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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword

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A – MASTERS

123

Celebrity Lastname

Introduction

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C – AMERICAN CLASSICS

Thornton Dial: KAREN WILKIN

123

Valerie Rousseau

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Emery Blagdon: LESLIE UMBERGER

123

William Edmondson: JUDITH MCWILLIE

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Morris Hirschfield: RICHARD MEYER

123

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123

At a Crossroads

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THE HECKLER COLLECTION IN HISTORICAL CONTEXT

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Interview WITH

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Jon Serl: RANDALL MORRIS

123

Adolf Wölfli: VALERIE ROUSSEAU

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Willetto: SHONTO BEGAY

123

INTERVIEW

Gabritchevsky: VALERIE ROUSSEAU

Anne-Imelda Radice

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Nek Chand: JOHN MAIZELS

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123

Guo Fengyi: TINA KUKIELSKI

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Hiroyuki Doi: EDWARD GOMEZ

123

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M’onma: RANDALL MORRIS

123

123 123 |

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123

Lubos Plny: BARBARA SAFAROVA

123

123

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Christine Sefolosha: COLIN RHODES

Aloïse Corbaz: SARAH LOMBARDI

123

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123

123

AUDREY HECKLER |

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Achilles Rizzoli: BARBARA SAFAROVA

B – ART BRUT AND SELF-TAUGHT ARTISTS IN EUROPE

Jane Kallir

123

123

Justin McCarthy: EDWARD GOMEZ

123

Bill Traylor: BERNIE HERMAN

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Henry Darger: MICHAEL BONESTEEL

Martin Ramirez: ELSA LONGHAUSER AND PHYLLIS KIND

James Castle: LYNNE COOKE

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E – 21ST CENTURY SELF-TAUGHT ART – WORLDWIDE

Madge Gill: ROGER CARDINAL

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123 |

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123

Gugging artists: JOHANN FEILACHER

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123

George Widener: CLAUDIA DICHTER

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123

Georgia Blizzard: TOM PATTERSON

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Domenico Zindato: EDWARD GOMEZ

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123

David Butler: RANDALL MORRIS

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123

Sam Doyle: GORDON BAILEY

123

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123

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123

123

NOTES/BIBLIO

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123

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Ronald Lockett: BERNIE HERMAN

Johann Hauser

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123

Sister Gertrude Morgan: ELAINE YAU

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123

Franz Kernbeis

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123

Jimmy Lee Sudduth: SUSAN CRAWLEY

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123

Oswald Tschirtner

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Mose Tolliver : SUSAN CRAWLEY Purvis Young: GORDON BAILEY

123

August Klotz/Klett: THOMAS ROSKE

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123

Augustin Lesage: VALERIE ROUSSEAU

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123

Barbus Müller: SARAH LOMBARDI

123

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Schroeder-Sonnenstern: PHILIPP DO BRITO Scottie Wilson: ROGER CARDINAL

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© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

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CREDITS

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123 123

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Anna Zemankova: BARBARA SAFAROVA Carlo Zinelli: VALERIE ROUSSEAU

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123

123

CONTRIBUTOR BIOS

William Hawkins: ROGER RICCO

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123

Sylvain & Ghyslaine Staelens: RANDALL MORRIS

Johann Fischer

Johann Korec

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D – SOUTHERN SELF-TAUGHT FAVORITES

Howard Finster: KATHERINE JENTLESON

123

123

123

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© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

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123

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H I D D EN A RT: T H E AU D R E Y B . H ECK L ER CO L L EC T I O N

8

Thornton Dial Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48” Thornton Dial Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


T I T L E CH A P T ER

25

Martin Ramirez | Untitled (winter sleigh | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48” Martin Ramirez | Untitled (winter sleigh | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


ART BRUT AND S E L F - TA U G H T A R T I S T S © 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


H I D D EN A RT: T H E AU D R E Y B . H ECK L ER CO L L EC T I O N

66

T I T L E CH A P T ER

67

Gutting Artists | Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48” Gutting Artists | Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48” Gutting Artists | Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48” Gutting Artists | Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


99

T I T L E CH A P T ER

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

Anna Zemankova

| Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 | Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

Anna Zemankova

| Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 | Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


100

H I D D EN A RT: T H E AU D R E Y B . H ECK L ER CO L L EC T I O N

T I T L E CH A P T ER

101

VALÉRIE ROUSSEAU

Carlo Zinelli

Carlo Zinelli (1916–1974) had not yet reached ten years

committed to the San Giacomo psychiatric hospital in

old when his father gave him up to a foster family that

Verona, placed in a section for irrevocable cases where

lived on secluded farmland on the outskirts of Verona,

patients were given cold showers, electroshock therapy,

1

Italy, where he was put in charge of the cattle.He

and insulin injections.

stayed there until 1934, surrounded by other seasonal and child workers, who sometimes got together during

Nurses noticed the graffiti-like drawings Zinelli made

evenings, once their tasks were completed, to engage

with brick fragments on the walls of his room, and sug-

in storytelling, dancing, and singing (his interest for

gested he attend the new hospital-based studio headed

music arose at that time). When he turned eighteen,

by the Scottish sculptor Michael Noble beginning in

Zinelli decided to move with his sisters to Verona, where

1956, where residents—unguided—where invited to

he found an apprentice job at a local slaughterhouse.

create. After a rather slow beginning, during which he

The same year, he was conscripted for military service

created human head sculptures in terracotta, he finally

in Vipiteno, where he joined the 11th Regiment of the

found an unstoppable creative rhythm that would last all

2

3

Alpini. Ten months later, he was designated to join the

day long, until the end of his life. Despite the consis-

troops Mussolini sent into combat with Franco in Spain.

tency of his graphic production, which includes rep-

His ship was attacked on its way to the front, and he

etition in iconology, Zinelli’s drawings indicate four

ended up working as a stretcher bearer. After only two

distinct phases marked by subtle variations.

Carlo Zinelli | Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

months, Zinelli was sent back home, the victim of various delusions and hallucinations. In 1947, he was finally

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


H I D D EN A RT: T H E AU D R E Y B . H ECK L ER CO L L EC T I O N

122

MICHAEL BONESTEEL

Henry Darger

123

T I T L E CH A P T ER

Henry Darger (1892–1973) was a reclusive Chicago

As the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinnian War

hospital janitor with a tortured past whose vast creative

Storm As Caused by the Child-Slave Rebellion (The Realms of

output—including two epic-length novels, an equally

the Unreal) , most of his carbon-traced watercolor draw-

monumental and semi-fictional autobiography, numer-

ings are more like loose improvisations on activities

ous journals, diaries, notebooks, and scrapbooks, and

taking place in the novel’s imaginary world, where the

three gigantic albums of visual artwork—was virtually

Christian nation of Abbieannia is at war with the satanic

unknown by anyone until shortly before his death.

empire of Glandelinia over the issue of child slavery.

While all of Darger’s visual art centers around and

There are many depictions of the seven blond-haired

sometimes depicts specific episodes from his 15,000-

Abbieannian princesses, the intrepid Vivian Girls (as

page novel,The Story of the Vivian Girls in What Is Known well as other identifiable characters from his literary

Henry Darger

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

| Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 | Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


H I D D EN A RT: T H E AU D R E Y B . H ECK L ER CO L L EC T I O N

180

T I T L E CH A P T ER

181

Sister Gertrude Morgan | Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 | Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


Mose Tolliver

| Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 | Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

Mose Tolliver

| Untitled (winter sleigh ) | Ca. 1970 | Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


Domenico Zindato Untitled (winter sleigh | Ca. 1970 Enamel on wood | 37 × 48”

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Skira Rizzoli. All Rights Reserved


A Day with Claude Monet in Giverny Adrien Goetz Photography by Francis Hammond Fondation Claude Monet This handsome slipcased volume gives an intimate glimpse into the idyllic Giverny gardens which inspired Monet’s most iconic paintings. HC w/luxury slipcase 224 pages 300 color illustrations 5 ½ x 9 in. (14 x 22.5 cm) ISBN: 978-2-08-020306-9 $34.95 Publication: May 2017


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


A Day with Claude Monet in Giverny KEY POINTS • INSIDER ACCESS : An intimate overview of the rural haven that inspired Monet’s most famous paintings, now recognized as one of France’s most beautiful gardens. • PICTURE PERFECT : Exquisite photographs allow the reader to discover the carefully restored Giverny gardens, from the picturesque Japanese bridge to the infamous floating water lilies. • ARTISTIC IMPORTANCE: The cradle of Monet’s most iconic works, the gardens of Giverny are of interest to aficionados of the artist, garden design, and impressionism.

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


A Day with Claude Monet in Giverny Adrien Goetz Photography by Francis Hammond Fondation Claude Monet HC w/luxury slipcase 224 pages 300 color illustrations 5 ½ x 9 in. (14 x 22.5 cm) ISBN: 978-2-08-020306-9 $34.95 Publication: May 2017 For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Publicity Director T. (212) 387-3465 psommers@rizzoliusa.com

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved

© 2017 Flammarion. All Rights Reserved


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Tiki Cocktails

200 super summery drinks


2

Rum Based Cocktails

Rum Based Cocktails

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Tiki Cocktails

Traditionally, tiki cocktails were made predominantly with rum, often blends of different kinds of rum, each imparting a different characteristic to the drink. There are so many different variations of rum out there, each with subtle differences in flavour. There’s white rum, dark rum, aged rum, demerera rum, rum made from molasses, rum made from fresh sugar cane, over proofed rum, navy rum… the list goes on. Like with any recipes, the better the ingredients you use, the better the final product will be. You don’t need to go out and buy the best rum in the world, but you should get the best rum you can afford. If you’re having a tiki party, get your guests to each bring a different bottle of rum. Do a little research and be specific as to what you want people to bring. This way, you can sample the different types and see  how they change the overriding flavor of your cocktails (all while stock up your rum cabinet for next time). At the very least, you will need a good white rum, dark rum and spiced rum.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


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Rum Based Cocktails

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Tiki Cocktails

Don The Beachcomber’s Mai Tai In the late 1930s/early 40s, there was a war going on. I’m not talking about the war in Europe, I’m talking about the Mai Tai war between Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic’s. Both claimed to have invented the iconic drink. And both their recipes are different. This is Don Beach’s recipe.

Serves 1 60 ml aged rum 20 ml orange curacao 20 ml Orgeat syrup (page xx) 20 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed mint, for ganish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake. Strain into an old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with mint.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


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Rum Based Cocktails

Trader Vic’s Mai Tai And this is Vic’s… Serves 1 30 ml dark rum 30 ml rhum agricole 15 ml orange curacao 7 ml Orgeat syrup (page xx) 30 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed mint, for ganish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake. Strain into an old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with mint.

Zombie Another Donn Beach original that has inspired singers and song writers. The Zombie was named after the effect that it has on you if you drink 3 of them.

Tiki Cocktails

Dragon 88 Mai Tai A variation on the classic, this cocktail was served at Dragon 88 in WestBoylston, Massachusetts. A much more complex drink than it’s predecessor. Serves 1 45 ml rhum agricole 30 ml demerara rum 30 ml dark spiced rum 15 ml orange curacao 15 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed 15 ml Orgeat syrup (page xx) 15 ml Velvet falernum (page xx) pineapple and maraschino cherry, for ganish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake. Strain into an old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with mint, pineapple and maraschino cherry.

Serves 1 45 ml gold rum 45 ml dark rum 30 ml 151 proof Demerara rum 20 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed 15 ml Velvet falernum (page xx) 1 teaspoon Grenadine (page xx) 5 ml Pernod 1 dash Orange bitters (page xx) 15 ml Don’s mix (page xx) mint, for garnish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a blender with ¾ cup of crushed ice. Blend for 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass and top up with ice cubes. Garnish with mint and drink responsibly.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


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Rum Based Cocktails

Tiki Cocktails

Q B Cooler

Hurricane

Some say Vic developed his Mai Tai from Don’s QB Cooler.

This drink comes from New Orleans in the 1940’s from a speakeasy called “Mr. O’brien’s Club Tipperary”. The password to get in was “storm’s brewin”. It was originally a way to get rid of excess rum, but the drink caught on with the sailors and became a mainstay.

