are required to take tests on a regular basis.  7KH Ă€QDO $3 WHVW LQ 0D\

for music theory is composed of IRXUSDUWV7KHĂ€UVWLVDPXOWLSOH choice section in which the students will answer questions based on a musical passage that they see. “There’s a section just from what they hear, they’re going to have to answer multiple choice questions about different aspects of the piece,â€? Knight said. The third section consists of two melodic examples of music that the students have never seen before. Students will have to be recorded singing these melodic examples. 'XULQJ WKH Ă€QDO VHFWLRQ students will listen to some melodic exercises and dictate them exactly as they hear them. Knight said he advises future students to have a strong foundation in reading music if they want to sign up for the class. Orchestra, band and chorus students at Rose are exposed to most of the knowledge that is recommended for the class. However, students who play instruments leisurely may have D PRUH GLIĂ€FXOW WLPH OHDUQLQJ what could be completely foreign material. Knight has realized this and has offered a probable solution. There is a standard music theory class in the registration guide, and if it were offered at Rose, students who play instruments or sing could get a basic foundation of music theory before taking on the AP level

class. “I’d really like to get that class up and running next year for the student that is interested in learning to read music,â€? Knight said. Knight said that if this class were established, it could relieve some of the stress felt by the VWXGHQWVGXULQJWKHĂ€UVWZHHNRI AP Music Theory. Two students have felt content throughout the class, juniors Isaac and Julian Ward, twins that have been playing instruments since elementary school. While they both play various instruments, Julian :DUG¡V VSHFLDOW\ LV WKH Ă XWH DQG Isaac Ward’s is the oboe. The brothers agreed that the class has been simple so far. They said that singing is a new territory for them, but they felt that they are ready for the challenge. “I’m not overly worried about it yet,â€? Isaac Ward said. He also said that he feels by the time the exam comes around, he thinks that he should have enough practice with singing that it should not be a problem. For others in the class, the journey so far has not been so smooth. AP music theory is not such an “easy AP.â€? “Some students may have viewed it as ‘oh hey, here’s a good AP class, oh it`s about music it will be easy!’â€? Knight said. “The reality is that this is a very tough curriculum.â€?


12 RAMPANT FEATURES

RAMPANT LINES, FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Holding on while

holding strong contributed  photo  

by madie lewis  photo  editor Senior Almon-re Alston had a tough time entering high school because he was teetering on the edge of life and death. Alston, better known by his nickname Scooby, was in middle school when KH Ă€UVW QRWLFHG SUREOHPV ZLWK KLV health. Alston said he went to the doctor one day to see what was wrong because he was feeling sick After the doctor ran several blood tests on Alston they informed him that he had a serious kidney SUREOHP 2QFH WKH QHZV UHDFKHG the rest of Alston’s family, mixed IHHOLQJV RI KRSH DQG ZRUU\ EHJDQ to sink in. “I felt like he wasn’t going to make it. Junior Amber Alston, Almon-re’s sister, said. Alston has what is called thin basement membrane disease, ZKLFKPHDQVKLVNLGQH\¡VĂ€OWUDWLRQ V\VWHP QHYHU IXOO\ GHYHORSHG when he was born. He also has been diagnosed with a minor blood SUREOHP “I have a blood disorder that FDXVHV PH WR QRW EH DEOH WR SOD\ FRQWDFW VSRUWV OLNH IRRWEDOO DQG basketball, Almon-re Alston said. “I ZDVDJRRGIRRWEDOOSOD\HU,OLNHG SOD\LQJ WKH VSRUW 7KH GLVHDVH VHW me back from reaching my goal of JRLQJWRFROOHJHWRSOD\IRRWEDOOÂľ Not only did this disease make goals that Almon-re Alston had even harder to reach, it also haunted him with thoughts of ´ZKDWLI"Âľ “I remember thinking ‘how DP , JRLQJ WR KHOS P\ PRP RXW WKURXJK OLIH DQG HYHU\WKLQJ"¡¾

Alston said. $OPRQUH$OVWRQH[SUHVVHGKLV concerns about his health and his future to his sister. ´:H ZHUH WDONLQJ RQH GD\Âľ Amber Alston said. “And he told PHÂśVLVLIDQ\WKLQJHYHUKDSSHQVWR PHWDNHFDUHRI0D¡¾ With these worries in mind and his football dreams coming to a close, Alston’s doctors were still not able to come to a clear diagnosis. For 12-year-old Alston, it ZDVMXVWDÂśNLGQH\SUREOHP¡UHVXOWV SHQGLQJ ´,ZDVJRLQJWRDVSHFLDOLVWLQ :DNH )RUHVW HYHU\ WZR PRQWKVÂľ Almon-re Alston said. “I missed school for weeks just to go to the GRFWRUÂľ Almon-re Alston went to Georgia and then to Maryland to -RKQ +RSNLQV WR VHH VSHFLDOLVWV EHFDXVHRIKLV´VSHFLDOFDVHÂľ “I was thinking ‘why are you VWLFNLQJ P\ EURWKHU VR PXFK"¡¾ $PEHU $OVWRQ VDLG ´7KH\ ZRXOG stick him in his arms to draw his blood. He would squeeze my hand DQG ,¡G WDNH KLV SDLQ IRU KLP , would think, ‘that’s my brother. \¡DOODUHKXUWLQJP\EURWKHU¡¾ :KHQKHZDVWKHVSHFLDOLVWV decided surgery was the way to go. 7KH\QHHGHGWRĂ€[DQDUWHU\LQKLV KHDUW DQG GXULQJ WKLV RSHUDWLRQ they would get a good look at his kidneys as well. It was a two for RQH GHDO Ă€[LQJ WZR RUJDQV ZLWK one surgery. ´7KH\RSHQHGPHXS,KDYHD UHDOORQJVFDUÂľ$OVWRQVDLG  7ZR YHLQV LQ KLV KHDUW ZHUH connected incorrectly, making his EORRG Ă RZ LUUHJXODU 7KH VXUJHRQ severing them both then reattached WKHPSURSHUO\WRWKHKHDUW

