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BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

October 2019 Volume 10 Issue 3

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom C.S. Lewis

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

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Humor Advice Health Community

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

7 Finding the Right Medicare Plan 12 Publisher's Column 14 Can the Brain Heal Itself After a Stroke? 16 Winter Open HouseNovember 14 AUM OLLI 18 Clay, Linda Graydon

Features 24 Kiwanis Club of Montgomery’s 100th Anniversary

20 Cardio vs Weights? Leigh Anne Richards

30 Reed Books... Museum of Fond Memories

40 Gray Divorce: Common Reasons and Tips for the New You

52 Beech Mountain Peak of Fun and Hospitality-Jeff Barganier

Departments 32 This and That Interesting Stuff

60 {12} Things For Active Boomers

22 Historical Drama to be Presented in Restored Tallassee Theatre 28 Breast Cancer Awareness Making Strides, Support Cure! Beat the Odds

56 Greg Budell “You’re Leading a Charmed Life, Mister”

34 Alabama's Fall Color Trail 36 LISA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE 38 Build a Solid Financial Foundation McDonald Hagen Wealth

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42 When a Loved One Enters a Nursing Home Ask an Elder Law Attorney 44 BOOM! Cover Profile 50 Cheese Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

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54 An Ernie Kovacs Centennial

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, P.O. Box 6203, Montgomery, AL 36106. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2019 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

My Breast Cancer Story Many of you have one. Mine began with my first wife, Marty. Each year during October I share my Breast Cancer Story with our readers. Everyone who has experienced Breast Cancer knows the bond we all share yet everyone’s story is unique. I consider my experience a blessing.

The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Breast Cancer’s Blessing Could life be any better? My wife and I were truly enjoying the fruits of our labor. We were business partners, she was the boss and I was her advisor. We had been publishing Montgomery Parents for eight years and serving our community with something we thought was worth doing. We were “empty nesters”, and our schedules allowed for travel and plenty of time to love on the grandkids. Through our effort we had discovered the joy of “made for each other”, because both of us brought something to our marriage and business relationship the other didn’t have. We became a complete work of love. After a 40-year relationship stemming from a 9th grade history class encounter, Marty and I had discovered the “sweet spot” of happiness and we were enjoying the blessing of God’s design. And then we weren’t.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Jeff Barganier Tracy Bhalla Greg Budell

Henry Frazer Linda Graydon Katie Main Brandt McDonald Willie Moseley Cheryl Popp Jim Reed Leigh Anne Richards Kimberley Carter Spivey Lisa Swearingen Nick Thomas Raley L. Wiggins

In April of 2003, our lives changed. Marty and I were sitting in our living room as our family doctor told Marty she had metastatic breast cancer. We were paralyzed by the thought. It’s as if our brains were frozen. It was a Friday afternoon, so we would have to spend the weekend with this intruder; we were being held hostage by breast cancer until Monday’s appointment with the oncologist. We both struggled to understand the why. I researched breast cancer and learned too much while Marty began sharing with family and friends the “news” no one wanted to hear. As an optimist I was going to get to the bottom of this problem and find a solution. Marty, who had a deep faith, knew the solution was with God. Of course, we both would press and probe our doctors for answers and hope and got some of both. But in the end, our journey with breast cancer led to God and the peace that only He can provide. Breast cancer changed our lives, but God was the director.

Cover Photography

I became a caregiver, and like many men, was pretty unfamiliar with the job description. But when your wife has breast cancer and every day together is truly precious, you ask a lot of dumb questions and you get smart quick. I’m not talking medical stuff, I’m talking laundry and cooking and pill organizing and, most importantly, serving. Marty lived 30 months after her diagnosis and I wouldn’t trade one moment of serving her for anything in this world. The blessing of serving is hard to realize and appreciate because we all want for ourselves. Our nature is to be selfish. But when you serve someone you forget about your needs and value someone else’s. I learned that from Marty. She was a selfless, caring person and when I took on that role in our lives it was an abundant blessing. Marty showed me where to find hope and how to never lose it. Our hope was and is in God. God’s blessings aren’t about being in the best place of your life, they’re about being in the best place with Him.

Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com

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Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

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Our Cover Profile this month is Lisa Swearingen, a breast cancer survivor like many of you. Lisa has dealt with this disease twice, with two different types of breast cancer. She has faced her struggle with a strong faith in God and His Will. Her strength obviously emanates by His presence and she is an inspiration to be around. Lisa is a passionate woman about another area of her life, America's farmers. She is one and her insurance agency sells them insurance. My experience with Lisa has been enlightening and I hope you will find her story equally interesting. Thanks for being part of our BOOM! Community.

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

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By Cheryl Popp

Can the Brain Heal Itself After a Stroke? Identifying care needs and setting expectations following a stroke The good news is, yes! Research now indicates1 that in many instances, a brain can heal itself after a stroke, even though it has been deprived of blood and may have damaged nerve cells. While physical and mental changes can occur following a stroke, stroke victims can and do regain function; the brain is a fighter and does attempt to heal itself. Cells that are damaged but not beyond repair begin to regenerate; new cells are even created in a process called neurogenesis. There is hope for recovery from a stroke even in elderly and previously ill individuals. The best outcomes of course involve comprehensive post-stroke

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person’s overall health before the stroke. While the most rapid recovery usually occurs during the first three to four months after a stroke, some stroke survivors continue to recover well into the firstand second-year post-stroke. Common physical, mental, and emotional symptoms following a stroke include:

care and early rehabilitation – physical, occupational and speech therapies – as well as a thorough understanding of what to expect after a stroke. Expectations Following a Stroke Strokes affect everyone differently depending on the severity of the stroke, which side of the brain was affected, which part of the brain was damaged, and a

R Muscle weakness on side of the body, trouble walking, grasping objects. (The side of the body that is affected is opposite from the side of the brain that was damaged by the stroke.) R Joint pain, rigidity, muscle stiffness or spasms R Sense of touch or the ability to feel hot and cold may be altered R Pain, numbness or tingling in the arms and legs

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R Trouble coordinating body movements (Apraxia) R Difficulty swallowing and eating (Dysphagia) R Incontinence R Speech and language problems (Aphasia) – processing and/or communicating information can be challenging R Memory & other cognitive problems – trouble focusing and remembering R Problems associated with perception – judging distance, etc. R Vision issues R Emotional challenges – fear, anxiety, anger, sadness, frustration, depression Post-stroke depression afflicts 30-50% of stroke survivors. This depression is typically characterized by lethargy, irritability, sleep disturbances, lowered self-esteem, and withdrawal. Don’t be surprised if your loved one is experiencing these challenges, seek professional guidance and learn how to help them cope with the aftermath of

this debilitating experience. Post-Stroke Care In addition to physical therapy and other rehab programs, additional assistance during the recovery process can make a big difference in how quickly your loved one recovers. Awareness, sensitivity, and patience are critical components of post-stroke care. R Be aware of the medications prescribed to your loved one and their side effects. Make sure they are taking them! R Evaluate your home; does it need to be modified to accommodate your loved one to reduce any risks? R Ensure that your loved one is eating a healthy diet and getting exercise (walks are great!) R Be on the lookout for dizziness or imbalance that can result in falls which are very common in stroke patients. R Monitor changes in attitude and behavior as well as physical ability. Poststroke depression is also very common. R Seek support – from family, friends, caregivers, community resources,

support groups. R Take care of yourself; get others to help and maintain balance in your own life by eating well and getting some fresh air and exercise. Many stroke patients can in fact lead very healthy and fulfilling lives once again, so don’t be discouraged. The best way for a brain to rewire itself after a stroke is for it to get used – reading, crossword puzzles, card games and other stimuli, including music, singing and social interaction help trigger cognitive awareness and jump start the brain. Don’t let a stroke patient be reclusive and encourage them to reengage on every possible front. Sources: www.lghealthhub.org/Brain-Spine-Health/Can-abrain-heal-itself-after-a-stroke www.webmd.com/stroke/tc/stroke-rehabilitationwhat-to-expect-after-a-stroke#1 www.homecareassistance.com/stroke-care

