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MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS

Rachel Keeven | Programming Exercise 3

William Eggleston Collection Memphis, Tennessee


“I had this notion of what I called a democratic way of looking around, that nothing was more or less important� -William Eggleston, on The Democratic Forest


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

Pre-Design

39

Schematic Design Design Development

49

Mid Review

65

Construction Documents

73

Final Presentation

95

Final Thoughts


PRE-DESIGN

Weeks 0 - 3 PERSONAL DESIGN PHILOSOPHY Architecture is at its best when simple, but correct moves, are made. I aim to design simple partis that create easily understandable building forms, plans, and organization. The experiences of a building should not be interrupted by confusion or being lost. Simple does not mean boring though, but actually allows for more creative design decisions to be made in the details and character of the design. Smart design does not necessarily mean doing the most elaborate design, but what is right for the situation. Of course there are many considerations for each design, but the context of the site and the program must evolve together and inform one another. There is to be a connection from the inside out, the building to the site, and the outside in, the site to the building, that becomes successful by designing from both directions. The site exists beyond the physical setting, and includes the culture and context surround the building. In this project, as always, there is a great need to focus on the client and visitors. This center has the opportunity to bring more people to Memphis and become a new cultural center in a “coming back� district that showcases a local world known photographer.

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The project proposes that we develop a 30,000 (G)SF ‘Museum of the Photographic Arts’ for the city of Memphis, focusing on the work of famed local William Eggleston; in particular his ‘Democratic Forest’ collection. This particular collection currently does not have a permanent home, thus giving a reason and purpose for this investigation. The project desires to break out of the traditional response of the prototypical museum being a ‘careful’ and ‘prescribed’ environment so that we can achieve a response that has a visible and clear alignment with Eggleston’s work. You will be asked to thoroughly articulate the purpose and intent of your museum through a careful analysis found in the overlapping energies of programmatic spaces, city and enigmatic photographer.

Pre-Design

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Lastly, the project must address the reality that exists in the world of ‘high(brow) art’ which feels photography is merely a subset or ‘other’ form of art. Eggleston has successfully challenged this notion, but without a proper and permanent location for this work the work becomes temporal and, naturally, so does the larger conversation of photography and its rightful place in our cultures precious museums. To be clear… this project is not about developing and proposing another white-wall museum that is both “limitless” in its flexibility and (somehow) exacting in its lack of purpose and definition. Instead, this project is about the purposeful response to a particular set of precious and artful works and to help further the justification of photography as a multidimensional and valid representation of the human condition.

PROFESSOR DENTON NICHOL’S STUDIO INTENT This studio is truly about you. Your abilities, your strengths, and your desire to evolve will define your success in this studio. I am simply a guide and your ‘consultant’ in this process. With that said, it is obvious that you will be fully responsible for your advancement in this studio. It is not my responsibility to convince you that this is an important part of your education…my role is to inspire and equip those that desire advancement and greater knowledge in our discipline. I am also not about confirming pre-conceived notions, reinforcing bad habits or rewarding careless and purposeless investigation. We have a very important role as architects; my commitment to you is as great as your commitment to the reality of this privilege and responsibility presented to you. I trust that by signing up for this studio you are fully aware of the effort it will take to advance through the effort. You will find that I am a fully committed educator to those that have a passion for our craft and enjoy immensely the relationships that are developed in this journey. As your guide I will be ‘wearing many hats’ in this process…that of an engineer, client, general public, maintenance staff and as a fellow architect. It is through all of these resources that you will begin to see the importance of truly comprehensive thought. There is not ever just one answer and one ‘client’…there are many factors involved in all realities involved with being an architect and it is your responsibility to organize these entities and find the common thread that ties them together. Your ability to create this unified vision is what makes you a true artist (as well as a scientist) and the single most important reason for our profession. 2


DECONSTRUCTING THE PROTOTYPICAL MUSEUM My Response

For me deconstructing the prototypical museum meant that the served as more than just a gallery. This was especially important in Memphis, because at this time I do not believe that the city could host a successful museum, for it is going through a rebirth. The program that Professor Nichols set up for us included community type spaces and a cafe. The arrangement of these in each individual project would be key to creating a successful museum in the South Main District of Memphis. These spaces also have the ability to help aid the rebirth of the city as they become open to the community. Also, because we wanted to create something other than the typical white wall gallery it would be very important to understand different ways to view art, specifically photographic art.

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Pre-Design Goals

-To develop and understand a functional building from the scale of the large space to the details. -Create a simple parti that helps keep me focused on the essence of my project. -Learn to use Revit and other programs. -Create better renditions than I have in the past.