Serves 1 30 ml gold rum 30 ml white rum 15 ml Demerara rum 10 ml ginger liqueur 30 ml orange juice, freshly squeezed 15 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed 15 ml Honey syrup (page xx) 7 ml Velvet falernum (page xx) 30 ml soda water 2 dashes Orange bitters (page xx) mint, for garnish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a blender with ½ cup crushed ice. Blend at high speed for 5 seconds. Pour into a large old fashioned glass and top with crushed ice. Garnish with mint.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Serves 1 60 ml white rum 60 ml dark rum 30 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed 30 ml orange juice, freshly squeezed 60 ml passion fruit pulp 15 ml Passion fruit syrup (page xx) 15 ml Sugar syrup (page xx) 15 ml Grenadine (page xx) 5 ml orgeat syrup orange and maraschino cherry, for ganish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake. Strain into a hurricane glass filled with ice. Garnish with orange slice and maraschino cherry. For an extra kick, this drink can has over-proofed rum floated on top.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


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Rum Based Cocktails

Tiki Cocktails

Navy Grog

Colonial Grog

One of Donn Beach’s originals. The name says it all. Serves 1 30 ml dark rum 30 ml demerara rum 30 ml white rum 20 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed 20 ml grapefruit juice, freshly squeezed 30 ml honey syrup soda water, to top up lime, for garnish

Combine rums, fruit juices and honey syrup in a cocktail shaker filled with ice and shake. Strain into an old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice. Top with soda water & garnish with lime. Traditionally this drink is garnished with a frozen “snow cone” made from crushed ice with a straw through the middle. You can make your own by filling a cone shaped glass with crushed ice, poking a hole through the centre and placing in the freezer.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

A variation of Donn Beach’s classic drink, this was created by the tiki cocktail historian Jeff “Beachbum” Berry. Serves 1 15 ml dark rum 15 ml gold rum 15 ml lime juice, freshly squeezed 15 ml orange juice, freshly squeezed 15 ml soda water 10 ml maple syrup 5 ml Allspice dram (page xx) 1 dash Orange bitters (page xx) orange, for garnish

Combine all ingredients (except garnish) in a blender with ½ cup crushed ice. Blend at high speed for 5 seconds. Strain into an old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with orange. Traditionally, this drink was served in a glass lined with a shell of crushed ice. To do this, finely crush ice and fill an old fashioned glass. With a spoon, slowly create a well in the middle, pushing the ice up the sides of the glass. When you have a well in the ice, put the glass in the freezer until you’re ready to serve.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


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Rum Based Cocktails

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Tiki Cocktails

Coffee Grog Maybe you’re looking for a breakfast grog? Or grog to warm you on a cold night on the high seas? This rum toddy will surely get the shiver out of your timbers. Serves 1 1 sugar cube 1 teaspoon Don’s Coffee Grog Batter (page xx) 1 pinch ground nutmeg 1 pinch ground clove 1 pinch ground cinnamon 3 strips orange rind 1 strip grapefruit rind 180 ml freshly brewed coffee 15 ml aged rum 15 ml 151 proof dark rum cinnamon stick, for garnish

In a large warmed mug or heatproof glass, add the sugar, batter, spices and rind. Pour in hot coffee and stir until sugar and batter dissolves. In a metal ladle or heatproof jug, add the rums and ignite with a match. Pour the flaming rum into the coffee and garnish with cinnamon stick.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2017 Smith Street International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Tiki Cocktails 200 Super Summery Drinks by Peggy Holden Smith Street Books 6/5 Cross Street, Brunswick East Victoria 3057, Australia smithstreetbooks.com ISBN: 978-1-92-541833-0 $19.95 US • $26.95 Can Paper over board, 5¹⁄³ x 7³⁄� inches 176 pages 80 color illustrations Release Date: May 2, 2017 Rights: US/Canada, Latin America For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Publicity Director, T. (212) 387-3465, psommers@rizzoliusa.com


Princess Pamela’s Soul Food Cookbook A Mouth-Watering Treasury of Afro-American Recipes Pamela Strobel Rizzoli International Publications, Inc. 300 Park Avenue South New York, NY 10010 www.rizzoliusa.com ISBN: 978-0-8478-5842-2 $30.00, Can: $40 Hardcover, 5.875 x 8.75 inches 240 pages 25 b/w illustrations Rights: World English For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Executive Director of Publicity, T. (212) 3873465, psommers@rizzoliusa.com “Princess’s simple and authentically soulful recipes are more relevant than ever. Her quotes throughout the cookbook are so timeless—it’s as if she’s whispering pearls of wisdom directly into your ear.” —Carla Hall, co-host ABC’s The Chew “For a southern-born girl, it took grit and skills to thrive in the Big Apple restaurant scene—Ms. Strobel did that on her own terms. From Headcheese to Peanut Pie, Pamela shows a new generation about soul.” —Nicole A. Taylor, author of The Up South Cookbook: Chasing Dixie in a Brooklyn Kitchen

“If you lived in New York on big dreams and no money, Princess Pamela’s was where you wanted to eat. Quirky and clubby (the Princess didn’t let everybody in), her Little Kitchen served cheap cuts—tripe, chittlins’, pig tails—and made them taste like food for angels. You felt lucky to be there.” —Ruth Reichl, author of My Kitchen Year “Princess Pamela was not only an icon of New York, but one of the most influential restaurateurs to bring soul food to Manhattan from the South during the Great Migration. This cookbook is a bible for those looking to learn about the authentic experience—her poetic voice, southern hospitality, and wealth of knowledge come across so strongly on the page that you feel like you’re sitting in her downtown kitchen talking over over Smothered Chicken or Fried Salt Pork.” —Marcus Samuellson, author of Yes, Chef “This re-issue is right on time! Soul food is experiencing challenging times these days, and the Lee Brothers have picked one of my favorite cookbooks to remind us of the cuisine’s glory days. Princess Pamela will please cooks with its timeless, urban, working-class recipes that are wonderfully paired with Pamela Strobel’s folklore and humor. This cookbook is mouth watering and rib tickling!” —Adrian Miller, author of the James Beard Award–winning Soul Food


) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) •x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x-

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Foreword

•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x•x-

) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ike her tiny restaurants in New York City’s East Village, Pamela Strobel’s only cookbook, Princess Pamela’s Soul Food Cookbook, published in 1969 by Signet Books, almost begged you to walk on by. Printed on stiff brown newsprint, in the curt format of a pulp-fiction paperback, it was virtually impossible to deploy in the kitchen without splitting the spine and straining eyes. Strobel’s first restaurant, The Little Kitchen, at 242 East 10th Street, which she opened in 1965 and operated for twenty-four years, was essentially a speakeasy — you had to know about it, and know to ring the buzzer for apartment 2A. After The Little Kitchen closed, Strobel opened Princess’ Southern Touch, at 78 East 1st Street, whose sign boasted, “Cuisine of South Carolina.” Customers ducked under a metal roll-gate — which always seemed onethird closed, even during business hours — and obeyed the hand-written sign (“Please Knock”) since the door was kept locked. Even then, Princess’ hospitality might amount only to drawing back the lace curtain that covered the door, a look up and down of appraisal through the glass door, and a dismissal: “We’re closed.” But, as with her cookbook, those who persisted reaped rewards. We bought “Princess Pamela’s Soul Food Cookbook” from a vintage bookseller in 2004 — her restaurant had closed in 1998 — and our copy, 35 years old at the time, arrived already well-loved, its corners rounded, the pages on the verge of crumbling in our hands. Once readers get inside this unusual cookbook, Strobel’s recipes and poetry — here in nearequal measure — perform the transformative magic of the very best cookbooks, of immersing the reader in Strobel’s culinary intelligence, her spunky outlook on life, her lovelorn spirit — it’s hard to conjure up

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a word other than soul. Hers is a “food soul” that changes the way you cook and the way you think about sustenance. The first page of Strobel’s book, immediately opposite the copyright page, is a dedication — To the Memory of My Mother — and beneath it, the book’s first poem, “The Soul of Beauty.” (“Beauty” refers to her mother, Beauty Strobel.) In four stanzas and a couplet spanning two pages, we learn so much: that her mother was the head pastry chef at a prominent restaurant in Spartanburg (South Carolina) and died when Strobel was 10. That although she was orphaned, Strobel already knew how to cook like Beauty — “the best Black folk cookin’/in the Carolinas.” And we learn that she traveled North alone, using her cooking skills to survive. The penultimate stanza lays out the triumph of her restaurant, and her cookbook: “And now with all them famous folks/comin’ round to my place,” she writes, listing celebrities of the day who’ve visited her restaurant, including the film director Sidney Lumet, singer and actress Pearl Bailey, novelist Tom Wolfe, “Tonight Show” bandleader and composer Skitch Henderson, fashion designer Norman Norrell, journalist and activist Gloria Steinem, as well as bold-faced social-register names: Radziwill, Rothschild, Rosselini. “I feel like they is/kissin’ Beauty’s hands,” she concludes. According to the author Isabel Wilkerson, whose Search for Warmer Sons: The Epic of the Great Migration is considered the definitive volume on the subject, one of the numerous things we can learn from the stories of the six million African-Americans who fled the South following the Civil War is “an insight into longevity and what it takes to survive the harshest of lives and come out whole.” Princess Pamela’s Soul Food Cookbook functions not only as an superb instructional guide to the cooking of upstate South Carolina, but the confident, positive voice of her recipes themselves — and more on them later — in conjunction with the personality expressed through her verse, offer a portrait of fortitude, wisdom and humor. Reading this book cover to cover gives insight into what strength of character it took to endure what most would perceive to be crushing adversity. In Princess Pamela’s Soul Food Cookbook, the recipes appear on the

P r i nce s s pa m e l a

F or e wor d

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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her a squeeze.” “She poked her head into/my kitchen and asked/me if I cooked my/ chicken with a thermometer./I told her, “Ain’t had any/get sick on me yet.” Strobel frequently reminds us of the ways that cooking can be its own reward, in its opportunity for contemplation and the gentle stimulation of the senses. The poem that appears opposite the recipes for Red Beans & Rice, reads: “I enjoy makin’ rice/’cause I like the/feel of it running through/my fingers/smooth and a glistenin’/pearly-white with/cool water washin’/over it.” In Strobel’s world, fallibility in the kitchen—and in life--is no obstacle to enjoyment:

There ain't a thing I do, a person I know, a dish I cook, couldn't be made a mite better. That's no reason not to love it for the best that it is right now. Cooking this book is a real pleasure we hope many people will be able to experience, a motivation which is primary for this new upsized hardcover edition. In the current era of deeply prolix recipes, where

. .~. ~ . . ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~ . . ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~ . . ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~ . . ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~ . . ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~ . . ~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. ~ . .~. .~. ~. .~. ~. .~. .~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Standing Tall on the Coca-Cola Crates I was thirteen when Mama and Grandmama were dead, so I decided to go on my own up north—about 125 miles to Winston-Salem. That was certainly North to me. I rode a bus and had three pigtails, my mother’s suitcase and diamond watch, and a big white bow in my hair, but I didn’t even have a place to stay. So I asked a man on the bus where the colored section was, and he sent me to the worst part of Winston-Salem. I saw a lady walk by when I got out of the cab. Her name was Maude, and the first thing she asked me was, “Did you run away?” I said, “No, ma’am.” And I kept asking her if she had a room to rent. Finally that

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lady said she had a mother-in-law in a wheelchair about a block away. “Maybe you can stay there, because she’s holy and righteous,” she said. And I did, and she was. Early mornings, I’d go look for work right here by the R.J. Reynolds tobacco plant. You had a lot of little restaurants around there because of those thousands of people. Well, there was this little place on the corner, where a lady had already said I was too young. So, I decided to go see her at home when she was sick. “You’re too young, honey, what can you cook?” she said. I wanted that job so bad! So I said,

“Well, who is gonna cook the food for lunch?” Pretty soon, she’s sending me to the restaurant to help the salad lady. When I got there, I saw this high sink was filled with dishes, and I couldn’t even reach the sink! So I looked out back, and there were some Coca-Cola crates, and I kept piling them up until I could reach the sink. I washed those dishes, and after that, I took the chops out of the icebox, and I made chops and I made steaks. You know how you take the steak and flatten it out and then fry them off and then make gravy? You talk about something good. I even started making the slaw my own way that day, and pretty soon the salad lady made it that way. When I started there, I couldn’t even lift the frying pan down without someone helping me! That was the beginning of what I’m

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doing now. I learned a lot from Mrs. Smith, and I loved her. The only day I wouldn’t go work there was Sunday, but I’d go anyway and sit with her in that little restaurant because that luncheonette was her life. I think I learned how to cook the best food in the world between Mrs. Smith and my grandmamma, and I’m trying to keep my place what our food is about. I try to keep the music that goes with our food, the jazz. I have to pay for the musicians out of the chicken money and it’s hard. And I sing hard. But I’m from staunch stock, and don’t you forget it. —Pamela Strobel, in an interview with Mary Abbott Waite and Remar Sutton, from The Common Ground Book: A Circle of Friends (British American Publishing, Ltd., 1992)

F or e wor d

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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Fried Chicken 1 4-pound fryer*, cut up Salt Flour

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Baking powder Milk or water Bacon drippings

Pour drippings into heavy frying pan 1 1/2" deep and beat well. Combine flour with salt to taste and baking powder (1/2 teaspoon for each cup of flour). Dip chicken in milk or water, then dredge in flour mixture. Brown quickly in hot fat on all sides. Then reduce heat, cover, and cook until chicken is tender. Drain on absorbent paper. Serve hot or cold. Serves 4 to 6.

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I love gladiolas. Lotsa times I didn’t have money to buy a chicken and I had to have my fresh-cut gladiolas in the window jus’ the same.

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*

EDITOR’S NOTE: A fryer is a younger chicken (about 2 1/2 months old); older chickens will not yield as tender a texture when fried.

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_.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__.__. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Soak a salt-cured ham overnight in water to cover, to which 1 cup of vinegar bas been added. Drain. Cover with hot water and add another cup of vinegar. Gently simmer until parboiled. Drain and rinse. Again, place the ham in hot water to cover and add 1 or 2 bay leaves, 3 tablespoons sugar, a strip of lemon peel, and a chopped onion. Gently simmer until tender—about 3 hours. Skin the ham. Combine 1 cup brown sugar with 1 teaspoon dry mustard and moisten with a little broth. Pat the mixture onto the ham and stud with a few cloves. Place in baking pan and bake at 350° for 1 hour, basting occasionally with its brown sugar syrup.

You gotta learn to take the bitter with the sweet. Anybody knows good cookin’ knows that.

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On Sundays when I was nine there was always lotsa Bible readin’ and milk-baked ham and singin’ to the good Lord before the biscuits got cold.

A 2"-thick slice of ham 2 tablespoon flour 2 heaping teaspoons dry mustard 2 tablespoons brown sugar Sweet milk

Combine the flour, dry mustard, and brown sugar. Work the mixture into both sides of the bam. Place in baking dish and cover completely with milk. Bake at 350° for about 1 hour, or until the ham is tender. When ham is done, its surface should be browned and the milk almost entirely disappeared.

