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#urbaninteventions studio 31 crowd-funding architecture


In-ter-ven-tion |ˌintərˈvenCHən| noun [ the act of intervening ] [ interference of one state in the affairs upon another ] [ interference so as to modify a process or situation ] Urban Intervention

a participatory act performed to stimulate community involvement in order to create social awareness regarding an urban issue.


Contents Introduction Case Studies

#+pod #foodiesbytheyarra #hiddencrafts #homelessnighthub #illuminateyourinfrastructure #landscapesofprejudice #laneart #messageboard #nmgreenspace #playlaneway #secretgardenmelbourne

#strangerselfie

#theurbanlighthouseproject

#wayfindingyoursenses

Conclusion


Studio 31_Intervention Map


Introduction Who owns the city? The modern day city is no longer curated by its citizens, but instead by institutions, developers and capital. To challenge this notion, Studio 31 posed a series of urban interventions aiming to re-claim and re-write the city at the human scale. These interventions aimed to explore the physical and social condition of the contemporary metropolitan realm through spontaneous and temporary appropriations of public space.

The interventions bring together art, architecture, performance, installation, activism and urbanism to question if the city we have, is in-fact the city we need?


#+pod jilly raleigh


Title: +pod Audience: Residents and Carlton Community Location: Housing Commission Towers - Carlton Time/Date: Saturday, march 29, 10:30am-1pm Duration: 2.5 hours

Intervention Summary This intervention is a prelude to an ambitious architectural project aiming to crowd-fund an affordable housing revolution, focusing on the infamous Housing Commission tower complex in Carlton.

3 _ Introduction

Jillian Raleigh


Project The +POD project seeks to reinvent the current affordable housing system in Australia: one of segregation and subjugation, funded by involuntary donation (read: taxation).

The project proposes a model of crowdfunded equity and benefaction to achieve the reinvigoration of existing housing infrastructure, creating an integrated, empowered community. Intervention The intervention is a critical preliminary to the community engagement phase of the project (refer PROJECT STRUCTURE in IMPLICATIONS), and seeks to form a primary research base for the project, gathering raw data that will inform the design response.

The intervention is a survey of two substantially segregated communities: one within the affordable housing system, and the other on the periphery. Less an ‘intervention’ than an exercise in observation and listening, the survey is comprised of prompting phrases requiring short answers, designed to gauge: a. the aspirations and frustrations of commission residents; b. the perceptions of affordable housing and its local manifestation amongst the noncommission community.

4 _ Introduction

Jillian Raleigh


Pragmatics PART A WHAT WHO WHERE WHEN HOW

resident survey housing commission residents grassed area between the Carlton Primary School and the Uniting Church, corner of Palmerston and Drummond, Carlton Saturday, march 29, 10:30am-1pm prompt cards requesting short responses from participants, designed to elicit specific complaints and aspirations

“MY HOME IS” “I WANT MY HOME TO BE”

PART B WHAT WHO

WHERE WHEN HOW

community survey non-commission residents, business owners, general public public transport nodes and shopping precinct, Lygon Street between Elgin and Faraday, Carlton monday, march 31, 10:30am-11:30am prompt cards requesting short responses from participants, designed to ascertain public perception of or engagement with affordable housing, in particular the Carlton housing commission complex

“AFFORDABLE HOUSING IS” “PUBLIC HOUSING IS” “COMMISSION TOWERS ARE”

5 _ What/Who/Were/When/How

Jillian Raleigh


http://candychang.com/i-wish-this-was/

6 _Precedent

Jillian Raleigh


Precedent The intervention draws on a simple, but brilliantly engaging work by American artist, Candy Chang. “I Wish This Was” is one of Chang’s many fill-in-theblank works, in which the community is asked to respond with an aspiration for a particular space in the city. This intervention attempts to emulate the engaging and aspirational quality of “I Wish This Was,” albeit in a much more intimate context: in order to engage a community less likely to participate in a model reliant on autonomy and initiative, survey responses are delivered to a witness, rather than anonymously. http://candychang.com/i-wish-this-was/

7 _Precedent

Jillian Raleigh


INTERVENTION LOCATION MAP

0

PART A commission resident survey PART B non-commission resident survey existing pedestrian corridors

Location Map

8 _Site

Jillian Raleigh

50

100m


Site The intervention is located at various nodes on the periphery of the project site, deliberately within view of the Commission towers to emphasise the immediacy of the affordable housing issue.

The intervention is located primarily to maximise contact with target participants: the commission residents in the case of Part A, and noncommission residents and local business owners in Part B. The specific locations are also deliberately areas of neutral, public territory - for instance, not in the centre of the commission complex, or on the door steps of Carlton - to avoid any disrespect of or invasion of privacy. Both location and methodology have been selected with a view to maintaining respect for participants. Part A is located on a principle axis of pedestrian traffic from the Commission complex to the local Lygon Street shopping precinct.

Part B is located at public transport nodes surrounding the project site and within the Lygon Street shopping precinct.

9 _Site

Jillian Raleigh


PART A park near the housing commission

10

opposite approach


PART B lygon street shopping precinct

11 11_Site

Jillian Raleigh


no images of PART B methodology due to particpant requests not to be photographed.

participant expanding on survey prompt.


Materials PART A eggs butter brown sugar vanilla plain flour carrots pecans cinnamon cream cheese icing sugar technique lemon juice dark chocolate cocoa PART B survey cards pens

name tag survey cards pens table

table cloth napkins

FREE CAKE sign friend to crit you on

courage

Methodology PART A 1. bake a carrot cake/brownies/other delicious treat 2. place table in public territory, preferably adjacent to a busy pedestrian thoroughfare. 3. arrange survey cards and cake on table. 4. put on a non-threatening, non-proselytising smile 5. commence interception of survey participants! PART B 1. approach the service counter of a local business 2. deliver spiel (similar to PART A: refer REVIEW OF TECHNIQUE)

13 _Materials & Methodology

Jillian Raleigh


SAMPLE OF SURVEY RESPONSES: PART A

SAMPLE OF SURVEY RESPONSES: PART B 14


Review of Technique

Avoid exacerbating cultural dissimilarities and deterring an already reluctant audience: wear inoffensive clothing and little or no makeup.

Accept non-standard survey responses: allowing participants to intuitively respond may be more informative than the original format.

LISTEN to participants rather than lecture: you are not in the business of educating the community, particularly at this stage of the engagement process.

Be considerate in your choice of words: language is critical to establishing an equal relationship between you and the participant, which is in turn essential to unencumbered dialogue.

Structure your pitch to rapidly allay fears of any malign or evanglising intent. after 5 or 6 attempts at prioritising different bits of information, the following structure proved the most effective: 1. disarm suspicion by identifying yourself and your purpose: “hello, i’m a student at the university of Melbourne and i’m doing a project on community housing” 2. signal involvement is simple and very brief: “would you mind answering two quick questions? the first asks what you think of your housing now and the second asks what you’d like your housing to be” 3. introduce the cake as bait if necessary, particularly if the potential participant looks fit to escape! Consider the appropriateness of intervention methodologies. several common techniques rejected on technological and social grounds: 1. provocative signage addressing segregation initially considered, but abandoned due to failure to demonstrate respect for a group already marginalised) 2. #towernow failed utterly, due to a (partly anticipated) lack of engagement with social media.

Bake a diabetic-friendly treat (an unfortunate oversight in the case of several of my elderly participants)! 15 _Technique

Jillian Raleigh


lonely not safe (particularly for children)

good

poorly maintained/ not clean

too small

MY HOME IS

satisfactory

more parking better appliances (kitchen/heating)

no change

better maintenance

more space (a backyard)

stronger community

safer community stability housing

I WANT MY HOME TO BE


Raw Data PART A Responses are categorised according to theme to provide clarity.

Though the sample size (26 participants) is too small for any proper statistical analysis, the survey responses yield critical information relating to existing conditions and priorities of commission residents.

PART B Due to a very small sample size (11 participants), hence the qualitative, not quantitative treatment of results. Responses from non-commission residents and business owners reveal important trends in perception:

1. affordable housing is a social imperative, but is currently unattainable: 30% of household income is seen as too high. 2. the commission housing community is to blame for the lack of integration into wider community. 3. lack of employment is the main cause for housing stress. 4. commission towers are aesthetically offensive, but necessary for public housing to remain economically feasible: aesthetic or practical amenity is a secondary concern.

The participants displayed a general awareness of the affordable housing issue, but no knowledge of the specific circumstances or challenges confronted by the housing commission community.