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WILLIAM EGGLESTON b. July 27, 1939

Born in Memphis, Tennessee and spent many summers growing up on a family plantation in Mississippi. He studied for a year at Vanderbilt when he received his first Leica camera, He later studied at Ole Miss and became more interested in art. Eggleston was influenced by French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson’s book, The Decisive Moment and Swiss Photographer Robert Frank. Eggleston firsts prints were in black at white and in 1965 he started to first experiment with color transparency film. While teaching at Harvard in the early 1970s he learned about dye-transfer printing and this became the media he is most known for. His first portfolio, 14 Pictures (1974) was exhibited at the MoMA in 1976. Eggleston’s style has been said to focus on the mundane object, often lacking the presence of the human and creating an eerie sense. Eggleston has produced many portfolios and continues to take photos. He lives in Memphis, Tennessee. 5


Pre-Design I was in Oxford, Mississippi for a few days and I was driving out to Holly Springs on a back road, stopping here and there. It was the time of year when the landscape wasn't yet green. I left the car and walked into the dead leaves off the road. It was one of those occasions when there was no picture there. It seemed like nothing, but of course there was something for someone out there. I started forcing myself to take pictures of the earth, where it had been eroded thirty or forty feet from the road. There were a few weeds. I began to realize that soon I was taking some pretty good pictures, so I went further into the woods and up a little hill, and got well into an entire roll of film. Later, when I was having dinner with some friends, writers from around Oxford, or maybe at the bar of the Holiday Inn, someone said, 'What have you been photographing here today, Eggleston?' 'Well, I've been photographing democratically,' I replied. 'But what have you been taking pictures of?' 'I've been outdoors, nowhere, in nothing.' 'What do you mean?' 'Well, just woods and dirt, a little asphalt here and there.‘ From a conversation with Mark Holborn, Greenwood, Mississippi, February 1988 6


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Pre-Design


THE DEMOCRATIC FOREST 1989

All the photographs have place as their subject....He has called his book The Democratic Forest, a title to embrace all he shows us.... The photographs range widely, they are highly differing, richly varying. In landscapes, cityscapes, street scenes, roadside scenes, at every sort of public converging-point, in dreaming long view and arresting close-up, through hours of dark and light, he sets forth what makes up our ordinary world. What is there, however strange, can be accepted without question; familiarity will be what overwhelms us. The extraordinary thing is that in all these photographs, wonderfully inclusive and purposefully chose as they are, you will look in vain for the presence of a human being. This isn’t to say that the photographs deny man’s existence. That is exactly what they don’t do. Everywhere you find the vividness of his presence... But the camera tells us nobody is there. - Eudora Welty, Introduction for The Democratic Forest 9


Pre-Design I am afraid that there are more people than I can imagine who can go no further than appreciating a picture that is a rectangle with an object in the middle of it, which they can identify. They don't care what is around the object as long as nothing interferes with the object itself, right in the center. Even after the lessons of Winogrand and Friedlander, they don't get it. They respect their work because they are told by respectable institutions that they are important artists, but what they really want to see is a picture with a figure or an object in the middle of it. They want something obvious. The blindness is apparent when someone lets slip the word 'snapshot'. Ignorance can always be covered by 'snapshot'. The word has never had any meaning.

I am at war with the obvious.

From a conversation with Mark Holborn, Greenwood, Mississippi, February 1988

It was important for me to remember that the purpose of this building is ultimately to show and preserve the work of William Eggleston. Though his work is not widely known, it deserves to become more recognized and it is especially fitting to place a museum in his home town. To me to work is a bit strange, and some images are eerie. They ask their viewer to really think about the human presence and what our actions create. 10


Downtown Mississippi Rivier

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

South Main Historic District

Memphis was founded in 1819. The site was first chosen for settlement by the Spanish for its natural site attributes. It lies on the Mississippi River where it also meets Arkansas and Mississippi, and its metropolitan area also expands into these states. According to the 2010 census the city of Memphis is the largest city in Tennessee, the third largest city in the South, and 20th largest in the country. Memphis lacks much park land. The city was listed the fourth most dangerous city by Forbes with a crime index of 1 out of 100 meaning it is safer than less than one percent of the cities in the US. Our site in South Main Historic District is considered one of least safe areas in Memphis. About 1/5 of the crimes are recorded as violent crimes while 4/5 are property crimes.

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Pre-Design

Ma

in

Str ee

t

Orpheum Museum

Site 1 Blues Foundation

Site 2

National Civil Rights Museum

Memphis Farmers’ Market Memphis Central Station | Trolley and Railroad Museum

The South Main Historic District creates a downtown urban experience in Memphis that is focusing on “coming back” after it started to be deserted in the 1960s when the railroad was no longer used as often. In the 1980s the area named many buildings historic sites and since the 1990s has been reestablishing entertainment, restaurants, art, and living in the district. The river walk has also become an attraction. The Memphis skyline is easily scene from this area. Though the area has been “coming back”for over a decade many lots are still empty or in much need of care.

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SITE 1 ANALYSIS

Northern Site

Site 1 is an open lot with one small building that may either be used or demolished. The lot faces northwest towards South Main with an area in the back for parking across Mulberry Street. There is a small slope of about 6 feet away from South Main. The lot’s area is approximately 12,750 square feet.

District Building Context:

Many buildings were built in the late Nineteenth Century to early Twentieth Century as minimal commercial style buildings mostly used as small shops, factories, and warehouses. Materials are mostly load-bearing brick masonry walls with various running patterns including the herringbone pattern. The windows are deep, spacious, single-pane glass panels framed with either steel or wood studs. The roofs are mostly build-up flat roofs with parapet borders. 13


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Pre-Design


SITE 2 ANALYSIS Southern Site

Site 2 is a partially open lot with three shotgun shaped buildings on the northern end. These will most likely be demolished. The lot sits between buildings and the old railroad lines lie behind the lot. The lot faces east towards South Main with an area for parking adjacent and northwest of the site. There is a small slope of about 6 feet towards the northwest. The lot’s area is approximatly 20,000 square feet.