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1 cup milk 3 eggs, well beaten

Place the ground pork in frying pan and break up with a fork. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and sage and mix well. Fry until brown and cooked throughout. Drain off the fat and reserve. Combine tomatoes, onion, and celery in saucepan and let boil for several minutes. Gradually stir in the corn meal. Cook until thick, stirring constantly. Stir in the milk and heat through. Combine the beaten eggs with the pork, 1/4 cup of the reserved fat, and the corn meal mixture. Turn into a casserole and bake at 375° for about 45 to 50 minutes. Serves 4.

Fresh pork sausage is like a sweet prayer. It may not bring you anythin’ good but it make everythin’ bad a mite easier to swallow.

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A lot of marriages may be made in Heaven but I bet a darn sight more been made leanin’ over a hot stove in the kitchen. 60

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Cut pork link sausages apart and place in frying pan. Add boiling water to cover and cook over low beat for 5 minutes. Drain and brown evenly over moderate beat. Serve with any of the following: fried chicken, mashed sweet potatoes, corn bread, eggs, fried apples, rice, griddle cakes, potatoes.

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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1 pound ground pork no. 1 can of tomatoes (2 cups) 2 tablespoons minced onion 1 tablespoon minced celery 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground sage 3/4 cup yellow corn meal

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·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·×·× !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷÷

Lately I been robbin’ Paul, to pay back Peter.

Nobody’s perfect. Everybody make mistakes. That’s why pencils got erasers on ’em.

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2 red pepper pods Salt and pepper Boiling water

Thoroughly wash the greens, breaking off the tough stems. Place them in a pot with ham hocks and red pepper pods. Cover with boiling water and boil gently for 3 hours. When done, season to taste with salt and pepper. Drain, reserving the cooking liquid. Arrange on serving platter with the meat over the greens. Serve with corn bread and cups of “pot likker” (the reserved cooking liquid) for dunking. Serves 6.

1 pound dried black-eyed peas 2 pounds ham hocks* 2 onions, chopped 2 stalks celery, chopped 1 small bay leaf

A

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2 pounds young, tender turnip greens 1 pound ham hocks, ham fat, or ham bone

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1 clove garlic 1 pod hot red pepper 1 small can of tomato puree 2 tablespoons chili sauce Boiling water

Wash the peas. Cover with boiling water, cook for 2 minutes, and remove from heat. Let soak for 1 hour. Boil the meat for 30 minutes in water to cover. Add the peas, drained, and remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer until tender—about 3 hours. Serves 6 to 8.

*

EDITOR’S NOTE: A ham bone with scraps, bacon ends, or pig tails may be substituted.

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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* ···• * -----* ···• * -----* ···• * ----* ···• * -----* ···• * -----* ···• * ----* ···• * -----* ···• * -----* ···• * ----* ···• * -----* ···•

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×××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××

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All through the thirties we ate so much catfish we jus’ natcherly purred when we sit down to mealtime.

*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*.*·*. 1/2 cup bacon drippings 2 pounds onions, chopped 2 cans condensed tomato soup 2 soup cans water 1 bottle tomato catsup

1 tablespoon Worcestershire A few drops of Tabasco Salt and pepper to taste 4 pounds catfish, skinned and cleaned 4 to 6 large potatoes, pared and cubed

2 pounds catfish, cleaned and skinned 1/2 cup sifted flour Salt and pepper to taste

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Cook the onions in hot bacon drippings until they are soft. Add tomato soup, water, catsup, Worcestershire, Tabasco, salt, and pepper. Blend well and bring to a boil. Add catfish and potatoes. Cover and cook over low heat for about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Serves 8. 1/2 cup yellow corn meal 3 tablespoons bacon fat or other shortening

Wipe the fish with a damp cloth or paper towel. Mix together the flour, salt, pepper, and corn meal. Roll the fish in the mixture and fry in hot bacon fat until golden brown on one side. Then turn and brown the other side. Total cooking time will be about 8 to 10 minutes. Serves 4.

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She sure could cook up a potful, that woman. But there wasn’t much for her to cook an’ one time I saw her cryin’, her tears runnin’ down in the catfish soup.

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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2 {-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-}-{-.-

Sweet Sweet Gard en Garden Greens Greens Roots

Shoots

’n

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swe e t gar de n gre e ns

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†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.

Once I had a cat, a big fat Tabby,

Fried GReen TomaToes

and he strutted aroun’ like he owned the place. Would yuh believe

4 firm green tomatoes, sliced 1/2" thick Beaten egg Dry bread crumbs

it got so bad he would walk through the legs of customers comin’ in

a week or two and then I saw

so they’d fall on their face.

him aroun’ the

I got so mad I throwed him out

neighbor hoop,

and screamed for him to stay out.

but he never paid no ’tention to me and he’d walk past my

You know how hard it is to get

place like it

rid of a cat and I figured he be

wasn’t there.

back soon enough. I didn’t see hide nor hair of him for

--------

with Milk Gravy

3 tablespoons bacon fat Flour Milk Salt and pepper

Heat the bacon fat in a heavy frying pan. Dip the sliced tomatoes in egg, then in bread crumbs. Slowly fry them in the bacon fat until golden brown on both sides. Remove tomatoes to hot serving platter. For each tablespoon of fat left in the pan: stir in 1 tablespoon of flour and blend well; then stir in 1 cup milk and cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour over the tomatoes and serve hot. Serves 4 to 6.

I tell you, I admire real pride in man, woman, or beast.

Cut 3 slices of bacon into small pieces and fry in a heavy pan until crisp. Remove the bacon. To the drippings, add 2 cups of cooked dry rice, 1 cup of okra which has been cut up and stewed, 2 tablespoons tomato sauce, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook over low heat for a few minutes and add the fried bacon pieces just before serving. Serves 3 to 4.

.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†.†. 108

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P r i nce s s pa m e l a

swe e t gar de n gre e ns

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!

109


1 3- to 4-pound head of cabbage, shredded 1/2 cup vinegar Salt

-- - --- - -

12 green peppers 12 red peppers 12 mild, medium-sized onions Boiling water

1/2 cup sugar 1 egg, beaten Pepper

-----------

There’s a lot of trouble in this world, a lot of hunger, a lot of weeping. And the way I see it, every home-cooked meal is a lovin’ gesture and a kind of celebration in itself. 1 cup brown sugar 3 tablespoons salt Pepper to taste 1 tablespoon mustard seed 1 quart vinegar

Grind together the peppers and onions. Cover with boiling water and let stand for 10 minutes. Drain. Add brown sugar, salt, pepper, and mustard seed. Add vinegar and simmer for about 10 minutes. Taste for seasoning and add more sugar and/or salt if necessary. Store in sealed sterilized jars. Makes about 3 quarts. This relish is a delicious accompaniment to meats and poultry.

Soak the shredded cabbage in salted cold water for about 20 minutes. Drain. Pour a small amount of boiling water (about 2" to 3") into a large skillet and add 1 teaspoon of salt. Add the drained cabbage, cover, and cook until the cabbage is just tender. Cook rather quickly and give it a stir once or twice. Drain as soon as it is done. Combine the vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan. Heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Slowly stir into the beaten egg. Pour over the cabbage and toss to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serves 4 to 6.

112

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P r i nce s s pa m e l a

swe e t gar de n gre e ns

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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113


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P r i nce s s

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14

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I enjoy makin’ rice ‘cause I like the feel of it running through my fingers smooth and a glistenin’ pearly-white with cool water washin’ over it.

»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»*«×»

––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– 1 cup rice 2 tablespoons butter ––– 2 / 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon salt ––– ––– 2 / 1 1 cups water ––– ––– ––– Wash the rice in three or four changes of water. Place in a heavy sauce––– ––– pan along with remaining ingredients. Cover tightly and quickly bring ––– ––– to a boil. Stir once with a fork and replace lid. Reduce heat and cook ––– very slowly until the liquid has been absorbed—about 20 minutes. Toss ––– ––– lightly with fork. Serves 4. ––– ––– ––– ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ––– ––– /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////////////////////////////////// ––– – --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////––––////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// – ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^––––^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– 1 pound dried red beans 1 teaspoon salt ––– ––– 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 pound bam or salt pork ––– ––– 1 onion, whole or chopped 2 c ups dry boiled or ––– steamed rice (see above) ––– 1 clove of garlic (optional) ––– ––– ––– Soak the beans overnight in cold water to cover. Or boil for 2 minutes ––– ––– and let stand for 1 hour. Drain. Place beans in pot with water to cover. ––– Bring to a boil. Then add onion and garlic and simmer until beans are ––– ––– tender but not mushy. Add salt and pepper when beans are about half ––– ––– done. Add the rice, mix and cook over very low beat for about 10 min––– utes. Serves 6 to 8. ––– ––– ––– ––– ––– pa m e l a gr i t s , ' tat e r s , r i c e , ' n m u s h ! 15 ––– © 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All – © 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved. –––Rights Reserved. ––


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I been close to Jewish people and Eye-talians all my life. There is the kind of love in them that comes of bein’ hurt and healed a thousand times.

30

!

P r i nce s s pa m e l a

1 cup corn meal 1 cup flour 3 teaspoons baking powder 2 1/ teaspoon salt

- - --- - - - - -

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1/4 cup molasses 1 cup milk 1 egg, well beaten 2 tablespoons bacon fat, melted

Sift together the dry ingredients. Add the remaining ingredients and pour into greased square baking pan. Bake at 450° for about 15 to 20 minutes.

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

bat t e r ' n bu t t e r

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!

31


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You kin keep a good man Down– all you have to do is to thicken the batter!

With all them famous folks comin’ round to my place, they always advisin’ me, “Pam, be sure to always be yourself.” Never knew anybody could be otherwise.

.............................................................................................

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bat t e r ' n bu t t e r

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33

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1 cup milk 1 tablespoon lard or bacon fat, melted 1 egg, well beaten

Sift together the dry ingredients. Stir in milk and melted lard. Add the egg. Turn into greased com-stick pans and bake in preheated 425° oven until done.

P r i nce s s pa m e l a

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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2 cups corn meal 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 / 1 teaspoon salt

—•

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Mix together all the ingredients. Bake on hot, well-greased bread hoe or iron frying pan on top of stove over medium heat. When browned on the bottom, turn over and cook until done—about 15 to 20 minutes.

—•

1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

*

2 cups sifted corn meal 2 cups cold water

—•

Hoe Cake

32

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Entertaining in the Country LOVE WHERE YOU EAT Festive Table Settings, Favorite Recipes, and Design Inspiration

Entertaining in the Country Love Where You Eat Festive Table Settings, Favorite Recipes, and Design Inspiration Joan Osofsky and Abby Adams Principal photography by John Gruen Rizzoli International Publications, Inc. 300 Park Avenue South New York, NY 10010 www.rizzoliusa.com ISBN: 978-0-8478-5883-5 Hardcover, with jacket 8½ x 10¼ inches 192 pages 150 color photographs Rights: World For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Publicity Director, T. (212) 387-3465, psommers@rizzoliusa.com

JOAN OSOFSKYE N T& E R T AABBY I N I N G I N T H E C OADAMS UNTRY 3 Photography by John Gruen


POTLUCK SUPPER FOR FORTY MENU s ta rt e r s

Rosey and Barry’s Chaseholm Cheeses Leah’s Green Beans with Peanut Dip *Mary’s Guacamole *Abby’s Brandade de Morue mains

*Joan’s Moroccan Brisket Chris and Gayle’s Baked Ham Walter’s Mom’s Pasta Casserole Jane and Jama’s Vegetable Casserole *Joan’s Moussaka sides

Moisha’s Kale Salad Jennifer and Nick’s Sesame Noodles *Rhonda’s Mixed Salad *Jack and Bob’s Corn Pudding *Jamie’s Beet Salad Chuck and Chuck’s Corn Creole Steve’s Bread

Here in the country, when you invite people to dinner, they always ask: “What can I bring?” Recently, when some very dear friends of ours, Steven and Melissa Sorman, decided to relocate from the Hudson Valley to Minnesota, Abby and I decided to throw them a big goodbye party, a potluck. Potluck parties are great icebreakers. In the invitation we encouraged our friends to let us know if they would like to bring something. (It would be terribly rude to demand that they do so.) For the next few weeks e-mails and phone calls flew back and forth as the menu evolved. We wanted to avoid duplicates— and to make sure that all the bases (starters, mains, desserts) were covered. I contributed two dishes, both recipes that have been in my repertory for years: a moussaka and a Moroccan-style beef brisket. Both are crowd-pleasers, can be made ahead of time, and are best served at room temperature. One friend brought a baked ham, always a good choice for a party: It’s easy to serve and goes with everything. There were a number of hearty casseroles, several salads, and some stunning desserts. We made up cards for each dish with the name of the cook and the recipe title, and set them on place card holders. The cards made it easy to organize the party offerings. We put the starters near the bar, encouraging guests to mingle while we arranged the main-course platters on the long table in the kitchen. Desserts were set on a round table in the corner. The guests served themselves. Seating consisted of chairs around tables in three rooms, in addition to sofas. The party was a huge success. The variety of dishes made for a great grazing experience and the honorees—Steven and Melissa—had an unforgettable send-off.

d e s s e rt s

*Jeannette’s Quesillo *Barry Chase’s Apple Pie Robin’s Lemon Squares Adrienne’s Pear Almond Tart *Terry’s Chocolate Hazelnut Mousse Cake

4

With forty guests expected for the party, we set up tables—some small, like this one, some bigger—throughout the house. I like to arrange the napkins and flowers ahead of time. The branchlike wall sconces are a Hammertown favorite: I love their graceful organic shapes.

