Issuu on Google+

The effect of arguing on marital closeness in the US and India Shannon A. Corkery , Ashley K. Randall , Deepti Duggi , Valerie J. Young , Shanmukh V. Kamble , &  1 Emily A. Butler 1

1

2

 

1

2

1=University of Arizona, 2=Karnatak University, India

Methods

Abstract A majority of relationship theories postulate that conflict is a  natural and important factor in resolving disagreements and  building closeness within intimate relationships. Arguing, however,  is inherently individualistic and may not contribute to intimacy in  couples from more collectivistic cultures (Sandhya, 2009). To  investigate this we collected daily diary reports of arguments and  relationship closeness from married couples in the United States  (N = 20 couples) and India  (N = 20). As predicted, American  couples reported higher frequency and intensity of arguing. At low  levels of arguing, Indian couples reported greater closeness than  the U.S. couples. At higher levels of arguing, U.S. couples reported  increased levels of closeness and no longer differed from Indians’  closeness.  These findings are in accord with relationship theories  which suggest that conflict, embedded in a European American  cultural context, can bring a couple closer.

Participants  40 male/female dyads (20 from the US, 20 from India)  U.S. Sample: 20 couples, age (M = 44.82 yrs, SD = 10.01),         relationship length (M = 14.19 yrs, SD = 8.12)  India Sample: 20 couples, age (M = 35.47 yrs, SD = 7.71),          relationship length (M = 9.97 yrs, SD = 8.02)    Procedure  Participants from the U.S. completed a 7­day online diary survey;  Indian participants completed a 7­day paper survey. Measures  Self­reported closeness: For each daily survey, participants  responded to how close they felt to the partner by circling one of the  following:                  1                  2              3               4

Hypothesis 2: Supported (See Figure 2) As predicted, a significant interaction was found between country and  arguing, F(1,419) = 4.97, p <.05. At low levels of arguing, Indian  couples reported greater levels of closeness than US couples.  At  higher levels of arguing, US couples reported increased levels of  closeness making them no longer differ from Indians’ closeness .

Background Self reported arguing: For each daily survey, participants responded to  “Have you had an argument or disagreement with your partner?” on a 0  to 4 scale where 0 = “no,” 1 = “yes, a very minor one,” 2 = “yes, a small  one,” 3 = “yes, a moderate one,” and 4 = “yes, a large one.”

Some research suggests that conflict may be a  stable and necessary feature of western marital  relationships (McGonagle, Kessler, and Schilling,  1992).   Conflict can likely generate increased  feelings of closeness because arguing, often  occurs as a pursuit toward fulfillment of marital  intimacy, a strong western value. 

Results

We used a cross­cultural sample from the US (western­ individualistic) and India (eastern­collectivistic) to examine the  150 interplay of daily conflict and marital closeness as it occurs in a  couple’s natural living environment.

Hypotheses 100

(H1) US couples will report higher frequency of arguing.    (H2) Conflict (operationalized as frequency of arguing) will be  50 associated with higher closeness in US couples. Conflict in  Indian couples will be associated with lower levels of closeness. 

Frequency of argue with partner today

Frequency of argue with partner today

On the other hand, research on        collectivistic cultures suggests that       intimacy  may not be a necessary feature       of marital  Hypothesis 1: Supported (see Figure 1) relationships (Shweder, 1991).       Conflict,  American couples reported higher frequency and intensity of arguing  Frequency and Intensity of reports of daily arguing in US and Indian couples contrary to its’ intimacy­      generating role  compared to Indian couples. (US:  t(419) = ­2.23, p<.05)(India: t(419) =  in western relationships,       may be an indicator  Frequency and Intensity of reports of daily arguing in US and Indian couples ­4.03, p < .001). of intimacy due to  collectivistic values that restrict engagement in  country 200 conflict unless already very close.  country 200 0= India 1= United States

1

2

Conclusions and Implications We conclude that culture plays a significant role in the frequency,  interpretation, and outcomes of arguing for married couples.  We  suspect that couples’ reports of closeness on days when they argue  is affected by their cultural interpretation of the efficacy of arguing.  

150

100

0 = no 1 = yes, a very minor one 2 = yes, a small one 3 = yes, a moderate one 4 = yes a large one

50

0 0

1

0

2

3

1Argued with 2 partner?3

4

4

With widespread globalization rapidly occurring, it is becoming  increasingly necessary to recognize the role that cultural differences  play in regard to individuals and relationships.  By taking a cultural  perspective, we can foster an understanding and appreciation of the  variety and heterogeneity of relational mechanisms that influence  interactions.      

Acknowledgements

Argue with partner today (intensity)?

Figure 1. Frequency and intensity of arguing in US and Indian    couples across the 7 days

0 0

0 1

Figure 2. The effect of arguing on marital closeness in          the United States and India

3

Argued with partner?

4

The authors acknowledge funding from the Frances McClelland  Institute for Children, Youth, and Families.


/Poster%20example%20-%20IARR%20-%20A.Ran