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Pre-Design


Wind Rose

CLIMATE ANALYSIS Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis lies at 35°07′03″N 89°58′16″W which is much more south than Kansas City 39°5′59.01″N 94°34′42.78″W. These location differences allow for longer periods of sunlight in Memphis. The city experiences all four distinct seasons. It is at risk for both hail storms and tornadoes. Average temperatures are about 6 degrees higher in Memphis than Kansas City. Memphis also has more precipitation in the winter, but less humidity. Harsh winter winds come from both the south and north and strong summer breezes come from the southwest.

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Pre-Design Average Hours of Sunlight

Average Rainfall

Average Temperature Min | Max 18


CULTURE

Memphis is mainly known for music and entertainment scene in both the city and its metropolitan area, and brings much of the revenue to the city. There are three main arts and culture districts in the city. The city is associated with the start of or contributes to many musicians and genres: Blues, Gospel, Rock n’ Roll, and southern country music. Beale Street is lit by recording studio lights and nightlife. Music in Memphis has always created opportunities for anyone no matter sex or race. The city has a range of both historical and art museums, including the National Civil Rights Museum, and sporting venues. Many festivals take place yearly including the international festival Memphis in May featuring a different country each year along with entertainment and a BBQ competition (Memphis’s main cuisine).

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Pre-Design

DEMOGRAPHICS

The largest age group living in Memphis is 25-34 years old, with other large age groups ranging from 18-54. Over half of the population is African American and 1/3 of the population is white. Many religious faiths are represented throughout Memphis, especially Christianity and Judaism. The city’s largest industry is retail trade followed by health care and science. Most people travel 15-29 minutes to their work and 90% arrive by personal vehicles due to many people moving to the suburbs.

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ZONING

South Main Historic District The City of Memphis wrote up The Plan in the mid 2000s to redevelop and improve the South Business District in Shelby County. This includes the South Main Historic District where our site is. “The Plan describes the following factors that will influence and contribute to development in the district: area history, current conditions, physical and environmental characteristics, public facilities, vacant land and buildings, and traffic analyses. Analysis of these factors has resulted in a list of Goals for the district that include economic revitalization, job generation, addressing obsolescence in zoning and building stock, preservation of cultural and historic assets, and the creation of a vibrant sports and entertainment component for downtown.’ “...The South CBID Plan next documents the study area appearance. The area is characterized by older industrial, commercial and warehousing facilities, yet there is a critical mass of new residential constructions along the riverfront as well as in other areas. There are also several historic structures already being reused or renovated around Main Street. In general however, areas to the south and nearer the railroad tracks contain the bulk of the vacant lots and abandoned buildings.” (From written by Memphis & Shelby Co. Office of Planning and Development.) 21


Public Transportation There is an extension to the trolley service. Additional bus shelters are needed for increased usage. Pedestrians The sidewalks are needing to be replaced and repaired in many areas, especially at major intersections. Pedestrian traffic signals and crosswalks need be placed where necessary. All surfaces should follow ADA guidelines.

Pre-Design

Public facilities need to be prepared for growth and expansion; many of these will affect our project.

Lighting Public lighting should be adequate, especially since night life is a main attraction to the district. Lighting should be placed at all pedestrian walks and parking/transit areas. Lighting should fit with the districts architecture. Parks | Greenspace There is a great need for more parks and outdoor gathering spaces. Additional greenspace is needed throughout the entire district. Obsolete Land There is 220 acres not developed at its highest and best use. Much of this land is vacant and in need for redeveloping.

“South Main and South Main Extended District...will protect the unique character of the area. To maintain and redefine the uses to ensure that the special ambiance abundant in the existing South Main Special District and historical character of the area is complimented by new development...

(From written by Memphis & Shelby Co. Office of Planning and Development.)

-To preserve and strengthen the South Main Area, the South Main Historic District, and the cultural character of the area -To promote a harmonic redevelopment of the area consistent with the scale and character of existing mixed uses in the area. -To encourage the development and redevelopment of residential uses, and small scale commercial, office use, and industrial uses, thereby strengthening the City’s tax base. -To promote the mixed uses character of the area and to prohibit or discourage large-scale uses as well as incompatible uses. -To preserve, maintain and enhance the existing scale of the street, building and open space features. -To provide and encourage amenities, such as public open space and street trees to improve the physical environment. 22


ZONING

S CBID - South Main

Permitted Use:

Residential Additional Uses Permitted such as a museum Special Use Permit Buildings

Maximum street frontage per street facade is 100 linear feet unless with a special permit. Maximum Height is 90 feet or 8 stories; most in the area are two to five stories high Building Setbacks are subject to site plan review, but are often minimal Parking lots and garages shall be landscaped

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Pre-Design

“These guidelines are designed to encourage rehabilitation and new construction that is sensitive to the original style and method of construction widely used within each district. They strive to void inappropriate design features such as blank facades and suburban development patterns, while promoting development that responds to its surroundings, maintains the established character and reinforces the urban fabric... The Center City Commission acknowledges that exceptions to the rules will occur from time to time, and that such situations should be dealt with on a case-by-case basis.” Scale of the building should reflect the adjacent buildings and new buildings should create transitions between buildings of different scales. The building should be at a human scale at the ground.