T This article is sponsored by Home Care Assistance, for more info visit www.homecareassistance.com

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HomeCareAssistanceMontgomery.com R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

Call Kristy today for your free in-home consultation! October 2019

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YOU ARE INVITED TO AUM OLLI

Winter Term: January 27 - March 13, 2020

Winter Open House-November 14

You are invited to the Winter Open House on Thursday, November 14, 2019, from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m., at the AUM Center for Lifelong Learning, 75 TechnaCenter Drive. As always, the OLLI open house is an opportunity for people to share a cup of coffee with instructors, ask questions about classes in which they are interested, and register for classes. The Winter Open House also has an added attraction: an art and craft exhibit and sale. In their fall classes, OLLI instructors and members have been working on skills in some hands-on classes: zentangle, pop-up cards, pine needle baskets, painting, and jewelry. They will display the results of their work and have some for sale for special, unique Christmas gifts.

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The winter term features courses on a number of new subjects: World War I, Pat Conroy, Italy, Taoist Tai Chi for Pain Relief, and Harper Lee’s lesser-known talents. Many popular continuing or repeated courses are also available: a computer class, paper engineering, jewelry, line dancing, sports, financial planning, pine needle basket weaving, gardening, brain bowl, ballroom dancing (see online catalog for new description and hours), and others. A new class has been added to the winter schedule since the catalog was printed: Be Famous for Your Cookies. There is a course for everyone’s particular interest. Bonus opportunities for OLLI members during the winter term include the potluck

lunch, lunch presentations, and a book discussion group. Registration for winter term opens on Friday, November 1, 2019. The full winter schedule is available in the current OLLI Fall 2019 & Winter 2020 catalog. View the digital catalog online. All of these opportunities are available for OLLI members. Space is limited, so make your reservations for these exciting events soon. To become an OLLI member and register for these events and classes, go online at www.aum.edu/OLLI or contact Brittany Thomasson at 334-244-3804.

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Quatuor Arod in Concert

Founded in 2013, the Quatuor Arod benefited from the teaching of Mathieu Herzog and Jean Sulemas well as the Quatuor Artemis at the Queen Elisabeth Music Chapel in Brussels. It has also worked regularly with the Quatuor Ebène and the Quatuor Diotima. In 2016, it won the First Prize at theARD International Music Competition of Munich. It had already been awardedthe First Prize at the Carl Nielsen International Competition of Copenhagenin 2015 and the First Prize at the European Competition of the FNAPEC Concours in 2014. In 2017, they were named“BBC New Generation Artist” for the seasons 2017 to 2019, and ECHO Rising Star for the season 2018-2019.

For the past few seasons, the Quatuor Arod has been performing in the greatest concert halls in France and worldwide: the Philharmonie de Paris, the Operas of Bordeaux and Montpellier, the Vienna Konzerthausand Musikverein, the Berlin Philharmonia, the Concertgebouw of Amsterdam, the Tonhalleof Zurich, Wigmore Hall and the Barbican Centre in London, Carnegie Hall in New-York, Bozar Bruxelles, Auditori of Barcelona, Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg, the Gulbenkianof Lisbon, the Konzerthuset of Stockholm, the Philharmonie of Luxembourg, the Oji Hall of Tokyo, the Mozarteum of Salzburg... as well as in Denmark, Italy, Serbia, Finland, Morocco, Israel, the Czech Republic, or China. The Quatuor Arod also appears in many festivals: Verbierand Montreux (Switzerland), Aix-en-Provence, Menton,

Salon-de-Provence, Les Folles Journées de Nantes, Besançon, Heidelberg, Rheingau, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Bremen Musikfest, Mozartfest Würzburg, Spring Music Festival of Prague, the Cheltenham Festival. The Quatuor Arod artists are Jordan Victoria - violin, Alexandre Vu - violin, Tanguy Parisot alto, Samy Rachid - cello​. The River Region will have the opportunity to experience these talented musicians on Tuesday, October 15th at the Wilson Auditorium at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art. If you haven't experienced chamber music before, now is the time to create a new experience of listening to world class quality music. Visit the MCMO website, www.montgomerychambermusic.org. for more info and tickets. Treat a friend to this unique musical experience, they'll be glad you did. For more visit www.quatuorarod.com

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Master Gardener's Perspective

Best soil in the world. To be more specific red clay, according to Oma Ruth. She ‘ought to know’. She had washed enough off her knees, fingernail, toenails and hair and scrubbed enough out of her flour sack dresses to know the stuff was there for good. You might think you got it off, but there was always a hint of red in whatever, to let you know it would always be around. But that is neither here nor there. What is most important is the amount of truck load crops it could produce for her dear, old Pa. It was their livelihood and it had to be good for all the brothers and sisters. Mama loved her hometown county Clay so much, that she named her youngest son after it. Vegetables are good, but peaches are better. Sweet, juicy elberta peaches; so good and succulent your mouth will water just thinking about them. Sweet things tasted like that as a child never leave you. They are embedded in your memories and you react to them by instinct. So it was that when we moved to Redland Road my mama fell in love with our dirt (clay); and it was so hard we had to soak the ground the day before so we could get a shovel in it to dig the foundation. But she had a plan for that hard, red clay because she knew what it could do. It was almost like coming home for her. She knew the ground and she knew her

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By Linda Graydon

CLAY

peach seeds. In fact, the seeds were very special, almost in our ancestry. Seed passed down from seed to seed. Back in those days’ mama would save milk

cartons, because they had a variety of uses. One of which was growing. Just take that peach seed gotten from the old home place in Clay County, put it under the outside side faucet beside the driveway, you know the one that always drips some and let it do its work. Before you know it, a little sprout comes up and looks at the light of day. Bright, warm, comforting sunshine sends its confident assurance that it will stay with the sweet seed until it is a beautiful, glorious tree, but where to plant the tree. The small tree goes into the multipurpose milk carton and is sheltered by loving hands in its infancy. The perfect spot awaits up Redland Road. Full sun, well-drained soil and red

clay are the perfect ingredients to yield wonderful peaches. Soon the young tree is ready to be put into the nourishing soil and the process for peaches begins. This is where patience comes into play, for nothing good happens overnight except maybe Santa Claus. It can take years for some things to mature, but all this time the clay is teaching you its laws of co-existence. While you wait, you learn what to do, what not to do when to prune, snip, thin out, water and spray. Be patient, cause the end is well worth it. The process is not just with this one seed, but with many that have come from the old home place. Tree after tree is introduced into this familiar red clay. Literally, hundreds of buckets of delicious peaches are harvested to be given away to members of our son’s baseball team parents, frozen for winter use, baked into pies and blended into drinks, or just eaten fresh off the tree. All this started with a love of red clay. We are bound to our lands and love them deeply. Yes, it is in our DNA. Ashes to ashes and dust to dust. Linda Grayson, an intern in the 2019 Master Gardener Class, lives in Wetumpka. For more information on becoming a master gardener, visit www.capcitymga.org or email capcitymga@gmail.com.

