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bull

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2008-2009

A guide to the traditions at the University of South Florida Sponsored by the:


tra路di路tion [truh-dish-uh n] noun 1: an inherited, established or customary pattern of thought, action or behavior 2: a belief or story relating to the past that is commonly accepted as historical 3: the handing down of information, beliefs and customs by word of mouth or by example from one generation to another


A little over 50 years ago, USF opened its doors for the first time with a handful of buildings, a dream and a lot of sand. Much has changed since the days when Fowler Avenue was an unpaved dirt road. Since then, students and alumni have shaped our history and traditions. Some of these traditions are based on songs; such as the USF Alma Mater. Other traditions are based on school spirit; such as our “Go Bulls!� hand symbol and the Herd of Thunder Marching Band. You’ll also find campus traditions based on ceremony, events and places of significance. The list continues to grow along with the University of South Florida. But traditions are nothing without the individuals who make them and keep them. One of the missions of the USF Alumni Association is to identify the Tradition Makers and Tradition Keepers of the University and recognize them for their contributions. Tradition Makers are people who started something that has continued. Maybe they wrote a song, created a ceremony or event, or came up with a gesture that embodied school spirit. Simple or intricate, their efforts have evolved over time into a USF tradition. Tradition Keepers are people who work to keep our traditions alive. They incorporate traditions into their own lives, educate others on their significance or push to resurrect old traditions. Without them, there would be no cycle of traditions to unify students and alumni.


Letter from the Executive Director Dear Alumni, Although the University of South Florida is considered a young university, many students, faculty and alumni have already established traditions that have become a part of USF’s culture and history. Here, progress is an everyday word. As each year passes, USF’s history becomes richer and the celebrated cycle of traditions grows. The USF Alumni Association recognizes the valuable role that traditions play to connect former and current students, build pride and give the University of South Florida its unique identity. One of the goals of the USF Alumni Association is to help identify and educate others on USF’s traditions and recognize those individuals who have contributed to the University’s history. Still, there are many traditions at USF that have yet to be born and others that have just begun and need to be cultivated. I encourage all students and alumni to stay involved with the University and the USF Alumni Association by starting a new USF tradition and becoming a Tradition Maker. Or, you can be a Tradition Keeper by learning about USF’s traditions and keeping them alive. If you’d like to learn more, please give us a call at 1-800-299-2855, 813-974-2100 or visit us at www.USFalumni.org. We’d love to hear what you think. Sincerely, John B. Harper ’76 Executive Director USF Alumni Association


Table of Contents The USF Alumni Association Chapter 1 Who We Are . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What We Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 USF Alumni Association Membership Application . . . . . . . . 6 ®

Welcome To Bulls Country Chapter 2 How the Bulls Were Born . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 The USF Logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The USF Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 ®

The Songs of USF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 3 The USF Alma Mater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The USF Fight Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 ®

USF Spirit Chapter 4 Go Bulls! Hand Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Herd of Thunder Marching Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Mascot Rocky the Bull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Painted Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Spirit Team’s Celebration of Scoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 USF Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 ®

Ceremonies Chapter 5 Alumni Awards Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Engineering Induction Ceremony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 King O’Neal and Outstanding Senior Awards . . . . . . . . . . . 26 National Match Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 USF Commencement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 The USF Mace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 White Coat Ceremony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ®


Student Life Chapter 6 The Bull Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Greek Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Living on Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Movies on The Lawn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 The Oracle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Patio Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Student Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 University Lecture Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 USF Ambassadors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 USF Ambassadors Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Week of Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 ®

Traditional Events Chapter 7 Bull-arney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Bullstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Celebration of Free Enterprise Dinner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Children’s Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Engineering Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Family Weekend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Homecoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Stampede of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 USF Day at the Capitol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 ®

Places of Significance Chapter 8 Alumni Center Archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Botanical Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Centre Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Chinsegut Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Martin Luther King, Jr. Plaza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 The Phyllis P. Marshall Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Riverfront Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 USF Lakeland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 USF St. Petersburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 USF Sarasota-Manatee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 ®

Famous Faces Chapter 9 USF Presidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Past USF Alumni Association Presidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 ®


The USF Alumni Association

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Who We Are The USF Alumni Association The University of South Florida Alumni Association is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization.

Where you can find us: On Alumni Drive (next to the USF President’s residence)

Mailing address: Gibbons Alumni Center 4202 E. Fowler Ave. ALC100 Tampa, FL 33620-5455

Telephone: (813) 974-2100 or 1-800-299-2855 Website: www.USFalumni.org Hours of operation: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday – Friday The Sam and Martha Gibbons Alumni Center, named in honor of retired U.S. Congressman Sam Gibbons and his late wife, Martha, opened in April 1998 and expanded in 2004. Sam Gibbons, who is known as the “Father of USF,” was the driving force behind the creation of the University and its medical school.

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The Sam and Martha Gibbons Alumni Center provides USF alumni with a home base on the Tampa campus. The brick building with the green awning is a tangible landmark for students, guests and visitors and houses the administrative offices for the USF Alumni Association, USF Development and the USF Foundation. At 18,514 square-feet, the Alumni Center is a popular site for meetings, wedding and graduation receptions, luncheons, holiday socials, class reunions and campus events.


What We Do The USF Alumni Association’s mission is to connect alumni, support students and strengthen USF. We are a dues-based organization, with membership open to all graduates, students and friends of the University. Through the dues and additional sponsorships and donations, the USF Alumni Association is able to offer an array of events, programs and services to students and alumni.

Scholarship Opportunities With the help of our generous donors and the USF Bulls License Plate program, the USF Alumni Association is able to award several scholarships. We have scholarships for students attending all four USF campuses, as well as scholarships in the name of dignitaries such as Martin Luther King, Jr., and important figures in the University’s past, including devoted former Resident Assistant Candy Creamer Schreck and the first Dean of Women, Margaret Fisher. We also administer the prestigious Kosove Scholarship, a four-year, all expenses-paid scholarship granted to only the most exceptional student leaders.

Student Recognition The USF Alumni Association sponsors the Outstanding Senior Award and the King O’Neal Scholar Award for students graduating with a cumulative 4.0 GPA or higher.

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USF Ambassadors Program The USF Ambassadors is a group of the University’s best-andbrightest students who serve as liaisons between the student body, faculty, staff and the community.