E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

5


opposite and left : We set up the bar in a separate room from the kitchen. Ice, garnishes, and pretty cocktail napkins, along with opened bottles of wine and other beverages, are handy so that guests can help themselves. The basket beside the table is a useful receptacle for empty bottles and used napkins. The vegetable still life above the table is by photographer Lynn Karlin. above : Photographer Val Shaff took the soulful cow portrait that hangs on the kitchen wall. I love the different shapes and textures of these wooden bowls and cutting boards.

Š 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Š 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Julia assembles her Chicken Potpie; it’s fascinating to watch an accomplished cook at work. top , left and right : The shredded chicken, in a bowl with crème fraîche and mustard; a shower of chopped shallots. middle row and bottom : Assembling the piecrust. opposite : The final touch: cutting slits in the crust so steam can escape.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


A PERFECT DAY FOR A PICNIC MENU *Flatbread Pizza *Baked Chicken with Olives side

*Salad of Cauliflower, Broccoli, Asparagus, and Baby Greens d e s s e rt

Mini-Strawberry Tarts with Fresh Strawberries

“You have to be a little imperfect to be perfect.” This is Patrick Robinson’s philosophy, which he applies to his work as a fashion designer, and to the soul-satisfying meals he cooks for his family. His wife, Virginia Smith, is the fashion market/accessories director at Vogue, and they have a young son, Wyeth. During the week (when Virginia isn’t in Milan, Paris, or London) they race about New York City, going to meetings and fashion shows, accompanying Wyeth to and from school and to his after-school activities. But on weekends they put it all behind them and relax at their Hudson Valley home. This corner of New York’s Columbia County is pastoral, with rolling hills, farmland, and lots of open sky. The house, which was originally a barn, had already been converted when Virginia and Patrick found it. They’ve done some remodeling, opening up windows and building decks. The interior is casual but refined; Virginia cites Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt as an inspiration. There are rough beams, clean-lined modern furniture, and piles of books. Outside, there’s a big vegetable garden, a family of chickens, a pond with a weeping willow, and a great old oak tree, the setting for many summer picnics. Patrick is the family cook. He moves easily and confidently around the big open kitchen, cleaning up as he works. Today’s meal is mostly sourced locally, and it celebrates the season. The herbs, salad greens, and flowers for the table all come from their backyard. As Patrick cooks, the guests sip rosé and chat with Wyeth. Virginia loads the food and wine and the table settings onto a wagon and pulls it down to the picnic table, under the oak tree. As the sun moves overhead, family and friends linger over lunch, chickens clucking in the background, punctuated by an occasional raucous cock-a-doodle-doo. The meal concludes with bite-size strawberry tarts, from Taart Work Pies in Brooklyn. They are garnished with organic strawberries picked earlier in the day at nearby Thompson-Finch Farm.

This magnificent old oak tree provides shade and shelter for a summer afternoon in the country. The peonies were picked earlier in the day.

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E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


c l o ckwise , from top right :

Virginia uses an all-purpose garden wagon to haul the table settings from the house to the picnic site. The rooster protects a family of chickens that provide eggs for the kitchen. The vegetable garden is well fenced to keep out deer and other marauders. Windows flanking the front door bring light through the house. opposite : Patrick built the decks that surround two sides of this former barn. In the foreground, grapevines climb a trellis outside the garden.

12 Š 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

Š 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Flatbread Pizza Who doesn’t love pizza? Patrick’s recipe makes a hearty rustic pizza that is perfect for picnic food. Time: 1½ hours Serves 8 1 pound fresh cherry tomatoes 4 garlic cloves, finely diced 4 shallots, finely diced ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for greasing the pan 1 teaspoon kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 flatbread crusts (Patrick uses Damascus Bakeries’ Brooklyn Bred brand) ¼ cup shredded whole milk mozzarella cheese ½ cup ricotta cheese

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1. Preheat the oven to 300°F. 2. Toss the tomatoes with the garlic, shallots, olive oil, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl. 3. Spread the seasoned tomatoes in a baking pan and roast them for 1 hour. Halfway through the cooking time, toss them again so they cook evenly. Remove the tomatoes from the oven and set aside. 4. Twenty minutes before serving time, turn the broiler on to high. 5. Place the flatbread crusts on a greased 10 by 18-inch baking sheet and spread the mozzarella and ricotta on top. Spoon the roasted tomatoes over the cheeses. 6. Place the pizzas under the broiler and cook for 10 to 12 minutes, until they are bubbling and the crusts are just beginning to brown. Cut into 2-inch slices and serve hot.

E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Salad of Snap Peas and Ricotta Cheese This lovely salad is a Simpson family favorite. Time: 10 minutes Serves 8 1 pound fresh sugar snap peas, trimmed (tails and strings removed) ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil Grated zest of ½ lemon ¼ cup fresh mint leaves, cut into chiffonade Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 cups whole milk ricotta cheese 1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and blanch the snap peas for 1 minute, then quickly transfer them to a bowl of cold water. 2. Whisk the olive oil with the lemon zest and mint in a small bowl. Drain the chilled snap peas and stir them together with the dressing. Season with salt and pepper. 3. Spread the ricotta in a serving dish. Pour the snap peas and dressing on top and serve at room temperature.

The gardens surrounding the house were designed by landscape designer Christine Krause; they combine strong geometry with soft-colored foliage plants. overleaf , far right : This hand-forged Damascus steel Kramer knife is Jamey’s pride and joy.

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E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Blueberry Johnnycake Crumble Tartlets

Oatmeal Cranberry Cookies

These blueberry tartlets make a lovely finale to a party. The johnnycake crumble—johnnycakes are traditional cornmeal breads—tops precooked tartlets and your favorite blueberry pie filling.

These easy-to-make cookies are always a hit. Both the cookie and blueberry tartlet recipes come for Peggy McEnroe’s bakery/restaurant Back in the Kitchen.

Time: 1 hour Makes 2 dozen tartlets

Time: 30 minutes Makes 2 dozen cookies

1½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour ¾ cup yellow cornmeal ¼ cup sugar 1 tablespoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon kosher salt 4 tablespoons (½ stick) cold unsalted butter 1 cup heavy cream, plus more as needed 2 cups blueberry pie filling (your own or store-bought) 1 dozen prebaked tartlet shells (if bought frozen, defrost and bake following package directions)

1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup light brown sugar, packed 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats ½ cup granola (your favorite) 1 cup dried cranberries 2 large eggs, beaten 8 ounces (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt with a wooden spoon.

2. In a large bowl, with a wooden spoon, combine the granulated sugar, brown sugar, flour, salt, baking soda, and baking powder, with the rolled oats, granola, and cranberries.

3. Cut the butter into small pieces, then combine with the flour mixture, mixing it with your fingers until it resembles coarse meal. 4. Add the heavy cream and stir with a fork to form a soft, moist dough. If it is dry, add more cream, 1 tablespoon at a time to moisten. 5. In a small saucepan, heat the blueberry pie filling.

3. Add the eggs, butter, and vanilla and mix thoroughly. 4. Using a 1-ounce cookie scoop, scoop the dough onto a greased 18-inch baking sheet. Bake the cookies for 10 to 15 minutes, until lightly browned. 5. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack and let them cool completely before serving.

6. To assemble the tarts: Spoon the blueberry filling into each of the prebaked tartlets, then top each with a spoonful of the johnnycake crumble dough, and place them on a greased 18-inch baking sheet. 7. Bake the tartlets for 10 to 15 minutes, until the crusts are golden brown. Let them cool completely before serving.

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An assortment of cookies makes a perfect finale to a cocktail party. From foreground to rear: Oatmeal Cranberry Cookies, Blueberry Johnnycake Crumble Tartlets, and Ginger Cookies.

E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Fresh Herb Mignonette Erin gets fresh oysters delivered from the Maine coast; she arranges them on a bed of seaweed and shaved ice and spoons her mignonette sauce on top of each oyster. The herbs in this sauce were picked just minutes ahead of time. Makes ½ cup (enough for 12 oysters) ¼ cup rice wine vinegar 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh chives 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh dill ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Mix the rice wine vinegar, shallots, chives, dill, and pepper in a small bowl. Serve over freshly shucked oysters on the half shell.

above :

The wood-handled knife at top is a special oyster knife. Opening these delectable bivalves requires skill and strength. opposite : The oysters, dressed with mignonette sauce, are presented on a bed of fresh seaweed.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Cider-Braised Brussels Sprouts Apple cider and shallots enrich this hearty autumn vegetable. Quickly cooked with butter, shallots, and apple cider, the sprouts are tender and delicious. Time: 30 minutes Serves 4 1 pound Brussels sprouts 2 tablespoons good olive oil ½ cup finely chopped shallots Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup apple cider 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 2. Trim the Brussels sprouts: Remove the tough outer leaves and stem, and cut each Brussels sprout in half. 3. Heat a 10-inch cast-iron pan on medium heat. Add the olive oil and shallots. Cook over medium heat until the shallots turn translucent. 4. Add the trimmed Brussels sprouts. Cook for 1 minute, tossing frequently. Season with salt and pepper, then add the apple cider. Reduce the cider for 1 minute, then add the butter. 5. Put the pan in the oven and cook until the Brussels sprouts are tender but still a bit crunchy, about 3 minutes. Serve hot.

Salad of Baby Spinach Leaves with Sliced Apples and Calendula Petals This pretty salad rounds out the feast. The fresh young onions were picked earlier in the day. Time: 30 minutes Serves 6 1 tablespoon finely chopped sweet onion 3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 pound whole baby spinach leaves, washed and dried 1 crisp apple, cored and very thinly sliced (do not peel) ¼ cup calendula petals for sprinkling (or substitute nasturtium petals) 1. Combine the chopped onion and rice wine vinegar in a small bowl and macerate for 10 minutes. Add the olive oil and pepper and whisk to combine. 2. Put the spinach leaves and apple slices in a serving bowl. 3. Pour the vinaigrette over the spinach and apple slices, toss gently, then sprinkle the calendula petals on top and serve. above :

A basket of just-picked apples and vegetables.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Pear and Cornmeal Upside-Down Skillet Cake This favorite family recipe was passed down from Erin’s grandmother. The pears came from the orchard, where we had lunch, and were picked the morning she prepared the cake. Time: 1 hour Serves 8 4 firm but ripe pears (Bosc or Bartlett) 12 ounces (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature 1½ cups granulated sugar 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour ½ cup yellow cornmeal 1½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ½ cup sour cream Confectioners’ sugar 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 2. Prepare the pears: Stem, peel, halve, and core the pears, using a melon baller to scoop out the cores. Without cutting through the top ½ inch of the pear halves, slice each one lengthwise, 4 or 5 times, keeping the stem ends intact. 3. Heat 8 tablespoons of the butter in a 10-inch well-seasoned cast-iron pan over medium heat. When the butter has melted, add ½ cup of the granulated sugar and stir. 4. Arrange the partially sliced pear halves decoratively in a concentric circle in the pan, skin side down. Caramelize the pears over medium heat until the sugar has turned a deep golden color, 15 to 20 minutes. 5. Make the batter (you can do this while the pears are cooking): Combine the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt in a small bowl and set aside. In a separate bowl, with a whisk, beat the remaining 1 cup (2 sticks) butter until soft, slowly adding the remaining 1 cup granulated sugar. Beat until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating until they are well combined. Add the

vanilla and sour cream. Stir in the flour mixture. (This can all be done a few hours ahead of time.) 6. Pour the batter over the cooked pears and bake in the skillet in the oven for about 25 minutes, until a tester inserted into the cake comes out clean. 7. Let the cake cool on a rack for about 5 minutes, then run a knife around the edge of the pan and invert the cake onto a serving plate. Dust with confectioners’ sugar and serve warm.

TIPS Like many serious cooks, Erin French treasures her sturdy cast-iron pans. Nothing beats them for even cooking and heat retention. They are inexpensive to buy and will last forever if treated kindly. New pans need to be “seasoned”: Coat the surface with vegetable oil and heat the pan in a 300°F oven for an hour or so, then wipe the pan dry. Clean your pan after each use with hot water and a sponge or a soft brush. A little kosher salt will help to remove stubborn grime; do not use soap as it will strip away the pan’s seasoning. Always dry the pan thoroughly. If the surface looks dull, rub a bit of oil into it. If the pan becomes rough or rusted, re-season it in the oven.

E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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Adrienne’s Pear Almond Tart My daughter, Adrienne Adams, loves to bake. This elegant tart is one of her specialties. The pastry dough can be made one or two days ahead. The pie can be finished in the morning of the event and served at room temperature. Serves 10 For the pastry dough 1¼ cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting ¾ cup almond meal ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, cold, cut into small pieces 1. In a food processor, pulse the flour, almond meal, salt, and sugar together. Add the butter pieces and pulse until the crumbs are no larger than peas. Add 2 tablespoons ice water and pulse 3 or 4 times. If the dough doesn’t hold together when pressed between your fingers, add more ice water a spoonful at a time until the dough sticks. 2. Shape the dough into a thick disk, wrap it in plastic wrap, and chill until firm, about 1 hour. The dough can be made up to 2 days ahead.