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Cardio vs Weights? Inside this corner are dumbbells. Inside the other corner is walking. Which one wins for the best program as we age? Well done workout plans generally include both cardiovascular exercise and strength or resistance training. One can get arguments on both sides of the fence on which is best. The American College of Sports Medicine emphasizes cardio for people of all ages. Irv Rubenstein, exercise physiologist and founder of S.T.E. P., a science based fitness facility in Nashville, Tennessee, says.” It (cardio) not only improves cardiovascular health but also helps control blood sugar and cholesterol, which have become the big dogs in the fight against well-being.” The type of exercise you choose is also important in determining the benefits you will gain. Biking and elliptical training, are non-weight bearing- they work well for the heart but don’t benefit bone density as impact exercises like walking or jogging. Rubenstein says cardio exercise is necessary for people 50 +. Aerobic exercise controls blood sugar and improves the heart and lung function, but it also improves brain functioning

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and memory according to a 2013 study from the University of Texas at Dallas. They study shows that sedentary adults that practices aerobic exercise for one hour three times a week for 12 weeks

any type of exercise for people over 40 because we lose 3-5% percent muscle mass every year after age 35. By the time you reach 85, you will have lost 40 percent of your muscle if you don’t strength train.” Another perk for strength training is the boost in metabolism. The leaner mass you have the more calories you burn at rest.

Fitness over Fifty by Leigh Anne Richards

increased blood flow to an area of the brain linked to superior cognition later in life. Recommendations vary on the type of exercise that one should be doing depending on any orthopedic concerns. It is recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine that 30-60 minutes of cardio exercise be done 4-7 times a week to see the greatest health benefits. Now- lets flip the coin. Dr. Ken Kim, chief medical officer of Alignment Healthcare, Irvine California says strength training should be the choice IF one had to be chosen for people 50 and older. “Overall, strength training should be included in

Loss of muscle leads to a less independent life in doing daily activities such as getting off the toilet, opening prescription bottles, and even walking on uneven pavement.

Dr. Kim adheres to the philosophy that “when you do cardio you don’t get strength training benefits, but when you do strength training you get some cardiovascular benefit- your heart rate goes up when you lift weights.” According to the National Strength and Conditioning Association, aging triggers a decline in areas linked to muscle loss such as power, muscular endurance, muscle mass, and bone density. At the same time, body fat decreases. Studies have shown that even seniors in their 90’s show positive changes from a well-designed strength program. Improvements are seen in gait speed, stair climbing ability, balance, and overall functioning.

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It is very important to strengthen lower extremity muscles – especially the quadricep muscles (large muscle group in front of the thighs responsible for extending the knee). Falls and fractures are the biggest killer for the elderly (one out of five) hip fracture patients die within a year of their injury. Quadricep strength, overall leg strength and balance exercises are most important as we age, Dr. Kim says. Multi joint movement exercises like squats and lunges which use the hip and thigh are the best exercises to do verses a leg extension machine, which is only a single joint movement (knee joint). Specific guidelines for strength training vary depending on the goals of the individual, but in general a 20-30 minute well designed routine, 2-4 times a week, that strengths all the major muscle groups, works well. Eight to twelve repetitions and 1-3 sets is recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine. Ideally, exercise physiologist or a nationally certified and licensed personal trainer would design the program. Below is an excellent chart from an article sponsored by the Cleveland Clinic- Health Essentials. Bottom lineYou need both cardio and resistance!!! SOURCES: • “What’s Best at Midlife: Cardio or Weights? “Linda Malone. Next Avenue.org June 17,2014 • Cleveland Clinic Health Hub Knockout – Cardio vs. Resistance Training

Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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By Willie Moseley

Popular Historical Drama to be Presented in Restored Tallassee Theatre A popular-and-acclaimed drama chronicling the days of the Muscogee Creek nation along the eastern edge of the River Region is slated to be presented once again in Tallassee, and this time around, the play will be staged in that town’s historic Mt. Vernon Theatre, with three performances slated for November 1, 2, and 3. “…and One Fire Still Burns” recounts the 1811 visit of Shawnee warrior Tecumseh to the Muscogee Creek capital of Tuckabatchee, which was located just south of modern-day Tallassee. It is a production of the Friends of Tuckabatchee, a nonprofit organization that has produced other local plays. The original version of the drama, which debuted in 2011, had been staged outdoors at the historic Patterson Cabin in east Tallassee. While that setting was unique and appropriate, the opportunity to present the production at another local landmark—without having to be concerned about possible inclement weather—is a unique prospect. What’s more, the upcoming performances

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won’t be the first time the presentation has been staged indoors.

Kervin, “but they loved it. That performance also showed us that we could do it indoors.” “The Muscogee have confirmed that what we are doing is authentic and historically correct,” added Liz Britt, president of the Friends of Tuckabatchee.

In 2014, several hundred Muscogee Creek tribe members from Oklahoma Revisions to “…and One Fire Still visited east Burns” will include a Native dance central Alabama performed by Cherokee nation to commemorate member Jack Crawford of Knoxville, the two Tennessee. The Nov. 1 performance hundredth will be presented for students from Farris Powell, Re-enactor anniversary of area schools. “…and One Fire Still Burns” the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The play was originally The play has also been designated as an scheduled to be presented at the site authorized 2019 event by the Alabama of the battle, but a storm front forced Bicentennial Commission. the producers and cast to move the performance to the Tallassee High School “We want to preserve and educate,” Kervin auditorium. summarized. “We take pride in the fact that we present the history on our soil as “I was concerned about how (tribe historically accurate as possible.” members) would feel about being shown For more information, visit their own heritage by modern-day www.friendsoftuckabatchee.com Tallassee residents,” said director Jeanna or call 334.313.3934

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Contributed by Katie Main and Henry Frazer

Kiwanis Club of Montgomery’s

100th Anniversary October 31, 2019

Past Presidents of Kiwanis of Montgomery, 1945

Kiwanis of Montgomery Grant, Boys & Girls Club, 1948

Kiwanis International The first Kiwanis Club was founded in Detroit in 1915. Kiwanis has a total membership of more than 550,000. Kiwanis’ motto is “Serving the Children of the World.” This global volunteer organization annually raises more than $100 million and dedicates more than 18.5 million hours to strengthen communities and help children. Through service projects and fundraisers, Kiwanis members improve their communities, make lifelong friendships and, most importantly, help children reach their full potential. Kiwanis Club of Montgomery Alabama Our Club was founded on October 31, 1919. With a membership of more than 250, we are the third largest club in the world. The early history of this club through 1969 is recorded in a book published in 1970 entitled, “The Kiwanis Club of Montgomery (Its First Fifty Years)”. It’s editor, Kiwanian William J. Mahoney, Jr., in the book’s introduction wrote, “The narrative story of the Montgomery Kiwanis Club’s first fifty years is a success story challenging the finest that fiction has to offer.” It was true then and remains true today.

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Pete Peterson

Thompson House (Old Alabama Town) YMCA Camp Chandler and Camp Grandview Resurrection Catholic Mission American Red Cross Boy's and Girl's Club Montgomery Zoo Montgomery Area Food Bank Common Ground Montgomery Camp Kiwanis Girl Scout Camp Valiant Cross Academy Children’s Center of Montgomery Boys Scouts of America

With total assets of more than $3,000,000 and with our record of having consistently made charitable grants of approximately $250,000 annually, we can say with confidence that we are one of the wealthiest Kiwanis Clubs in the world. Since 1955, our club has made charitable donations of almost $9,000,000. Some of the major projects and organizations funded by our club are:

We have had numerous members who have been associated with Kiwanis for over 35 years, including Mayor Todd Strange, and over the past 10 years a number of active members who have celebrated their 50th year as a Kiwanian. We are all proud to be members of The Kiwanis Club of Montgomery. Our membership comprises community leaders who are willing to dedicate their lives in service and charity to our community, state and nation.