17 _Raw Data

Jillian Raleigh


english not as a primary language

english as a primary language

LANGUAGE

female male

GENDER

<20 years

>50 years

20-50 years

AGE


Analysis Primary language and age, rather than ethnicity, is of interest, having implications in the methods used for community engagement: older residents will likely respond better to an analogue information campaign, and communications (nonverbal and verbal) will have to be made in several languages. Gender of participants is also of interest, albeit secondary; gauging the receptiveness of women to engagement is critical, as women are often the drivers of change in the domestic environment non-spatial

private space

public space

SPATIALISATION OF RESPONSES

Despite often relating to abstract notions of community and security, the majority of negative responses are, at least in part, the consquence of spatial conditions, a crucial observation that validates a spatial solution.

Thus the survey confirms the axiom that good architecture and urban design are critical to good housing.

19 _Analysis

Jillian Raleigh


Observations The intervention provided a precious glimpse into the current affordable housing model as manifest in the Carlton housing commission. Participants both consciously and unconsciously revealed crucial empirical data omitted from official statistics and reports. TRUST Participants seemed initially suspicious of the survey, and sometimes reluctant to comment on record, perhaps suspecting some sort of link with a public authority or an official organisation. Introducing myself as a student seemed to dispell this anxiety.

The “MY NAME IS” card, intended as a trigger for a sense of ownership, was therefore not promoted as strenuously as the other prompts, though not abandoned completely: approximately 20% of participants completed a “NAME” card. The instinctive suspicion is perhaps due to my obvious position as interloper, but may also be symptomatic of the punitive nature of the current affordable housing system: a certain wariness of the potentially detrimental consequences of complaint. ASPIRATION Some misunderstanding arose over the request for a personal opinion or aspiration, with many participants retreating to a pragmatic response.

Even so, the humble and practical pattern of the responses may indicate that the desire for stability and basic amenity eclipses any wild consumer ambition.

The enduring and sometimes resigned tone of responses confirm the statistics, that housing commission residency is more often a permanent condition, rather than the temporary situation envisaged by the original conceivers of the scheme.

20 _Observation

Jillian Raleigh


S

LITERACY Many particpants found the prompt phrases confusing, causing me to reflect on how my language and presentation style was more suited to a more social-media-savvy (read: hipster) audience.

Such bias is difficult to redress without resorting to the bureaucratic language of existing housing surveys, but an effective mode of communication must be developed prior to launching the engagement process if the project is to be successful.

The occasional lack of English as a primary language, and the relatively poor literacy of some participants also posed an obstacle, signalling the need for a multi-modal, multi-lingual approach to engagement, and reinforcing critical role of communication.

CULTURE Some participants, particularly migrant women, seemed reluctant to interact with me, perhaps for reasons of cultural protocol.

However, despite my anticipation of an obstructive cultural dissimilarity, the majority of participants reacted in a very positive â&#x20AC;&#x201C; if slightly bemused â&#x20AC;&#x201C; manner to the intervention. The offer of cake, while probably culturally a little peculiar for some participants, instilled an informal, amicable atmosphere to the interaction, compared to a clip-board-brandishing approach.

21 _Observation

Jillian Raleigh


Implications The empirical observations just described have siginificant implications for the originating crowdfunding proposal, particularly in relation to the community engagement methodology and design process.

ENGAGEMENT While community engagement is obviously a critical component of the project (refer PROJECT STRUCTURE), the specific elements of engagement are arguably a primary potential source of failure. Critical themes of TRUST, LITERACY, ASPIRATION and CULTURE will become the pillars of the engagement process, emerging as objectives guiding the project team. For instance, the project team will: 1. 2. 3. 4.

strive gain the trust of the community (both commission and non-commission residents) facilitate the participation of all literacy levels encourage aspiration: hope, not consumerism integrate culturally-appropriate methods of engagement.

To achieve these objectives, the project team must implement tangible strategies (refer TANGIBLE ELEMENTS OF ENGAGEMENT). 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 22

HYBRID organisational structure (collaboration between technical and non-technical: bewteen designer, community, government and investor representatives. also refer DESIGN TEAM MEMBERS) PHYSICAL location for the design team (establishing a project base contributes to accessibility) ACCESSIBLE via a plethora of means (analogue and digital, to facilitate full participation) RESPONSIVE to contributions (especially criticisms) CONSISTENT methodology (regular and comprehensive communication, rational progression of project) COMPRESSED schedule (to avoid loss of momentum)


ENGAGEMENT

DESIGN CAMPAIGN

BUILD

PROJECT STRUCTURE hyrbrid physical

accessible

ENGAGEMENT PROCESS

consistent

compressed

responsive

TANGIBLE ELEMENTS OF ENGAGEMENT The strategic elements are drawn from a community engagement precedent in Chile: the New Masterplan in 90 days for earthquakedevastated Constituci贸n. http://brickstarter.org/conversation-rodrigoaraya-tironi-asociados/

23 _Implications

Jillian Raleigh


potential corporate investors potential donors

GENERAL PUBLIC

DESIGN TEAM COMMISSION RESIDENTS

government departments

DESIGN ADVISORY COUNCIL

potential private investors

PROJECT NETWORK

community support professionals

embedded government representative

business & marketing experts

architects NON-TECHNICAL

design advisory council representative

& TECHNICAL

principle contractor

urban designers

DESIGN TEAM MEMBERS

24


The relationship between stakeholder groups is also fundamental to the success of the project (refer PROJECT NETWORK). The nature of these connections are substantially established during the initial phase of the project: community engagement. The formation of a DESIGN ADVISORY COUNCIL is proposed to aid in the establishment of strong, productive relationships. Again based on the Constituci贸n precedent, the council will be comprised predominantly of elected community representatives, with ancillary government and investor delegates, in order to maintain the model of community empowerment. Integration of the general public - another formerly excluded stakeholder group - is envisaged as the project progresses beyond the initial engagement. The council will concentrate channel stakeholder contributions and provide a conduit for communication with stakeholder groups.

DESIGN The design process of the project must also respond to these themes, authentically and discernably adjusting according to both community influence and the principles of good design. For example, the design must reflect the observed permanent or semi-permanent condition of affordable housing, and prioritise the improvement of basic amentity so frequently quoted as lacking. In essence, the design must be embedded in the social and environmental context.

25 _Implications

Jillian Raleigh


Reflection The intervention proved to be much more than an elementary exercise in data gathering. Aside from the significant implications for +POD project implementation methodology, the interaction with participants initiated a dialogue that - while currently stifled by bureaucracy and predjudice - is an essential prologue to the affordable housing revolution proposed. From a design perspective, the intervention provided a genuine insight into the needs and aspirations of a community inaccessible to many architects, and has intensified the motivation to create positive change.

Challenging to both execute and emotionally confront, intervention in the form of interaction is thoroughly recommended to all architects: bake a cake and get out on the hustings.

26


27


#foodiesbytheyarra qing ping


Title: Foodies by the Yarra Audience: Tourist / Families / Youths / Homeless Location(s): Enterprize Park Time/Date: 6pm / 30th March 2014 Duration: 5 hours

Intervention Summary This intervention started with the idea of questioning if different demographics could be brought together through the common topic of food. This is to develop a common ground of interaction between different demographics of the city and the possible translation of this into my design.

The users perception of safety along the Yarra and activities to activate the Yarra was the secondary layer to this experimentation. To test this, the intervention was to be carried out across the span of afternoon to night to observe the change of users of the space. Data will also be obtained through active participation from the community on their opinions of this urban space along the Yarra.

3 _ Introduction

QING PING LEE LIM


Location Map

4 _ Site

QING PING LEE LIM


Site Photographs

The site is at Enterprize Park, which is located between Queens Bridge and Kings Bridge. The site is currently used mainly as a thoroughfare for residents and tourist, the park itself is frequented by families and youth groups, while the homeless live under the pylons of the rail lines.

This site was chosen due to its rich untapped history of the discovery of Melbourne and its strong connection to the Yarra. This site also provides the possibility of activating the space and form an engagement with the urban community.

5 _ Site

QING PING LEE LIM


PLAN

BBQ

Fairy Lights

Interactive Board Milk Crates

PERSPECTIVE

Plan & Section

6 _ Design

QING PING LEE LIM


ATTRACTION NODE

INHABITING SPACE

INTERACTIVE BOARD

INTERACTION BETWEEN DEMOGRAPHICS

Diagrams

The intervention sought to involve all demographics of the community and obtain their opinions of the space. It also tries to develop a lingering space which promotes interactions between social classes of the community.

There are a series of elements proposed to engage with the community. A free BBQ was to attract users of the space together through food. Interactive boards provide an outlet for people to share their opinions and participate. The milk crates and fairy lights seek to explore how people engage with a pre-defined space and promote interactions between different demographics.

7 _ Design

QING PING LEE LIM


Installation

Installation of the intervention took about 2 hours, from promoting our project through flyers, to purchasing the food products, to setting up the BBQ. Strategic placement of the various elements of the intervention was important as signage needed to engage with the crowds and the crates were placed for a view of the Yarra.