Career Building and Networking Both students and alumni can benefit from the many career and networking programs offered by the USF Alumni Association. Our website, www.USFalumni.org, has a Career & Networking section with employment opportunities, a resume builder, business card exchange and a link to inCircle, our online networking community. Alumni using inCircle can browse for jobs, post resumes and connect with fellow alumni who work in their industry. We also partner with the USF Career Center on bi-annual career fairs and business etiquette dinners featuring experts who offer advice on how to “outclass the competition.”

USF Alumni Association Events The USF Alumni Association hosts two of the biggest Homecoming parties: the Parade Watch Party, held the night before the big game, and Bulls Roast, a tailgate party held a few hours before kick-off. Food, drink, games, entertainment and free spirit supplies make these events the place to be for Bulls fans. At the Bulls’ away games, our co-sponsored football tailgate parties are a popular meeting spot for USF fans. We also host a hospitality tent at Raymond James Stadium before home games.

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Throughout the year, we partner with various campus organizations on business and cultural events, such as the University Lecture Series, Round-Up, orientation, Grad Stampede and commencement. You’ll find out more about these events as you read further in this book.

Alumni Legislative and Public Policy Programs The USF Alumni Association partners with the Department of Government & International Affairs in the College of Arts & Sciences to offer several programs – including classes, internships and directed study programs – that take students inside the legislative process and introduce them to the policymakers, staff, lobbyists and USF alumni already working in government.

Alumni Groups It’s easy to stay connected to other Bulls by joining one of USF’s alumni groups. In addition to local groups in Tampa, Pinellas County, Lakeland and Sarasota-Manatee, there are USF alumni groups statewide, nationally and even a few international groups that meet on a regular basis to socialize, network and attend events in their communities. We also have several special-interest groups, such as the Black Alumni and Geology Alumni groups, that meet for fun and fellowship.

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There are numerous benefits to membership in the USF Alumni Association, including: Connections through: • USF Magazine (3 issues annually) • AlumNews (monthly) • Alumni Voice magazine (4 issues annually) • Geographic- college- and interest-based alumni groups • inCircle – an online networking community Access to: • Networking and continuing education opportunities • Campus recreation centers (additional fees apply) • USF Federal Credit Union • Life and health insurance • Bulls travel opportunities • USF branded items • USF Library Discounts on: • Auto and home insurance • USF logo gear from the USF Bookstore, Bulls Outfitter and Bulls Heaven • Hotels • Car rentals • Busch Gardens, Adventure Island and Sea World admission • New AAA memberships (restrictions apply) • MOSI memberships • Florida Aquarium memberships … and MORE!

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Membership Application Join or renew online! www.USFalumni.org

GREAT NEWS!

Membership dues may now be tax deductible! (consult your tax advisor)

Member Name (include middle initial)

Maiden

Address City, State, ZIP E-mail Home Phone

Annual Membership

n n

Life Membership

$40.00 - Single

n n

$55.00 - Joint

$700 - Single $1,000 - Joint

Life Membership Monthly Installment Plan (per month for 12 consecutive months)

n

$58.33 - Single

n

$83.33 - Joint

(Available for credit card payments only) With your first installment payment, you will receive an associate life membership card. After 12 payments, you will receive your life membership card and materials.

Joint Member Name (include middle initial)

Maiden

o Check enclosed (payable to the USF Alumni Association) o Visa

o MasterCard

o American Express

o Auto Renewal:

I give the USF Alumni Association permission to charge the annual cost of membership to my credit card. I reserve the right to cancel this payment option by notifying the USF Alumni Association a minimum of 15 days prior to my membership expiration date.

Credit Card Number

Exp. Date

Signature (as it appears on the credit card)

Return this form with payment to:

University of South Florida Alumni Association 4202 E. Fowler Ave., ALC100, Tampa, Florida 33620-5455 (813) 974-2100 • (800) 299-BULL (2855) www.USFalumni.org


Get Your USF Bulls License Plate TODAY Make the switch to a USF Bulls license plate and we’ll cover the initial $25 specialty license plate fee. If you already have your plate, thank you! If not, don’t miss the chance to get a USF Bulls license plate for less. And now there are three easy ways to switchincluding the NEW online option. Go to www.bullsplate.org to download your FREE $25 voucher today! Showing your Bull pride and supporting student scholarships has never been easier. If you have any questions, please call the USF Alumni Association at 813-974-2100.

Less Time! Less Money! Go online to www.bullsplate.org to download your voucher.


Welcome to Bulls Country

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How The Bulls Were Born How does the USF Desert Rats or the South Florida Roosters sound to you? Those were just a couple of the suggestions tossed around when the University was choosing a mascot in the Sixties. At the suggestion of Tradition Maker Robert Bickel, ’66 – and after a close and controversial run-off – the name Golden Brahmans was chosen over the Buccaneers in 1962. The Golden Brahmans, a reference to Florida’s flourishing cattle industry, was shortened to the Bulls in the late Eighties for promotional purposes.

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Present

The USF Logo In the Seventies, USF had several different logo designs. By the early Eighties, a thin, script-like logo was being used. Tradition Maker Pat Hill was instrumental in designing the 1984 USF outline logo and the 1988 USF logo that had “University of South Florida� spelled out underneath. Hill said the intent of the 1984 and 1988 logos was to lessen the confusion with Florida Southern College and the University of San Francisco. In 2003, USF established new visual identity standards and launched a fresh new logo. USF graphic designer and Tradition Maker David Fink and his team from the University Relations department developed 20 different logo ideas that were considered by faculty, staff and students. The new logo was a clear favorite. It has a strong and sophisticated feel, with a darker green and a shift from yellow to a golden hue.

Past

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The USF Seal In 1958, Dr. John Allen, USF’s first president, commissioned Tradition Maker Henry Gardner of Industrial Supply Corporation to design and create the official seal for the University. President Allen wanted a symbol that would depict education on a global level. Each element of the seal has special meaning. The sun represents life to all living things. The lamp symbolizes learning. The globe signifies the broadened perspective and opportunities provided by higher education. Green and gold were selected as the school colors because green represents life on earth and gold symbolizes the lifegiving heat and light of the sun. Also, Grace Allen, President Allen’s wife, felt they were “workable” colors that were not affiliated with any other state school. The seal has been in use since the first USF catalog in 1959. For many years, it was used on everything from business cards to stationery. Since 1988, the USF seal has been reserved for exclusive use on diplomas, official stationery, academic certificates and other legal documents.