Miracle League Ball Field Boundless Playground Brantwood Children's Home Goodwill Industries Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Camp ASCCA

Sources of Funding Each March, from all sources, we donate approximately $200-$350,000 to nonprofit organizations which assist children in the community. In 2019, we donated more than $340,000 to the

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children of the Alabama area. Our River Region. fair was founded In recent years, as the South the local Boy Alabama State Scouts of Fair in 1954 under America group the leadership of was able to Kiwanians such as upgrade their Jimmie Pruett and technology Ben Wilbanks. The center for aftername was later school care; changed to the the Girl Scouts Alabama National of Central Fair. Alabama Kiwanis of Montgomery Grant-Miracle League were able The anchor of the to establish a tutoring program; many ANF are its agricultural exhibits and underprivileged high school juniors were competitions that draw participants able to attend a summer leadership from the southeast and beyond with conference free of charge; the Boys & prizes that have exceeded $3,000,000. Girls Club of Central Alabama and Valiant Cross Academy were both able to purchase a van to transport children; the Gift of Life Foundation was able to purchase cribs for newborns born into low income families; and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts was able to expand its art program in public schools in low income areas of the city. And these are only a very few examples of how the Kiwanis Club of Montgomery has impacted the lives of children in the River Region!

funds to aid the youth in the community. • Pete Peterson Trust In 1968, long time Kiwanian, Pete Peterson, died. To the surprise of almost everyone, his will provided a $675,000 bequest to the Kiwanis Club of Montgomery to be used for the youth projects of Kiwanis. Since that time, the club has distributed more than $3.3 million dollars from the trust, and the trust has a present market value of approximately $3 million dollars.

• Individual Contributions As a means of accepting charitable donations, the Club created the Kiwanis Club of Montgomery Foundation in 1995, which is a 501 (c) (3) organization recognized as such by the Internal Revenue Service. Individuals can make contributions to the Club’s Foundation at any time. If they would like, donors can designate their contributions be used for a specific purpose. For example, a donor may prefer a donation be used to help fund scholarships. Kiwanis of Montgomery Grant Recipients 2019 The Club's charitable Alternatively, a contributions are funded from donor may prefer three sources: the Alabama National Fair, a donation be placed in the Member Also, as part of the ANF, and perhaps the Pete Peterson Trust, and individual Charity Fund which was created for the most visible aspect of the event, are contributions. donors wishing to support charities the traditional “fair” activities including rather than funding scholarships. exciting outside shows such as racing • Alabama National Fair pigs, frisbee-catching dogs, and leaping The Kiwanis Scholarships tigers, as well as a Club of The Kiwanis Club of Montgomery high-energy carnival Montgomery provides several scholarships to with amusement rides hosts its annual graduating high school students who will for all age groups, fundraiser, be continuing their education. games, and the the Alabama traditional and notNational Fair, • Kiwanis Club of Montgomery so-traditional carnival over 11 days Scholarship Fund food. in September The Club awards one or more four and October. It year scholarships, each in the amount The ANF itself is is the “11 Best of $4,000 annually to graduation high a blessing to the Days of Fall” for school seniors. Currently, there are six community, but the families in the Kiwanis scholarship recipients. primary purpose for Kiwanis of Montgomery Grant-Boundless Playground the ANF is to generate Montgomery,

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• Jack L. Carr Scholarship Fund This fund was made possible by a bequest by the wife of long time Kiwanian Jack L. Carr. The fund awards an annual scholarship in the amount of $1,500.00 for a student to study engineering at an Alabama university. Currently, there are three Carr scholarship recipients.

GOLD for its submission of the Alabama National Fair.

The Kiwanis Club of Montgomery took home GOLD in Kiwanis

International's Signature Project competition. Their entry was the • Donna Mac Savage Alabama National Fair which has given back more than $7 million to Scholarship Fund the children in the River Region. Congratulations!! This fund was established in honor of Donna Mac Savage for her years Each year, Kiwanis International holds a of service to our Club. One $500.00 signature project contest recognizing the scholarship is awarded annually for a most impactful signature projects in the period of world. This year, four years. the Kiwanis Club Currently, of Montgomery there are (through the two Savage Alabama District scholarship of Kiwanis) recipients. entered the

Alabama National Fair Wins Major Kiwanis International Award Kiwanis signature projects show the impact a Kiwanis club can have on a community. From playgrounds and parks to festivals and fundraisers, signature projects are the hallmarks of what Kiwanis clubs are known for in their communities.

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Alabama National Fair into the contest. The Club received notice that it was selected as 1 of 3 finalists for the award, and it was invited to a luncheon at the Kiwanis International Convention in Orlando, Florida where the bronze, silver, and gold winners would be announced. At the luncheon, the Kiwanis Club of Montgomery/Alabama District received

CCOPS The Kiwanis Club of Montgomery is a proud sponsor of the Concerned Citizens Organized for Police Support (“CCOPS”) Program. The Club honors a member of law enforcement at its meeting on a quarterly and annual basis. The honoree has performed exceptional work as either a member of the police force, sheriff’s department, or state trooper department. CCOPS is a wonderful way for the Club to say thank you to the law enforcement officers in our area! MEMBERSHIP Membership in the Kiwanis Club of Montgomery is by invitation only. We have nearly 300 members who are actively involved in the River Region, so chances are you know someone within the club that will gladly serve as a host for your visit. Our civic club meets every Tuesday at noon at the RSA Activities Center located at 201 Dexter Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104. Those interested in visiting should contact our Executive Director, Katie Main, kmain@montgomerykiwanis.org, or 334-260-7996. You can also visit, www.montgomerykiwanis.org

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Cancer Wellness Foundation Beat the Odds Fundraiser The Cancer Wellness Foundation steps in post-diagnosis and provides cancer patients living in the River Region with transportation and medication assistance. We help over 1,000 local cancer patients every year. Our help is LOCAL and helps our friends, families and neighbors.

COMMUNITY INVITED TO HELP CREATE A WORLD FREE FROM THE PAIN AND SUFFERING CAUSED BY BREAST CANCER

American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk is October 19th

The American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk will be held Saturday October 19th at the Montgomery Train Shed, 210 Water St, Downtown Montgomery and will unite the community with a shared determination to help create a world free from the pain and suffering caused by breast cancer. Registration for this noncompetitive, inspirational event begins at 7:30 A.M. and the walk is set to start at 8:30 A.M. This event is free to the public.

Our Beat the Odds Casino Night and Drawdown event is a wonderful party with a casino night theme, a drawdown for a chance to win $10,000 and a silent auction. There are real tables and dealers for blackjack and other card games as well as a craps table, roulette wheel and even slot machines. There are fantastic prizes at the end of the evening such as the Iron Bowl tickets given by Total Sports Travel. If you are not familiar with how a drawdown works, with the purchase of a $125 ticket, your ticket goes into a bowl of 350 tickets which we “draw out” throughout the evening. The owner of the last ticket left in the bowl wins the pot of $10,000. It makes for an exciting conclusion to the evening. Beat the Odds Casino Night is October 17th from 6 p.m.-9 p.m. at the Wynlakes Country Club. For tickets or info visit www.cancerwellnessfoundation.org

Dollars raised by Making Strides supporters in Montgomery help the American Cancer Society ensure no one faces breast cancer alone by funding innovative breast cancer research, promoting education and risk reduction, and providing comprehensive patient support to those who need it most. Since 1993, more than 12 million supporters have raised more than $750 million nationwide. Last year, 1600 participants in Montgomery helped to raise more than $243,000. According to the American Cancer Society Cancer Facts & Figures 2016, an estimated 246,660 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,450 will die from the disease this year. “Because of the determination of Making Strides supporters, the American Cancer Society is there for people in every community affected by breast cancer, whether they’re currently dealing with a diagnosis, may face one in the future, or will avoid it altogether because of education and risk reduction,” said Jeannie Smith, Breast Cancer Survivor. To learn more about the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event and how you can become involved, visit www.makingstrideswalk.org/MontgomeryAL or email MontgomeryALStrides@cancer.org. Follow us on Facebook, and on Twitter @ americancancer

