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BATTERY PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION It’s been a long time coming but the new ruling by the PHMSA will finally solve some of the regulations that have plagued issues over battery packaging and transportation.

The tangled joys of compliance

Rulings, revisions, exceptions and memos have mounted to the point that the simple task of sending a battery from point A to point B became tantamount to mounting a moon launch. 68 • Batteries International • Fall 2014

Issues related to the safe packaging and shipment of lithium-ion and other advanced chemistry batteries have frustrated national and international industry, governmental and regulatory bodies ever since their inception and subsequent widespread adoption. Over the last two decades, agencies, industries, and special interest groups have met regularly to debate and negotiate regulations that would successfully address concerns for the safe packaging and transport of these batteries — only to encounter new concerns to be balanced, advancements to be accommodated, discrepancies to be addressed. Rulings, revisions, exceptions and memos have mounted to the point that the simple task of sending a battery from point A to point B became tantamount to mounting a moon launch. As this magazine noted in our spring 2012 issue — Playing according to the rules — US regulatory agencies have been working to harmonize discrepancies in language, definitions and requirements between national and international bodies that too often resulted in confusing and unintentional noncompliance. This August, the US Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) handed down the longawaited ruling HM-224F, which finally resolved long standing issues related to the classification and packaging for shipment of lithium batteries and packs, many of which require specialized packaging services. And that, say industry players, dangerous goods and hazardous materials consultants and trainers, should make life a lot easier for anyone — manufacturers, re-shippers, distributors and retailers — wanting to transport lithium batteries across North America and internationally. So what changes do the new rules entail, and how do they affect the industry? And more to the point, why does DOT complaint packaging of these batteries specifically, matter more than ever? While all batteries must be evaluated and classified according to CFR49 specifications, lithium ion batteries are subject to more regulations per applicable modal packaging specifications and state-of-health considerations.

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Batteries International — issue 93  

UPS embracing the latest technology — The global implications for energy storage of the latest UK TSO report — The changing rules on transpo...

Batteries International — issue 93  

UPS embracing the latest technology — The global implications for energy storage of the latest UK TSO report — The changing rules on transpo...