Almon-re Alston said that KH ZDV SOHDVHG ZLWK WKH VXUJHU\ because after the doctors were able to look at his kidney, a clear diagnosis was made. His recovery WRRN DERXW PRQWK ZLWK WKH Ă€UVW ZHHN VSHQW LQ WKH KRVSLWDO GXULQJ which time he was not allowed to eat. Almon-re Alston lost thirty SRXQGVGXULQJKLVUHFRYHU\EXWWKH GLHWZDVQ¡WWKHRQO\GLIĂ€FXOWSDUWIRU him. “When they took me to go home, I couldn’t take a shower because my body was hurting and ZDV VZROOHQÂľ $OPRQUH $OVWRQ said. (YHQ WKURXJK DOO KLV SDLQ Almon-re Alston said that he was VWLOO DEOH WR Ă€QG WKH EULJKW VLGH RI this situation. “It [felt] good because I knew I didn’t have to go to the doctor a lot [because] they knew what was ZURQJ ZLWK PHÂľ$OPRQUH$OVWRQ

said. Now, he only has to make a ZHHNHQG WULS WR :LQVWRQ 6DOHP every six months to get a basic FKHFNXS%HFDXVHRIKLVGLVHDVHKH was eligible for the Make-A-Wish organization to grant him a Wish. ´, ZDV VXUSULVHGÂľ $OPRQ re Alston said. “My mom was emailing someone about it, so they came to my house and I was LQP\SDMDPDV>ZKHQ@,DQVZHUHG WKH GRRU 7KH\ DVNHG PH ZKDW my wish was and I knew what I ZDQWHGIURPWKHJHWJRÂľ Almon-re Alston was not DZDUH WKDW SHRSOH ZHUH ZRUNLQJ to grant him a wish until that knocked on his door, but he had an idea for a wish already in his thoughts. “My wish was to go to the Great Wolf Lodge and go to a 3DQWKHU¡VJDPHÂľ$OPRQUH$OVWRQ said. As an extra bonus, Almon-re

$OVWRQJRWWRPHHWIRRWEDOOSOD\HUV from the Carolina Panther’s team. Quarterback Cam Newton and wide receiver Steve Smith chatted ZLWKKLPEHIRUHWKH\OHIWWKHĂ€HOG ´7KH\ WROG PH WR PH WR NHHS P\KHDGRQWKHULJKWSDWKDQGWKDW MXVWEHFDXVH,FRXOGQ¡WSOD\IRRWEDOO any more that doesn’t mean it’s WKH HQG RI WKH ZRUOGÂľ $OPRQ UH $OVWRQ VDLG ´7KH\ VDLG WR MXVW NHHSP\KHDGXSDQGWU\WRUHDFK DQRWKHUJRDOÂľ Alston is thankful that his Wish was granted and that he got PRUH RXW RI WKH WULS WKDQ  MXVW D good time and new clothes. “I learned a lot about not WDNLQJ OLIH IRU JUDQWHGÂľ $OVWRQ said. “I always thought I could EH D SURIHVVLRQDO IRRWEDOO SOD\HU [but] you never know what might KDSSHQ,WHOOSHRSOHGRQ¡WWDNHOLIH IRU JUDQWHG DQG OLYH LW XS PDNH sure you live it the right way, have IXQZLWKLWÂľ


13 RAMPANT ENTERTAINMENT

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

Students’  style  choices  are  influenced  by  a  desire  to  stand  apart by alexandra theus

entertainment  coeditor Sweatpants, messy buns, gym shorts and stained shirts trudge through the halls of Rose High School, but junior Moshe Hendricks walks with her partially-shaved head held high. She knows that some of her classmates don’t always understand her style choices, but she doesn’t care. “I saw how Cassie [the singer] had half of her head shaved, so I did that until I moved the part over a little bit to make it more comfortable,â€? Hendricks said. “I just wanted to do something different.â€? Senior Musa Jose is also wellknown for his distinctive style, ZKLFKKHVDLGLVLQĂ XHQFHGE\KLV native state of California. “People in California are really different from people here,â€? Jose said. “We don’t really care what other people think of us or how we dress. We just wear what we feel. We wear what represents us.â€? Another aspect of Jose’s that

comes from California is the “tail� he sports as a hairstyle. This is a small patch of hair which remains uncut on the nape of Jose’s neck, and is a reminder of his California culture. “People in Northern Cali wear it to represent where they come from,� Jose said. “If you’re in LA, and you have it, the people there know that you’re from

´:HMXVWZHDU ZKDWZHIHHO :HZHDUZKDW UHSUHVHQWVXV¾ Musa Jose, Senior Northern Cali.� Hendricks said that her s i n g u l a r , unapologetic VW\OHLVLQà XHQFHG b y the likes of Katy Perry, Kanye West and Pharrell. She also draws inspiration from her favorite magazine, Teen Vogue, and gets ideas from different fashion blogs.