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 2. To caramelize the pears: Peel, halve, and core the pears. Melt 4 tablespoons of the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir in ¼ cup of the granulated sugar. When the sugar melts, add the pears, rounded side up, and cook until lightly browned. Turn the pears to cook on the other side. Remove the pears and set aside. 3. To make the filling: In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat together the remaining ½ cup granulated sugar and 6 tablespoons butter until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition, then add the vanilla and almond extract. Add the flour and mix until just combined. 4. To finish the pastry: Dust a rolling pin with flour. Place the refrigerated dough on lightly floured parchment paper. Working quickly, and turning the dough frequently, roll out the dough to a 12-inch round. Use the parchment paper to place the dough on a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom. Carefully press the dough onto the sides of the pan, then use a sharp knife to trim off any excess dough from the rim. 5. To assemble the tart: Spread the filling in the tart shell. Cut the pear halves across into 6 slices. Holding the slices together, fan them out in a decorative pattern. 6. Bake the tart for 30 to 40 minutes, until the filling is lightly puffed and firm. Dust with confectioners’ sugar before serving.

For finishing the tart 3 ripe but firm Bosc pears 10 tablespoons (1¼ sticks) unsalted butter, softened ¾ cup granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ½ teaspoon pure almond extract ¼ cup unbleached all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar opposite :

The dessert table is set up at one end of the living room, with pies, whipped cream, serving utensils, and demitasse cups. The branches in the big earthenware jug come from an ornamental pear tree in my backyard. I pick the red leaves in October and they hold their color for months. E N T E RTA I N I N G I N T H E C O U N T RY

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

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NOTABLE BOATS Small Craft, Many Adventures by Nic Compton Rizzoli International Publications 300 Park Avenue South New York, NY 10010 www.rizzoliusa.com ISBN: 978-0-8478-5967-2 $29.95 Can: $40.00 HC w/ cloth, 8 7/8 x 8 1/4â&#x20AC;? 160 pages 80 color images Rights: US / Canada + non-exclusive Open Market For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Executive Director of Publicity, T. (212) 387-3465, psommers@rizzoliusa.com


Nova Espero C OLIN AND S TANLEY S MITH TOOK SELF - PROMOTION TO A NEW LEVEL WHEN THEY SAILED A 20 FT (6.1 M ) OPEN BOAT ACROSS THE A TLANTIC TO PUBLICIZE THEIR BOATBUILDING SKILLS . THEIR VERDICT AT THE END OF THE 43- DAY CROSSING? “ W E ’ VE JUST ABOUT HAD ENOUGH !” JOURNEY :

Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, to Dartmouth, UK Nova Espero CAPTAIN : Colin and Stanley Smith DATE : 1949 DISTANCE : 3,000 nautical miles (5,550m) BOAT NAME :

6ft 3in (1.9m)

20ft (6.1m)

LENGTH :

DATE BUILT :

BEAM :

RIG :

20ft (6.1m) 6ft 3in (1.9m) DRAFT : 2ft 10in (86cm) DISPLACEMENT : 1.5 tons (1.36 tonnes)

1949 Sloop (later yawl) CREW : 2

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Megan Jaye SIX MONTHS BEFORE HE DIED , JOHN LENNON FULFILLED A LONG -HELD AMBITION TO GO SAILING — AND NOT JUST ON A FAMILY CRUISE , BUT A SERIOUS OCEAN PASSAGE IN SERIOUS OCEAN WEATHER .

THE RESULT WAS A LIFE -CHANGING ADVENTURE THAT INSPIRED HIS LAST ALBUM .

ROUTE :

Newport, Rhode Island, to Bermuda BOAT NAME : Megan Jaye CAPTAIN : Hank Halstead DATE : 1980 DISTANCE : 635 nautical miles (1,176km)

12ft 3in (3.7m)

42ft 9in (13m)

LENGTH :

42ft 9in (13m) BEAM : 12ft 3in (3.7m) DRAFT : 4ft 3in (1.3m) / 11ft 6in (3.5m) (centerboard down)

DISPLACEMENT :

11.8 tons (10.7 tonnes) DATE BUILT : 1977 RIG : Sloop CREW : 5

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Swallow W HEN A RTHUR R ANSOME WROTE AN UNASSUMING BOOK ABOUT THE ADVENTURES OF A BUNCH E NGLISH LAKE , HE CAN ’ T HAVE IMAGINED IT WOULD APPEAL TO A SECRET LONGING IN MILLIONS OF PEOPLE — ADULTS AND CHILDREN ALIKE . OF CHILDREN ON A COUPLE OF BOATS ON AN

ROUTE :

Fictional lake, based on Coniston Water, UK BOAT NAME : Swallow CAPTAIN : John Walker DATE : 1929 DISTANCE : Half a nautical mile (approx. 1km)

5ft (1.5m)

13ft 6in (4.1m)

LENGTH :

13ft 6in (4.1m) BEAM : 5ft (1.5m) DRAFT : 8 in (0.2m) DISPLACEMENT : 250lb (114kg)

DATE BUILT :

ca.1912

RIG :

Lug CREW : 4

22

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Iduna ELLEN MAC ARTHUR WOULD BECOME FAMOUS FOR CRYING AS SHE CLIMBED THE RIGGING OF HER STATE - OF - THE - ART RACING YACHT AND , LATER , FOR BREAKING THE ROUND - THE - WORLD SPEED RECORD .

BUT, BEFORE EITHER OF THOSE EVENTS, THERE WAS IDUNA , THE 21FT (6.4M) CRUISING BOAT SHE SAILED AROUND B RITAIN WHEN SHE WAS JUST A TEENAGER . JOURNEY :

Around Britain, via the Caledonian Canal Iduna CAPTAIN : Ellen MacArthur DATE : 1995 DISTANCE : 1,500 nautical miles (2,800km) BOAT NAME :

7ft 2in (2.18m)

20ft 9in (6.3m)

LENGTH :

DATE BUILT :

BEAM :

RIG :

20ft 9in (6.3m) 7ft 2in (2.18m) DRAFT : 3ft (90cm) DISPLACEMENT : 1 ton (0.9 tonnes)

ca.1970s

Sloop CREW : 1

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Firecrest H E ’ S ONE OF F RANCE ’ S SAILING HEROES AND ONLY THE THIRD MAN TO SAIL AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE - HANDED , YET

A LAIN G ERBAULT ’ S REPUTATION IS CONSTANTLY UNDER

ATTACK WITH ACCUSATIONS OF HIM HAVING A POP - STAR ATTITUDE LONG BEFORE POP STARS WERE EVEN INVENTED . ROUTE :

Cannes to Le Havre, France, via the world Firecrest CAPTAIN : Alain Gerbault DATE : 1923–29 DISTANCE : 40,000 nautical miles (74,000km) BOAT NAME :

8ft 6in (2.6m)

39ft (11.9m)

LENGTH :

DATE BUILT :

BEAM :

RIG :

39ft (11.9m) 8ft 6in (2.6m) DRAFT : 7ft (2.1m) DISPLACEMENT : 11.65 tons (10.6 tonnes)

1892 Gaff cutter (Bermudan after 1924) CREW : 1

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Bluenose N EARLY A HUNDRED YEARS AFTER SHE WAS LAUNCHED , THE MIGHTY B LUENOSE STILL FEATURES C ANADIAN COINS , A SYMBOL OF NATIONAL PRIDE . S O WHY DID THE FAMOUS SCHOONER, UNBEATEN IN HER OWN LIFETIME , END HER DAYS WRECKED ON A CORAL REEF IN THE ON

C ARIBBEAN ? A ND WHY IS THE 1963 REPLICA, BUILT TO EXACTLY THE SAME PLANS , NOT QUITE AS FAST AS THE ORIGINAL ? JOURNEY :

Race course off Halifax, Nova Scotia BOAT NAME : Bluenose CAPTAIN : Angus Walters DATE : 1921–38 DISTANCE : 39.5 nautical miles (73km)

23ft (7m)

143ft (43.6m)

LENGTH :

143ft (43.6m) BEAM : 23ft (7m) DRAFT : 15ft 10in (4.83m) DISPLACEMENT : 319 ton (289 tonnes)

DATE BUILT :

1921 RIG : Schooner CREW : 22

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Hõkõle’a HOW DID THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF POLYNESIA ORIGINALLY MIGRATE TO SUCH ISOLATED ISLANDS , THOUSANDS OF MILES OUT AT SEA ?

DID THEY TRAVEL THERE INTENTIONALLY OR WERE THEY BLOWN THERE BY THE WIND ? F OR ONE GROUP OF MARITIME “ INVESTIGATORS ,” THERE WAS ONLY ONE WAY TO FIND OUT . JOURNEY :

Hawai’i to Tahiti BOAT NAME : Hõkõle’a CAPTAIN : Kawika Kapahulehua DATE : 1976 DISTANCE : 2,250 nautical miles (4,170km)

17ft 6in (5.3m)

62ft 4in (19m)

LENGTH :

62ft 4in (19m) BEAM : 17ft 6in (5.3m) DRAFT : 2ft 6in (76cm) DISPLACEMENT : 14 tons (12.7 tonnes)

DATE BUILT :

1973–5 RIG : Crab claw CREW : 15

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Dove/Return of Dove WHEN HE WAS 16, ROBIN LEE GRAHAM TOLD HIS PARENTS HE WANTED A BOAT TO SAIL THE P ACIFIC . MOST PARENTS WOULD HAVE LAUGHED , BUT GRAHAM’S PARENTS BOUGHT HIM A BOAT AND HELPED HIM SAIL AROUND THE WORLD .

TROUBLE WAS, THIS BOAT CAME WITH STRINGS

ATTACHED — LOTS OF THEM . JOURNEY :

Los Angeles to Los Angeles, California, via the world BOAT NAME : Dove/Return of Dove CAPTAIN : Robin Lee Graham DATE : 1975–80 DISTANCE : 30,600 nautical miles (56,670km)

8ft (2.4m) 10ft (3.05m)

24ft (7.3m) 33ft (10.1m) LENGTH :

24ft (7.3m)/33ft (10.1m) BEAM : 8ft (2.4m)/10ft (3.05m) DRAFT : 4ft (1.2m)/5ft (1.5m) DISPLACEMENT : 4,350lb (1,980kg)/12,800lb

(5,800kg) DATE BUILT :

1960/1968 RIG : Sloop/sloop CREW : 1

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© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


Complete Guide to Boating and Seamanship Powerboats • Canoeing • Fishing Boats • Kayaking • Navigation • Water Sports • Fishing • Water Survival • Electronics • U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Vin T. Sparano UNIVERSE PUBLISHING A Division of Rizzoli International Publications, Inc. 300 Park Avenue South New York, NY 10010 www.rizzoliusa.com ISBN: 978-0-7893-3287-5 $29.95 Can: $29.95, UK: £TK PB, 7 5/16 x 9 inches 320 pages 600 color photographs/illustrations Rights: World For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Executive Director of Publicity, T. (212) 387-3465, psommers@rizzoliusa.com

COMPLETE GUIDE TO BOATING AND SEAMANSHIP

• POWERBOATS • CANOEING AND KAYAKING • FISHING BOATS • NAVIGATION • • WATER SPORTS • FISHING • WATER SURVIVAL • ELECTRONICS • BOATING SAFETY • • FIRST AID FOR BOATERS • U.S. COAST GUARD REGULATIONS •

Vin T. Sparano

UNIVERSE


Contents

ARTIFICIAL LURES—Plugs Spoons Spinners Buzz Baits Jigs Plastic Lures Pork Rind Flies NATURAL FRESHWATER BAITS NATURAL SALTWATER BAITS HOW TO CATCH BAIT AND KEEP IT FRESH—Worms Sea Worms Minnows Crayfish Frogs KNOTS TERMINAL-RIG ACCESSORIES AVOIDING LINE TWIST—Open-Face Spinning Reel Revolving-Spool Reel Spincast Reel CARE AND REPAIR OF FISHING TACKLE—Care of Rods Care of Lines Care of Reels Care of Tackle Accessories Selecting the Tip Top and Other Guides Selecting Rod Ferrules Spacing of Rod Guides ESTIMATING FISH WEIGHT EASY FISH RELEASE FISHING BY THE BIRDS WATER TEMPERATURES AND FISH n

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Preface ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 00 SECTION ONE

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Boating Design and Construction............................................................................ 00

HULL DESIGN—Displacement Hulls Planing Hulls Multiple Hulls BOAT CONSTRUCTION—Wood Aluminum Fiberglass Fabric n

SECTION TWO

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BOATS FOR FISHING—Boats for Sheltered Waters Float-Trip Boats Boats for Open Waters Offshore Outboard-Powered Boats The Sportfisherman BOATS FOR HUNTING—Float Hunting Duckboats BOATS FOR CAMPING—Camping with Small Boats Family Runabouts Houseboats and Cruisers KAYAKS AND CANOES—Paddling a Kayak Fishing Kayaks Ins and Outs of Canoes Unswamping a Canoe PADDLEBOARDS WATER SPORTS—Personal Watercraft (Jet Skis) Water Skiing Ski Boats Tubing Wakeboarding n

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SECTION THREE

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Outfitting Your Boat................................................................................................................000

FROM HOOK TO MARINE MOTORS—Outboard Electrics Inboard (Gasoline) Diesel Stern Drive Jet Drive BOATING ELECTRONICS—Depthsounders Marine Radios Global Positioning System (GPS) ANCHORS, MOORINGS, AND ROPES—How to Set a Mooring Boat Knots Anchor Lines and Strength BOAT TRAILERS—Choosing a Trailer Loading a Trailer Trailer Maintenance On the Road and Launching PREPARING FOR WINTER STORAGE PREPARING FOR SPRING LAUNCHING n

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SECTION FOUR

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Boating Safety and Tips.......................................................................................................000