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The Songs of USF

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The USF Alma Mater Composed in 1960 by Tradition Maker Wayne Hugoboom, a professor of music at USF, the USF Alma Mater was first performed in 1961. Hugoboom won a USF song competition and received a check for $250 for coming up with the ceremonial music and lyrics. The USF Alma Mater is played at events such as commencement and orientation.

Hail to thee, our Alma Mater May thy name be told, Where above thy gleaming splendor, Waves the green and gold Thou our guide in quest for knowledge Where we all are free University of South Florida Alma Mater, Hail to thee!

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Be our guide in truth and wisdom As we onward go, May thy glory, fame and honor Never cease to grow May our thoughts and prayers Be with thee through eternity, University of South Florida Alma Mater, Hail to thee!


The USF Fight Song You’ll hear USF’s Fight Song, The Golden Brahman March, at football games, basketball games and many other sports and spirited events. Fans are encouraged to raise the Go Bulls! hand symbol during the last part of the song.

USF Bulls are we, We hold our standard upright and free. For green and gold we stand united. Our beacon lighted and noble to see. USF Bulls are we, For USF we’ll always be. With all our might we fight the battle Here and now, and we will win the Victory… (Shout:) S-o-u-t-h F-l-o-r-i-d-a

South Florida, South Florida Go Bulls Go!

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USF Spirit

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Go Bulls! Hand Symbol To make the Go Bulls! hand symbol, use your thumb to fold your two middle fingers into your palm. Your hand can either be palm forward or facing inward, as long as your pinkie and index fingers are extended to make bull horns. The gesture originated as a good luck sign for free-throw shots during basketball games, but has evolved into a greeting between fellow Bulls and an all-purpose symbol of Bull pride.

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Herd of Thunder Marching Band USF’s marching band, the Herd of Thunder (HOT), first took the field at Raymond James Stadium before the season home opener against Southwest Texas State on Sept. 11, 1999. Tradition Maker and first director of the Herd of Thunder, Sid Haton, was at the helm. The band took the field for their first pre-game show in a dramatic stampede of musicians that was dubbed the “Call of the Bulls” – a tradition that continues to this day. You’ll hear the marching band perform at pre-game shows, halftime and in the stands at all USF home football games and select away games. USF’s Show Band and Pep Band are also part of the Herd of Thunder. HOT also performs at area and regional competitions, Bucs games, USF bowl games and other events. The USF Alumni Association sponsors snack bags for band members traveling to away games.

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Favorite Songs Other popular selections played by HOT include “El Toro Caliente,” the USF Fight Song, “March Victorious,” the USF Alma Mater and “The Bull #8.” “Wooly Bully,” by the Sixties band Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs and Rage Against the Machine’s “Parade of the Bulls” are also fan favorites.


Rocky

Mascot Rocky the Bull Rocky the Bull was conceived in 1965 as a plush toy to sell in the USF bookstore. Tradition Maker Ray Cooper, ’66, was a student assistant in the University’s graphics department when he was assigned to come up with some preliminary sketches of Rocky. Over his next three decades with the University, Cooper saw many evolutions of Rocky. It wasn’t until the early Seventies that Rocky was first set to paper as a cartoon for USF Athletics to use in its newsletters. A fighting bull figure standing on two legs was trademarked in 1974 and used through the early Eighties when USF’s teams were known as the Golden Brahmans. Rocky was redesigned again in 1984 and the current Rocky was unveiled at the 2003 Homecoming game. Though he never speaks, Rocky raises the roof at USF games, campus events and community activities.

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Painted Fans In 1999, Tradition Makers Brian Hope, ’03, and Walter Price, ’04, wanted to add some more excitement to USF football and basketball games, so they dreamed up the idea of the Green and Gold Guys. The two freshmen would paint their bodies half green and half gold, then head out to home games to pump up USF fans. The fun movement caught on. In 2002, a second group of painted students called The Beef Studs emerged. Founded by Tradition Maker Brandon Faza, ’05, the Beef Studs and Beef Babes are now found at all home football and basketball games. It’s hard to miss their signature grass skirts, viking horns and unmistakable green and gold war paint. The USF Alumni Association enthusiastically supplies the Beef Studs and Babes with paint.

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The Spirit Team’s Celebration of Scoring When the Bulls score, the USF Cheerleaders and Sun Dolls acknowledge the feat with their own traditions. One of the cheerleaders will do a push up for each point atop an elevated platform raised by the other cheerleaders. The Sun Dolls do concurrent kicks – one kick for each point.

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USF Athletics USF’s first intercollegiate sports were swimming and soccer, which began in 1963. President John Allen wanted USF’s focus to be on academics and prohibited the swim team from competing on school days. Student desire for football was strong from the beginning, but President Allen discouraged it, fearing money would be diverted from academics. In 1968, USF’s existing athletic teams were invited to join the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA.) Men’s basketball was added in 1970. Women’s basketball followed in 1972. Over the years, various Bulls sports teams have dominated the Sun Belt and Metro Conferences, Conference USA and most recently the Big East Conference.

USF Football USF football was only nine years old in 2005 when the team was invited to join the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) mix. 

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While the Bulls have always pulled off some major upsets, so far none have been as momentous as the 2007 season. USF rolled out six straight wins, including an overtime triumph on the road at Auburn and a home defeat of No. 5 West Virginia. On September 16, 2007, USF made its first ever appearance in the national rankings at No. 23. Four weeks later, on October 14, the Bulls were No. 2 in the country! The Bulls had arrived; leaving their footprint on college football and becoming the fastest program to go from an upstart NCAA FBS school to a Top 10 national ranking. 