While Hendricks and Jose are forging new paths with their wardrobes, senior Davis Fussell uses clothing to honor the people of what he calls “the greatest generation.â€? “I think we as a generation put a lot less emphasis on dressing up than previous generations,â€? Fussell said. “I, for one, respect my grandparents and the greatest generation they were a part of. They had to go through so much more than us, and I enjoy respecting their tradition of dressing up.â€? Hendricks, Jose and Fussell said that they would like to see more Rose students step up their style game. “The problem is that everybody wants to be like everybody else,â€? Hendricks said. “They get their clothes from the same stores, and they’re afraid to be different. They don’t want people to see them and say, ‘Why are you wearing that,’ like they do to me.â€? Junior Addison Lebo, known for making her uniform look unique with stylish touches like UXIĂ HV DQG XQXVXDO IDEULFV VDLG that she also notices students’ apprehension to be different. “A lot of people here dress so plainly,â€? Lebo said. “It’s really easy to stick out with what you wear.â€? Lebo said that she thinks the way a person dresses is important “Clothes can really tell you

who are,� Lebo said. “How you dress can really determine how people approach you.� Sophomore Kathryn Hamill shares Lebo’s sentiments, but notes that it is impractical for students to “dress up� every day and usually dresses with a more comfortable, laid back style. “I think that it is

“Who gets in Ă€JKWVLQWLHVDQG SHQQ\ORDIHUV"Âľ Davis Fussell, Senior important, how you dress yourself and present yourself to the world,â€? Hamill said. “You don’t just want people to see you for your bad mood or your laziness that morning.â€? Hendricks said that while she wishes students would think more outside the box when getting dressed, she doubts that they will, because of their fears of being judged. Jose said that students’ apathy is to blame. “The way you dress says a lot about who you are, and if you don’t care about how you dress,

then it shows that you don’t care about other things,â€? Jose said. “Some students don’t take school seriously, so they don’t feel like they have to dress seriously. You can’t make some one care. They way I dress is just my personality.â€? Fussell said that a betterdressed student body could change not only students’ and teachers’ impressions of each other, but the community’s view of the school as well. ´'UHVVLQJ XS UHĂ HFWV EHWWHU on the school and I think it would improve behavior and academics,â€? Fussell said. “Who JHWV LQ Ă€JKWV LQ WLHV DQG SHQQ\ loafers?â€? Hamill, who feels restrained by the uniform policy, recently SXUFKDVHG D SDLU RI Ă RUDO 'RF Martens that are very dear to her, but she feels that she cannot wear them as often as she would like. “I do have a sense of style, even though I like to dress comfortably,â€?Hamill said. “But I can’t just wear my Doc Martens with the uniform. I usually end up just throwing something on.â€? Lebo said that students should not be afraid of the uniform policy. “You can make a simple RXWĂ€W UHDOO\ IXQN\ ZLWK D FRRO sweater or a pair of earrings, but VKRHVDUHGHĂ€QLWHO\P\IDYRULWHÂľ Lebo said. “All that really matters LVWKDW\RX¡UHFRQĂ€GHQWZLWKZKDW you’re wearing and that you don’t worry about what other people


14 RAMPANT ENTERTAINMENT

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

RAMPANT REVIEWS >>  Books Through  My  Eyes by  Tim  Tebow by patrick moloney staff  writer He has been called the greatest college football player ever, a hero in Denver and Gainesville and a role model for our nation. Others know him as the luckiest quarterback in the NFL, a kid who does not belong in the pros, the Jesus freak. Now Tim Tebow can add writer to his endless collection of titles. When we talk about football players, writer is not a description we normally think of. Tebow has proved us all wrong once again. Partnering with sports biographer Nathan Whitaker, who has helped write the biographies of former NFL greats Tony Dungy and James Brown, Tebow writes the story of his life journey in his autobiography, Through My Eyes. Through My Eyes tells the story of a small farm boy, the missionary kid that overcame all odds ever since his mother was told there was not a chance her boy could survive birth. It is the story of a kid who was told he could not be a quarterback, the story of the shy college kid heavily harassed by the opposition and praised by fans. Tebow starts off his book in New York, New York at the 2008 Heisman Trophy ceremony. He WKHQ FRQWLQXHV KLV VWRU\ à DVKLQJ back to his childhood days and continuing his life story from there. Tebow spends pages upon pages blabbering about plays from the hundreds of football games he’s played. These chapters are a sure hit for sport lovers, but have the tendency to be fairly repetitive and tedious for the average reader. Tebow includes not only the story of his football career, but also his journey of his Christian

faith. He begins each chapter with a bible verse and includes several more throughout the book. I personally enjoyed the story of his faith because it adds a unique twist from the average biography that makes us all dose off, drooling on the hundreds of pages left to read. Admit it, we have all done it before. I would recommend Through My Eyes to anyone who has any interest in Tebow, football, or sports in general. The in-depth description of many of Tebow’s games at the University of Florida may be a turnoff for the average reader, but the incredible story of the wonder kid makes up for it. Through My Eyes makes the reader feel like he was there, growing up with Tebow. If you are looking for a book that features fantastic writing styles or a wide vocabulary usage, please do not waste your time. None of these are present, but what more can you expect from an NFL player?

>>  Movies Michel  Hazanavicius’s  The   Artist by alexandra theus entertainment  co-­editor Having already snagged three Golden Globes and been nominated for ten Academy Awards, The Artist LVUDLVLQJDORWRIUXFNXVLQWKHÀOP industry. Set in the late 1920s and early 1930s, this black-and-white ÀOPLVWKHÀUVWVLOHQWPRYLHWRUHFHLYH such widespread exposure and acclaim in decades. Some have called it a case of pretention, which has received such praise merely for its artsyfartsy qualities. However, after having seen the movie, the only way I can imagine anyone saying anything negative about The Artist is if they simply haven’t seen it.