SAFE BOATING—Basic Tool Kit Spare Parts All-Purpose Kit Safe Boating Procedures Small Boat, Big Water Coast Guard–Approved Equipment Navigation Lights Loading Your Boat NAVIGATION HANDLING WIND, WEATHER, AND WATER—How to Forecast Weather Lightning and Your Boat Get Ready for Hurricanes Man Overboard Why Boats Sink Why Boats Blow Up n

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SECTION FIVE

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First Aid for Boaters........................................................................................................................000

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TREATMENT—Bleeding Artificial Respiration Choking BITES AND POISONOUS PLANTS—Snakebites Coping with Bugs Bee Stings Chigger and Tick Bites Spider and Scorpion Bits Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, and Poison Sumac SUNBURN SURVIVING HEAT AND COLD—Sunstroke Hypothermia Frostbite Sun and Eyes SPRAINS OTHER INJURIES—Eye Injuries or Foreign Body in Eye Cuts, Abrasions, and Bruises Puncture Wounds Fishhook Removal ILLNESS—Appendicitis Diarrhea Toothache FIRST-AID KIT n

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PLANNING AHEAD PREPARING A SURVIVAL KIT—Boater’s Survival Kit SUSTENANCE—Making Potable Water SURVIVING THE COLD SURVIVING THE HEAT AND SUN—Intense Sunlight and Heat DEALING WITH DANGEROUS WATER—Rivers and Streams Rapids Surviving in Cold Water

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Survival............................................................................................................................................................000

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Fishing Basics for Boaters...................................................................................................000

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FROM HOOK TO TABLE FIELD CARE AND DRESSING OF FISH HOW TO FILLET FISH SMOKING YOUR FISH HOW TO FREEZE FISH

SECTION TEN

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SPINNING—The Reel The Rod FLY FISHING—The Reel The Rod BAITCASTING—The Reel The Rod • Flipping SPINCASTING—The Reel The Rod CONVENTIONAL TACKLE FOR SALTWATER TROLLING AND CASTING—Trolling Reels Trolling Rods Casting and Boat Reels Casting and Boat Rods KITE FISHING HOW TO SET DRAG LINES—Braided Fishing Lines Fly Lines FISHHOOKS—Hook Wire Size Shank Length Hook Characteristics Hook Styles and Sizes

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SECTION NINE

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Freshwater Game Fish.................................................................................................................000 SECTION SEVEN Saltwater Game Fish.............................................................................................................000 SECTION EIGHT Cooking Techniques.................................................................................................................000 SECTION SIX

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Boats for Outdoor Recreation.......................................................................................... 00

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Index ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................000 Acknowledgments and Photo Credits ............................................................................................................................000 About the Author ................................................................................................................................................................................000

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

SECTION TWO

7

BOATING

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

Cruisers

SECTION TWO

9

Planing-Hull Designs

Cruisers are generally more seaworthy and comfortable than runabouts. Size can range from 20 to more than 100 feet. Cruisers usually have overnight accommodations.

Flying Bridge • Elevated steering position on a powerboat Cockpit • Sunken space below the gunwale line

Deck • Covering of the hull

Sole • Floor of a cockpit or interior cabin Bow Railing • A raised bar with vertical supports surrounding the bow area

Forward • Toward the bow, or front

Swim Platform • A deck extending from the transom at the waterline position Cabin • Enclosed living space

▲ The G3 Eagle 166 SE is a 16½-foot rigged johnboat with a welded hull. Rated for a maximum of 60 horsepower, this model is ideal for most freshwater fishing. It comes with a 19-gallon livewell.

Aft • Toward the back, or stern

Runabouts Most runabouts range in size from 16 to 25 feet and can be either outboard or inboard powered.

▲ The MAKO Pro Skiff is a 17-footer with an inverted-V hull. Rated for outboards up to 60 horsepower and with a weight capacity of 1,400 pounds, this is an ideal utility craft for sportsmen.

Red and Green Sidelights Bow • Front of a vessel

Port • Left side of a vessel

▲ The G3 Angler V172C is a typical side-console planing hull runabout. It’s a 17-footer with a 92-inch beam and a 115-horsepower rating. The double-plated bow makes it a good choice for shoreline fishing.

Hull • Body of a vessel

All-Around White Light

▲ The Viking 82 Convertible represents the ultimate in offshore fishing. The overall length is 87 feet and the beam measures 22 feet. With fuel options, it holds 6,750 gallons of fuel and 450 gallons of water. It is capable of bluewater big-game fishing all around the world.

Gunwale • Upper edge of a vessel’s side Starboard • Right side of a vessel Stern • Rear of a vessel

Propeller • Rotates and powers a boat forward or backward

▲ The Yellowfin 42, a 42-footer, is a good example of progress made in center consoles built to get offshore quickly with four 300-horsepower outboards totaling 1,200 horsepower.

Beam

Cleat • Metal fitting on which a rope can be fastened

All terms above are referenced to standing in the middle of the boat facing the front of the boat.

▲ The MAKO 284 CC, a 28-footer with a 10-foot beam and deep-V hull, will handle nearly all offshore waters.This center console is rated for 600 horsepower with a fuel capacity of 228 gallons.

Freeboard

Draft

Maverick’s Mirage 18 HPX-V is a typical well-equipped flats boat. This 18-footer has a 150-horsepower rating, draws only 9 inches, and has both a poling tower and a bow casting platform.

Transom • Portion of hull at the stern, at right angles to the centerline

Keel

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

The Elusive Green Flash

Moorings Three-anchor mooring with Danforth anchors

C

onsider yourself very lucky if you witness the green flash. Not many boaters are so fortunate and some don’t even believe it actually happens. The green flash is an amazing sunset phenomenon. Watch the red ball of the sun descend at sunset when you’re on the water, especially if you’re offshore in the southern half of the country. When the sun touches the horizon, it will turn orange, and then yellow. When the sun drops out of sight, you may instantly see a brilliant green flash. The color change is caused by the refraction of the sun’s rays passing through layers of atmosphere. Your best chance of seeing the green flash is on a calm ocean with a clear view of the horizon. Look for this phenomenon when conditions are right. If you see the green flash, you are one of the lucky ones to witness this amazing end-of-day display.

SECTION TWO

11

Ropes: Minimum Tensile Strength (pounds)* Circumference Diameter (inches) (inches)

Ship Brand Manila

Yacht Manila

Linen Yacht

Nylon and Gold Line Dacron

Poly- Polyethylene propylene

3 ⁄16 ⁄16 450 525 600 1,100 1,050 690 1,050 ⁄4 ¼ 600 688 1,020 1,850 1,750 1,150 1,700 5 1 ⁄16 1,000 1,190 1,520 2,850 2,650 1,730 2,450 3 11⁄8 ⁄8 1,350 1,590 2,090 4,000 3,600 2,400 3,400 7 1¼ ⁄16 1,750 1,930 2,700 5,500 4,800 3,260 4,300 1½ ½ 2,650 2,920 3,500 7,100 6,100 4,050 5,300 9 13⁄4 ⁄16 3,450 3,800 4,350 8,350 7,400 5,000 6,400 5 2 ⁄8 4,400 4,840 5,150 10,500 9,000 6,050 7,600 3 2¼ ⁄4 5,400 5,940 7,100 14,200 12,500 9,000 10,000 7 23⁄4 ⁄8 7,700 8,450 9,400 19,000 16,000 12,000 13,000 3 1 9,000 9,900 12,000 24,600 20,000 15,000 16,500 3½ 11⁄8 12,000 13,200 —— 34,000 21,500 18,500 19,500 33⁄4 1¼ 13,500 14,850 —— 38,000 24,500 21,000 22,000 4½ 1½ 18,500 —— —— 55,000 36,000 29,000 31,500 9 3

*For the approximate average tensile strength, add 20 percent for Ship Brand, Yacht Manila, and Linen Yacht ropes.

Fore-and-aft mooring for crowded anchorages

Recommended Anchor Lines for Power Craft

Anchor Overall Length of Boat Under 20 Feet 20–25 Feet 25–30 Feet 30–40 Feet

As sunset approaches, these Florida Keys anglers might see the green flash.

n How to Set a Mooring An anchored mooring is cheaper than a dock, and in many crowded public facilities it is the only choice. The authorities may stipulate the minimum mooring that is acceptable. You may want to improve on this, particularly if you have a valuable boat. In any case, remember that your boat might do damage if it drags its mooring or breaks loose—and the responsibility is yours.

On soft bottoms, heavy iron mushroom-type moorings are often used successfully. A chain is attached from the mooring anchor to a floating buoy, where the boat is tied, usually with a snap hook on a short line from the bow. Even a big mushroom mooring can be pulled through the mud if a really hard storm or hurricane blows, however, and it is for this occasional danger that you must prepare when setting a permanent mooring. A single mooring anchor assumes adequate scope on the line to hold in a blow, but scope of this length is impossible in crowded anchorages. Therefore, three anchors are sometimes used, set in an equilateral triangle with only one boat length of extra scope to the buoy (see accompanying illustrations). An alternative in the most crowded

Length of anchor lines Diameter if nylon Diameter if first-class manila Diameter if Plymouth bolt manila

Light 100 feet Heavy 3 Light ⁄8 inch Heavy Light ½ inch Heavy 7 Light ⁄16 inch Heavy

100 feet 150 feet 3 ⁄8 inch ½ inch ½ inch 5 ⁄8 inch 7 ⁄16 inch 9 ⁄16 inch

locations is fore-and-aft anchoring, with two anchors to each buoy, and each boat tied to the buoy both fore and aft of it.

n Anchor Lines and Strength Synthetic fibers have produced ropes that are a blessing to boatmen. The new ropes are somewhat more expensive than manila, but they are stronger for their size, lighter, and more comfortable to handle. They also

100 feet 180 feet ½ inch 9 ⁄16 inch 5 ⁄8 inch 3 ⁄4 inch 9 ⁄16 inch 5 ⁄8 inch

125 feet 200 feet 9 ⁄16 inch 3 ⁄4 inch 3 ⁄4 inch 1 inch 5 ⁄8 inch 7 ⁄8 inch

40–50 Feet 50–65 Feet

150 feet 250 feet 3 ⁄4 inch 1 inch 1 inch 13⁄8 inches 7 ⁄8 inch 1 1 ⁄8 inches

180 feet 300 feet 7 ⁄8 inch 1 1 ⁄8 inches 1¼ inches 1½ inches 1 inch 1¼ inches

won’t rot or mildew, and are easy to work with. One drawback is that they resist bite in tying; therefore, knots must be positive. Granny knots and loose knots are out. Elasticity is always a factor to be considered when using any line for anchoring or tying a boat at a dock. Nylon rope is more than four times as elastic as manila when loaded repeatedly; Dacron is about 50 percent more elastic than manila, but it is more sensitive than nylon to abrasion.

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

BOAT KNOTS

n  SHORT SPLICE

5 • Take both lashings (which were applied in Steps 1 and 2) off the other side of the rope. Repeat the above operations.

A

B

Note • To taper the splice, first make one more tuck just like the first one. Then, make the third tuck the same way, but first cut off one-third of the yarn from the strands. For the fourth tuck, cut off half of the remaining yarn. For the untapered short splice, you do not cut the strands. You just make three more tucks, exactly like the first one.

3 • Now, tie each pair of opposing strands (see B and E) with an overhand knot, tuck each strand twice, as in the short splice, and then twice more. Or, halve each strand (see A and D) and tie with an overhand knot before tucking. With this latter method, a smaller splice results—but at a considerable sacrifice of strength. B E 4 • Roll and pound well before cutting the strands off close to the rope.

The side splice is also called the eye splice because it is used to form an eye or loop in the end of a rope by splicing the end back into its own side. A B 1 • Start by seizing the working D end of the rope. Unlay the three strands—A, B, and C—to the seiz- E ing and whip the end of each strand. F Then, twist the rope slightly to open up strands D, E, and F of the standing part of the rope as shown.

B

E

C A

B

E C

F B

A F

C

2 • The first tuck is shown. The middle strand is always tucked first, so strand B is tucked under strand E, the middle strand of the standing part.

E

D

1 • Unlay the end of each rope about 15 turns and place the ropes together, alternating strands from each end as shown.

D

▼ 6 • This illustration shows the second round of tucks started, with the rope reversed again for E ease in handling. Strand B is passed D over strand D and tucked under the next strand to the left. Continue with strands A and C, tucking over one strand and then under one to the left. To complete the splice, tuck each strand in once more.

A

C

n FIGURE-EIGHT KNOT This knot can be tied simply and quickly. Used in the end of a rope to temporarily prevent the strands from unlaying, it does not jam as easily as the overhand knot and is therefore useful in preventing the end of a rope from slipping through a block or an eye.

3 • The secA ond tuck is now made as shown. The left strand A of the working D end is tucked under strand D, passing over strand E.

B

C

n BOWLINE The bowline is often used for temporary anchor knots. It never jams or slips if properly tied.

E

4 • This illustration shows how the third tuck is made. In order to make strand F easy to grab,

4 • Roll the rope toward you. Pick up the second strand, and repeat the same operation. Then, do it again with the third strand.You have now made one full tuck.

C

A

3 • Tuck against the twist or “lay” of the rope.What happens is that the tuck goes over one strand, under the second, and out between the second and third.

A

B

B

2 • Now, tie down all the strands temporarily (B). Take off the lashing from one side of the rope and raise one strand on this side, using a fid. Take the middle strand of the opposite side, and tuck it over one strand and under the raised strand. Pull it up taut.