In addition to football at Raymond James Stadium and basketball at the USF Sun Dome, you’ll find tennis, golf, baseball, softball, volleyball, soccer, lacrosse, cross country, track & field, cycling and sailing teams at USF. There are also over 30 intramural sports available to students. In 2004, an $18 million athletic facility opened for use by student athletes. The Largest Student Section in the BIG EAST As the football team rises to national prominence on the field, the USF student section at Bulls games has become known for its boisterous support. After students turned out in record numbers for the 2007 season opener, the USF Athletics Department increased the student section to 12,501 seats, covering three levels in the south end of Raymond James Stadium. It is the largest student section in the BIG EAST and easily the most vibrant. Retired Athletic Jerseys USF Athletics began retiring athletic jerseys for outstanding athletes on February 14, 1987, with the retiring of basketball jersey No. 30, belonging to forward Charlie Bradley. Thus far, a total of seven USF jerseys have been retired-in men’s basketball and baseball and in women’s basketball and volleyball. Jerseys are retired upon recommendation from a coach and are considered a rare occurrence. Retired USF jerseys: Charlie Bradley, No. 30, ’81-’85 Chucky Atkins, No. 12, ’92-’96 Radenko Dobras, No. 31, ’88-’92 Robin Roberts, ’77-’85

Scott Hemond, ’84-’86 Wanda Guyton, No. 50, ’84-’89 Michelle Collier, No. 10, ’98-’02

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Ceremonies

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Alumni Awards Program The Alumni Association’s prestigious annual awards program recognizes three prominent alumni and one outstanding community member for their achievements and service to USF. The four awards are: Donald A. Gifford Alumni Service Award: Recognizes outstanding service to the University by a USF graduate. Distinguished Alumnus Award: Recognizes a USF graduate who has reached the pinnacle of success in their profession. Outstanding Young Alumni Award: Recognizes outstanding achievement by an alumnus age 35 or younger. Class of ’56 Award: Recognizes a non-alumnus who has made a difference in the community. The recipients are honored with a luncheon and recognition each fall, usually during Homecoming weekend. Nomination forms are available all year from the USF Alumni Association and on www.USFalumni.org.

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Engineering Induction Ceremony At the end of the fall and spring semesters, USF College of Engineering graduates are inducted into the engineering profession in a special ceremony that typically takes place on the same day as commencement. Graduating seniors (undergraduate or graduate level) recite the Engineer’s Oath and are presented with a stainless steel ring to be worn on the small finger of the dominant hand – an internationally recognized symbol of an engineer.

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King O’Neal and Outstanding Senior Awards The King O’Neal Scholar Award, a tradition since 1988, is named for USF charter class graduates Lucas King and Evelyn O’Neal and is presented by the USF Alumni Association at commencement to students who graduate with at least a 4.0 GPA. Award recipients receive a certificate of accomplishment, a gold medallion of the USF Seal and are individually recognized during the commencement ceremony. The USF Alumni Association also recognizes one Outstanding Senior each semester – a student who embodies leadership, school spirit, academic excellence, community involvement and a love for USF.

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National Match Day On National Match Day, held annually on the third Thursday in March, thousands of medical students nationwide learn where they will spend the next three to seven years of their lives serving residencies. Med students are matched through the National Residency Matching Program, established in 1952. Hospitals rank their picks; students rank theirs. Computers make the final decision. The results are read aloud, one by one, while med students and their families anxiously await word. For more than 30 years, USF medical students have gathered at Skipper’s Smokehouse on Match Day to await the nail-biting news. At the start of the event, each med student donates $1 to a pot which goes to the last USF student announced.

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USF Commencement The first USF commencement was held in 1963 for 326 graduates. Today, USF commencement exercises include up to seven ceremonies with more than 5,400 participants from all four campuses. In 2005, the inaugural graduate student ceremony was held for masters and doctoral graduates. During the University’s 50th anniversary in 2006, special institutional regalia for doctoral students debuted. It is a long-standing commencement tradition for every USF graduate to cross the stage, be recognized by name and shake the hand of the University President. In preparation for commencement, the USF Alumni Association participates in Grad Stampede prior to the end of each semester. At the Stampede, graduates can sign up for membership in the Alumni Association at a discount while purchasing their cap and gown. New grads who join the USF Alumni Association receive a professional portfolio to use during job interviews. The Alumni Association also sponsors the Get It Together Tent – a lastminute prep spot for graduates before they enter the ceremony. The tent, set up in the Sun Dome Corral, has essentials such as mirrors, hair spray and bobby pins, as well as alumni volunteers who help graduates make sure their ceremonial regalia is properly displayed. President’s Chain of Office The President’s Chain of Office is a customized gold medallion worn by the USF President during commencement and inaugural ceremonies. Commissioned in 2006, today’s Chain of Office features the USF seal and is engraved with the names and years of service of all of USF’s permanent presidents. The original Chain of Office, used by founding President John Allen, is now housed in the University archives.

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The USF Mace The tradition of the mace can be dated to the kings of the Middle Ages, whose bodyguards would use a mace for protection. It came to symbolize strength and authority. Gradually, universities adopted the use of a mace to show the right of academic institutions to grant degrees to graduates. USF’s mace is used at commencement and during the installation of a new University President. Its designer was Tradition Maker Harrison Covington, former dean of the USF College of Fine Arts, now known as the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The mace is topped by a golden pine cone, symbolizing growth and continuity. It sits atop eight silver semicircles, representing each of the eight colleges in existence in 1999, when the mace debuted. The 11-pound piece of mahogany, sterling silver and gilded silver was worth $9,500 at completion. When not in use, the mace is displayed in a glass case in the foyer of the President’s office. The first USF mace is on display at the USF Alumni Center.

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White Coat Ceremony This rite of passage for USF College of Medicine students was originated by the Gold Foundation in New Jersey and is held at more than 100 colleges nationwide. During the ceremony, first-year medical students receive a white coat marking their entry into the profession. The purpose of the ceremony is to establish a psychological contract for novice medical students that emphasizes the importance of caring as an aspect of curing and establishes the primacy of empathy in the doctor/patient relationship.

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Student Life

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The Bull Market A decades old tradition, the Bull Market’s original venue was in the mall behind the University Center, now the Marshall Center. Today, the Bull Market is located at Sessums Mall, between Cooper Hall and the College of Education. The mall was built specifically for the purpose of hosting the weekly market. Every Wednesday, the flea market fills with students, staff and faculty eager to find a bargain, eat lunch and socialize.