DESIGN GUIDELINES | HISTORIC PRESERVATION

South Main Historic District

Massing should be proportional with the surrounding buildings’ masses depending on each district’s characteristics. Unless based on historical design long uninterrupted facade and roof planes should be avoided. Many are box shaped Base & Cap should be incorporated in all buildings by creating defined horizontal elements at the top and bottom of a building. Facades facing the street should invite in the public through design and clearly be different than the other facades of a building with details and fenestration. Street facades shall mainly be designed vertical including window and door design. Roof forms should consider surrounding building form and are mostly flat Materials, textures and colors should be influenced by the surrounding buildings and site. Existing masonry should not be painted. Brick, terra cotta, and stone are mostly used. Details should be based on the design of the building and surrounding buildings/site. New buildings should replicate and simplify historical detailing. Parking lots should be screened by walls, fences, or landscaping.

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CATEGORY ‘A’ – PUBLIC SPACES ENTRY: VESTIBULE * RECEPTION * COAT ROOM 160

PROGRAM BREAK DOWN

Provided by Denton Nichols NSF: 21,000 NSF / GSF RATIO: (MUSEUMS) 1.43 GSF: 30,030 CIRCULATION: (WITHIN GSF @ 25%) 7,800 +/- SF MECHANICAL: (WITHIN GSF @ 15%) 4,500 +/- SF EXTERIOR PLAZA: (NOT WITHIN GSF) 5,000 PARKING: (40 CARS -10 X 18 STALL)

GALLERIES (3): GALLERY 1 (DEMOCRATIC FOREST) 3,200 STORAGE 220 PRE-FUNCTION * GALLERY 2 (ROTATING / ANALOG) 1,800 STORAGE 140 PRE-FUNCTION * GALLERY 3 (MULTI-PURPOSE / DIGITAL) 1,200 STORAGE 100 PRE-FUNCTION * ARCHIVE: ARCHIVAL OFFICE 200 STORAGE / INTAKE 200 STORAGE / PRESENTATION QUEUE 400 STORAGE / DISPLAY 200 CLOSED STACKS / FLAT-FILE STORAGE 3,200 OPEN SHELVING AREA 600 WORK AREA 200 CAFÉ / DINING: DINING AREA (INTERIOR) 1,000 COOKING AREA 400 FOOD PREP AREA 120 REF. / FRZ. STORAGE 120 DRY FOOD STORAGE (PANTRY) 80 RECEPTION 200 *part of gsf

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CATEGORY ‘C’ – SERVICE AND CIRCULATION

OFFICES: EGGLESTON TRUST OFFICES: PRIVATE OFFICES (4 @ 120) 480 BREAK ROOM 200 WORK / COPY / FILING ROOM 240 CONFERENCE ROOM 200 UNISEX TOILET 60

CIRCULATION: (STAIRS, CORRIDORS, ELEVATOR) (25% OF GSF +/-) 7,500

MUSEUM OPERATIONS OFFICES: PRIVATE OFFICES (4 @ 120) 480 BREAK ROOM 200 WORK / COPY / FILING ROOM 240 CONFERENCE ROOM 200 UNISEX TOILET 60 COMMUNITY SPACE: LECTURE HALL 1,500 LECTURE HALL STORAGE 120 LIBRARY 1,000 VIEWING ROOM / PRIVATE GALLERY 320 CONFERENCE ROOM 400 WORK AREA 400 WORK AREA STORAGE LOCKER 200

MECHANICAL ROOM: (15% OF GSF +/-) 4,500

Pre-Design

CATEGORY ‘B’ – PRIVATE SPACES

MECHANICAL COURTYARD: (20’ X 30’) DOCK: (FOR OVERALL BUILDING USE) (FOR ARCHIVE / GALLERY USE ALSO) PUBLIC TOILETS: (NEAR ENTRY) MEN (1) 120 WOMEN (1) 120 BUILDING SERVICE AREAS: BUILDING STORAGE 480 JANITORS CLOSET 40 ELECTRICAL CLOSET 40 DATA CLOSET 80

CATEGORY ‘D’ – SITE EXTERIOR COURTYARD / PLAZA @ GRADE @ ROOFTOP ETC… PARKING: 40 CARS – OFF SITE 15% GREEN SPACE 26


PROGRAMMING STORIES

Pre-Site Visit Program Studies Programming Considerations

As we started to think about programming there were many considerations that influenced our decisions. For me they helped form a functional building from the beginning of the semester that could serve to hold William Eggleston’s Democratic Forest Collection. By thinking of these issues at the forefront of design and creating a story through the programming space planning, I could later focus more on creativity the experience of each individual space within a programming category. Bubble diagrams helped me to first investigate what adjacencies and scales I felt were important to creating the story I wanted to create.

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the building will have to be more than a museum it will need a great curator

What is the purpose/intent of this building?

How does the building affect its visitors?