8 _ Installation

QING PING LEE LIM


Observation

People responded well to the interactive boards as the community wanted to be involved and contribute to a better built environment. There was a strong engagement from all demographics who wanted to express their opinions on the usage of the space.

The BBQ on the other hand attracted a specific set of people of the homeless and youth groups. They would engage with and claim these spaces that we set up. However due the lack of food variety and assurance of food quality, tourist and older demographics were not as open to lingering in this space. 9 _ Observation

QING PING LEE LIM


Results

10 _ Observation

QING PING LEE LIM


Conclusion The intervention was able to engage with a wide array of users of the space, most of the people were open to be involved and give their opinion on how to improve this space. This shows and encouraging fact that the urban community is looking for an outlet to engage with for the betterment of the built environment. There is a high potential to develop an urban community in this space. This River front promenade was actively used by a wide range of demographics across the daylight hours. However from the feedback, most of the people did not feel safe here due to its empty and isolated atmosphere at night. There is a need to activate this space to improve usage and passive surveillance.

From observations, people frequented the river front promenade and would linger at seating spaces looking towards the Yarra. Also from the data collected, most people considered that the Yarra is an important part of the city providing a natural element to the CBD. However, in its current state it feels isolated from the city. It has large untapped potentials which would lead to the improvement of the city of Melbourne.

From the survey, it was interesting to find that there is a strong interest in developing an urban garden for the community, as responses stated that it adds to the natural aspect of the Yarra and could bring together a community.

11 _ Conclusion

QING PING LEE LIM


#hiddencrafts lana blazanin


Title: A Handtervention Audience: All Passerbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Young and Old Location(s): Gertrude Street, Fitzroy Geelong Waterfront Degraves Place, CBD Rankins Lane, CBD Time/Date: Sunday 30th March 2014 Duration: All Day

Intervention Summary: Moulding my hand and fingers as a plaster sculptures to fix upon existing surfaces. With a clear description and instructions for social media support posted close by. Would Victorians interact with craft? Would they even notice it?

3 _ Introduction

Lana Blazanin


Location Maps

4 _ Sites

Lana Blazanin


Site Photographs

Spread across Victoria, the sites and their specific interventions chosen were carefully thought out to extract relevant knowledge and research. The Handtervention in Fitzroy was to draw upon an established and thriving art and craft community to test if they would financially support a craft orientated project. The Handterventions within the Central Business District were targetting a diverse range of large crowds to see if in amongst them were any craftspeople. The Handtervention in Geelong was placed in a highly occupied area on a sunny Sunday to test if the people of Geelong see craft in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existing city fabric.

5_ Site

Lana Blazanin


6 _ Design

Lana Blazanin


Diagrams

Could this be an opportunity to rekindle Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love affair with craft?

Through the symbol of the hand, representing the handcrafted objects associated with many crafts, the tactile sculptural object becomes a focal point. Placed upon surfaces of contrasting texture, colour, scale and context - the pure white hand/fingers become attention grabbing and spark curiosity.

7 _ Design

Lana Blazanin


Some people barely noticed . Some people photgraphed . Some people touched the hand .

8 _ Installation

Lana Blazanin


Some people stood to read and engage . Some people pulled it apart . Some people simply smiled .

9 _ Installation

Lana Blazanin


100% EXHIBITION / EVENT SPACE

OUTER CITY SUBURBS

HARDLY EVER

PRIVATE STUDIO

THAT FAR? NO THANK YOU

$5-20

MAYBE... DEPENDS WHAT CRAFT

75%

CONTRIBUTION TO ITS DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

FAIRLY OFTEN

RETAIL OUTLET

AN OBJECT CRAFTED BY THE CRAFTSPEOPLE INVOLVED

50%

CLASSES / WORKSHOPS

RURAL

VERY OFTEN

OF COURSE

$50-100

A TAX DEDUCTABLE GOOD FEELING

25%

0%

What Does Your Business Provide?

Where Are You Located?

How Often Do Customers Travel To You From Afar?

12 _ Survey Summary

Would You Consider How Much Would You If So, What Reward Travelling To Geelong Donate To Support Would You Like For For Craft? The Development Your Donation? Of A Large Craft Orientated Community Hub?

Lana Blazanin


Observations and Conclusion: Victorians are curious about craft - most passerby’s were stopping to look, ask questions and physically touch the temporary sculpture.

This allows for a confidence in designing a tactile project grabbing the attention of passerby’s revealing that craftspeople are not hidden (or overtaken by hipsters). The larger sculptures were more visible and therefore attracted more interaction. From this we could conclude that the project should develop to be fairly visible amongst it’s existing landscape to gain the initial attention and support required.

This project was fairly successful in gaining attention and formulating discussion/thought as to each individuals relationship with the crafts. I believe, it may have been more successful if the intervention was directly relateable to a real-life project. The ambiguity of the intervention made many people disregard it’s potential.

Alongside the various Handterventions, a short online survey was emailed to many craft associated businesses and people across Victoria, This industry specific survey was a simple way to generate first hand data relevant to creating a space especially for these type of businesses and people.

The responses were postiive in reinforcing the idea of relocating a large craft-orienated community hub beyond the metropolitan of Melbourne and into Geelong. Alongside positive results in regards to the success of the businesses and their range of customers, the sizeable donations they would be willing to donate is reflective of a strong and supportive industry. The ‘Do You Craft?’ survey is helpful in refining the audience and crowdfunding tactics. Whilst, the Handtervention was predominately a marketing test that enables for a definite understanding that the way to market this project through crowdfunding requires strong and clear visuals to engage and inform the prospective pledgers.

13 _ Observations & Conclusion

Lana Blazanin


#homelessnighthub madeleine hodge


Title: sleeping on the streets Audience: the community Location: state library steps Time/date: tuesday 04/01/2014 @ 10:30am Duration: 2 hours

Intervention Summary: the purpose of this intervention was to see how interested the public is in helping homeless people. so many times in the city i have seen people walk straight past homeless people like they are not even there, so i wanted to see whether they would do the same when i lay amongst the chalked outlines.

3 _ Introduction

Madeleine Hodge


Installations one + two

University of Melbourne

Installation three

State library steps

Site

I chose a couple of sites including union house at melbourne university and the state library steps. I chose these sites because i wanted there to be plenty of foot traffic,which my site does not currently have. The state library was my key site, as it is a symbol of social progress; a place where alot of social protests and marches have been held.

5_ Site

Madeleine Hodge


6 _ Design

Madeleine Hodge


The design of this intervention was simple. Find busy streets and be outlined in chalk in Sleeping positions. Some of the interventions Had â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;homelessnessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; writen above them. All the installations had a page taped beside Them saying;

More than 1300 people in melbourne are homeless Many of them are forced to sleep on the streets Show your support to help these people Take photos + share on social media with the hashtag #isupportthehomeless or like homeless night hub on facebook After the lack of responses at melbourne university i decided to put multiple people all curled up amongst each other to create more of an impact. I used different colours of chalk. I also spent time amongst the chalked outlines to see if that might make more people look.


The installation only took minutes to create; drawing the outlines around myself and them colouring them in.


9 _ Installation

Madeleine Hodge


Observations: The first two installations were done at union House south at the university of melbourne. Many people seemed interested whilst I was being in chalk, but once the installation was complete no one seemed to notice it or even stop to read it.

One girl came + asked me if I was okay while being chalked [it looked as though i had collapsed]. After not much response at University of Melbourne. The next installation took place outside the state library.

After drawing one body a man came a photographed it [+ put it on instagram]. Many people came + looked as we continued to draw more + more chalk people. Like at the previous installations once It was complete, not many people stopped to read the sign - although most people would atleast look at the installation. I decided to lie amongst the installation to create more of a response, and atleast 70% of people walking past would look at the Installation (alot of people looked at it very briefly and them moved on.

Alot of people took photos + talked about the hashtag, but they did not appear on social media. I was amazed at the number of people that did not look at me whilst I was crumpled on the ground. I really could see what it must be like to live on the streets - you really would feel like a second class citizen.

No one asked me whether i was okay, although several people asked my mum who was on site with me [how they knew to ask her i am not sure].

11 _ Observations

Madeleine Hodge


Conclusion: When I decided to do this intervention, I was after something more artistic + open-ended than the first intervention; i didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to lead people to say of course they care, like what may happen in a written survey or face to face.

I was a little disappointed that i did not get as many responses as i had hoped, but i think this is generally a sign of modernity; people are used to seeing strange things happening in the cbd all the time.

Alot of people definitely looked at the installation, particularly when i was lying amongst it. I was shocked at the number of people that did not even look or do anything about it. I read a story about a homeless man in Melbourne that died on the street of heat exhaustion + he lay there for a full day before anyone realised he was dead. despite this alot of people did stop + read the sign + take photos, but did not take it further.