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Greek Life USF is home to 40 Greek organizations: 16 sororities, 23 fraternities and one co-ed group, representing a wide spectrum of diversity among students. Greek life originated on campus in the late Sixties, followed a few years later by the first of many proposals for Greek housing. After many decades, the long-awaited Greek Village finally opened to residents in 2003 and has helped to create a new tradition at USF. Greek Enrichment meetings are another Greek tradition on the USF campus. These meetings are held once a month to provide leadership development for members of the Greek community. Greeks create a special bond within their organizations by participating in rituals. These rituals are taken seriously and involve learning the secret meanings of the letters, symbols and other details of their organization. Another popular tradition is Greek Week. Held every spring, fraternities and sororities compete in the Greek Olympics, volunteer in the community and raise money for worthy causes.

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Living on Campus Living on campus today is a far cry from what it was in the late Fifties, when a few dozen students lived in a makeshift dormitory on the fourth floor of the University Center. Things began to change in 1961 with the opening of Alpha Hall. Now students can choose to live in a traditional residence hall, such as Beta Hall or Castor Hall, or share a suite in the Andros Complex, Cypress Hall or Maple Hall. There is also apartment-style living available in the Cypress, Holly, Magnolia and Kosove complexes. Fraternity and sorority members have the option of living in the Greek Village. One of the biggest traditions for campus residents is RezFest, a two-week celebration of life in the residence halls. Other events include the Cypress FestiBULL, Andros I Dance, Maple Hall’s Maple Syrup Annual and MLTiKI, as well as Andros 2 RA’s and Building Council’s yearly luau and pool party.

Waterfront Living USF St. Petersburg completed its first residence hall in 2006 and forever changed the landscape of the waterfront campus. Resident Hall One provided a new campus experience for students and is the first of a three-building phase.

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Movies on the Lawn When the Special Events Center (SEC) was built across from the Marshall Center in 1990, students lost a portion of Crescent Hill, but gained a new opportunity. It turned out that the back wall of the SEC made a great outdoor movie screen. Movies on the Lawn, founded by Tradition Maker Stacy Bruels, ’93, debuted in the fall of 1991, and features a recently released motion picture and free popcorn. The weekly event regularly draws 400-500 students. The location may be moved in 2008 to accommodate the renovation of the Marshall Student Center.

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The Oracle The first issue of USF’s free student newspaper, The Oracle, debuted in September 1966, as “a college newspaper, with items of interest for all segments of our diversified community,” according to a mission statement written by Tradition Maker and founding Editor in Chief Harry Haigley, ’67. Before that, campus news was contained in a weekly insert in The Tampa Times. Originally a broadsheet publication published only on Wednesdays, The Oracle has undergone many redesigns over the years. It now publishes weekdays during the spring and fall semesters, twice weekly during the summer and is also available online at www.USFOracle.com.

First Oracle color photograph

Fun Fact If the name originally proposed for The Oracle hadn’t been nixed, it would’ve been called The USF Bull Sheet. The Oracle was eventually chosen by the founding staff for the Greek word meaning “prophecy.”

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Patio Tuesday Tradition Maker Debbie Lum, ’85, started Patio Tuesday as a weekly event in 1995 after a new patio was built outside the Marshall Center. Sponsored by the Campus Activities Board, Patio Tuesday features music, food, bands, contests and charity fundraisers. It’s now held on the first Tuesday of the month during the fall and spring semesters.

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Student Government USF’s first Student Government (SG) president was Tradition Maker Jim Woodroffe, ’64, who was elected in 1961. The first woman Student Government president was Yvonne Berry, ’77, elected in 1976, and the first African-American Student Government president was Les Miller, ’78, elected in 1977. The University of South Florida Student Government’s mission is to “boldly advocate for diverse student interests, provide opportunities to engage students and enhance university life and serve with integrity and honor” in all that they do. In addition to the Executive Branch, Student Senate and the Judicial Branch, Student Government oversees Student Information Services, SG Computer Services, the SAFE Team and WBUL. Each year, Student Government holds a traditional Farewell and Inaugural ceremony after elections to install new officers. Tradition Maker Dr. Wilma Henry, former associate vice president for Student Life and Wellness, initiated the first ceremony in 1997. The ceremony, designed by SG business manager and Tradition Maker Joe Synovec, is modeled after a military chain-of-command ceremony. During the proceedings, the University’s colors are passed from a freshman student representing the student body to the departing SG leaders, then to the USF President. The President passes the flag to the new SG leadership, who then pass the flag back to the freshman student. This ritual symbolizes that the true power of student government is in the students themselves.

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Tradition Makers Joe Whalen and Jen Brack, SG president and vice president, ’96-’97, and Edwin Narain and Kamilah Oliphant, president and vice president, ’97-’98, were the first USF Student Government officers to participate in the ceremony.

Student Government Flag & Seal Student Government unveiled its flag and seal in 2003. The Student Government seal was commissioned by Tradition Makers and Class of 2003 graduates Michael Griffin and Dave Mincberg, then SG president and vice president, to give USF Student Government an enduring symbol of its own.

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Student Government leadership wanted a flag that would speak to the student body’s potential. The lamp and flame represent the bright futures of USF’s forward-thinking students. A circle, divided into three sections, represents the three branches of Student Government and also forms a peace sign. The Roman numerals MCMLXI indicate 1961, the year that Student Government was founded. The globe mimics the USF seal and represents the university’s global perspective. The SG motto, “Service to Students,” is written in Greek at the bottom. Three arrows inside the seal indicate a secret tradition that is passed from the outgoing Student Government president to the incoming president – a ritual that is known only to those officers.


University Lecture Series The University Lecture Series (ULS) began around 1986 and featured faculty and staff lecturing on topics relevant to the campus. Today, the series attracts international speakers such as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Reverend Jesse Jackson and Maya Angelou, who draw crowds of up to 5,000. In 1990, ULS earned the Drew Pearson Award as the top lecture program in the country. ULS is a student-supported program designed to develop intellectual potential and present interesting views and information on a variety of topics relevant to students and the community.