Pre-Design

Main Question: How do you get people to come back to a museum for William Eggleston?

a cultural node to build and give information to tell a story avoid elitist view deformation to take position in design

What spaces are and aren’t meant for visitor access? What do visitors come to the MOPA for?

Considerations:

How do I make this a significant building on South Main Street in Memphis, TN? How do people move through the space? The photos/art have a location, people move around it Think of the realistic scale of spaces and their relationship to one another Think of the site and what the realities are of views, sun, wind Is there a big, bold parti? A typology? How does the programming invite people in from the street? What on the upper floors pulls visitors up? What is this building if it is not functioning as a museum? Access to site for visitors, staff, deliveries, etc. Where’s the mechanical room if not in the basement or on the roof? 2/3 of the mechanical room should be on the ground floor- this will be seen and accessed form the exterior The sequence of photos to and through an archive and being put on display The archive will store photos/art, but can it also display it? There must be 2 exits for visitors, but may only be one entrance People will work here during business hours, what is their experience? Are spaces needing similar ceiling heights on the same floor?

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Site 1

Site 2

Weeks 1-3

1ST PROGRAMMING STORIES 1/32” = 1’ Models 29


Pre-Design

Site 1

HYBRID PROGRAMMING MODELS

Before visiting Memphis we created six programming studies, three for each site. After a class discussion we each created hybrid programming models that we were to consider when visiting the site. These models helped us determine the story we wanted to create with our design and the experience of space sequences we wanted for our visitors.

Site 2

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SITE 1 VISIT

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An existing building sits on the corner site that could be both saved or taken down. Site one is closer to downtown, and would be viewed emerging above the one story building to the north if viewed from downtown. The rear of the building will be seen from areas of downtown and strongly needs to be considered during design so it is recognizable. Also would need to consider access from parking lot.


Pre-Design

SITE 2 VISIT

Site two is situated between two buildings and currently has existing structures on it that would most likely be taken down. It is highly visible traveling down South Main Street. There is a large height difference from the front to the rear of the building and it sits along the rail road tracks. The surface area of the site is very large and the site directly lines up with Butler street and the Lorraine Hotel.

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MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

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Memphis has a very wide culture. One of the main focuses is the start of blues music that is still present in the city. African American culture is very strong and seen throughout much of the city. It is also the city that Martin Luther King was killed in. I also realized there is a large presence of old, Southern money. The city as a whole, not just South Main, seems to have vacancies and a lingering presence of it’s more populated days


Pre-Design

SOUTH MAIN HISTORICAL DISTRICT

The material media of South Main is mostly brick and some other masonry. There are many empty buildings and sites, and other buildings and sites are not taken that good of care of. Others buildings are in great condition and most are businesses. A 25’ bay system is very evident along South Main. The once present human is seen in the district, but it is no longer highly active and populated.

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CLYFFORD STILL MUSEUM Denver, Colorado

Architect: Project Team: Project Year: Project Area Material:

Allied Works Architecture Brad Cloepfil, Design Principal Chris Bixby, Project Lead 2011 28,500 square feet Concrete

The entry lawn creates a transition zone into the museum from the urban street. The nine galleries are the second floor are laid out to be viewed chronologically through Still’s career. Each gallery was designed specifically for each display. The archive on the ground level is open to visitors A partial basement (plan not found) contains more archive and storage space. Classroom: Circulation: Archive: Gallery: 35

710 square feet 2,450 square feet 1,700 square feet 10,000 square feet


Pre-Design 1. Reception 2. Research Labs 3. Office 4. Painting Stor. 5. Conservation Labs 6. Archive Display 7. Mechanical 8. Loading

1. Orientation Gallery 2. Painting Gallery 3. Drawing Gallery 4. Education Gallery

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KNUT HAMSUN CENTER Hamarøy, Norway

Architect: Steven Holl Project Year: 1994 - 2009 Project Area 24,445 square feet Material: Tarred black wood and concrete The building sits near where the writer grew up and the design draws inspiration from his writings. The carefulness in the design has led it to be a regional icon in the Arctic Circle that has become known to the world. The center includes an auditorium that seats 230 people, a roof garden, cafe, and a library. Classroom Circulation Gallery

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Pre-Design Ground Level

First Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor 1. Entry 2. Lobby 3. Reception

Fourth Floor 4. Cafe 5. Kitchen 6. Auditorium

7. Offices 8. Galleries 9. Balcony

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45% INVESTIGATION Weeks 4-5

I chose to work with site one, mainly because I liked the smaller site, it was on a corner, and the existing building had more opportunity to be kept than at site two. The weeks after the site visit consisted mostly of continuing programming research and story development according to our reactions from the site visits.

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Schematic Design

45% PRESENTATION

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90% INVESTIGATION

45% Jurors’ Comments

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-There is a opportunity to create a separate event space on the third floor. -What pulls people from the entrance to the farthest corner of the building? -Design stairs to interact with the Eggleston gallery. -Cafe and library really don’t have much of a connection. -What is the connection between the two patios? -Re-evaluate the form and make sure it works how I want it to. -Materialization will be key. -What is in the connection between the lecture hall and existing building?