This knot is slightly weaker than the short splice, but it allows the rope to run freely through a properly sized pulley and causes less wear at the point of splicing. D C F

C

7 • The finished eye splice is shown. Remove the temporary seizing and cut off the strand ends, leaving at least ½ inch on each end. Roll the splice back and forth under your foot to even up and smooth out the strands.

n EYE OR SIDE SPLICE

n  LONG SPLICE

A

1 • Lash rope about 12 diameters from each end (A). Unlay the strands up to the lashings. Whip the strands to prevent untwisting and then put together as in illustration, alternating the strands from each end. Pull it up taut.

6 • To finish, cut off the ends of the strands, leaving about 1 or 2 inches protruding.

B

5 • Strand C is then passed to the right of and tucked under strand F as F shown. This completes the first round of tucks.

B

A

This is the strongest of splices for joining ends of two pieces of rope, but it cannot be used to run through a pulley due to the bulk of the splice. This procedure also applies to splicing nylon and other synthetic ropes, but one additional full tuck should be used.

the rope is turned over. Strand C now appears on the left side.

operation with another pair of strands in the opposite direction as shown. D F C E

art of the fun of owning a boat is in learning and using boat knots. Here are ways to make the knots and splices needed for anchoring and mooring your boat.

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SECTION TWO

2 • Start with any opposite pair, unlay one strand, and replace it with a strand from the other part. Repeat the

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

Quartering a Following Sea

n Safe Boating Procedures

Quartering may be the only solution to crossing a following sea. Your speed, however, must be faster than the waves running at your stern. You’ll have to make corrections with each wave you meet. As you cross the crest, wave action tries to turn a quartering boat broadside by pushing its stern into the trough between it and the next wave crest. You must power your boat into the direction of the trough to properly point your bow toward the next crest. (Note the direction of the outboard and prop in illustration.) Never allow wave action to push your boat parallel to the trough.

First, it is important to know your boat. Get familiar with its equipment and discover its limitations. If it’s a livery rental, check it over completely before you push off. Make a habit of checking off safety equipment aboard. First, locate the safety items required by law. Then, compare your optional equipment with the Coast Guard’s list of recommended equipment. Count the life preservers, and make sure that each passenger has one that will keep him afloat in the water. Carry a proper chart, GPS, compass, VHF, and a fully charged cell phone. Put tackle, guns, decoys, nets, and other gear where they are secure and won’t clutter walkways and footing. Check the fuel supply, and the condition of the tank and feed line. Make sure the spark is strong and regular. Take along at least 1½ times as much fuel as you estimate you will need. If you run into heavy waves, your boat will take more fuel to go the same distance. Gasoline vapors are explosive and will settle in the low areas of a boat. During fueling, keep doors, hatches, ports, and chests closed, stoves and pilot lights off, electrical circuits off, and absolutely no smoking! Keep the fill nozzle in firm contact with the fill neck to prevent static spark. Don’t spill, for you’ll have to dry it up before starting the engine. Do not use gasoline appliances aboard—they’re lethal risks. Use alcohol and other less volatile fuels. After fueling, ventilate thoroughly before pressing the starter. One minute is the minimum safe ventilation time. Big boats should be ventilated longer, with effective blowers operating and all ports opened. Keep your fuel lines in perfect condition and the boat’s bilges clean. Electrical equipment, switches, and wiring are some prime sources of boat fires and explosions. Keep batteries clean and ventilated. Do not overload your boat. Make sure you have safely adequate freeboard before casting off. Look ahead to water conditions and weather changes you may encounter. Keep an alert lookout. If you have a boat longer than 20 feet, name your mate and agree that he’ll keep lookout any time you can’t. You have more to watch out for than other boats and shallow water. Watch for obstructions such as rocks and floating logs. Swimmers are hard to see in the water. Running through swimmers or a swimming area is the most sensitive violation a boat can make. If in doubt, give beaches and rafts a wide swing.

Direction of Current

Mouth of River or Inlet Wherever a current enters a body of water—this is true for river mouths as well as ocean inlets—you can expect to find relatively calm water at the edge of the intruding flow. Usually this calm transition zone is marked by surface wave action. When running any inlet, always ride the back of the wave in front of you. Never power over its crest, or drift far enough back to be picked up by the crest of the following wave.

Choppy Water

lm Ca r ate W Current

SECTION TWO

15

Buoys

B

uoys are traffic signals that guide boaters safely along waterways. They can also identify dangerous areas, as well as give directions and information. The colors and numbers on buoys mean the same thing regardless of what kind of buoy on which they appear. Red colors, red lights, and even numbers • These indicate the right side of the channel as a boater enters from the open sea or heads upstream. Numbers usually increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Green colors, green lights, and odd numbers • These indicate the left side of the channel as a boater enters from the open sea and heads upstream. Numbers will usually increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Red and green horizontal stripes • These are placed at the junction of two channels to indicate the preferred (primary) channel when a channel splits. If green is on top,

the preferred channel is to the right. If red is on top, the preferred channel is to the left. The light color matches the top stripe. These are also sometimes referred to as junction buoys. Nun buoys • These cone-shaped buoys are always marked with red markings and even numbers. They mark the right side of the channel as a boater enters from the open sea or heads upstream. Can buoys • These cylindrical-shaped buoys are always marked with green markings and odd numbers. They mark the left side of the channel as a boater enters from the open sea or heads upstream.

2

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3

4

1 • Red Colors and Lights 2 • Green Colors and Lights 3 • Red/Green Horizontally Striped Buoy 4 • Green/Red Horizontally Striped Buoy 5 • Nun Buoy (Red with Even Numbers) 6 • Can Buoy (Green with Odd Numbers)

5

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

SECTION TWO

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Backing a Trailer When launching or recovering, never turn off the car’s engine, and keep the parking brake set while you work the boat off the trailer.

releasing the tie-downs, and disconnecting or removing the trailer’s stop and directional lights. When launching or recovering, never turn the car’s engine off, and keep the parking brake set while you work the boat off the trailer. Only the driver should be in the towing vehicle during launching and recovering. One or two observers can help the driver watch the trailer and traffic. Keep everyone else away from the launching ramp. It is also prudent to use a tire stop to avoid an unexpected dunking of trailer and car. Many trailer-boat owners’ worst moments have occurred at busy launching ramps because they have not practiced backing their rig. Before you attempt a launching, you should put in a couple of hours in a deserted parking lot learning how to back your rig through a maze of cardboard boxes. A helpful hint when backing is to place your hand on the bottom of the steering wheel and move the wheel in the direction you want the trailer to go. Do not oversteer. If you have an unwieldy trailer, you may want to get an auxiliary front bumper hitch, which will make close-quarters maneuvering much simpler, as well as keep the drive wheels of the towing vehicle on higher, drier ground. Make sure you never, ever cast off all the lines from the boat before launching. Someone on shore must have a line that is made fast to the boat. The line makes it easy to shove the boat off the trailer and then pull the boat to a dock or boarding platform or back to the trailer at a wide, busy launching ramp. Above all, take the time necessary to launch safely, but as soon as the boat is afloat, move the vehicle and the trailer to the parking lot and the boat to the dock for loading. Don’t loiter. Always try to avoid getting the trailer hubs in the water. If you cannot avoid dunking them, at least let

them cool first. If you don’t, the sudden cooling may crack or chip the bearings or suck them full of water. One way to pass the time, if you are a sailor, is to step the mast in the parking lot while waiting to launch. However, make sure that there are no low power lines or other overhead obstructions between you and the launching ramp. Unfortunately, a few boaters are electrocuted every year because their rigging comes in contact with overhead electrical wires.

Step 1 • Keep the tow vehicle and trailer straight and close to the ramp when getting into position. Remember that you will be steering in reverse.

Step 2 • When your trailer is in position to be backed onto the ramp, turn the steering wheel sharply in the direction opposite the intended path of the trailer.

Step 3 • As the trailer begins to move down the ramp, start to turn your steering wheel to the left (as shown), which will push your trailer to the right. If possible, have a second person outside to assist you with hand signals.

Step 4 • As soon as your trailer is lined up correctly on the ramp, straighten your wheels and follow the trailer as you back it down the ramp for your launch. While waiting your turn on the ramp, watch other launchings to gauge the effects of wind and current.

BACKING A TRAILER: Backing a boat trailer down a

tight, slick launch ramp can be tricky, and a busy ramp is not the place to learn. Practice in an empty parking lot on a Sunday morning. You’ll be able to go at your own pace without an impatient audience. When backing the trailer, keep in mind that you’re pushing it, not pulling it. No big deal when you back straight up—you just have to keep the wheels of the tow vehicle perfectly straight. But when it’s time to turn, everything is reversed: turning the steering wheel to the right will turn the rear end of the tow vehicle to the right, causing the trailer to turn left, and vice versa.

Steering Tip

P

lacing your hand on the bottom of the steering wheel simpli­ fies the process of backing up. Pull the wheel to the right, the trailer heads right, and vice versa.

RETRIEVAL: Retrieving your boat is similar to launching and should be done with the same courtesy by reversing the procedures. Unload your boat at the dock and keep it there until the trailer is ready to move down the ramp. Move the boat to the trailer and raise the lower unit. Winch the boat on to the trailer and secure it. Finally, move the towing vehicle and trailer with the boat to the

parking area for loading, housekeeping, and other general maintenance chores.

STORAGE: To prevent water from accumulating in the boat, remove the drain plug and tilt the trailer and the boat enough to allow drainage. This should be done for even short-term storage.

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

Stern • Rear of a Vessel

Steering Nozzle

Typical Jet Drive

SECTION TWO

Impeller Water Flow

Water Flow

Water Flow Steerable Nozzle

Water is drawn into the housing, and then the impeller pressurizes the water and forces it in a stream toward the back of the boat, pushing the watercraft in the opposite direction.

When the steering control is turned right, the jet stream also turns to the right, pushing the back of the boat to the left, causing the craft to turn right.

cut, regardless of the steering input from the operator. Reverse is available on some types of personal watercraft. This is accomplished by a clamshell-type device that moves over the directional nozzle and reverses the water flow, allowing the personal watercraft to “back up.” This mechanism is not a brake and should not be regarded as such. If you take a spill, most personal watercraft have one of the following options: n

n

precautions you should take with the jet pump on your personal watercraft: Jet Pump Intake Grate

Impeller Drive Shaft

n

n

the water leaving the jet pump pushes the personal watercraft through the water. The pump works by drawing water into the housing ahead of the impeller. The impeller (a type of precision propeller contained within the housing) pressurizes the water and forces it in a stream toward the back of the personal watercraft. The force of the exiting water pushes the boat in the opposite direction. Although you will not have to worry about hurting yourself from an exposed propeller, there are some

n

n

 Keep your hands and feet, as well as hair and clothing, away from the pump intake.  When checking the pump intake for possible obstructions, make sure the engine is off.  Don’t operate your boat in shallow water (less than 24 inches deep).  Anything stirred up from the bottom, such as sand or vegetation, can be sucked into the jet pump and damage your personal watercraft, as well as possibly injuring someone if particles are expelled out of the pump.

handlebars. The steering control directs the stream of water to the left or right. When the steering control is turned to the right, the steerable nozzle also turns to the right. As throttle is applied, the force of the water stream, pointed right, then pushes the back of the boat to the left, which causes the craft to turn to the right. For safety purposes, the most important thing to remember about steering is that you must have power to the pump in order to maintain steering control. If you allow the engine to return to idle or shut off during a turn, the craft will continue in the same direction as it was moving at the point the power was

19

 The engine will run at idle speed while the boat circles slowly so that the operator can board as it circles past. It is important that the idling speed be properly set.  An engine-stop lanyard is attached to the operator’s wrist or personal flotation device and shuts off the engine when the operator falls off. For this reason, it is essential that the lanyard is always properly attached to the watercraft and the operator.

Swim to your personal watercraft, reboard carefully, reattach the lanyard (if applicable), restart your engine, and continue your ride. If the watercraft has turned upside down, follow the instructions in your owner’s manual and turn the watercraft upright. If your personal watercraft has stalled or will not restart, do not attempt to swim to shore. Stay with your vessel and continue to wear your personal flotation device.

Most personal watercraft have a steerable nozzle at the rear of the pump housing that is controlled by the Safety Lanyard • Short cord for attaching the ignition safety switch to the operator’s wrist or PFD (life jacket)

Steering Control • Means of controlling the steering nozzle Throttle Lever

Starboard • Right side of a vessel Personal watercraft, also called jet skis, are small powerboats designed to be operated by people sitting, standing, or kneeling. Under the law, they have the same requirements for regulation and come under the same laws as other powerboats.

Port • Left side of a vessel Fuel Cap

The Yamaha WaveRunner VX Deluxe will seat one to three persons. This WaveRunner weighs 681 pounds, has a fuel capacity of 18½ gallons, and is powered by a four-cylinder, four-stroke Yamaha engine. It is a good choice for a multiuse personal watercraft.

All personal watercraft (PWCs) are inboard-powered boats and fall under the same Coast Guard rules and regulations as other powerboats. In addition to recreational use, PWCs have proven effective in rescue operations.

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

SECTION TWO

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Canoes and Kayaks

▲ The Freedom Hawk Pathfinder Kayak has multi-position 50-inch outriggers for fishermen who prefer to stand in their kayaks. The outriggers also provide greater stability in rough waters. This 14-footer weighs 79 pounds. It is a good choice for fly fishermen.

▲ The Point 65 is a modular threepiece sit-in kayak design. The sections snap apart for easy storage or transportation. The sections snap together to form a 13½-foot kayak. Two-piece and four-piece models are also available. It is a good choice where storage space is a problem.

▲ The Ocean Kayak Tetra model is good for beginners. It’s 10 feet, 8 inches long, and weighs 51 pounds. The polyethylene hull will hold a maximum load of 275 pounds.