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Help the American Cancer Society Raise the Bar:

Discover and Support Cure! On November 1, 1512, Michelangelo’s paintings on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel were first exhibited; on November 1, 1848, the first U. S. medical school for women opened in Boston; on November 1, 1965, the first concert was held in Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco; on November 1, 1969, the Beatles’ album Abbey Road hit #1 on the billboard charts; and on November 1, 2019, the American Cancer Society (ACS) in the River Region will present the first-ever signature fundraiser Cure! Raising the Bar. Starting at 6:00 p.m. at Wynlakes Golf and Country Club, the event will feature live music by everyone’s favorite band, Chevy 6, crafted beers, liquor and wine and gourmet food tastings, live and silent auctions, and most important, the opportunity to help launch what is sure to become the River Region’s premier social and philanthropic annual event. “Of course, our number one goal is to find a cure for cancer. Then, of course, we want to ensure that families have what they need to secure treatment and a better quality of life. Because you rarely come across anyone whose life has not been impacted by cancer in some way, we feel like our event Cure is something everybody can support. We also want to add a whole lot of fun to the mix,” said Margen Gadd, Community Development Manager for the American Cancer Society (ACS) in Montgomery. Cure! is the American Cancer Society’s answer to “Vintage Affair,” which was the agency’s primary fundraising event for 25 years. “That is an incredibly long and successful lifespan for a fundraising The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

those already challenging cancer, our most important, world-changing and costly mission is developing a cure,” Gadd said. “Because we want our fundraising efforts to reflect our mission, our amazing and dedicated grassroots committee conceived this event, deciding on the new name for the event, sifting down to the core, imagining an event that highlights the most ambitious piece of the ACS mission—finding a cure for cancer. So, welcome to CURE! Raising the Bar!” said Gadd. “We are thrilled about this new opportunity, talented planning committee, and the promise of maintaining the ACS reputation of hosting the number one philanthropic event in the River Region. We expect more than 300 guests, including your friends, coworkers, community and civic leaders.” event, and we realized that we could never replace it,” said Gadd. Therefore, the agency gathered long-time and new friends of the American Cancer Society to help rebrand the event and take it to the next level. “The process has been so much fun, and the people so committed, we feel we cannot help but be successful.” In 2019, the ACS expects 1.6 million new cancer cases to be diagnosed. The ACS exists to help these people, saving and celebrating lives while leading the fight for a world without cancer. Of course, a world without cancer would signal the incredible discovery of a cure! “Apart from the amazing work we do to help

There are several ways to help: buy a ticket, sponsor the event, contribute an auction item or become a volunteer. “Any of these commitments is vital to our success,” Gadd emphasized. Sponsorship packages and tickets are currently available by visiting www.ascalcure.org. “Don’t delay, sponsorships and tickets are limited. Don’t regret you did not play a vital role in supporting CURE!” For more information, call 334.612.8180 or email Margen Gadd at Margen.Gadd@ cancer.org.

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Downtown Birmingham shop is part book store, part museum

Jim Reed of Reed Books has created a unique shop in downtown Birmingham. (Photos by Phil Free / Alabama NewsCenter)

“This is a book store?” the new customer asks in surprise. “I was just looking at the doodads,” she’s referring to all the collectible and cherished items scattered about to keep the books company. She pauses thoughtfully, “Well, it’s good to know you have books, too, in case we ever need one.” Her husband responds when I ask him what his kids are reading these days, “Well, they don’t read. Except on their phones.” It’s another beautiful day in the neighborhood for Reed Books and the Museum of Fond Memories. Lots of browsers are combing the aisles and examining my foster children, the books. Some shoppers are just along for the ride with family and friends, some are here to dive into other worlds, other times, other lives through the page-by-page surprises

awaiting them. Some shoppers don’t get it – why would anybody read a book? Others cannot imagine living without an abundance of reading matter … because, well, reading matters to them. I cherish customers who have fallen in love with reading. I cherish those who are beginning a flirtation with literature. I cherish readers who are returning to reading after years of distraction, decades of losing their way. I even cherish this rural husband and wife who do not read at all. I hope they have found something as thrilling and mind-boggling as reading, to while away their years. I can hope, can’t I? I am about to begin my 40th year as curator/owner/founder/janitor of Reed Books. I operate this lovely calling, this business, out of sheer hope, sheer enthusiasm, sheer refusal to imagine a world that does not know what true love

of reading is like. To paraphrase the fictitious literary character Henry Standing Bear, It’s another beautiful day at Reed Books’ continual soiree. Come on down and drink deep, feast heartily on the best food for thought I can think of: books. Convince me that you might be the visitor who just found out that you could use a book or two to get through the week.

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And tell me where else in the world such characters as William Shakespeare and Rick Bragg and Henry Standing Bear would hang out. And find out how exciting it is to rub rubbing elbows with literati and illiterati with such ease.

Tell Your Friends BOOM! is available at

REED BOOKS The Museum of Fond Memories 2021 Third Avenue North Birmingham, Alabama 35203 (205) 326-4460 Email: jim@jimreedbooks.com Website: www.jimreedbooks.com Blog: www.redclaydiary.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/jimreedbooks Facebook: http://facebook.com/jimreed.jimreed HOURS: Tuesday through Friday 10:30 a.m. till 5:30 p.m.; Saturdays 11 a.m. till 4 p.m. Founded in 1980 A.D. Tours and tour groups welcomed! Source: www.alabamanewscenter.com

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St. Nicholas by Conor McPherson @ The Sanctuary “Just in time for Halloween, this compelling show is a perfect ghost story!” Associated Press. Helluva Theatre Company will present ST. NICHOLAS by Tony-Award winning playwright Conor McPherson – a modern-day Gothic tale about a theater critic, a beautiful actress and a coven of vampires – starring John Martello and directed by Alex Dmitriev. It will run for five performances at Montgomery’s The Sanctuary. It is for the benefit of Autism Creates A Foundation. In ST. NICHOLAS, when a jaded and cynical Dublin drama critic comes under the spell of a beautiful young actress and pursues her into a coven of vampires in modern-day London, storytelling at its spooky best comes to vivid life. Is it all a drunken lie? A tantalizing fairy tale? Or, is it the critic’s version of a higher truth? “An absolute delight”…NYTheatre.com, “Martello is completely engaging and a treat to watch”…AP. ST. NICHOLAS runs for five performances from Blue Thursday, Yonder October 30 through Sunday, November 3 at The Sanctuary (432 Goldthwaite St., Montgomery, AL). Wednesday, October 30, Thursday, October 31 and Saturday, November 2 at 7:30pm; Friday, November 1 is a special late-night performance at 11:00pm; Sunday, November 3 at 5pm. All tickets are $15 and are available online at www.eventbrite.com. To learn more visit www.helluvatheatre.com (Note: This play contains adult language and is not suitable for children)