I need to encourage people to stop being passive about Homelessness + incite the desire for change. I think this is why a bigger campaign is needed to really remind and encourage people to donate.

Moving forward i think a mix of kickstarter + traditional avenues of promotion would suit this project; advertising material like charities but also providing rewards or experiences like kickstarter projects to provide maximum donations.

13 _ Conclusion

Madeleine Hodge


#illuminateyourinfrastucture alexander holland


ILLUMINATE ILLUMINATE your your

INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE +

+

+

+


Title: Illuminate Your Infrastructure Audience: Citylink Bypass Location(s): Clarendon Street, South Melbourne Time/Date: 8:30pm 30/03/2014 Duration: 4 hours

Intervention Summary In the wider studio Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking at the relationship between manufacturing and the city, and a cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure. Such infrastructure might do good on a wider city scale but causes lots of damage on the local scale.

Can use bottom up tactics to change how we interact with these top down, disconnected spaces created by huge infrastructure?

3 _ Introduction

Alex Holland


Site Photographs

Bypasses do more than damage neighbourhoods. They sever them from each other.

Clarendon street dies under Citylink, cutting Southbank (already so damaged) from vibrant South Melbourne.

5_ Site Alex Holland


your

+ ILLUMINATE INFRASTRUCT your + + INFRASTRUCTURE ILLUMINATE + + your NFRASTRUCTURE + +

+

+

But bypasses also create a vacuum, an opportunity for something new to emerge under them.

If we all take back a little bit of the underpass by lighting a candle, collectively we might create a space people will want to travel through (and maybe use!) again.

7 _ Design

Alex Holland


8 _ Installation

Alex Holland


Installation Sand was â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;borrowedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; from St Kilda Beach. 50 bags were pre-filled.

A table was set up with the sand, paper bags, tea candles, markets, scissors and lighters allowing anyone to join in illuminating infrastructure. A picnic rug and beers where also provided.

9 _ Installation

Alex Holland


Observations: People were much more responsive than I anticipated. Lots readily took part, quite a surprise considering it was at night under an underpass! Many were surprised how large the space under Citylink actually is. Even those who went through the underpass daily often did not see how large the space is until they actually stopped to take it in.

Besides from one crazy man who wanted to fight (we calmed him down and he then participated, taking about 20 minutes to draw his bag, the second last bag on the following page), no one tried to stop us. Perhaps this shows how abandoned the space is?

10 _ Observation

Alex Holland


By providing a blank canvas, ready art & craft supplies and a table, people created their own intervention.

It was quite surprising how intricate some bags where, when they were just to be placed under a bypass and never seen again. Perhaps this impermanence (combined with the novelty of the project) allowed people to be a bit more free than what they would do in their regular life.

11 _ Observations

Alex Holland


12


13


Photographs


Photographs


Conclution Although initially uncomfortable under Citylink: the bright lights, the sounds of trucks and cars rattling above, the feeling of being dwarfed by this massive infrastructure, we adjusted easily.

By hour 2, we were sitting down, drawing & drinking beers like we were having a picnic in a nice park. People would stop by and chat, the lights piquing their interest and softening the space.

Perhaps this was the biggest (and most useful lesson for my project) - all spaces are useful, you just have to get used to them!


#landscapesofprejudice stacie ng


Title: Landscapes of Prejudice Audience: Public Location: Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton Date/Time: 29th March 2014, 11am Duration: 2 hours

Intervention Summary Consciously or not, there are spaces/topics which we avoid. For example, hospitals, cemeteries, dark alleys and sometimes your mother-in-lawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place. I refer to these as landscapes of fear.

The urban intervention was taken as an opportunity to test whether knowledge, affinity, or awareness would then alter/add to our prejudice towards these spaces.

3 _ Introduction

Stacie Ng


Chapel

4 _ Site

Stacie Ng


Before the Colony of Victoria or even Carlton existed, the Melbourne General Cemetery was a remote bushland. In 1849, it was chosen by Superintendent C.J. La Trobe and charted by Robert Hoddle. This year, it celebrates its 161 years after formally opening its gates in June 1853. The cemetery began its operations during the chaos of Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main alluvial gold rush. Its first major extension happened between 1858 and 1860. It also coincided with the depletion of alluvial gold and the return of disillusioned â&#x20AC;&#x153;diggersâ&#x20AC;? to the colonial metropolis. The cemetery experienced another significant development during the years of the Great Depression.

The cemetery has 4 entrances, North, South, East and West. Visitors can enter from the northern gate at Princess Hill, the eastern gate along Lygon Street or the main entry off College Crescent. Having 161 years of history meant that this cemetery was rich in diverse memorials and tombstones that reflect every wave of immigration that has occurred in Melbourne. 5_ Site

Stacie Ng


Map of Tour

6 _ Journey

Stacie Ng


Ornamented Celtic Cross memorial to Sir John O’Shanassy.

Before the Tour

Social Media

Mausoleum

For this urban intervention, it was crucial to track the changes in perception. Participants were asked the day before to fill in a survey based on their existing ideas of cemetery and spaces related to death.

All the survey’s used for the intervention were created using “Survey Monkey”. Links were then emailed, messaged and posted on friend’s walls. A public Facebook event was also created as a platform to mass link friends and family. The hashtag #cemeteryparty was created as a means to compile and track pictures posted by the participants.

A Whatsapp chat group was also created as a means of organising timing, venue and programme with the participants.

7 _ Planning

Stacie Ng


The tour began at the North entrance, along Macpherson Street. The lucky participants who came got beef pies to avoid grumpy friends who might potentially give grumpy feedbacks. The tour was planned to finished within an hour but as we entered the gates, I began to realise the cemetery grounds was huge. I used the book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Melbourne General Cemeteryâ&#x20AC;? by Don Chambers to guide the tour. As we walked deeper, i began to realise how neat and well signed the cemetery was. Many of the participants have never been into the Melbourne General Cemetery as 80% of the participants were not local. Many also mentioned they have never been a part of a cemetery tour. Though the advantage of having this group of participants were that they each came from different cities around the world. Eg. Ecuador, Malaysia, Singapore, UK, Australia. There was opportunity then, to have conversations comparing the differences. 8 _ Intervention

Stacie Ng


Observations: Symbolisms The cemetery is divided according to culture, religion and burial methods. It was very easy to identify differences through symbols and contrast materials between each section.

Representation Level of detailing and formal representation reflected major periods of immigration into Australia. Eg. Meditteranean Immigrants, Italian Immigrants, Polish families, etc. 9 _ Intervention

Scale The size of each burial plots often reflect status, wealth and influence. Some as if reaching for the skies, others, finished to the normal scale of the human body. Others, in niches. Stacie Ng

Intensity Note the cemetery is often perceived as a destination and not part of a journey. Throughout the tour, there were low levels of activity. The cemetery is spread across the ground level only.


Survey 1 outcomes: Survey 1 was done as a documentation of the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perception towards cemetery spaces. There were a total of 134 responses. The survey was carried out through an online platform to widen the demographics of the study group. Table 1 shows the range in age group that participated in the survey. Table 2 illustrates the frequency of visiting a cemetery annually. The amount of feedback received was overwhelming. I did not expect to get any more than 20 responses but the creation of a public Facebook event helped gain publicity and momentum.

Feedback Diagram

Do you explicitly avoid the cemetery when you travel?

Conversation outcomes: I interviewed a few friends who were not able to make it to the tour but were willing to verbally share their ideas on cemeteries. From one of those conversations, I came to realise that some are not allowed onto cemetery grounds. They avoided such spaces as were concerned that it was intruding on spaces that are meant for the dead. Another conversation led me to realise that there was just no reason to go to a cemetery. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that they wanted to avoid it, but there was no programme to go to.

One friend even wrote to me his views on the market for death. The conversation established the desire by some younger generations to invest in burial plots, even if it costs millions.


11 _ Feedback Diagram

Stacie Ng


Photographs


Reflections: The experience of guiding a tour through the Melbourne General Cemetery was very strange. Prior to the tour, i had always carried with me the impression that cemeteries were amongst my favourite spaces in a cityscape. However, as we approached the cemetery, it felt like any other cemetery i saw on the TV. There were no excitement, no attachment, no memories to flash back on. Only the knowledge that this is a part of the urbanscape that i have stumbled upon.

As we walked deeper into the cemetery, i realised that symbolism and representation are crucial elements within the cemetery. Symbols and details are fragments of memories left behind. It is also a point of reference on the beliefs and ideologies that were practiced by the people in that point in time. CYCLIST! Who knew! As captured in the top picture on the previous page, he did not stop to visit a grave or niche. Instead, the cemetery became part of his journey into the city. Some of my friends have also remarked to me how they sometimes walk across or cycle across the cemetery as there was less traffic and was a shortcut between Carlton and Royal Parade, As we proceeded from the North entrance to the South entrance where we ended the tour. I also noticed the different ways people were now being buried. Some had well maintained by fairly young trees growing above their plots. Some buried in the same plot of their families. There was even a whole rose garden just at start of the South Entrance. All this have led me to realise there is a shift in perception of death. Perhaps even a move towards integrating life as part of the ceremony.