▲ L.L. Bean’s Manatee Deluxe, a 10-foot sit-in kayak, weighs only 40 pounds and has a capacity of 275 pounds. The cockpit is oversized and roomy enough for paddlers to comfortably move around. It is ideal for ponds, lakes, and calm waters.

The Old Town 169 is a durable family canoe from L.L. Bean. With a length of 16 feet, 9 inches, it’s roomy enough for an overnight canoe trip. It will hold 1,400 pounds. Construction is three layers of polyethylene, and the weight is 85 pounds.

long distances. White-water models that have no keel (or a very shallow keel) are designed for fast maneuverability and not suitable for cruising. A good cruising canoe should have a beam of at least 36 inches and a center depth of 12 to 14 inches. The beam should be carried well into the bow and stern, so it can carry the maximum amount of gear and food. Wood canoe paddles may look pretty, but you’re better off with tough resilient fiberglass paddles. If you insist on wood, always carry a spare. For both the bow and stern paddler, pick a paddle that reaches between your chin and eyes. The kayak is a direct descendant of the seagoing kayaks of the Eskimos of the Far North. The basic kayak

is a slender, closed-decked craft with a body-fitting cockpit and a waterproof skirt that seals the hatch around the paddler, who feels that he is “wearing the boat.” A two-bladed paddle propels the boat and a small rudder at the stern assists in steering, making the kayak track straight, or holding the craft in position. The kayak is light, fast, and easy to handle in nearly all types of water. Various models are designed for touring, fishing, white-water, and sea kayaking. White-water kayaks are nearly always single-cockpit crafts designed for high maneuverability and minimal effort in paddling upriver or downriver. White-water models are usually 13 to 15 feet long with beams of 23 inches or so. Skilled paddlers

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

SECTION TWO

Unswamping a Canoe

Ins and Outs of Canoes

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S  tep 1 • The man overboard holds on to your canoe and steadies it as you roll the swamped canoe and simultaneously lift one end onto your gunwale. ▼ Step 2 • Work the canoe so it’s entirely out of the water, resting upside down across the gunwales of your canoe. Allow the water to drain out.

From the Dock: When alone, hold the dock with one hand and step into the canoe. Make certain you step on the keel line so the canoe won’t shift and slide away. With a friend, the stern paddler gets in first and steadies the canoe as the bow paddler climbs aboard.

▼ Step 3 • Making certain the canoe is balanced across your gunwales, roll it over slowly. The swamping victim should still be in the water, steadying your canoe.

Changing Positions: This sequence shows how to change positions safely. The bowman slides off the seat and sits on the bottom of the hull. The stern man, in a half crouch, holds both sides of the canoe as he moves forward, over the bowman, and settles into the bow position. The bowman then moves to the stern position in the same manner. Done smoothly, these moves will not rock the canoe.

sit-in models may be drier and warmer in some waters and allow you to keep more gear covered and dry, but the sit-on kayaks are easier to get on and off, an important factor for fishermen who also like to wade. There are additional advantages to sit-on models. Some newcomers to kayaking harbor a fear of capsizing and getting trapped upside down underwater. If you capsize with a sit-on kayak, you simply roll the kayak over and climb back on. Sit-on kayaks are also more comfortable if you are big with long legs. Most sit-on models have watertight hatches, which make them a good choice for

divers and photographers. Sit-on kayaks also tend to be more stable than the traditional sit-in models. Good fishing kayaks should measure 12 to 14 feet with a beam of about 30 inches and weigh 60 to 80 pounds. Stability in a fishing kayak is a key factor. Those long, slender kayaks may be faster, but short, beamier models will be more stable and a better choice for fishing. For extra stability, some models offer removable outriggers.

INS AND OUTS OF CANOES: The cardinal rule for fisher-

From the Shore: Getting into a canoe from shore is a shaky deal unless someone steadies it. Launch the canoe stern first, and then the stern paddler gets into position while the bow paddler steadies the craft. The stern paddler steadies the canoe with the paddle braced on the bottom and against the gunwale. The bow paddler then steps aboard. Both push off.

S  tep 4 • Slide the empty canoe back into the water. Now it’s ready to go. Steady the craft against your canoe, allowing the person in the water to pull himself aboard.

men who use canoes is don’t stand! Learn to cast, fight fish, and haul an anchor from a sitting position. Standing is one of the most common causes of people falling out of, or capsizing, canoes. Rule No. 2 is never swim away from your canoe if you get dumped. Most canoes have enough flotation to keep afloat until help arrives. Never be afraid of your canoe. I did some testing several years ago and I was amazed at how difficult it was to intentionally capsize or tip a canoe over from a sitting position. Getting in and out of a canoe, however, can be tricky unless you follow some basic procedures (see accompanying illustrations). UNSWAMPING A CANOE: As mentioned, the most important rule in canoeing is don’t stand! Standing is the most common cause of people falling out of canoes, but the rule is often violated by sportsmen who are casting, fighting fish, or hauling an anchor. Equally important, if your canoe swamps, is to never leave it to try to swim toward shore. Most modern canoes will keep you afloat, even when full of water. In fact, you can sometimes paddle a swamped canoe to shore with only your hands.

If another canoe swamps, you can use your canoe as a rescue craft to get the swamped canoe back into service without having to beach it (see accompanying illustrations).

n Paddleboarding Fishermen who are interested in kayaks and canoes are also likely to be interested in paddleboarding, and this is especially true for shallow-water anglers. Paddleboarding is a water sport dating back to 1926, when some boards were made of redwood. The big comeback of paddleboarding started around 1996 and this water sport is still growing. Paddleboarders can lie down or kneel on a paddleboard, but standing has become the new norm. Most manufacturers recommend paddleboards that are 10 to 12 feet long with a fixed rudder and a weight capacity of about 250 pounds. The boards, which look like surfboards, are usually constructed of a polyethylene outer shell over a watertight polyurethane inner core. Paddles should be 8 to 10 inches taller than the paddler. Some paddles have an angle built in for better efficiency.

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

SECTION FIVE

Saltwater Trolling Rigs

Saltwater Bait Rigs Rigging a Whole Unweighted Eel

Rigging an Eelskin with a Metal Squid

Hooks are attached to light chain or heavy monofilament, or they can be attached to linen line.

To a Montauk- or Belmar-type metal squid, a ring is attached, onto which the eelskin is tied.

25

Rigging a Herring for Trolling

Rigging a Mullet for Trolling

Rigging an Eelskin with a Plug

Two Ways to Hook a Live Eel

The eelskin is slipped over the plug, whose tail treble hook has been removed. Bottom treble hooks protrude as shown, and the skin is tied on at the plug’s head.

The fish is split down the back, and the backbone and entrails are removed and discarded. The hook is run through the body and out the vent. The eye of the hook and the fish’s mouth are sewn together, and the back is sewn up.

The fish is first deboned by running a hollow metal tube, its tip sharpened and cut at an angle, through the mouth and over the backbone. Deboning makes herring more flexible and lifelike. Hook as shown.

Two Ways to Rig Balao for Big-Game Trolling Bait-and-Plug Rig for Trolling

Hooking a Squid Head

Squid and Leadhead Jig

Rigging a Whole Eel with Tin Squid for Trolling and Casting

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3

Hooking Whole Squid for Bottom Fishing

Three-Hook Squid Rig

Step 4 Step 5

To rig an eel this way, you’ll need a long needle with an eye. Form a loop in some relatively heavy line (about 36-pound test) and run the loop through the needle’s eye. Run the needle through the eel from mouth to vent (Step 1). Pull the loop all the way through the eel, and attach to it a 6/0 to 8/0 hook (Step 2). Draw the protruding line and hook shank into the eel (Step 3). Take a small block-tin squid, run its hook through the eel’s head (or lips) from bottom to top, and tie the line to the eye on the flat surface of the squid (Step 4). With light line, tie the eel’s mouth shut, make a tie around its head where the hook protrudes to prevent the hook from ripping out, and make a similar tie around the vent (Step 5).

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C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO B O AT I N G A N D S E A M A N S H I P

Section Seven

SECTION SEVEN

FISHING METHODS: Trolling and chumming

SALTWATER GAME FISH

BAITS: Whole or cut fish and scrap meat (and occasionally artificial lures)

n White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) COMMON NAMES: White shark, great white shark, and

n Blue Shark (Prionace glauca) DESCRIPTION: This large shark species, which has a

reputation as a man-eater, is distinguished by its abnormally long pectoral fins and by its bright-cobalt color (the belly is white). It has the long snout of many members of the large shark family, and the dorsal fin is set well back on the back, nearly at the midpoint.

RANGE: Blue sharks are found throughout the tropical and temperate waters of the world. HABITAT: Though often seen in shallow waters on the Pacific coast of the United States and on the surface in other northern areas, the blue shark is usually caught in deep water. It often roams in packs, while at other times it is found singly or in pairs. SIZE: Blue sharks average less than 10 feet in length, but they have been reported to attain lengths of more than 20 feet. The largest rod-caught blue shark weighed 410 pounds. FOOD: Blue sharks eat mainly mackerel, herring, squid,

Blue Shark

It differs from the white mainly in the dorsal and pectoral fins, the tips of which are rounded in the mako, rather than pointed in the white. In color, the mako is dark blue to bluish gray above, shading to silver on the belly. The mako differs from the porbeagle shark in that its second dorsal fin is positioned a bit forward of the anal fin, while the porbeagle’s second dorsal is directly above the anal fin.

n Porbeagle Shark (Lamna nasus)

DESCRIPTION: The white shark—enormous, vicious,

COMMON NAMES: Porbeagle shark and mackerel shark

and incredibly powerful—is one of the largest of all fish. Its usual colors are grayish brown, slate blue, or gray, while the belly is off-white. Large specimens are sometimes a general off-white color. The white shark is built blockier than the look-alike mako, having a much deeper body. The white has a pointed snout, triangular serrated teeth, and a crescent-shaped caudal fin.

RANGE: The white shark is found throughout the world in tropical and temperate waters, though it seems to prefer warm to temperate regions over tropics. It is not numerous anywhere. HABITAT: White sharks generally stay well offshore and seem to prefer relatively cool waters.

oceans and the warmer areas of the Atlantic Ocean. In U.S. waters, it is found as far north as Cape Cod. It seems to be most numerous around New Zealand.

HABITAT: Makos tend to stay near the surface in open-

FOOD: White sharks eat such things as other sharks that

ocean areas.

SIZE: Makos reach lengths of more than 12 feet and weights of more than 1,000 pounds.

FISHING METHODS: Chumming and trolling from boats

FOOD: Staples of the mako’s diet include tuna, mackerel, and herring. For some reason, it often attacks, but seldom kills, swordfish.

are 4 to 7 feet long, sea lions, seals, sturgeon, tuna, sea turtles, squid, and refuse.

FISHING METHODS: Chumming and trolling BAITS: Whole fish or cut baits (and occasionally artificial lures)

RANGE: The porbeagle is found on both sides of the Atlantic as far south as the Mediterranean and Africa. On the Atlantic coast of the United States, it has been taken from South Carolina to the St. Lawrence Gulf. It is also found along most of the Pacific coast. HABITAT: The porbeagle is a fish of temperate waters. In

warm waters, it is found closer to shore and nearer to the surface, but when the water cools it may head for depths as great as 80 fathoms.

SIZE: The porbeagle apparently reaches a maximum length of about 12 feet, though the largest definitely recorded stretched 10 feet. The largest rod-caught porbeagle weighed 465 pounds. FOOD: Porbeagles thrive on school-type fish such as mackerel and herring and on bottom-dwelling fish such as cod, hake, and flounders.

BAITS: Whole or cut baits

n Thresher Shark (Alopias vulpinus)

COMMON NAMES: Mako shark and mackerel shark hard-fighting shark is closely related to the white shark.

DESCRIPTION: The porbeagle is a blocky-bodied shark that closely resembles the mako, though it is much less game. The best way to distinguish the porbeagle from both the mako and the white shark is the location of the second dorsal fin—the porbeagle is the only one whose second dorsal is directly above the anal fin. In color, the porbeagle shades from black to bluish gray on the back to white on the belly. Its anal fin is white or dusky.

FISHING METHODS: Trolling and chumming

n Mako Shark (Isurus oxyrinchus)

DESCRIPTION: This huge, dangerous, fast-swimming,

White Shark

man-eater

SIZE: The white shark is a true behemoth; one specimen 36½ feet long has been captured. The weight of that fish must have been astronomical, considering that a white shark just 13 feet long weighed 2,100 pounds! Whites that are 20 feet long are not at all uncommon.

RANGE: The mako is an inhabitant of the tropical

other sharks, flying fish, anchovies, and even such tidbits as seagulls and garbage deep-sixed from ships.

BAITS: Whole or cut fish (and occasionally artificial lures)

27

Mako Shark

Porbeagle Shark

DESCRIPTION: The thresher shark is nearly as large as the mako and is an excellent fighter, making breath

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SPECIMENS OF CHROMATIC WOOD TYPE AND BORDERS By Wm. H. Page & Co.

Edited by Esther K. Smith Foreword by Steven Heller Preface by Wayne White Rizzoli International Publications, Inc. 300 Park Avenue South New York, NY 10010 www.rizzoliusa.com ISBN: 978-0-8478-5868-2 US: $45 CAN: $60 HC, 10 x 13 inches 120 pages 100 full color illustrations Rights: World For serial rights, images to accompany your coverage, or any other publicity information about this title please contact: Pam Sommers, Executive Director of Publicity T. (212) 387-3465, psommers@rizzoliusa.com


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.

© 2016 Rizzoli International Publications. All Rights Reserved.


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