Design Development Study Reactions to Comments

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90% PRESENTATION Weeks 6-7

PLANS

Basement Ground Floor 43


Design Development

SITE PLAN

Second Floor Third Floor 44


VOLUMETRIC SECTIONS

DIAGRAMS

Programming Structure

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Design Development

Circulation HVAC 46


90% SCHEMATIC DESIGN March 1, 2013

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Design Development PHASE SUMMARY

During this phase we mainly focused on developing our story and making sure that the programming allowed for our story to be created. Volumetric sections allowed us to see adjacencies and understand the experience from the entrance and then through the building. Towards the end of the phase we started to look at structure. I focused on creating a 25’ bay system along the front facade which allowed incorporating primary structure to be fairly straight forward. We also focused much on circulation in the building that both met code and created a sequence of spaces that delivered the desirable experience for all building users. Last, we started to plan out HVAC systems and understand the challenges that come with adding in systems.

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FIRST LOOK AT MATERIAL Weeks 7-8

The gallery space needed to have a material of its own to have a strong presence in the building. The facade material was either to contrast or be similar to that of the existing space. It was also important to look at the materials of the district.

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Design Development

Existing Building Brick

Copper Panels To me the copper panels and their changing look overtime resembled the sort of grittiness of the district, verses a clean silver metal.

Wood The wood would have a very earthy characteristic and be connected to the brick of the existing building by being a long time common building material.

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MID REVIEW PRESENTATION March 14, 2013

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52

Mid-Review


1/16” = 1’ MODEL

5

5

4

4

3

3

Lecture Hall

U

2

Jan.

2

Stor.

AHU

AHU

1

1

Archive Stacks

U

D

Coat Room

A

D B

Mechanical

Elec.

A

Library Conf.

Stor.

B

Work Space C

C

Gallery

D

D

PLANS

Basement Ground Floor 53


Mid-Review

SITE PLAN

5

5

5

44

44

Digital

4

Digital

Gallery

Gallery U

D

3 U

Cooking Area Dry Frz. Ref. Section C Food Prep

Section C

3

D

Dining

2 2

1

Analog Gallery

1

Analog Gallery

Storage

A

A D U

Conf. B

Stor.

B

Work Space C

Gallery

2

Section B

Intake Work Democratic Area Forest

Open Shelving

1

1

Patio

4

Cooking Area Dry Frz. Ref. Food Prep D

3 D

3

Section A

Section A

Dining

Section B

AHU

Storage Intake

Democratic Forest

Mechanical

5

AHU

Stor.

2

1

Patio Democratic Forest Collection

Work Area A

Open Shelving

D Pres. Pres. Queue Queue U Arch. Arch.Arch. Arch. Display Work Display Work Off. Off. Room Room B Op. Op. Off. Off. Op. Op. Conf. Conf. Off. Op. Off. Op. Off. Op. Off. Op. C Off. Break Off. Break Room Room

D

C

D

Break Room Work Room

1

Democratic Forest Collection Sculpture Patio

A

B

2

Stor.

Break Room

Stor.

Sculpture Patio A

A

Stor.B

B

Work Room Conf.Tr. Conf. Tr. Off. Tr. Off. Tr. Off. Tr. Off. Tr. C Off. Tr. Off. Tr. Off. Off.

C

D D

D

D

D

Second Floor Third Floor 54


ELEVATIONS

S. Main Street Talbot Street

TITLE

SECTIONS

DIAGRAMS 55

Section AA

Programming

Circulation


Service Entrance Elevation

Mid-Review

Mulberry Street

Section BB Section CC

Structure

HVAC

Material 56


MID REVIEW

March 14, 2013

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Mid-Review

PHASE SUMMARY

At mid review we were focused on finalizing all design decisions so that after we could start looking at wall sections and secondary structure. There would be one week after the mid review to edit designs based on juror’s thoughts. The time between the 90% presentation and mid review was spent investigating material and fenestration.

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JUROR’S COMMENTS Mark Muller -agreed with location of community spaces on the ground level -agreed that galleries need slight connections, but that the Democratic Forest galleries needed to stand apart in the building -rethink how the copper will react and change over time -what on the exterior shows the presence of the gallery box on the interior -think about the soffit material at the entry

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Professor Shannon Criss -agreed with the design/layout of first floor -thought second and third floor lose clarity -copper? -facade needs to have a single main idea to make sure that its language is consistent throughout -can you show the box as more of a volumetric form inside of the building -maybe move bathrooms, elevator -re-evaluate the upper floor event sequence


Professor Steve Grabow -reconsider how the building fits into the site -look at patterns with surrounding buildings -horizontals are strong along South Main -re-evaluate fenestration

Mid-Review

Dana Koch -existing connection to city is seen at immediacies- can you expose the brick wall in the lecture hall? -what exactly do you want the materials to tell? -agreed with the “void� material -make sure to tell the small stories in my design -does the light-well become a void too? apply material to this?

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Applestone Limestone

Wave Texture of Concrete Clyfford Still Museum

Aluminum

Aluminum Tubes Wyly Theater

FIXES

Week 10

After mid review I looked at the shape of the front facade and re-thought through materials. A main exercise in doing this was looking closer at existing patterns and lines from the adjacent buildings. The materials started to focus on showing the divisions of the interior spaces.