The Artist chronicles the journeys of two actors working for the Ă€FWLRQDO.LQRJUDSK6WXGLRVGXULQJD critical time for motion pictures. Jean Dujardin stars as George Valentin, a silent movie star who loses fame as “talkies,â€? motion pictures with sound, become the dominant types RI Ă€OPV SURGXFHG %pUpQLFH %HMR stars opposite Dujardin as Peppy Miller, an aspiring actress who Ă RXULVKHV LQ WDONLQJ PRYLHV %RWK actors give stellar performances, and though you do not hear their voices, the emotion with which they craft these characters is heartbreaking and stirring. Silent movies heavily rely upon the score to set up scenes and convey emotion. Ludovic Bource’s score captures and compliments every frame of The Artist, though the occasional moments of redundancy in the music can be slightly offputting. Overall, the music in many ZD\VPDNHVWKHĂ€OPDQGZLOOKDYH viewers humming on their way out of the theater. In addition to the spectacular performances of the actors and the brilliant score, the dialogue of the Ă€OP LV DFWXDOO\ RQH RI P\ IDYRULWH aspects of The Artist. It is odd that in a movie where the voices of the actors are unheard, the words exchanged between them are some of the most striking moments of the HQWLUHĂ€OPEXWWKHPRPHQWVFUHDWHG E\WKRVHSDQHOVRIZRUGVWKDWĂ DVK across the screen are enough to take any viewer’s breath away. One LQVWDQFH RFFXUV ODWHU LQ WKH Ă€OP as Valentin’s wife pleads with her broke, depressed husband, “George, I’m unhappy.â€? The music swells as he looks up at her and says, “So are millions of us.â€? In those words, the viewer is gripped not only by Valentin’s despair, but the despair of an entire nation during the Great D e p re s s i o n . The people’s only escape is in cinema, and 9DOHQWLQ Ă€QGV himself cut off from that single ray of hope in

his dreary existence. Throughout The Artist, the absence of sound never once takes DZD\IURPWKHEULOOLDQFHRIWKHĂ€OP It is everything that makes movies magical, full of moments that will surprise, inspire, and break the hearts of those who view it. It is with QR UHVHUYDWLRQ WKDW , DIĂ€UP HYHU\ praise given to The Artist, which breaks new ground in the oldest ways.

>>  Albums Becoming Abigail  Williams by mathew hopkins entertainment  co-­editor

The release of the American black metal band Abigail Williams’ third full-length album is probably not one that many Rose students have been eagerly anticipating for the last six months. To be honest, I wasn’t eagerly anticipating it, either. But after giving it a listen, I was pleasantly surprised by Abigail Williams’ Becoming. The album is just short of being an hour long, clocking in at 55 minutes, but it only contains six VRQJV7KHĂ€UVWRIWKHVHVL[WUDFNV is an eleven-minute monolith entitled “Ascension Sickness.â€? The song contains acoustic sections along with a mixture of clean vocals and almost inaudible growls, as well as the standard fast-paced drumming and intense guitar work. The lyrics are a familiar mixture of allusions to death, darkness, and winter (evident in such lines as “Dark clouds cover the sky, blocking the pale, illusive moonlightâ€?). The album then proceeds to the next track, “Radiance.â€? This song is unique because the lyrics

are a direct quotation of the Lord Byron poem “So We’ll Go No More a-Roving.â€? The third and fourth tracks are fairly unremarkable. However, the next song, “Three Days of Darknessâ€? is a breath of fresh air. “Three Days of Darknessâ€? is the shortest song on the album (just under two and a half minutes long), and it is an instrumental WUDFN 7KH Ă€UVW PLQXWH RI WKH song is a strange medley of eerie sounds, many of which seem to emulate the wind blowing. Just as these noises reach a cacophonic peak, they smoothly transition into DPHORGLFĂ XWHDQGYLROLQGXHWKDW sound oddly Medieval. The last track, “Beyond The Veil,â€? is truly epic. It is the longest song on the album at 17 minutes and 32 seconds. I was initially hooked by the dissonant, yet oddly melodic violin intro. The melody moves into a smooth guitar lead, which continues enticingly for WKH Ă€UVW Ă€YH PLQXWHV RI WKH VRQJ Then, the familiar intensity and GDUNQHVVWKDWKDVGHĂ€QHGPRVWRI the previous songs takes over the guitar. After several minutes of this, there is a break that contains another violin lead which is surprisingly up-beat and hopeful VRXQGLQJ7KHVRQJEULHĂ \UHWXUQV to standard black metal chaos and then slows down for a third and Ă€QDOYLROLQVHFWLRQZKLFKDFFRXQWV for the remaining six minutes, starting off calmly but building in intensity until the song ends. Overall, Becoming was a surprisingly good album. It is a fairly drastic change from the EDQG¡VVRXQGRQWKHLUĂ€UVWDOEXP In The Shadow of A Thousand Suns, DQG KDV D PXFK PRUH FRQĂ€GHQW sound than previous albums. Fans of this genre of music will enjoy the album, and fans of $ELJDLO:LOOLDPV¡Ă€UVWWZRUHOHDVHV will enjoy it as well, though it may take some getting used to. For WKRVHZKRĂ€QGWKLVVW\OHRIPXVLF to be nothing but atonal noise, this album won’t cause a change in heart, but if you look past the LQWHQVLW\DQGFKDRV\RXPD\Ă€QG something strangely beautiful in the poetic lyrics and dark melodies of Becoming.