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The USF Ambassadors Program The USF Alumni Association sponsors one of the most elite student programs at the University – the USF Ambassadors Program. The program was founded in 1979 to promote leadership, community, University involvement and educational advancement among USF’s best and brightest students. The program helps to strengthen the relationships between alumni, students, faculty and staff. Immediately recognizable in their signature green blazers, the USF Ambassadors serve as hosts at University-sponsored events and volunteer for worthy causes on campus and in the community. Some of the USF Ambassadors’ projects include Operation Giving Tree, Green and Gold Rush, Apple Polishing and the traditional annual retreat. Interested students apply to the Ambassadors program through a formalized application and interview process held during the spring semester.

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USF Ambassadors Application Submit application to: Attn: USF Ambassadors Advisor USF Alumni Association 4202 E. Fowler Ave., ALC100 Tampa, FL 33620

Please print or type the following. Use additional paper if needed:

1. Name ________________________________________________________ _

Local Address_ ________________________________________________________________________

_

Permanent Address____________________________________________________________________

_

UID#__________________________________________ Date of Birth____________________________

_

Daytime Phone________________________________ Evening/Cell Phone_ ____________________

_

E-mail Address_ _______________________________________________________________________

2. College of Study_ _

College of Study Degree____________________ Major_ _____________________ ________________ Overall GPA_ _____________ Major GPA _______________ Month/Year of Graduation_ _________

3. Which campus of USF Ambassadors are you applying for?_

_Which _______________________________ campus of USF Ambassadors are y

4. Name of Parents_

Name of Parents _______________________________________________________________________

_

Parents’ Telephone_____________________________________________________________________

_

Parents’ Address_______________________________________________________________________

_

Parents’ E-mail_ _______________________________________________________________________

_

Business Phone________________________________________________________________________

5. How did you hear about this program?_

How did you hear about this program? __________________________________________________

6. Please provide three letters of recommendation (references may include faculty, staff, mentor, supervisor, adviser and service liaisons). 7. In resume form: please provide the following:

A. Work Experience: List any positions or offices held on or off campus that generate

B. Leadership: List memberships in organizations and offices held. Briefly describe

C. School Spirit: Identify activities that demonstrate your spirit of enthusiasm and

compensation of any kind. Also, include hours spent per week on this commitment. examples of leadership activities if offices were held.

pride for USF.

D. Scholastic Awards and Achievements: List all awards and/or achievements.

E. Community Service: List and identify degree of participation in community activities.

Please indicate if this involvement directly or indirectly involved the university or reflected well on the university.

8. On a separate sheet of paper, please answer the following questions.

What can you contribute to the Ambassadors program?

In your opinion, how can the Ambassadors organization strengthen the relationship between the Alumni Association and the student body? (statements should not exceed one page)

9. Do you have any conflicts that would prevent you from attending Ambassadors meetings

on Tuesdays from 5-6 p.m.; Ambassadors Academy and Fall Retreat, (dates TBD) YES_________ NO _________

10. Where would this organization be placed on your list of priorities? (Please rank order) Why? _________________________________________________________________________________________


Week of Welcome The purpose of the Week of Welcome (WOW), held each fall, is to prepare new students for their first semester at USF. Dozens of events are held to give students a chance to socialize and learn about the University. WOW was started by the Office of Student Activities, now known as the Center for Student Involvement. Some WOW Events Multicultural Welcome Week: Sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Activities, the activities scheduled during this week help students from diverse cultural backgrounds meet each other and acclimate to USF. This office also organizes several other multicultural events throughout the year. Community Plunge: Sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement and Volunteerism, this event encourages students to volunteer for a morning of service.

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Round-Up: The largest event of the week, Round-Up began in 2002 as a Welcome Back event. Originally part fair and part pep rally, Round-Up has transformed into a huge showcase and comedy show. Held during the first week of the fall semester, incoming students can meet student government representatives, learn about the university’s traditions, enjoy free food, raffles and entertainment, and savor their first taste of campus life. The USF Alumni Association participates in Round-Up by providing giveaways and information about USF traditions.


Traditional Events

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Bull-arney Things may get a little crazy at Bull-arney, the USF College of Engineering’s annual fundraising dinner and silent auction. Guests are served by a unique wait staff comprised of notable USF alumni, faculty and staff dressed in a hilarious manner that defies description. The spring event has been held for more than a decade and helps fund engineering scholarships for numerous students.

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Bullstock Bullstock is a springtime live music festival held in the tradition of Woodstock. In its early days, Bullstock was held on Crescent Hill and featured local bands and other attractions, such as a petting zoo. As it grew in popularity, the event was moved to Fowler Field and features nationally known bands. The Campus Activities Board organizes the event.

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Celebration of Free Enterprise Dinner Top business leaders, such as Indianapolis Motor Speedway president Joie Chitwood, MBA ’95, are the featured speakers at the USF College of Business’ annual Celebration of Free Enterprise Dinner, founded in 1983. The event, which draws hundreds of the area’s most prominent executives, honors those who have made significant contributions to the free enterprise system and also raises money for scholarships.

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Children’s Festival Tradition Maker Dr. Ron Linder, professor of Childhood Education, founded the USF College of Education’s Children’s Festival in 1979, coinciding with the United Nations International Year of the Child. Geared toward children from preschool to high school, the free festival features dozens of fun and educational activities designed by USF education majors to encourage hands-on learning. Thousands of local children attend the festival each year.

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Engineering Expo The annual Engineering Expo is proof that engineers just want to have fun. This twoday event, founded by Tradition Maker Dolly Gooding in 1974, draws thousands of professional engineers and students of all ages to the Tampa campus in celebration of National Engineers Week each February. Engineering firms and related companies from all over the country set up displays and demonstrations. Some of the more popular activities are “Fun with Physics” and the “Chemical Magic Show,” as well as a laser light show and an extremely competitive Electrathon Car race.

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Family Weekend Hosted by the USF Parents & Family Association each fall, Family Weekend gives parents a chance to meet other USF families and spend some fun time with their student. Golfing, canoeing, picnicking and, of course, a tailgate and football game, are all part of the experience. The Parents & Family Association is an outlet for parents to receive information, ask questions and offer suggestions about university programs and services. It serves as an advocate on the issues affecting parents and students and creates an effective line of communication with USF administration.