ELEVATIONS 61

S. Main Street

Talbot Street


Mulberry Street

Mid-Review

PHASE SUMMARY

Service Entrance Elevation 62


Aluminum Tubes Wyly Theater

Zinc Panels

Atlantic Slate Natural Finish

Existing Brick Building

Massaranduba Wood

FIXES

The study before this helped lead me in the right direction for choosing materials, but I was still not happy with them. I again looked over different materials and precedence to determine my final material choices.

ELEVATIONS 63

S. Main Street

Talbot Street


Mulberry Street

Mid-Review

PHASE SUMMARY

Service Entrance Elevation 64


EARLY CD DISCUSSIONS Weeks 11-12

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Construction Documents

PHASE SUMMARY

At the beginning of the CD phase, Professor Nichols held class discussions to help us understand basic building sequences and strategies. He also gave us some starting diagrams of typical wall sections. We looked at the entire wall system from the foundation to the parapet. We also started to understand secondary structure systems.

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CD DEVELOPMENT Weeks 13-14

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Construction Documents


DESIGNING ALUMINUM TUBING SYSTEM

I wanted to use a metal screen system on the upper portion of the facade that emphasized verticality, reflecting the verticality of the buildings in the district. I looked at the Wyly Theater is Dallas as an precedence for my facade. The aluminum facade system was designed so that it could be assembled in 5 foot wide strips off site and then be placed on the building.

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Construction Documents


90% CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS April 26, 2013

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Construction Documents

PHASE SUMMARY

As we neared the end of the construction documents phase we produced two 2D wall sections and a 3D wall section that investigated the section from the foundation to the parapet. It was very important to cut through each of our materials and different types of windows to fully understand our design.

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FINAL PRESENTATION MAY 15, 2013

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Final Presentation


Existing Building Community at Lower Floor New Building Museum Upper Two Floors

PARTI DIAGRAMS SUBTITLE

The MOPA brings awareness to the photographic arts, specifically William Eggleston, through a community center that is active both during and outside of museum hours.

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Final Presentation

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Democratic Forest Collection Community 3rd Floor at center of building Event Space

SITE PLAN 76


5.1

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Basement Ground Floor 77


5.1

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Community Space

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Second Floor

C

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Galleries Offices

Final Presentation

5.1

Third Floor 78


ELEVATIONS

Looking towards the rear of MOPA 79


Atlantic Slate Natural Cleft Finish

Zinc Panels

Existing Brick Facade

Massaranduba Wood

Final Presentation

Aluminum Tubes

Looking towards Downtown 80


2nd Floor Democratic Forest

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Entry Lobby

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Final Presentation


VOLUMETRIC SECTIONS

Looking towards the rear of MOPA 83


Final Presentation Looking towards Downtown 84


Steel Structure

Circulation

HVAC

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Programming


Talbot Street

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Final Presentation


Parapet

46’

Roof 44’ TOS Level 42’8”

1/2” WALL SECTIONS 3rd Level 30’

2nd Level 16’

1st Level 0’

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Cover Board Tapered Insulation 2 layers of EPS Insulation Corrugated Metal Roof Decking K12 Open Web Joists W24x55 Beam 6x6 Square Steel Column Spray Polyurethane Insulation Foam Steel Knife Plate 4x2 Steel Tubing Aluminum Tubes

2” Slate Panels

Concrete Corrugated Metal Decking K12 Open Web Joists W24x55 Beam 6x6 Steel Column Steel Knife Plate Glass 4x2 Steel Tubing Vertical Aluminum Louvers Existing Brick Facade

Final Presentation

1 1/2” Dark Zinc Metal Panels

1 1/2” Dark Zinc Metal Panels 3” Air Space 3” Closed Cell Insulation Sheathing Stud Wall Gypsum Board

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1/16” MODEL

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90

Final Presentation


1/4” SECTIONAL MODEL

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Final Presentation


FINAL PRESENTATION May 15, 2013

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Variety of Jurors: Professor Chad Kraus Professor Kent Spreckelmeyer Christine Bono - 5th year student Matt McKillip - in practice Stan Hernly - in practice

Main comments made by all/most jurors: -Reduce material palette by at least material. They agreed with how each was used, but because the building is fairly small the variety is too large. -The “gallery box” could have been developed more as a separate form inside of another building. -They appreciated the focus on Eggleston’s work, and the programming layout. - They wanted to see a presence of the “gallery box” on the exterior. - Spend a short time to further develop experience between circulation and the “gallery box.”

Final Presentation

JUROR’S COMMENTS

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FINAL THOUGHTS

Even as a freshman, Architecture 609 was the studio that I was both excited for and dreaded. The studio would be a huge stepping stone in my education, but the work seemed overwhelming, and at times I was nervous that I might not be ready for it. I wanted to have Denton Nichols as my professor for two main reasons, I was impressed by his previous students’ work and also I had the opportunity to take many of the other professors. I knew that Professor Nichols would push me to learn everything he could teach me. I was ready for the challenge, though I was not looking forward to the many late nights I knew were to come. The late nights were easier and more worth it than I imagined. I can honestly say that the photographic art museum had nothing to do with why I choose this studio, but I am thankful for the project type I was able to work on. This past semester made me realize that I enjoy all types of architecture, and that I do not want to have a focus in my career, or at least for now. I am also grateful that I had the opportunity to work on a project from pre-design through the construction document phase that allowed me to see what areas of the field I may be more interested or talented in. There are many aspects of my project that I am satisfied with, and others that I would like to design differently. Though frustrating at the time, I appreciate the push to make quick decisions so that our projects were able to move on and be completed for the final review. Having to quickly work through the phases allowed me to understand which design issues I was able to solve better than others on my own. The construction document phase was the most aggravating for me, but I also felt that I learned