13 _ Observations

Stacie Ng


Feedback Diagram


Added: The visit was really nice! Actually I didn’t knew there was an Elvis Memorial hehe, and you can learn about society in the past and how religious beliefs even affected the design of the cementery.

Added: I used to visit my grandparents every alternate month when i am home. and so i had a perception of closeness and affinity to cemeteries. but after today’s tour at the Melbourne Cemetery, i did not feel as attached or as relate-able to the one at home. but the history definitely opened my eyes on the styles and symbolism in cemeteries.

yes and no: I think it depends on the types of cemeteries that we visit. Melbourne’s Cemetery was well maintained and hence it was a peaceful visit. But some countries, we don’t have the opportunity and funds to maintain cemeteries, and hence, people often have a negative view on cemeteries.

Not really: But I think the reason that some people don’t pay frequent visits to the cemetery is just because of a lack of incentive or need to visit the cemetery, i.e. they have no reason to go/want to go. It may not necessarily be because they have their fears of visits, but just that there is no need for them to be there.

Yes: A cemetery can be a beautiful place too. Where history, art and culture of a city(place) is re-lived and re-experienced. Like going to a museum. Each own (religious) denominations and cultures (ie Irish, Italian, English, Polish, Chinese) expressed their own believes and cultural background though the art and design of tombstones or small structures. It’s almost like a tour of the different cultures of Melbourne!

Yes: i realised that it was actually less scarier to visit a western cemetery compared to Asian cemetery. The cemetery i visited today gave me an ambience which wasn’t the same as the cemetery at my homeland.

Yes: it has changed the way I view burial grounds and why burial grounds are important in remembering the death of a loved one or someone who is well respected. It (Tombstones and Monuments) also reflects the time and customs of the people living in that time.

Yes: it change mi view. I now think that is also a place to spend time in. Going with friends, and not just having fun, but also think about our lives, remembering that life is short and we should be happy. A cemetery is more like a museum for me, after going today.

15 _ Responses after tour

Stacie Ng


Archangel guarding the Dawsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family tomb


View of the city from the cemetery.

17 _ Photography

Stacie Ng


Diagrams, Data

18


Conclusion: The research for the urban intervention led me to realise that there are indeed spaces that we has been victims to our imagination and prejudice. We then go on to consciously avoid or stigmatise these spaces.

In the feedbacks received, participants often described the cemetery using sensorial and emotional terms. Eg. Cold, depressing, scary, dark. The sense of place held by people regarding the cemetery often encapsulated a sense of place that is not inherently â&#x20AC;&#x153;positiveâ&#x20AC;?, and may even connote images of fear and horror. Therefore, conscious avoidance.

As a conclusion to the initial research question, the urban intervention indeed proved that knowledge can reveal and uncover the prejudices we can have towards certain spaces.

After the intervention and through analysing the verbal and written feedbacks, the research led me to ask the flip side of all this. What is the direct opposite to fear and horror? What is the reversal of conscious avoidance and subconscious automation? How can we invert the notion of death to be a part of life? How can journey be a part of the destination? What are the things in our lives that are carried out in automation? These questions will be further looked into as part of the final architectural project.

19 _ Conclusion

Stacie Ng


#laneart linda feng


Title: Laneart Audience: General public Location: Lingham Lane Time/Date: 1:30 pm/30th March Duration: 1 hr 15 minutes

Intervention Summary: To investigates pedestrian interaction with art in Melbourne laneways. Drawings and photographs were hanging across window bars and fixtures along Lingham Lane. This intervention aims to spread and redirect pedestrian flows along Flinders lane; encouraging pedestrians to engage with art by utilising empty laneways.

Can art redirect people to less utilised spaces, can it inform and remind Melbournians of historical structures that many walk by without noticing?

3 _ Introduction

Linda Feng


Location Map

4 _ Site

Linda Feng


Site Photographs

5_ Site

Originally Manchester Lane selected as the site location, it branches off from Flinders Lane, it occupies a few small retail stores and eateries. Although it is only a few meters from the popular Degraves and Centre Place, it is quieter. However, due to underestimate of light fixture height, the art boards could not be hung from Manchester lane; instead location moved to Lingham Lane. Its dark entrance with bright backdrop created a dramatic scene. It is particularly quiet lane used only by local businesses as drive way to parking. Linda Feng


Section A

Flinders Lane

Plan 1:75 on A3

Plan & Section

6 _ Design

Linda Feng


Section A 1:20 on A3

7


Photos of Melbourne laneways were displayed and used to remind the pedestrians of Melbourne buildings that are often unnoticed. To also address the main focus of engaging Melbournians with art in laneways, images were photoshopped then drawn over. Questionnaire was written at back of photo drawings to survey what Melbournians thought of art in laneways.

8 _ Design

Linda Feng


All artworks were hung using fishing wire on fixtures along the laneway; e.g. bars on windows, door handles and handrails The process of putting the art work up took two people - half an hour

Due to the positions of these fixtures, the boards were hung at chin level. Originally, the boards were planned to be hung at eye level, allowing by passers to easily see and notice the intervention. However, due to the change of location, the intervention became much more than just art for observation. The level which it was hanging allowed pedestrians to interact with the intervention as well as the laneway. Pedestrians who wanted to looked at all the boards had to bend to move into the laneway. The dramatic contrast between light and darkness in Lingham Lane brought out the uniqueness of Melbourne Laneart and the potential for the development of Laneart project.

9 _ Installation

Linda Feng


10 _ Installation

Linda Feng


11 _ Installation 11

Linda Feng


12 _ Photographs

Linda Feng


13 _ Photographs

Linda Feng


Observations: Many took an interest while the installation were still going up; curiously lingering at the entrance of the laneway to peek at what was happening. Although majority of people were interested, most stayed at the entrance rather than entering to take a closer look at the installation. Mostly because of insufficient lighting in the Lingham Lane but perhaps also fear of damaging the installation.

Seeing me ducking under fishing wires to get into the lane, triggered a pedestrian’s interest; and perhaps gave her the courage to enter the laneway and looked at the installation. She commented that “it was interesting see you duck all the wires to get in” and asked further about what I was doing. This comment has allowed me to realise that it is exactly this interaction between people and art that has started my conversation with a stranger, and perhaps it could become the next chapter in the story between Melbourne and art. Comments gathered from the installation included: “I think Melbourne need more art outside of art institutions. Perhaps art needs to be brought to the people rather than people go to view art”

“Melbourne needs art in more public spaces, where its easy for people to see” Reflection on observation:

People need to feel safe in laneways, especially at night when it is dark. How do I create an inviting space that people feel comfortable to walk into without feeling the need for other people being present.

14 _ Observations

Linda Feng


“Retail” “Some kinds of small modern art gallery that the public have put together ad can appeal to the young and old” “High tea places, vintage stores” “Bars” “Lights” “Days spas that sinks below ground” “More art/sculptures” “Maybe some markets, possibly showing jewellery makers or other arts and crafts and little boutique stalls that are unique to Melbourne” “Movie screens” “Not sure! Installations are always cool though. Definitely less dumpsters and nooks where people can jump out and stab you” “Artworks” “More life” “A lot can be invested in laneways, anything people would enjoy doing, art, rest, hide and seek” “A circus performance! Lots of walls/windows to play with” “Urban drama and arts” “Street music performances” “Seriously, graffiti and cafes are what its all about - that is the character of laneways and what creates the atmosphere” “More greenery! Too many ugly brick walls and smelly sewer. Look at European laneways, ugly walls all covered in beautiful flowers”

15 15 _ Data

Linda Feng


16 16 _ Data

Linda Feng


Conclusion: The intervention and survey raised some important points which I should consider in my main design. -Is there specific art that suits or should fit in an laneway gallery. Not all art is suitable to be displayed in Melbourne laneways. -How will the space be inviting

-Consider safety issues in laneways/especially after dark or in more isolated locations

-Creating spaces that encourages interaction between people as well as with the art itself -Taking in account of many suggestions made by Melbournians

17 _ Conclusion

Linda Feng


#messageboard baiyu liu


Title: Message Board Audience: General Public Location(s): State Library/Melbourne Uni Time/Date: 10:30 am. ~ 4:30 pm 30-03-2014 Duration: 6 Hours

Intervention Summary This is a small scale intervention which provides people an opportunity to voice their ideas on how to enhance social connections in Melbourne. I created a message board with four basic questions to promt people to leave message on it. The message board is meant to act as a generator to allow strangers to get together and have informal discussions. In this way the message board emmulates what will happen in the social hub.