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Homecoming Nothing draws students, alumni and the community to USF like the annual Homecoming Week celebration. The University comes alive with a kick-off party, carnival, comedy show, student competitions, night parade, bonfire and fireworks, and the Homecoming Ball, where a Homecoming Court is crowned representing each of USF’s four campuses. The festivities culminate with the annual Homecoming football game at Raymond James Stadium. Homecoming is one of USF’s longest traditions, celebrated since 1964, the year after USF’s charter class graduated. Back then, it was a small event with no sports connection. When basketball came to campus in 1970, Homecoming was moved to February and ramped up to include a bonfire, parade and other events. Now, Homecoming is celebrated in the fall and centers around football.

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The annual Homecoming Parade is held on campus the night before the big game and features more than 100 floats sponsored by campus organizations, student groups, alumni groups and local businesses. The Parade After Party at Fowler Field includes a huge bonfire and a big-name concert. The Alumni Association hosts two of the biggest Homecoming events every year: the Parade Watch Party and Bulls Roast. The Parade Watch Party is a family-friendly event held in front of the Gibbons Alumni Center, with free food, activities, games, giveaways and prime curbside seating to watch the parade. Bulls Roast, billed as “the biggest tailgate party of the year”, is held three hours prior to kick-off at Raymond James Stadium and includes a huge buffet, cocktails, music, activities and loads of free spirit supplies.

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Fun Fact There were two Homecoming celebrations in 1997; the last basketball Homecoming and the first football Homecoming, dubbed “Super Bull” by Tradition Maker Rosanna Saraceno, ’99. The “Super Bull” name followed by the numeric succession has been used since 1997.

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Stampede of Service Stampede of Service (SOS) is the largest day of volunteer service by USF. Created by the Center for Civic Engagement & Volunteerism and Student Government in 2006, Stampede of Service gives thousands of USF students, staff and faculty the opportunity to donate their time to a worthy cause. The idea came from Tradition Maker and former Student Government president, Maxon Victor, ’07. SOS is held the third Saturday in January, in conjunction with the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration. Victor’s intent was to acknowledge that “everyone can be great because everyone can serve”. 

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USF Day at the Capitol First started in 2000, USF Day at the Capitol has grown into a major community and legislative effort on behalf of USF. Each spring, university administrators, staff and students meet with state legislators and officials to promote USF. The gathering includes USF’s Council of 100, alumni legislators and staff who work in the Capitol, along with dozens of USF organizations, colleges and departments. The USF Alumni Association helps sponsor this event.

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Places of Significance

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Alumni Center Archives Learn about the university’s history – from its inception on the former World War II bombing range known as Henderson Field to its current status as one of the nation’s top public research universities – in the Alumni Center archives exhibit. Featured in the exhibit are items such as the University’s first ceremonial mace, an original shovel from the groundbreaking in 1956, a vial of dirt from that same groundbreaking and a casing from a bombshell discovered on campus in the early Nineties during construction of the Magnolia Residence Halls. Press a button to hear the USF Alma Mater and Fight Song or just stop by and rub the bronze bull for good luck.

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Botanical Gardens When the USF Botanical Gardens was established in 1969, much of the campus was covered with scrub palm and ant hills. During its first two decades, the Botanical Gardens – originally located near the campus police station – served primarily as a teaching and research facility for the Biology Department. The Botanical Gardens blossomed in the Nineties, with new buildings and demonstration gardens in its existing location on the southwest corner of campus. Now part of the Department of Environmental Science and Policy in the College of Arts & Sciences, it has approximately seven acres of developed gardens connected to an additional greenbelt area, which are home to a living collection of more than 3,000 plants and natural habitats. The Botanical Gardens now hosts an estimated 35,000 visitors annually who enjoy a variety of festivals and events in its lush surroundings.

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Centre Gallery The Centre Gallery, located in the Marshall Center, was established in 1984, and is the only fully student-run, non profit exhibition space in Florida. It represents USF artists as well as artists from other universities and community programs who desire to experiment with new ideas while gaining an educational gallery experience. Exhibitions run in two-week increments and are attended by over 4,000 visitors each semester. 

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Chinsegut Hill This historic estate, located just north of Brooksville, is USF’s oldest property, dating back to 1842, before Florida officially became a state. USF leased it from the federal government until 1980 when officials bought the manor and 114.5 surrounding acres for the bargain amount of $1,372. In 2003, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. “Chinsegut” is an Inuit word meaning “where lost things are found.” Many dignitaries have visited over the years, including Thomas Edison and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. Nestled amid the oaks, the rural manor and cabins are now used as a retreat and conference center.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Plaza The best-known gathering place on USF’s Tampa campus is the Martin Luther King, Jr. Plaza. It’s beautiful now, but that wasn’t always the case. Up until the mid-Nineties, the plaza was a treeless expanse of crisscrossed sidewalks marked only with a small bust of the legendary civil rights activist. On Nov. 13, 1996, after extensive renovations, the new MLK, Jr. Plaza was rededicated and featured a trellised colonnade, benches and serene reflecting pool with stone tablets engraved with a portion of Dr. King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. The plaza is now a popular spot for sidewalk fairs, small concerts and showcases.

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The Phyllis P. Marshall Center The building now known as the Phyllis P. Marshall Center was one of the first five buildings on the Tampa campus when it opened in 1960. Back then, it was called the University Center, or simply the U.C., and housed a mix of classrooms (some were actually held in the basement), faculty offices, study areas, health services and the first women’s residence hall. Major renovations began in December 1988 and included the addition of the Special Events Center. Phyllis P. Marshall was the first resident instructor for women and eventually became the U.C. director. Marshall was a tireless and devoted mentor to many USF students during her 34-year career. Students led a grass-roots movement that convinced the Florida Legislature to pass a bill renaming the U.C. on her behalf when she retired in 1994. Marshall died in 2005. In 2008, the building will unveil its most recent renovation: the new 230,000 square-foot Marshall Student Center. It will include a 1,200-seat ballroom, 400-seat multipurpose room, 700-seat auditorium, 100-workstation computer lab, expanded food court, sports grille and restaurant, more space for student organizations, a variety of lounges, study spaces, programming areas, a large atrium, several outdoor areas, courtyards, outdoor dining areas and retail space.