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greatly from it. I struggle at times with being a perfectionist, but in this phase it is very important for drawings to be correct and that the designer fully understands how a system works. I think that this will help me in the future when putting these documents together. I was happy to bring what I have learned in my other architecture courses together in a single studio and begin to understand how they relate and affect one another at a large scale and all the way through details. The fast pace the 609 curriculum sets up for the studio was exhausting at times, but I was amazed at the high level of thought and design work Professor Nichols was able to push out of us in ten weeks. It was also surprising to see how far into details we were able to focus in on after the main design phases were complete while still having enough time to produce work for the final review. As I expected before the semester started, I enjoyed programming and organizational phases the most. This design aspect is want attracted to me to architecture even as a young girl. I enjoy architecture because it allows for creativity, but must be functional and rational. This phase is very important to me because it incorporates these issues, especially in this building type. I solved the issue of designing a museum that would be successful as a business through programming by placing most community spaces at the first level and creating an after museum hours event space on the third floor. Three main “tools” helped me to learn this past semester. Throughout the semester Professor Nichols introduced us to many different people, mostly architects. Krissy showed the studio around Memphis and helped us to understand the culture of the city and the South Main District. Many of Professor Nichols’ co-workers came for reviews and were able to bring in a variety of new ideas and remind us of issues we had started to overlook in design. We also met many other building experts that taught us about their specific work. Professor Nichols also had a multiple hat strategy that reminded us to think of all people who would impact or be impacted by our museum design. There were times when I would be stuck in my project, and reminding myself to think through the different building users allowed myself to make decisions. The last “tool” may be the most important. My classmates gave me design advice, helped me to understand issues I may not have understood in class, and participated in late night snack runs that kept us awake and able to work on studio.

My education and this studio, especially as an important stepping stone, have helped me prepare for my first internship this summer and for the workforce after I graduate. After this semester I look forward to start working in a firm and being able to contribute my talents to a design team, and having the opportunity to learn from others’ talents. I am mostly grateful for this past semester because it was obvious to me that I enjoyed working on a project that at the beginning I was hoping I would find interest in. I really am happy that I will be going into my career with an open mind about the range of architecture and the variety of work I may get involved with. I guess the late nights did more than help move my project along during the semester. They helped me realize how truly dedicated I am to the entire profession of architecture.

Final Thoughts

As I have looked back over the semester and searched through papers I found the list of my strengths and weaknesses from the first day of class. Listed first is confidence which has always been a main struggle of mine. After this course I am more confident that this is the right profession for me. This semester has helped me to gain confidence in my design abilities and to understand that I will not be perfect in all aspects that make up architecture. I was able to push past my issues with perfectionism, and realize that the semester wasn’t entirely about what I produced, but what I learned throughout the semester.

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Misson

Studio Mission and Intent provided by Denton Nichols

William Eggleston

http://www.egglestontrust.com/df_intro.html http://www.egglestontrust.com/df_afterword.html http://www.aaronschuman.com/egglestondemocratic.html

Site | Context

http://southmainmemphis.net/ http://www.memphisregion.com/culture.asp http://www.memphistravel.com/press/memphis-city-rich-histo ry-music-culture-and-food

BIBLIOGRAPHY Program

Program break down provided by Denton Nichols

Precedence Analysis

http://www.wallpaper.com/architecture/grande-landes-mu seum-france/2752 http://www.archdaily.com/203388/clyfford-still-museum-al lied-works-architecture-2/ http://www.archdaily.com/31221/knut-hamsun-center-ste ven-holl-architects/

Final Thoughts

THE MEMPHIS AND SHELBY COUNTY UNIFIED DEVELOPMENT CODE The Zoning Code and Subdivision Regulations for the City of Memphis and Unincorporated Shelby County https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:i_Is Me84EN0J:www.shelbycountytn.gov/Docu mentView.aspx?DID%3D669+south+central+business+ improvement&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEES gAzzzftsVKm11HFlbrfdWhoVvCVOhc8HAw5v83I5aQg Goj5_R3tlKgOiJx3Ru4z2M5XLRNbTKNCS4Ev_ajt16L 7j5Pk30ExK1Xj5lpPqLIx6q18y5yceBEGd9NpIbwZV0w FQ_X&sig=AHIEtbTOJj-VpyGc4083kFPS5rxGW8dutA http://www.downtownmemphiscommission.com/documents/ cbid_design_guidelines.pdf

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90% SCHEMATIC DESIGN March 1, 2013

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MID REVIEW

Final Thoughts

March 14, 2013

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FINAL PRESENTATION May 15, 2013

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Final Thoughts

Museum of Photographic Arts | William Eggleston Collection  

This documentation covers my fourth year comprehensive studio work completed Spring 2013.

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