What do the people want in a new 'social hub?' for Melbourne?

3 _ Introduction

Baiyu Liu Hellen


Melbourne Central Station & The State Library

Site Locations Melbourne Central station was chosen as it is one of the main transportation hubs to the city. Many different demographics of people pass through the station daily and will represent a good mix of people to question about what they want in the city. The State Library was chosen as it again represents a good mix of people in an outdoor urban invorment. Many people come here to simply relax in the city. It is also a good representation of people who would use the social hub. Location Map

4 _ Site

Baiyu Liu Hellen


Melbourne University Campus

Melbourne University Campus was chosen to interview people as it is representative of the specific target marget for 'the social hub'. Hence it is a valuble source to interview people and find out exactly what they'd like to see in a 'social hub.'

Location Map

5


Materials & Design The Message Board

6 _ Design

Baiyu Liu Hellen


CAMPUS: 10:30am ~ 12:30pm Active

CAMPUS: 10:30am ~ 12:30pm Active

STATION: 12:30pm ~ 02:30pm Silent

LIBRARY: 02:30pm ~ 04:30pm Crowded

7 _ Installation

Baiyu Liu Hellen


Photographs


Melbourne Uni Campus: 10:30am ~ 12:30pm Active

80% stop

60% leave message

20% discussion

9 _ Observations

Baiyu Liu Hellen


Melbourne Central Station: 12:30pm ~ 02:30pm Silent

50% stop

20% leave message

10% discussion


Library: 02:30pm ~ 04:30pm Crowded

90% stop

70% leave message

50% discussion


Multicultural Demographic Interviewed

LOCAL

CAMPUS

LIBRARY

STATION

Diagrams, Data

12

INTERNATIONAL


What are your ideas for the Social Hub?

PUBLIC SERVICE

WIFI FOOD & DRINK STORE

SPECIAL ROOM

MUSIC CHILD WORKSHOP

NATURE

GARDEN SEMI-CLOSED OUT SPACE

COMPETITION SPORT EVENT

ACTIVITY

13


Conclusion: It was found people are more likely to interact and engage when they are in a relaxed, natural place. This should be emmulated in the design of the ‘social hub’. People prefer are happy to engage with and learn from people with different cultural backgrounds the social hub should be designed to be accessible to all nationalities.

While beign adaptable, every room should be given a specific function that aims to help exchange between people in the city.

14 _ Conclusion �������������������������������������� ���������������������� Baiyu Liu Hellen


#nmgreenspace william hallett


Title: North Melbourne Greenspace Audience: Residents of North Melbourne Location: Scotia Street, North Melbourne Time/Date: 1pm 30/03/14 Duration: 6 hours

Intervention Summary The city of Melbourne is an ever changing environment which has fallen victim to the modern day disconnect of technology.

This intervention focusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on community engagement through a public greenspace and theatre to bring the community together. By installing a temporary greenspace I want to pose the question to local residents as to whether or not a space like this would be successful.

2 _ Introduction

William Hallett 625645


Location Map

3 _ Site

William Hallett 625645


Site Photographs

The site is located in Scotia Street, North Melbourne.

Scotia Street site between two of North Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular streets, Errol Street and Curzon Street. A hidden internal block surrounded by development, this space offers a rare opportunity to give life to a forgotten landmark.

Sitting between both new and old residencies, this abandoned expanse calls out for a fresh take on this ever changing environment.

4 _ Site

William Hallett 625645


SCOTIA STREET

SITE

ERROL STREET

Plan & Section

5 _ Design

William Hallett 625645


Diagrams

These sketches are initial diagrams that I developed when thinking about my concept. These were used to inform my thinking and in turn help address my intervention. Although these images show basic ideas, they were a great help in what I wanted to explore.

6 _ Design

William Hallett 625645


Walk past the installation

Take a glance and continue

Stop and ingage

7 _ Design

William Hallett 625645


8 _ Errol Street

William Hallett 625645


9 _ Scotia Street

William Hallett 625645


To generate conversation I wanted to strart addressing questions that I have been asking myself. By sticking key questions and statements would invite occupants to give their opinion allowed for the ball to start rolling, and from this suggestions could be made. Making the installation interactive was something that I wanted, it created a platform for occupants to give their own opinion. This alone is a key driver to seeing whether or not a project like this would actually work, and in bringing people together and voicing their own ideas, a discussion board can be shown.

10 _ Installation

William Hallett 625645


11_ Movement

William Hallett


The installation consisted of a greenspace with seating space, questions posted for occupants, and a feedback sheet. Situated on Scotia Street just off Errol Street, this exercise directly related to my chosen site which is roughly 50m further down the street. As I had chosen to do my intervention on the Sunday afternoon, I wanted to get an honest response from local residents. By doing this I knew that my installation would not be overly busy, but instead give me a good grounding for what residents wanted. The main typology of occpants consisted of couples, smaller groups and people walking by. This allowed for me to start conversation directly and at first instance occupants were interested with what the signs said, and from this they wanted to know more. 12_ Installation

William Hallett 625645


13 _ Movement

William Hallett 625645


I found that the signs were a key to bringing people into the installation. Due to the location of the site people need to engage from first instance and be brought toward the site. In discussion with several parties it was highly noted that Scotia Street is a common thoroughfare for both residents and travellers to pass through. In sitting between two busy steets it was mentioned that it was a relaxing walk that made you feel more at home, and not so much in the congestion of Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hustle and bustle. As I got more involved in the installation people started asking me questions about what I was doing and in doing this I noted

14_ Installation

William Hallett 625645


Conclusion: This intervention was a great way for me to address the ideas that I have been working on.

By going to the site and interacting with the people who actually reside there gave me an insight into my client base.

I will continue to explore these concepts to help further develop my project. And maybe do another intervention!

16_ Conclusion

William Hallett 625645


#playlaneway muzafar tufail


Intervention: Audience: Location: Date:

Duration:

#Playlaneway Passing People, City Dwellers, Family + Children Rankins Lane, Melbourne Monday 31 March 2014 (Day 1) Tuesday 1 April 2014 (Day2) Day 1 - 11am-5pm Day 2 - 1pm-5pm

Intervention Summary: Melbourne continues to grow as a city and governments are placing pressure for higher density living, yet the inner city of Melbourne lacks sufficient child friendly resources. #PlayLaneway is an urban intervention questioning the need and provision of children friendly infrastructure in our city centre and how children can help to foster new life within the laneway systems of Melbourne.

3 _ Introduction

muzafar tufail


Location Map

4 _ Site

Muzafar Tufail


Site Photographs

Rankinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lane

Between Bourke St, Little Bourke, Queen St and Elizabeth St.

5_ Site

Muzafar Tufail


stick â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em up by rstifting freizeit berlin

the red tape by roberto voorbij amsterdam

Precedents 6 _ Precendent

Muzafar Tufail


Materials Materials used for this intervention were neon coloured gaffer tape and chalk.

I was very particular on the type of tape used for this intervention. The tape played an important role as was used to depict a 2-dimensional playground. 7 _ Materials

Muzafar Tufail


before

8 _ Installation

after

Muzafar Tufail


The installation took roughly 2 hours to complete. Observations and responses were noted over a span of 2 days. 9 _ Installation

Muzafar Tufail


entrace


A series of questions were asked during the intervention. Are children missing from our city centre? Where can Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youngest citizens play in our great city? Is this an appropriate place for our children to play? Can children, and associated infrastructure, enliven our laneways? Are we lacking in infrastructure for children living in our city centre? Would more child friendly infrastructure make you more likely to live in, or near, the city centre? Are there enough childcare centres in Melbourne city?

11 _ Questions

Muzafar Tufail


Data & Response no yes

donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know

Are children missing from our city centre?

no yes

Is this an appropriate place for our children to play? no

yes

Can children, and associated infrastructure, enliven our laneways? 12 _ data/response

Muzafar Tufail


yes

Are we lacking in infrastructure for children living in our city centre?

yes

Would more child friendly infrastructure make you more likely to live in, or near, the city centre?

no

yes donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know

Are there enough childcare centres in Melbourne city?

13 _ data/response

Muzafar Tufail


Interaction with intervention

14 _ observations

Muzafar Tufail


social media

15 _ social media 15\

Muzafar Tufail


Conclusion: Over the period of 2 days. I have observed a lot of interaction between the public and my intervention.

Questions were raised about children spaces within the CBD and their responses were recorded. Majority of the public agreed that there were not enough childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spaces within the City of Melbourne. #PLAYLANEWAY was a success.

16 _ Conclusion

muzafar tufail


#secetgardenmelbourne thomas lo


Title: Melbourne Secret Garden Audience: Publics, Passers-by Location: Rutledge Lane Time/Date: 30/3/2014 3:00-6:30 Duration: 3 & 1/2 Hours

Intervention Summary: Provide an urban refuge for the people near an extremely busy area. An area that is hidden yet revealing to the public. This is to revitalize, re-engage abandoned secondary laneways that have been created by the contemporary enviroment, at the same time observe publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reaction to such forgotten spaces.