15 RAMPANT ENTERTAINMENT

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2011

Cafe Duo  provides  delicious  food  and  a  comfortable  atmosphere by charlie cannon

staff writer Café Duo recently opened a new restaurant at 505 Red Banks Road. With a comfortable atmosphere and outstanding food, this café provides an excellent addition to Greenville restaurants. The calm interior keeps customers satisfied until the food arrives. Upon entering Café Duo, patrons will find a menu waiting for them beside the door. This is convenient if customers are skeptical about the cuisine, so people can choose to stay or find another restaurant. Café Duo has three different menus for lunch, brunch and dinner. When I visited, I was presented with the brunch menu. The menu may only be one page, but it still managed to fit a large variety of items on it. All of the food is fairly priced, with the most expensive item being the Chilean Sea Bass for $27.50. Café Duo has two head chefs running the kitchen. The combined experience of

the chefs was evident in the quality of the cuisine. Not only was their food impeccable, but they also managed to prepare it quickly. I ordered the chicken caprese which was $8. While waiting for my order, I was presented with a basket of warm, white bread with a choice of butter or olive oil. The bread was absolutely delicious and it kept me occupied until my food arrived, which did not take very long. The chicken caprese is a succulent roasted chicken breast with fresh mozzarella, ovendried tomato and balsamic vinegar on fresh ciabatta bread served with a choice of fries or house salad. I had the opportunity to try both the fries and the house salad. The thin cut fries were perfectly seasoned, reminding me somewhat of Bojangles’, but with a better, more home-made taste. The green salad was spectacular, and it blended perfectly with the dressing. The dressing I chose for the

salad was raspberry vinaigrette dressing, although a large variety of dressings were offered. Each entree came with its own unique side options. Some other sides on the menu include sweet potato fries, potatoes and vegetable du jour, or the vegetable of the day. The sides were excellent and would work well with any meal, but the real star of the dish was, of course, the chicken caprese sandwich itself. The ciabatta was toasted brilliantly and provided a crispy and flaky addition to the roasted chicken. The combination of all the ingredients was simply sublime and left me wanting more. The elements of the sandwich all complimented each other nicely. I could taste every individual component and it all was absolutely flawless. The splendid food and relaxing surroundings established a cozy atmosphere suitable for any dining experience. Café Duo is an

photo by  madie  lewis  

Café Duo  is  a  fresh  restaurant  located  at  505  Red  Banks  Road. excellent choice for any time of day. It works for a professional dinner meeting or just a good time out with friends. The only disappointing aspect of the restaurant was the poor service from my waitress, which, from my observations, is not the norm for the staff at café Duo. Everything else about my dining experience fully met my expectations. Overall, Café Duo was an

excellent dining experience that I truly enjoyed. The food was wonderfully prepared by Café Duo’s two chefs, and everything worked together to create a joyous restaurant experience. Café Duo is an excellent addition to Greenville’s many restaurants. People will certainly be missing out on a marvelous dining experience if they do not give Café Duo a try.


16 RAMPANT SPORTS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2011

Former Rampant returns as softball coach

photo  by  marie  payne

)RUPHUSOD\HU/LQGVH\&RUEHWWZRUNVZLWKVHQLRU$OH[LV%ULOH\RQLQÂżHOGWHFKQLTXHVGXULQJWU\RXWV

by erin walden staff  writer Former Rose softball player /LQGVH\&RUEHWWLVWDNLQJWKHÀHOG this year with a new title. Corbett, a four year starter and two year varsity softball captain, is returning to the Rampant softball team as an assistant coach under head coach Chris Gaddy. Corbett was approached by Gaddy about the

possibility of coaching after the conclusion of last year’s softball season. “I knew I was going to have an open coaching position, and with Lindsey going to ECU, I thought this would be a great opportunity for her to start coaching,� Gaddy said. Corbett, who has played for Gaddy since her seventh grade year, quickly accepted the offer. “I’ve been playing for twelve

years, and I always thought about maybe one day being able to coach,â€? Corbett said. “I’ve learned so much from Coach Gaddy and it only makes sense to coach under him.â€? The returning players from last year’s team are getting used to Corbett’s transition from a teammate to coach. “It’s a lot of fun having her EDFN EXW LW¡V GLIĂ€FXOW WR VHSDUDWH our friendship from her being my coach,â€? senior Casey Hargett said.

Hargett, along with fellow senior Alexis Briley, played with Corbett at E.B. Aycock Middle School before coming to Rose. “It will be different, but I think after we all get adjusted, things will be great,â€? Briley said. Corbett’s coaching duties will range from helping the players with hitting mechanics to working with WKH LQĂ€HOGHUV RQ GHIHQVH &RUEHWW said she is willing to do whatever it takes to ensure the Rampant softball team has a successful season. “My main focus is to help Coach Gaddy in any way possible,â€? Corbett said. “I am prepared to do whatever needs to be done.â€? Corbett hopes to bring a different coaching perspective to the team. “We all have those times where we do not want to talk to our head coach and I hope to be able to be there not only as a coach, but as a friend to all of the players,â€? Corbett said. Briley said she feels that Corbett can relate to the team because most of the girls know her well. Since Corbett played on the team last year, she knows most of the players’ strengths and weaknesses, so it is easier to pinpoint what the players

need to work on. Hargett said that she feels similarly about Corbett, and believes that her experience with the team will help her with coaching. “She is someone I can trust and I know I can go to her on or off the Ă€HOGÂľ+DUJHWWVDLG Both Gaddy and Corbett said they are excited to start the 2012 softball season with Corbett working primarily with the JV team. “We are going to be a young team with a lot of inexperienced players,â€?Gaddy said.â€?I am looking forward to watching them grow and develop into better ball players over the season.â€? Corbett is excited about the opportunity to lace up her cleats again. “I cannot wait to get on the Ă€HOGDJDLQÂľ&RUEHWWVDLG´%HIRUH I made the commitment to coach, I was afraid that I wouldn’t play again legitimately. I would like to say that coaching at my alma mater is the next best thing, if not better.â€? The Rose softball team will begin the 2012 season on February 27th as they take on Farmville Central in a non-conference matchup.