Tisha Rhodes is appointed Director of Development at MMFA The Director and Board of Trustees at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) recently appointed Tisha Rhodes as the Museum’s new Director of Development. She began her role in late August. Rhodes arrives at the MMFA after spending two years as the Public Affairs and Development Director for another local non-profit, The Family Sunshine Center. During her time there, Rhodes dedicated herself to building mission awareness and to fundraising efforts that helped sustain hope and healing for victims of domestic abuse, sexual assault, and human trafficking. Rhodes’ arrival at the Museum is actually a homecoming as she previously spent 17 years with the institution as Director of Services. In this role, she managed Café M, the Museum Store, and all the institution’s internal and external special events and catering services. Rhodes created several long-standing signature events, including Divine Lunch, Jazz Jams, and Artist Market, all helping to build and broaden the Museum attendance.. For more info visit www.mmfa.org

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BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

Old Alabama Town’s Second Saturday and the Old Alabama Town Revue Bring your family and friends and step back in time for a day of fun in downtown Montgomery. Saturday, October 12th, Second Saturday at Old Alabama Town brings fun activities for the entire family! Enjoy Montgomery’s Oldest Houses Tour from 9 am - 4 pm See and learn about some of Montgomery’s oldest houses located in Old Alabama Town. Learn about the influences that created the decorative features and architectural styles. It’s “Home Grown & Home Made” for October’s Second Saturday in Old Alabama Town. Free admission all day Saturday. S&B Apiaries is here with bees, honey, and information about saving bees. Crafts for the children and much more make this a fun day for the whole family! Beginning at 2 pm, the 12th season for the Old Alabama Town Revue kicks off with a show theme of “It’s Fall Ya’ll.” The show features a combination of original songs and old favorites. Visit www.landmarksfoundation.com/events/upcoming-events/ or call Call 334-240-2400 for more information.

St. Michael's Angel Fest 2019 Millbrook's Premier Crafts Festival The Angel Fest Arts & Crafts Festival is held the third Saturday of October every year on the lush grounds of St. Michael’s. Enjoy entertainment while you browse the booths of renowned local artisans, bid on amazing items for an unbeatable price at the Silent Auction, as the children enjoy the Kids’ Carnival. And don’t miss out on all the great food! Grab a tasty lunch of mouthwatering homemade goods at the Bake Sale, freshly cooked Boston Butts and more. Put the date on your calendar and come be part of a classic Millbrook festival! This year's event is Saturday, October 19th, 9-2 pm. St Michael's is located at 5941 Main Street, Millbrook, Alabama. For more information, contact the church office @334-285-3905 or visit www.stmaa-millbrook.com

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Alabama's Fall Color Trail Alabama is beautiful throughout the year but especially in the fall. As the greens of summer surrender to glittering yellow poplars, scarlet dogwoods, orange maples and golden hickories, Alabama unfolds its patchwork quilt of color. This blend of brilliant autumn foliage, coupled with cooler temperatures and an occasional gentle breeze, makes for an unforgettable experience. Fall colors will begin showing in the mountains of North Alabama in early October and then sweep across the region. Colors will be at their peak from late October to early November. At Oak Mountain State Park (1) in Pelham, take in the view from Peavine Overlook and Peavine Falls. Head north to Oneonta/Blount County (2) and enjoy the color from Horton Mill, Old Easley or Swann covered bridges and Palisades Park. Take the drive on I-59 up Whitney Mountain near Oneonta, and proceed up U.S. 231. In Cullman/Cullman County (3), the Ave Maria Grotto and the 277-foot-long, 90-foot-high Clarkson Covered Bridge offer excellent views, as do scenic drives U.S. 31 and 278. From Bankhead National Forest, (4) take AL 195 to Double Springs, to AL 33, then take Forest Service roads 249, 262, 245 and 255 to CO 63 and back to AL 33. For more info visit https://alabama. travel/trails and www.outdooralabama.com/activities/fall-color-trail

The purpose of the River Region Prayer Walk is to bring together the citizens of the River Region to pray over our cities, government leaders, schools and teachers, uniformed heroes and servants, pastors and ministry leaders, businesses, and all the people who make up the River Region. This gathering serves to spiritually unite our community through prayer under the Lord our Banner, in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, to seek His favor, His protection, and the restoration of His people and His land. First, we will gather at the Union Station Train Shed for a praise concert and time of preparation for the walk. Next, we will walk a route through downtown Montgomery using guided prayer focused on the above-mentioned groups. For those who are unable to walk the route, there will be a time of corporate prayer at the train shed. Finally, we will conclude the Prayer Walk at the train shed with a free concert, free lunch, and lots of fun fellowship! For more information, call Beauty by Fire Ministries at 334-578-9783 or visit www.beautybyfire.org

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Master Gardener Associations Presents Free Lunch & Learn Programs Capital City Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 1st Wednesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Armory Learning Arts Center, 1018 Madison Avenue, Downtown Montgomery. Mark your calendars, October 2nd, Those Pesky Fire Ants, Mallory Kelley, Horticulturist, ACES and November 6th, Pucker Up: Citrus in the Southern Garden Tom McLemore, Master Gardener. Autauga County Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 1st Thursday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 610 Fairview Avenue, Prattville 36066. Mark your calendars, October 3rd, Japanese Maples, Robert Fifield, Horticulturist & Nursery Owner and November 7th, Herbal Infusion, Tia Gonzales, Medicinal Plant Garden, AU. Elmore County Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 2nd Tuesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Elmore County Extension Office, 340 Queen Ann Rd., Wetumpka, AL 36092. Mark your calendars, October 8th, Bugs In and Around the Home, Dani Carroll, Horticulturist, ACES and November 12th, Orchids, Charlotte Bent, Master Gardener. For information, please contact the Montgomery County Extension Office 334.270.4133. Also visit www.capcitymga.org.

Brass on the Grass @ Jasmine Hill Sunday October 20, bring the family and enjoy the talented ASU Faculty Brass Quintet in the beautiful Jasmine Hill Gardens and Outdoor Museum 3001 Jasmine Hill Rd, Wetumpka, Alabama 36093. Free entry to the gardens begins at 2 pm - Concert begins at 4pm. This is a free event! For more information, call 334.567.6463 or visit www.facebook.com/events/3091846690889314/

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LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE Okay all of you younger boomers and older gen-Xers: This is the soundtrack of your youth. Always willing to try something new, one of rock's biggest songstresses has merely changed gears (again) to become the star of an award-winning documentary. Narrating the doc herself, the film is a no-frills, enthralling story of one of the most powerful women in the history of pop music. It features interviews with her friends and collaborators, including Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton, Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Brown and JD Souther. Yes, it's got concert footage, too. And if you don't know her name, trust us: You know the sound of her voice, and you don't want to miss your chance to learn more about her. Price: $10 Nonmembers, $8 Members, $4 Children. Sat, Oct 19 through Wed, Oct 23. Call 334.262.4858 for more information or visit www.capritheatre.org

Oktoberfest at The Tipping Point Saturday, October 5, 1 – 10 pm, It’s time for Tipping Point's biggest event of the year. Oktoberfest! This year, there are over 25 participating breweries from across the country, German inspired food, and live music from Montgomery’s very own, Wyatt Edmondson. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. A portion of ticket sales will be donated to the Cloverdale Playhouse. For more information call 334-260-9110 or visit www.facebook.com/events/409795463010227/

Montgomery Botanical Gardens Monthly Class Saturday, October 5, at 9 am, "CAPTURING THE BEAUTY OF NATURE WITH YOUR CAMERA" Presented by Shellee Roberts, Studio Manager. Shellee is Studio Manager and Photographer at The Total Image. The Montgomery Botanical Gardens is a lovely setting to see and capture the beauty of nature up close. Participants please bring your camera. Fee to MBG Mmbers, $5 Donation Rquested of Others. Meet us in the Outdoor Classroom at MBG where there are “stump seats” but you may also bring a chair. For more info visit www.montgomerybotanicalgardens.com