3 _ Introduction

Thomas Lo


Survey

Secret Garden Survey! Please Circle!

!

1. AGE! 16 & under, 16-20, 21-30, 31-40, 40 & above!

! !

2. Access to Social Media! Yes No!

! !

3. How do you feel?!

! !

4. What can be improved?!

!

!

Cleanliness

Location

Size

!

Beer!

! 5. Suggest another place for the next Secret Garden?! ! ____________________________________________! t!

! 6. Suggest another of your favourite reading spot in the city! ! _____________________________________________! ! 7. Do you like being watched?! ! Yes No!

Thank you for supporting Secret Garden Melbourne!

9 _ Design

Thomas Lo


Observations: There were 4 types of people:

1) People who noticed it while walking on Hoiser lane, but did not stop. 2) Poeple who noticed it while walking on Hoiser lane, stopped and looked. But did not go closer.

3) People who noticed it, walked closer and around. Read the instructions but did not interact.

4) People who noticed, walked closer, read the instruction and sat down and enjoyed themselves. For group 1 & 2, people are generally in a rush.

For group 3, people were often looking around themselves. Their self consciousness stopped them from sitting down. But were excited about the project, they would discuss, talk but not interact.

For group 4, people were often in a group. There were two catagories. First catagory of people would walk around, observe the instrustions and items. Once they found the object that interests them, they sit down. Second catagory sat themselves down striaght away and then read about the instructions. Their approach are very much reversed but in general they stayed around for at least 10-15 mins. Evening time Closer to evening time, there were still alot of people around the site. Mainly because this is a tourist attraction with some famous resturants near by. The sky was still lit with a hint of gloominess, people still stopped to look but no one was interacting with it no more. This is due to a sense of security and perception of an alleyway. The atmosphere has changed, the weather became colder and people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel comfortable to sit down in an alley no more, dispite throwing myself into the seat and pretend to be enjoying myself as this was the first time I saw this. Research There were two types of research that went on with the project - media share and site related reponse. Most of the survey was filled which informed me what type of activies does the public want, how to imporve, how they feel, where do they normally read, and where could be a nice spot for this to reoccur. This has affected my site selection as I will try to avoid exsisting book stores as well as public spaces that are suitable for reading to some extent. 13 _ Observations

Thomas Lo


FROM THE OUTSIDE


FROM THE INSIDE


#stragerselfie essra neda


Title: Selfies with strangers Audience: Public Location(s): All over Melbourne Time/Date: 30th March 2014 Duration: 1 hour

Intervention Summary: “There are no strangers here; Only friends you haven’t yet met.” Anonymous

This intervention was about taking selfies with strangers. And was to test the ability of sharing with others and to what extent could it be done.

How much can you share with strangers? a stare, smile, a word, chat, food, money? SELFIE?!

3 _ Introduction

Israa Mohammed


et stre n la

unio

rke

bou

little

s

in coll

block pl

eet s str

swa

l tre p cen

r ln

este

nch

ma

in coll

s st rave deg

beth

reet

eliza et stre

Location Map

4 _ Site

eet n str

nsto

ne

rs la

e flind

eet rs str

e flind

Israa Mohammed


Site Photographs

The site was a journey on Swanston Street, from Carlton to Federation Square. This tested a few public spaces and type of people, from UoM located in a residential zone to RMIT university, Melbourne Central and the main square in the city, Federation square.

5_ Site

Israa Mohammed


smart phone with camera mobile data

courage me

+?

The activity required to walk around the city with a smart phone with camera and instagram as well as a sign to make it easier to explain, with some hashtags. It also required some courage to ask the question.

6 _ Activity

Israa Mohammed


The Narrative & Background: The aim of the intervention was to inspire people to change the idea of social interaction. It is a small act that could put a smile on peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face and encourage them to leave their comfort zone.

It also showed how much people are willing to share as a good gesture and friendly attitude and nothing more.

7 _ Photographs

Israa Mohammed


Photographs


Observations: Total of 30 requests to people was made.

There was a positive and a negative reaction from the audience. The responses varied between a welcoming smile to “I don’t care” to a couple of rude reactions. The data generated partly showed what kind of people were open to such ideas, through age, gender, social state, what they do and their personalities.

People who said yes. Turned a serious face into a smile. Many did not ask where is it going and did not put alot of attention to the hashtag to look it up, yet they were interested in the purpose of the activity. People who said no: Those who were unsure of the use of the photo refused. Some liked the idea and smiled but were not comfortable with it and the response was nicely said.

General: Approaching people walking, engaging in a personal activity or a conversation mostly resulted in a “No” where as those waiting for public transport, sitting in a public space or doing a casual activity accepted taking the photo. People who didn’t participate liked and encouraged the idea but were hesitant to do similar or be the one to initiate it.

9 _ Observations

Israa Mohammed


yes 47% no 53%

yes Police

2

Young adults

8

performers older than 45

no

5 1 1

12 1


new followers comments new followers new likers average likes

1 4 8 17.72


flinders street the project

flinders station

opportunities

e

b

yarra river

rid

d

n sa

ge

g rid

donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care

no

yes

rude shy

open flexible

A journey an experience events / workshops

mystery comfort

Diagrams

12


Conclusion: The act of taking photos with strangers was a fun and entertaining experience. It showed that giving an opportunity to make a start changes the situation we are in, but needs something /someone to initiate it.

Sharing and opensourcing is an essential part of this project and to observe closely peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reaction to such ideas changes the way we always perceive it. Why would they do it and why they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t?

How did this inform the project brief? Might include a casual workshop & exhibition area were people could manipulate without the supervision of organisers. Emphasis on flexibility, freedom of use and opening up opportunities. Emphasis on the element of entertainment through learning in the project use.

Give opportunity for people to understand the elements of the project for comfort in use. Openness in planning. However, do we still need a level of privacy to those who need their comfort zone for exploring? Make an opportunity for entrepreneurs from all disciplines to participate (art, design, entertainment, technology, music, film, etc) because they want to be OUT THERE.

13 _ Conclusion

Israa Mohammed


#theurbanlighthouseproject james freijah


Title: The Urban Lighthouse Project Audience: Melbourne City Pedestrian Traffic Locations: State Library Forecourt & The Design Hub Date: Saturday the 29th of March Duration: 0700 - 2100 Intervention Summary: To inspire social engagement through creative, eyecatching and provocative urban installations. The intervention consisted of taping out controversial statements and a creative lighting display on public footpaths in Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Business District (CBD).

In addition to mapping individual interaction with site, the intervention proposed questions regarding the impact of street lighting and CCTV surveillance cameras on creating a safer urban environment, particularly after dark. In conclusion, the intervention integrated the narrative of The Urban Lighthouse project to begin engaging public opinion. Can creative street lighting installations and/or crowdsourcing CCTV surveillance for public viewing contribute to a safer urban environment?

3 _ Introduction

James Freijah


Location Map

4 _ Site

Student Name


8


“A well-used city street is apt to being a safe city street. A deserted city street is apt to be unsafe” - Jane Jacobs

“It does not take many incidents of violence on a city street to make people fear the streets...And as they fear them, they use them less, which makes the streets still more unsafe” - Jane Jacobs

“...there must be eyes upon the streets, eyes belonging to those we might call the natural proprietors of the streets” - Jane Jacobs

“The sight of people attracts still other people” - Jane Jacobs

9 _ Diagrams

James Freijah


10


“Good lighting offers reassurance to people who wish to use the sidewalk at night, who then become street watchers simply by their presence” - Jane Jacobs

The notion of crowdsourcing CCTV surveillance footage and streaming it live, draws on the localised concept that “... there must be eyes upon the streets,” and applies the theory on a city wide scale, increasing the likelihood that somebody is watching.

11_ Diagrams

James Freijah


14


15


16


17


18


19


Photographs


Data Collection - 15 Minute Observations: Reactions were varied, but overall positive and conclusive. This exercise involved recording the reactions of every passerby in a 15 minute period. The reactions recorded included, (A) ‘taking no notice of the intervention,’ (B) ‘seeing the intervention but not stopping to gain a greater understanding,’ (C) ‘again seeing the intervention and not stopping however casting their gaze to the CCTV surveillance cameras pointed out,’ and actually (D) ‘stopping to engage the intervention - activating the space.’