+LOORIIHUVDOWHUQDWHHGXFDWLRQWKURXJKFURVVÂżWH[HUFLVH by jordan alread sports  co-­editor Last semester, social studies teacher Steven Hill offered his Latin class the opportunity to earn some extra credit. He did this by going to the gym and working out with them. Hill came up with the idea of exercise for extra credit by mimicking a mind-set developed by the ancient Greeks. The Greeks did not separate the body and mind like we do in modern times. “When the ancient Greeks would talk about education, they meant a sound body and mind,â€? Hill said. “I tried to reinforce this idea by offering another form of education in exercise.â€? With his experience of being

in the Marines, Hill knows the importance of staying in shape, and he wanted to share his healthy lifestyle with his students. Hill had the interested students meet him at the Tier 1 training center off of Red Banks Road at 5:30 am before school. The workout is classified as cross fit training which works on strength, stamina and endurance. It also includes anywhere from five to 25 people. The setup was a class, rather than a certain workout that Hill had planned out. The class was short in duration but worked many different areas and used techniques proven to be very effective. Cross fit training has been used with many sports such as cross country and soccer. Cross fit

is unique in the aspect that every workout is different, which helps the body grow and get stronger. “Though they aren’t the longest sessions, I think that the way cross fit is designed, the classes are harder and more s t re n u o u s t h a n h o u r s w i t h weights in the gym,� Hill said. “Also they give you a better idea of what fitness is.� Students can get more, or just as much out of working out in the time period the class offers, than going to the gym for hours. “The workout was definitely strenuous, and I honestly didn’t expect to be working very hard,� sophomore Jordan Bryant said. Their workout consisted of kettle bell squats, pushups and sit-ups.

Along with these exercises, the instructor developed a cycle that divided the workout into 15 minute sections. In each increment, they had to do as many sets of each exercise possible. “I was really glad that I went and could almost feel like I had gotten stronger after just that one workout,� sophomore Braun Alread said. “Afterwards I felt refreshed and awake and would definitely volunteer to go again.� The overall workout lasted only 30 minutes. At the same time, it gave the students a way to interact with their teacher outside of the classroom. Hill wanted to use this workout to expose his students to a rigorous workout that involved many different aspects of exercise. “Mr. Hill added a little fun to

the whole situation which really helped me to not focus as much on the difficulty of the workout,� Bryant said. Though this particular group only consisted of Rose students, Hill also sometimes works with some of his former students he has taught either at Rose or Pitt Community College. In the near future, Hill hopes to team up with his wife and coach the cross country team. For the time being, Hill plans to use the cross fit training in practices and wants to continue to offer it as extra credit. “I really enjoy working with my students,� Hill said. “I feel like it will help them to learn how to exercise correctly and implement it into their daily lifestyle.�


17 RAMPANT SPORTS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

Male Cheerleaders thrill the crowd

ROSE STUDENT

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT  

by brice edwards staff writer A popular stereotype regarding high school cheerleaders is that they are made up of only outgoing, peppy females. However, this has been proven untrue this year at Rose. Four new male cheerleaders have been added to the varsity cheerleading squad this year, along with one returning member from last year. Junior Emanuel Bryant, freshman Josh Moore, freshman Kevin Phillips, freshman Cedric Whitaker and junior Deon Nelson are new on the roster as the five male varsity cheerleaders. Bryant began helping the cheerleading squad last year. He enjoyed the team aspect and wanted to return the following year with new, talented members. Bryant recruited some of his friends that he thought would be a beneficial addition to the varsity cheerleading squad. “I enjoyed the routines, stunts, tumbling, and team dynamic,” Bryant said. “So, I wanted to return the next year and get some of my friends with potential involved. We went in with a positive attitude and wanted to help the team as much as we could.” Assistant coach Stephanie Campbell feels that the boys have made a huge contribution to the squad this year. “At first, the boys just came and helped cheer and tumble with the girls, but

>> Darryl  Wallace   Junior,  Basketball

Q: What is your favorite DVSHFWRIWUDFNDQGÀHOG" A: I like to meet new people and running is all around fun. Q: Do you have any pre-game ULWXDOV" A: I like to listen to the music on my phone and get focused.

photo by  chandler  kuenzi

Male cheerleaders,  Emmanuel  Bryant  and  Deon  Nelson  help  out  with  a  stunt  during  a  timeout as the season went on they began to participate in every part of the team’s practices,” Campbell said. “Now they are permanently part of the routines and stunts.” The boys have to follow the same rules that the girls follow. It is mandatory for them to attend practice every day and participate in all of the stunts and routines that go on during the games. If they miss a practice and do not have a legitimate reason, then they are on probation. “We do all of the same things that the girls do,” Phillips said. “We do the work that the girls don’t want to do, like carry the mats and clean up before and after practice.” Junior Bridgette Cullipher,

who is a varsity cheerleader, thinks that the boys have improved the team’s skills and helped make the team more entertaining. “They are very strong and help us with stunting,” Cullipher said. “Also a couple of them can tumble so it makes us

“The cheerleaders add excitement and encourage us to cheer on our fellow Rampants.” Mary-Haven vonLehmden, junior look more experienced during half time and time outs.” The male cheerleaders compete during half times and time outs with the opposing team, for who can tumble the best. This gets the fans going and the Rowdie Rampants on to their feet. “When the male cheerleaders have a tumble off with the other team, it gets the fans off their seats,” von Lehmden said.

Many Rowdie Rampants, including junior MaryHaven von Lehmden, enjoy the excitement the new male cheerleaders add to the games. “When the male cheerleaders do their tumbling routines, the students immediately get off their seats,” von Lehmden said. “The cheerleaders add excitement and encourage us to cheer on our fellow Rampants.” Apart from the physical aspects of cheerleading, the new male cheerleaders posses good qualities that help improve the team. “They all have such positive attitudes and the girls pick up on that and feed off of it,” Campbell said. “We have had a lot less attitude problems during practice now that the boys are on the team.” Next year, the squad hopes to have more boys participate in try outs therefore, adding more boys to the team which will increase the talent. They also hope to compete in coed competitions. “The new male cheerleaders have been a great contribution to our team,” Cullipher said. “I am so glad they have joined the team permanently.”