Neil Simon's Rumors @ Cloverdale Playhouse At a large, tastefully-appointed Sneden's Landing townhouse, the Deputy Mayor of New York has just shot himself. Though only a flesh wound, four couples are about to experience a severe attack of farce. Gathering for their tenth wedding anniversary, the host lies bleeding in the other room, and his wife is nowhere in sight. His lawyer, Ken, and wife, Chris, must get "the story" straight before the other guests arrive. As the confusions and miscommunications mount, the evening spins off into classic, farcical hilarity. An enjoyable romp, this is one of Simon's most celebrated comedies. "Has nothing on its mind except making the audience laugh." - The New York Times, "Not only sidesplitting, but front and back-splitting." - NBC-TV. CONTENT ADVISORY: This production is rated R for adult language and is not suitable for children. For more info visit www. Cloverdaleplayhouse.org or call 334.262.1530

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Customers Praise Employees with Props App Longtime homebuilder George Goodwyn Jr. believes in the adage that positive encouragement and reinforcement produces positive results. He believes it so deeply that he along with others including his wife, Sarah Goodwyn, have created an app called Props. The concept was born after he and his wife went to Andrews Sports Medicine & Orthopedic Center in Birmingham. He was overwhelmed Grandchild by the patience and thoroughness of the first nurse who spent 30 minutes with the couple. A Someone’s second nurse spent another 30Needs minutes Your Support setting up two same-day MRIs, which Goodwyn said he would pay cash for the $2,500 test. Unbeknownst to him, an employee in the finance department diligently spent 45 minutes getting the charges approved through the insurance company, saving him from having to pay. “I was shocked that those three women spent so much time and effort on my wife,” said Goodwyn, who has been building affordable housing for 30-plus years with Goodwyn Building Co. That’s why the Props app was created – to recognize someone for providing exceptional customer service and to do it conveniently from a

George Goodwyn Jr.

smart phone. And only positive comments are allowed. If someone sends a negative comment it can be hidden or reported. If someone continues to send negative comments, they will be blocked from the app. The app is available at Google Play and the App Store. For information, visit the website www.propslove.com or call Goodwyn at 334.221.0505.

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Build a Solid Financial Foundation When the markets and the economy are behaving badly, as they tend to do from time to time, it's easy to feel helpless. But creating a solid financial foundation can help you gain control of your investments and possibly avoid mistakes that can sabotage your portfolio. Your Net Worth -- A Place to Start Having a current picture of your finances is an important first step in building a solid foundation. By determining your net worth at the same time every year, you'll know what sort of financial shape you're in and whether you're making progress toward your goals. To find your net worth, list all of your assets, including bank and investment accounts, real estate, retirement plans, life insurance, business interests, etc. Then subtract your liabilities, such as your mortgage, credit card debt, loans, etc. The amount that's left is your net worth. If you don't like the number, look for ways to either decrease your debts or increase your assets. Lost Without Them

hit hardest by a decline, think about the things you can do that could make a difference. Investing money on a regular basis or adjusting your portfolio's asset allocation are steps that can help put you in control.1

Financial Thoughts

with Brandt McDonald

Good Behavior Think about creating a written investment statement that describes your risk tolerance, rebalancing schedule, and reasons for selling an investment.2 Having guidelines to follow can keep you from making mistakes that might thwart your plans. You might also want to review your own financial track record. Tax returns and brokerage statements can tell you a lot about your past successes and failures. Keep in mind that past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Setting specific goals can help you focus your investing efforts. Prioritize the goals you've set according to their importance and your time frame for needing the money. Keep in mind that the goals you have now will probably change over time, so be flexible. Revisit your goals periodically and revise them when necessary.

Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager www.mcdonaldhagen.com

Make It Personal

Source/Disclaimer: 1Asset allocation and dollar-cost averaging do not assure a profit or protect against a loss. Dollar-cost averaging involves regular, periodic investments in securities regardless of price levels. You should consider your

You can't control what happens in the economy, but you can control your own behavior. Instead of worrying about whether the market is up or down or which investments will be

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Direct comments and questions to Jennifer.Hunt@LPL.com or 334.387.0094

financial ability to continue purchasing shares though periods of high and low prices. 2Consider the tax consequences when selling investment shares. Rebalancing strategies may involve tax consequences, especially for non-tax-deferred accounts. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. No strategy assures success or protects against loss. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principle. This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized legal or tax advice. We suggest you discuss your specific legal or tax issues with a qualified legal or tax advisor. Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by DST Systems, Inc. or its sources, neither DST Systems, Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall DST Systems, Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber's or others' use of the content. Š 2018 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions. Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA & SIPC. Investment advice offered through McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor, and separate entity from LPL Financial.

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GRAY Divorce

By: Kimberley Carter Spivey

Common Reasons and Tips for the New You

O

ver the past two decades, the divorce rate is on the rise and it’s not a result of millennials. Though the social stigma of divorce has gradually diminished over the years, it’s led to an increase in divorce among couples over 50. This phenomenon is known as Gray Divorce, and it's impacting divorcees and their families’ across the nation. Research shows, the divorce rate for people over the age of 50 has doubled in the past 25 years, and one out of every four divorces in the United States is “gray.” According to data collected in 2017 by the National Center for Health Statistics and the American Community Survey, Bowling Green researchers examined the rates of “gray divorce,” and their findings revealed for 55 – 64-year-olds, climbed from 5 divorces per 1,000 marriages to 15 divorces per 1,000 marriages, and for those 65 and older, it rose from 1.8 to 5. Americans want to know, why do couples in mid-life choose to make a drastic change in their marital status? What could go wrong in a marriage after countless vacations, raising children, and sharing finances and property? Are people in the 21st century expecting a sense of happiness and fulfillment than they were before? You may have grown up seeing your grandparents, parents, or parents friends’ going through the motions of marriage and not engaged in a loving relationship. Perhaps, you witnessed roommates living in the same household raising children or sleeping in separate beds assuming “that was the way couples in a marriage interacted with each other.” Increasing gray divorces are scary

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gray divorce. Finances tend to be a sensitive topic of discussion and a constant struggle, mainly when one spouse manages poorly. Earnings play a major part in overspending, debt, and control of money. If an equal partnership and understanding of finances is not established, it can potentially lead to a divorce.

and rightfully so if you or someone you know is in a 20, 30 or 40-year marriage. Separation is never easy for both parties involved. Not only can it potentially take a toll on the divorcees, but young children and even adult children. Despite the uncertainties of parting ways, it’s important to know the causes, challenges, and how to start over and discover the new you after 50. 5 Common Reasons for Gray Divorce 1. Growing apart: This is a common cause that affects numerous baby boomers. While growing apart is a broad reason for divorce, there are several implications to consider what constitutes as growing apart. Couples may have realized later in life that they lost the spark in their relationship compared to the beginning of their marriage. Also, when they are left with the “empty nest syndrome” they are faced with trying to recognize and relate to the person they married. When couples are focused on raising and taking care of their children, it’s challenging to rekindle the romance they once had. 2. Financial Management: Money is one of the primary issues that occur during a

3. Health and Age: As spouses age, it’s inevitable that their health potentially starts to decline. Though partners vow to love and care for each other through sickness and health, some fear the burden of becoming a caretaker and the negative impacts it will have on their life. On the contrary, some spouses still feel vibrant and youthful, and he or she desires to share those feels with their partner, hoping they feel the same. When a partner doesn’t share those same commonalities, the marriage becomes challenging. 4. Self-Improvement: After many years of feeling, looking or dressing the same, some people want to make changes to their life. Lots of couples face this difficulty during a long term marriage when one spouse is thriving and focusing on redefining themselves, while the other spouse refuses to grow in the same areas of life. This potentially causes conflict if both partners are unwilling to co-exist in a marriage with opposing views on personal improvement. 5. Sex: There are many differences in marriage and changes in sex drive can also occur. When a couple is no longer connecting, they lack romance and