This exercise was conducted four times during the day; Test 1 at 10:00, Test 2 at 13:20, Test 3 at 15:15 and Test 4 at 20:15. The results are creatively diagrammed on the left. Proportionally, in test 1, 2 and 3, the majority of people reacted ‘B,’ followed by ‘A,’ ‘D’ and ‘C’ respectively. On average 28% of passersby did not engage the intervention, however a majority 72% of passersby did! Although this interest was varied and many individuals did not engage with the space at such an emotional/intellectual level as others, the results are a clear indication that society responds to creative public art expressions. If one is able to reach out and engage an individuals already inquisitive nature, one has the power to draw a crowd.

Test 4 on the other hand produced differing results to Tests 1, 2 and 3. In this exercise the intervention incorporated a model lighting installation. Reactions in this case saw the majority of passersby in group ‘D,’ followed by ‘B,’ ‘C’ and ‘A.’ Less than 3% of individuals did not engaged the site in one way, shape or form, from visual to the physical embodiment of space in time. That is a staggering 97%. The most exciting observation was that 48% of passersby were actually stopping and activating the space.

This result is a clear indication of how creative lighting and provocative street art can engage public interest and effectively activate urban space. In addition, the 48% in group ‘D’ formed a constant crowd around the installation and effectively drew more and more attention to the intervention, reducing numbers in group ‘A’ to below 3% and justify Jane Jacobs statement that, “The sight of people attracts still other people”

This exercise effectively legitimized the proposition of creative lighting installations to inspire social interest and cultural activity by activating space after dark, creating a safer urban environment because of increased use. 21 _ Observations

James Freijah


22


Data Collection - Talking on the Street: Potentially the most valuable information was collected by me actually approaching passersby that stopped to engage with the intervention. Feedback was varied, but every opinion was valid and thought provoking, sometime rasing more questions than what they were suppose to help answer.

An initial observation was consistency of responses reacting to the overall scheme for creating a safer urban environment. They all accepted, if they did not already agree, the premise of a lit environment having the inherent quality of making a space safe, that people watching people were policing each other at a localised subconscious level and receptive to the concept of translating this idea to an urban scale.

The only real concern raised regarding the lighting proposals was that later on today was earth house, raising awareness of light pollution and here I was calling for increased urban lighting. Through discussion, Bikes_of_3000 and I, came to the resolution that smart street lighting would be most effective. Solar powered and LED globes would provide adequate lighting while also promoting environmental sustainable building practices. Concerns were raised regarding CCTV surveillance. Firstly, public outcry to identify who is watching? Secondly, if someone is watching 24/7 and thirdly, how that information is stored and used? These questions hinder the current system of CCTV surveillance, casting a negative stigma over the devices functionality to provide urban security.

On another level, passersby indicated that CCTV cameras did not make them feel safe and secure because of their nature of being secondary to the fact. Commonly used to publicise crime captured on tape and the persecute offenders, CCTV surveillance does not stop the act and help the victim in real time like a natural bystander might, or deter the crime from happening in the first place, primary to the fact. The most confronting public observation, regarding the project proposal, was the fact that both the lighting installations and observatory building are surface level treatments for creating a safer urban environment. This architectural solution does not addressing the social circumstances which lead to acts of violence. However the proposal does not justify merely being a deterrent, as it is designed to inspire social engagement, activating spaces within the urban context to draw in more people, placing more eyes on the street to create a safer more secure environment and culture of violent free public urban space. 23 _ Observations

James Freijah


25 _ Photos

James Freijah


‘The Urban Lighthouse Project’ argues that increased rate-of-crime on city streets fosters the perception of an unsafe urban environment, reducing public activity which is further detrimental to creating a safer more secure city context. Governance primarily address this issue in the form of increased police visibility and secondary measures such as CCTV surveillance and public street lighting to deter criminal activity.

One major concern raised during the intervention was that ‘The Urban Lighthouse Project’ similarly offered surface level treatment to what is a deeper social problem. In reflection, as true as this seems, the project has greater potential to become more than just another deterrent. Designed specifically for increasing public security, the concept draws attention to and creates awareness of this contemporary problem and proposes to construct a foundation for creating safe public space by attracting more people to the city. Building on the premise that “the sight of people attracts still other people” and “A wellused city street is apt to being a safe city street,” the proposal envisions creating a rich urban culture, not completely free of violence but significant enough to change social behaviour at a deeper, more involved emotional level. Regarding police enforcement, statistics indicate that crime in urban centres do decreased, however after the point where normal enforcement had broken down, their presence detracts from the cultural activation of space as one alters their behaviour furthermore. The project proposes a utopian position of self-policing and self-regulation as the final stage for creating an ideal safe and secure urban environment.

The premise behind safety in numbers comes from the notion that complete strangers are subconsciously watching each other and behaving in a manor suitable to inhabiting a public space. The project’s proposal to crowdsource CCTV footage, engages this concept from its local scale and applies it on an urban scale. Knowing your being watched on a deserted street like you would be on a busy street, the culture, safety and security is transferred. The intervention identified the necessity for this footage to be completely open sourced and publicly accessible, creating a platform of transparency so that the power created is not misused.

27 _ Conclusion

James Freijah


#wayfindingyoursenses conchita blanco


Title: Wayfinding your Senses Audience: Urban explorers Location: Melbourne CBD

Intervention Summary: This is a small scale urban intervention experiment for Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban explorers to re connect with their senses and how they respond to signage as a wayfinding. For this I have created a path for Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban explorers to re discover each of these spaces that focuses in re activating each senses and to find your own sanctuary space in this concrete jungle This will become an experiment to prove for a new way of interacting to one another and pushing away for a moment from that world of virtual interface we are so constantly dependant over

3 _ Introduction

Conchita Blanco


Location Map


Site Photographs

I needed to find a site at the cbd and is within the central part of the city and is highly occupied, thus I could receive as much response from various demographic of the people of Melbourne.

I also choose this strip as it is easy for me to monitor and survey as a whole.

5 _ Site

Conchita Blanco


Journey

The path will start with a way that leads one to a space of: 1. Vision 2. Sound 3. Touch 4. Smell and Taste

6 _ Design

Conchita Blanco


Materials

List of materials Vision: mirrors Sound: spoons and strings Touch: textured blanket Smell and taste: lollies and strings

7 _ Design

Conchita Blanco


1A

1B

2 A/B

1 A/B Signage: Here the path starts with 1 A OR 1 B. 1 A was installed between 11 am to 2 pm and 1 B was installed from 2 pm to 5 pm. 2 A/B Vision: using the mirror to let the eye survey, control and investigate the space surrounding it.

8 _ Installation

Student Name


3 A/B

4 A/B

5 A/B

3 A/ B Sound: using spoons as a tool in creating a sound that could articulates the experience

4 A/ B Touch: Covering the urban furniture with texture thus letting the skin to read the texture, and comfort

5 A/ B Smell and taste: Hanging loolies over the tree and opposite the bin, letting the people in discovering the sweet smell before the stinky bin, giving impact by letting the nostril/smell articulates the experience and awakening the forgotten image. 9 _ Installation

Conchita Blanco


Photographs


VISION SOUND

11 _ Observations

TOUCH

SMELL+TASTE

Conchita Blanco


Time : 11 am - 12 pm Condition: less occupied

Time : 12 pm - 5 pm Condition: highly occupied/crowded Observations

How do people respond to signage?

Notice/Acknowledge Respond & Interact No Interaction Less occupied: the more people are willing to respond and interact More occupied: the more people arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to recognize and respond to its surroundings 12


Observations

Who are Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Urban Explorers? The older generation seems to have noticed and responded very well, as well as the younger demographic (mostly students). However, many of the city workers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to engage.

13


DO NOT FOLLOW THE PATH 80 %

FOLLOW THE PATH 20 %

BOTH 10%

Observations

Why do people respond to signane? From the statistics, so it seems that the people are more drawn to rebelling against the signs, people are more attracted to the bolder statements that could go against the common rules but challenges/fulfils the curious minds.

14


Conclusion: The more intimate,empty the space is, the more realizable are the qualities of its physical contents thus we use our sense more in spaces as this. This becomes clearer especially when setting up the signs for Thomas garden, as the site is not so crowded and is intimate in its own being,

I realized people are so easily drawn by my signage as wayfinding. And so, I guess, the less distraction there is within your surrounding, only then you are able to realize physical contents within a space and till then you start activating your sense unconsciously.

Thus the subjective experience is only successful in a space with great intimacy and less obstacles And so in relation to my project, it seems that the site that I have chosen could potentially become successful as it is under occupied and utilised and this could allow for one to endure the subjective experience within each spaces of senses. Also, this relates to how people are drawn by their curious minds rather than obvious expectation within a space. And so, the potential of exploration in finding each of my spaces of senses could be successful, since the people are so drawn in following a path they yet to discover.

15 _ Conclusion

Conchita Blanco


Conclusion Studio 31â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Urban Interventions capture spontaneous and planned moments in the city. They seek to remind us â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the public, we made these spaces and inhabit them, we should be at liberty to change them.



#studio31 urban interventions