Basement Band Series The Basement Band Series began in 2004 with local and regional bands performing free shows in the basement of the Marshall Center. Today, USF students keep the tradition going by playing on the first Friday of the month.

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Riverfront Park USF Riverfront Park is the University’s own private park on the picturesque Hillsborough River. It offers a wide variety of outdoor recreation opportunities including canoeing, kayaking, picnicking, volleyball, a ropes course and disc golf. The park is open only to current USF students, staff and faculty. USF Alumni Association Members also have access to the park if they join the USF Recreation Center.

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USF Lakeland Established in 1988, USF Lakeland serves over 2,000 students and offers more than 20 undergraduate and graduate degrees in arts and sciences, business, education, engineering and information technology. The campus also offers a number of individual classes, electives, web-based courses, certificate programs and program partnerships with the Tampa campus. With its key location in Florida’s emerging high tech corridor, USF Lakeland emphasizes technology and education degrees that meet the needs of those emerging industries. One of the traditional events on the Lakeland campus is The Gifts of the Heart Scholarship Reception. Held each spring, the reception provides an opportunity for donors to meet USF Lakeland scholarship recipients and for the rest of the campus to honor their commitment and dedication.

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USF St. Petersburg University of South Florida St. Petersburg is USF’s oldest and largest regional campus. The campus is known for its small college atmosphere, with the benefit of being part of a university with a national reputation for advanced scholarship. Over time, USF St. Petersburg has established its own identity and traditions. The waterfront on Bayboro Harbor makes campus life at USF St. Petersburg a truly Floridian experience. Offering scuba, sailing, swimming, fishing, kayaking and much more, the popular waterfront is a huge improvement from the old maritime barracks where students and staff lived and worked when the campus opened in the mid-Sixties.

St. Petersburg campus traditions include the Cardboard Boat Race, held annually during Homecoming week. Student teams must use skill and brute strength to maneuver their cardboard craft along the race course in Bayboro Harbor.

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The Williams and Snell houses offer a peek into St. Petersburg’s past. The John C. Williams House, built in 1890 by Williams, a city founder, was donated to USF St. Petersburg by Bob and Louise Flint Slansky. The house, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has elaborate gingerbread trim, shaped wooden shingles, an ornate cupola, carved doorways and interior etchings. It’s used for meetings, social gatherings and has offices for University Relations and the USF Alumni Association.   The C. Perry Snell House, built in 1904, is a St. Petersburg landmark. C. Perry Snell was an early developer of St. Petersburg, who built the home for his wife, Lillian. The Dutch-Colonial, two-story house has five fireplaces, a wrap-around front porch and a unique stainedglass window in the living room. Today, the house is home to the Florida Studies Program of Distinction and is used for meetings and gatherings.

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USF Sarasota-Manatee USF Sarasota-Manatee was established in 1975 in response to public demand for greater access to higher education. College juniors and seniors can choose between 28 Bachelors degrees and 11 Masters degrees offered on campus. A 100,000 square-foot academic facility includes 26 classrooms, the Selby Auditorium, conference rooms, computer labs and student gathering places. The campus’ preserves, plazas, walking paths and its access to Sarasota Bay capitalize on the natural beauty of the surrounding community. Get on the Bus! is an annual fundraiser and road trip for students, staff and faculty. Sarasota-Manatee Student Government is allotted game tickets to one home football game each season to use as an incentive to to raise money for charity. Along with the USF Alumni Association, Student Government hosts a hospitality tent before the game at Raymond James Stadium and provides a bus to transport fans to the game. Brunch on the Bay is the campus’ signature event. It celebrates leadership and the generosity of donors who endow scholarships. Brunch on the Bay has raised more than $1 million in scholarship funds for Sarasota-Manatee students.

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Famous Faces

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USF Presidents

John Allen

Cecil Mackey

Judy Genshaft

John Lott Brown

Francis Borkowski

Betty Castor

John Allen (1957-1970) Harris Dean (Interim, 1970-1971) Cecil Mackey (1971-1976) Wm. Reece Smith, Jr. (Interim, 1976-1977) Carl Riggs (Interim, 1977-1978) John Lott Brown (1978-1988) Francis Borkowski (1988-1993) Robert Bryan (Interim, 1993-1994) Betty Castor (1994-1999) Thomas Tighe (Acting, Fall 1999) Richard Peck (Interim, 1999-2000) Judy Genshaft (2000-present)

Past USF Alumni Association Presidents

Name Julian Piper, ’63 Peter Wells, ’63 David Jordan, ’63 William Geiger, ’63 Jack Boyd, Jr., ’63 William Jones, ’63 The Honorable John A. Grant, Jr., ’64 Rena Ezzell, ’63 F. Gaines Finley, ’65 James Richards, Jr., ’66 Michael Sierra, ’64 James Woodroffe III, ’64 Cesar Rivero, Jr., ’71 Donald Gifford, ’67 L. Ray Fleming, ’67 & MSE ’68

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Year(s) Served 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977

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Charles Gibson, Jr., ’72 Anna Marie Ippolitto, ’65 & MA ’72 James Loper, ’70 The Honorable Lesley Miller, Jr., ’78 Michael Arnold, ’70 James Ayers, ’68 Steven Anderson, ’70 Steven Oscher, ’77 Harold Costello, Jr., ’76 Richard Brown, ’67 Patrick Shea, ’76 Scott Barnett, ’69 R. Patrick Hill, ’70 Ken Rollins, ’64 Richard Lane, ’68 The Honorable Elizabeth Lindsay, ’83 William Eickhoff, ’69 & MBA ’73 Karen Klein Walker, ’74 Liana Fernandez Fox, MA ’80 & PhD ’98 The Honorable F. Dennis Alvarez, ’69 John Harper, ’76 The Honorable Raymond Gross, ’69 John Borreca, ’75 Jose Forns, Jr. ’72 Jim Magill, ’86 Dr. Anila Jain, ’81 Jim Krog, ’70 John Thomas, ’81 Charlie Harris, ’87 Jeff Spalding, ’87 Michele Norris, ’79

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1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008


University of South Florida Gibbons Alumni Center 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, ALC100, Tampa, FL 33620 (800) 299-BULL www.usfalumni.org


Book of Bull