4+DYH\RXHYHUSOD\HG DQ\RWKHUVSRUWV":HUH\RX VXFFHVVIXO" A: I played baseball and football in middle school, we were pretty good and I enjoyed it but I got bored with both. Q: What has been your most embarrassing moment UXQQLQJWUDFN" A: One time I slipped off of the block and almost fell before the race started. Q: What is your favorite race WRUXQIRUWUDFN" A: I like to run the 200 because it is short enough to where I won’t get very tired but long enough to recover if I mess up. Q: What is going through your mind when you are ZDLWLQJDWWKHVWDUWOLQH" A: Get out of the gates quick DQGÀQLVKKDUG Q: What inspired you to start UXQQLQJWUDFN" A: I had talked to a couple of my friends .about track and we went out that year and have been running ever since. Q: What kind of training do you do to stay in shape for WUDFN" A: I do a lot of different types RIWUDLQLQJWKDWNHHSVPHÀW


18 RAMPANT SPORTS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

CNN premier puts spotlight on safety

Swimming On Feb. 11 many Rose swimmers competed in the 6WDWHPHHW7RSÀQLVKHUVIRU the boys were sophomore Philip Perdue who placed 5th LQWKHIUHHDVZHOODVWKH IUHH7KHDQGIUHH medley team had a top 10 ÀQLVKZLWKDWHDPFRQVLVWLQJ RI(\DQ(DJOH7UH\3RIKDO 3KLOLS3HUGXHDQG$-3DUNHU *LUOVFRPSHWLQJDWWKH6WDWH PHHWZHUH(PLO\6DZ\HUDQG (PPLH%DUQKLOOZKRFRPSHWHG LQWKHIUHH Tennis 7U\RXWVIRUWKHWHQQLVWHDP DUHRQWKHWKDQGWKRI )HEUXDU\)ROORZLQJWKLVWU\RXW ZLOOEHDQDOOGD\VFULPPDJH on the 18th at Greene Central in Snow Hill. See Mr. Walter IRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQLI LQWHUHVWHGLQSOD\LQJWHQQLVIRU WKHXSFRPLQJVHDVRQ Dream Team (YHU\)ULGD\PRUQLQJDQG DIWHUQRRQ'UHDP7HDP meets to discuss the many HYHQWVWRFRPHIRUWKHFOXE )RUWKHIXWXUHPHHWLQJV0V /HZLVLVUHTXLULQJPHPEHUV WRWXUQLQWKHÀYHYROXQWHHU KRXUVUHTXLUHGIRUWKHFOXE 8SFRPLQJHYHQWVIRUWKH 'UHDP7HDP&OXEDUH5HDG $FURVV$PHULFDZKLFKZLOO WDNHSODFHRQ0DUFKWK&RPH WRWKHPHHWLQJVRQ)ULGD\ WRNHHSXSWRGDWHRQWKH QHZHYHQWVSODQQHGIRUDOO PHPEHUVWRWDNHSDUWLQ Track 7UDFNWU\RXWVIRUWKHVSULQJ season were held on the 20th DQGVWEXWLIDQ\LQWHUHVWHG VWXGHQWVVWLOOZLVKWRWDNHSDUW LQWKHVSULQJVHDVRQRIWUDFN they should see Coach Will %ODQGDQGFRPHRXWWRSUDFWLFH IURPSPWRSP0RQGD\ WKURXJK)ULGD\

contributed photo

Representatives spoke  for  the  CNN  premier  of  “Big  Hits,  Broken  Dreams”  in  the  PAC  on  Jan.  27th.

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with a doctor and his death IROORZHGWKHVHFRQGFRQFXVVLRQ Grimm was held partially UHVSRQVLEOH IRU QRW SUHYHQWLQJ :DOOHUIURPSOD\LQJWKHQLJKWRI the accident. ´:KDW PRUH FRXOG KH KDYH GRQHWKDQKLVMRE"µ3ROODUGVDLG 3ROODUG ZDV RQH RI WKH PDQ\ZKRVHOLYHVZHUHFKDQJHG E\ WKH HYHQWV WKDW IROORZHG WKH accident. +HU IDWKHU &RDFK :DOW 3ROODUGZDVWKHFRDFKWKDWVHQW :DOOHU LQ WKH JDPH EXW ZKHQ his player was rushed to the KRVSLWDO KH ZDV WKH RQH ULJKW EHVLGH KLP WKURXJK WKH HQWLUH QLJKW 7KHWHDPVWUXJJOHGWRNHHS XS WKH KDUG ZRUN WKH\ KDG SXW LQWR WKH VHDVRQ DQG ZLWK PHPRU\ RI WKHLU WHDPPDWH·V GHDWKWKH\ZHUHUHPLQGHGGDLO\ RI WKH UHVXOWV RI LQMXULHV WKDW FRPHZLWKSOD\LQJWKHJDPH ´5,3 -DTXDQ :DOOHUµ ZDV written on the white boards LQ WKH ZHLJKW URRPV DQG QRW one person in the school could LJQRUH WKH FKDLU VHDWHG LQ WKH FHQWHU RI WKH FRPPRQ ZLWK D VLQJOHURVHSODFHGRQWKHVHDW ´,WZDVDKDUGWUDQVLWLRQIRU HYHU\RQHRQWKHWHDPWKDW\HDUµ 'L[RQVDLGZKRZDVDIUHVKPDQ GXULQJWKHZKROHRUGHDO´(YHQ WKRXJK ZH ORVW D WHDPPDWH ZH VWLOO ZDQWHG WR NHHS SOD\LQJ EHFDXVH HYHU\RQH VWLOO KDG WKH

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19 RAMPANT SPORTS

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2012

Motocross requires skills, gives big thrills by chandler kuenzi

staff  writer   Motocross is an activity that involves racing a dirt bike through an enclosed off-road circuit. Some Rose students have found enjoyed through the sport of motocross. Senior David Edwards has motocrossed ever since he was eight and his parents bought him KLVĂ&#x20AC;UVWGLUWELNHDQGĂ&#x20AC;QGVPXFK enjoyment out of it. Edwards said that going around turns at high speeds and jumping are some of the most exciting aspects about motocross. The sport originated in the United Kingdom in 1906, with participants merely racing cross country, and has now developed into different categories of racing altogether. Freshman Landon Hill said he enjoys motocross for fun and he views it as more of a hobby than a sport. For Hill, the thrill of riding adds â&#x20AC;&#x153;an adrenaline rush like no otherâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I began motocrossing a few years ago just out of curiosity to see what it would be like,â&#x20AC;? Hill

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I ended up really liking it DQGSXUFKDVHGP\Ă&#x20AC;UVWPRWRFURVV bike so I could ride whenever I wanted.â&#x20AC;? Being able to motocross requires the rider to be physically fit, flexible and have good coordination. In order to turn HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\ DQG TXLFNO\ WKH ULGHU must have the strength, timing, and knowledge to correctly execute the turn. The same goes for jumps; the body does just as much work as the bike does. Motocross, as with riding dirtbikes in general, comes with its share of possible injuries. Due to the high jumps and speeds, falling is common. Falling can result in a multitude of negative effects on the body, from fractures to broken bones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of times, people want to see how fast and how high they can jump or do the craziest tricks,â&#x20AC;? Hill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes if a rider is not taught the proper way to ride, it can result in serious injuries; it is very important to be safe and know what you are doing.â&#x20AC;? Though motocross can end

in serious injuries, if motocross participants know the proper way to ride and have practiced enough, they can incorporate high speeds or tricks as a way to add excitement. Edwards said that although he is not one for major tricks , his favorite part is jumping. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I jumped over a really big ditch once,â&#x20AC;? Edwards said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought that was pretty cool; this thing was like six feet down, and I thought it would be fun.â&#x20AC;? Freestyle, along with Supermoto, ATV motocross, and Supercross are all forms of sports that have been adapted from the original sport of motocross. Along with the adaptations to form new sports, changes have been made to the different bikes designed for the various individual sports. The sport now has thousands of riders and continues to grow and evolve, while even more continue to ride on their own time for fun. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My goal is to continue to ride motocross and become as good as I can be,â&#x20AC;? Hill said.

contributed  photo

Freshman  Landon  Hill  goes  off  a  jump  while  practicing  on  his  bike

Tim  Tebow  takes  undeserving  heat  for  his  strong  beliefs by emily clark sports  co-­editor   Over the past few months, much has been written and said about Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow and the new phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tebowing.â&#x20AC;? Many have embraced this phenomenon in a positive way, but just as many have been critical on how this story has played out. Tebow made a name for himself this season. His team started their season off poorly with a 1-4 record. A turnaround did not look likely until the former third stringer for the Broncos, Tebow, took the starting quarterback position. He then led his team to an impressive six straight wins and seven out of eight wins to get them in the playoffs. In the process, he helped develop his team into one of the most exciting teams to

watch. Tebow has become famous for his fourth quarter comebacks. Tebowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity has less to do with football and more to do with his devotion to God, his stance on abortion and his decision to spend a $2.5 million signing bonus on famine, education and housing for the poor. Even though some mock him for his stances and beliefs, according to Tebowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, Through My Eyes Ă&#x20AC;YH DQG D KDOI million people changed their minds about abortion to prolife after a commercial was aired featuring him and his mom. Tebow is not afraid to stand up for his beliefs, especially his devotion to his faith, through a public way. During his games, Tebow would get down on one knee and start praying, even if everyone else around him is doing something different. This is called

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tebowing.â&#x20AC;? This is something Tebow has practiced throughout his career, not just since he became successful. Many have criticized Tebow for his lack of ability as a quarterback, but even more have ridiculed him for his open display of Christian faith. The sports networks, talk shows, comedians and many fans are ushering in demands for Tebow to be benched or let go. On the Internet, social networking web sites and the

â&#x20AC;&#x153;expertâ&#x20AC;? analysts have proceeded to mock the man who has led his team to the top of the American Football Conference West division standings. Many insisted before this season that Tebow would not be much of a quarterback and said that he had an inaccurate arm and a style of play that only works in college football but not for the National Football League. Tebow has surely proved them wrong. Some call him a failure and make fun of him for his faith because that is what some feel is appropriate. Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t they ponder on the realistic point of view and applaud Tebow for his great run and understand that he has a lot of work to do before calling him a failure? Tebow was not even supposed to be the second string quarterback for the Broncos this season. Tebow got a lot of recognition

when he led his team to a stunning overtime victory against the Pittsburgh Steelers in which Tebow passed for 316 total yards with a playoffs record-setting 31.6 yards per completion. Three, one and six were the three numbers Tebow painted under his eyes when he played for the University of Florida. It stood for the bible verse John 3:16, which was what Tebow wore under his eyes in his last bowl game. After that particular game, 94 million people looked up the verse John 3:16. I, for one, admire what he stands for and what he believes. His hard work, determination and beliefs should be an inspiration for all. It is a shame to the people who seemingly forgot about his outstanding season and focused more on his devotion to God by mocking anything he says or does.


20 RAMPANT PHOTO PAGE

RAMPANT LINES, February 23, 2011

Issue 5 ('11-'12)  

Issue 5 Rampant Lines