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intimacy, which can potentially lead to feelings of loneliness and undesirable. In addition, when a spouse gets older, their sex drive may differ, which can lead to frustration and the desire to divorce. 5 Tips to Discover the New You After 50 1. Let yourself grieve: Navigating through a divorce is one of the most stressful transitions you can make in life. In fact, divorce is associated with death (the death of a marriage). It represents all of the hopes and dreams that were a part of it. And the death of a marriage, like any death, requires giving yourself time to grieve and heal through the process. 2. Determine who you are: Identifying who you are is a practical first step towards living your life purposefully. Holding on to who you were in the past stifles you from creating a better version of yourself in the future. You have an opportunity to decide what you want your life to look like moving forward by discovering goals you’ve always had such as a career, traveling the world, volunteering with your favorite charities,

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or whatever your ambitions to get to know you again. 3. Take your time: Remember, you have devoted years to someone and a marriage you once shared with a spouse. Dating often becomes the topic of discussion once you’ve healed from a divorce, but there is no rule that obligates you to rush into any relationship. Oftentimes, a divorcee feels pressure from family and friends to start dating again, but you’re not ready. Clearly, friends and family want the best for you and it’s likely they want you to fall in love again. However, giving yourself time to process a divorce allows for a healthy relationship in the future, if that’s what you choose. 4. Accept change: In the recovery phase of a divorce, accepting divorce is a reality that will help you move forward with your life. Learning to accept your divorce determines the quality of life you have now. 5. Cultivate new friendships: During a marriage, couples jointly establish a circle of friends together who become a

part of their family. When a separation occurs, it’s hard for everyone involved because friends are suffering from a loss of friendship as well. However, creating new friendships is a great way to receive support and shift your focus towards new and exciting things in your life. If you or someone you know is going through a gray divorce, seeking professional counseling is a healthy option to consider. You have the freedom to create a life based on your happiness, values, and passions. It’s never too late to do anything and you deserve a life worth living. There is no “magic formula” for getting over a divorce, nor is there an “amount of time” it takes to heal and move forward with your new life. It’s important to know that everyone and their circumstance is different, therefore, it’s necessary to adopt the best suitable ways to manage a separation that will be most beneficial for you. Kimberly Carter Spivey is a freelance writer, blogger, and entrepreneur living in Montgomery. To learn more visit www.girlyouwrite.com

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney

By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

3 Things to Do When a Loved One Enters a Nursing Home Sending a loved one to a nursing home for care is never an easy decision. Families often feel guilty because they cannot provide the level of care that their loved one needs at home. During such a difficult time of transition, financial or planning issues may be the last thing on your mind.

Mrs. Smith can protect up to half of their assets for herself. But, if Mrs. Smith dies first, and her will leaves everything to Mr. Smith, the result is that Mr. Smith loses

spending $5,000 on the cost of their care, or pre-paying for an expense that all of us will eventually have.

In addition to the $5,000 in prepaid services, the applicant may Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop actually spend Wednesday, October 23 & December 18: Hosted by Red Oak additional funds But the fact is that nursing home for other items or care is expensive—somewhere in Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm at 322 Catoma Street downtown merchandise that the range of $6,000 per month— Montgomery. This educational workshop presented by local are part of those and financial concerns must be attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, prepaid services as addressed. I hope to give you some advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting well. For example idea of what to do if you are faced assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing they may purchase with this scenario. homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is a burial plot, headstone, casket, required. Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register 1. See an Elder Law Attorney and a pay for the It is not uncommon for a nursing online at www.redoaklegalpc.com. opening and closing home stay to devastate a family’s of the grave. While finances. Neither your private funeral shopping is probably not anyone’s his Medicaid eligibility, and will have to health insurance plan nor Medicare will idea of a fun way to spend a Sunday spend down the other half of their marital cover the cost of a long-term nursing afternoon, it is absolutely something that assets before he could qualify again. home stay, so many patients must pay should be done while there is money left out of pocket until they run out of money, to do it. If Mrs. Smith had updated her will, she then apply for Medicaid benefits. could have left Mr. Smith only the minimal amount required by law, and passed 4. Do Your Homework The Medicaid qualification rules are the rest on the their children. And, the There is a great deal of misinformation complex. This is one time in your life minimal amount left to Mr. Smith could out there about nursing homes and where a good attorney can save your have been protected in a supplemental Medicaid. You should be very careful family a great deal of money. Look for an needs trust, to be used for paying for about taking advice from your friend at attorney who practices Elder Law. Many things to improve his quality of life. Even the coffee shop or Sunday School. Every of the Elder Law Attorneys in Alabama better, their children could have inherited case is different, and just because a are members of the Elder Law Section of what was left in the trust after his death. planning strategy may have worked for the Alabama State Bar, or the National Because they did not plan, Mr. Smith died someone else, doesn’t mean it will work Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA). penniless, and their children inherited in your case. nothing. 2. Update the Estate Plan Do your homework, and get some good Mr. and Mrs. Smith are in their 80’s and legal advice. The stakes are high, and it’s 3. Make Funeral Arrangements have been married for 50 years. Mr. important to get it right. Just because someone enters a nursing Smith enters a nursing home, while Mrs. home doesn’t mean you’re just waiting Smith is healthy enough to continue living on them to die. But this is the time to in their home. When Mr. Smith enters the Raley L. Wiggins consider making funeral arrangements. nursing home, Mrs. Smith should update Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC her will to disinherit Mr. Smith to the 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com Medicaid rules allow a nursing home greatest extent allowed by law. 322 Catoma Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, resident to purchase up to $5,000 in www.redoaklegalpc.com prepaid funeral services (or deposit Sound harsh? Perhaps. But consider $5,000 into a designated burial fund) this. Mr. Smith must spend down his half without penalty. The choice is a noof their assets below $2,000 before he brainer. An applicant has the option of can qualify for Medicaid to cover his stay.

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October 23 & December 18, 2019, Registration Required

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Lisa Swearingen, Farmer's Daughter This month’s cover profile is a very special woman who is a breast cancer survivor and loves our farmers, because she is one. Lisa Swearingen lives in Pike Road on a 1055-acre farm and with wide open spaces. Lisa is the daughter of the late John Swearingen, who instilled in her a love for farmers and their major contributions to our quality of life, like food and clothing! Lisa’s father passed away in 2011 after a fight with cancer, and this is when she began to "dig" into the family farm and even took over her father’s insurance agency which specialized in selling crop insurance. She has a passion to continue her father’s legacy by working their farm as well as serving farmers through her insurance agency. Challenges she is passionate about. Another challenge is coping and fighting breast cancer. Her faith has guided her every step, both ups and downs, but she remains optimistic. Lisa is a survivor in many ways, and as many of you know surviving breast cancer is the biggest challenge many women will ever face. We salute Lisa and others who know this challenge very personally. Lisa took time from her busy schedule and shared some of her story with us, she welcomed us to her farm and made us feel right at home. She’s down to earth and a joy to know. We hope you enjoy getting to know her as much as we did.

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where were you born, education, family, what brought you to the Montgomery area, etc.?

Hospital in Birmingham. BOOM!: As a Breast Cancer survivor, would you please share your story with our readers?

of the full body mirror. As I got up, I caught a glimpse of myself and there it was; dimpling in my right breast. My first thought was, “not good”, which led to my second thought, “I will call the doctor’s office later.” Approximately three months went by and the pain in my back worsened, I lost feeling in my right hand to the point that it was hindering my workflow. I described my physical condition to my husband as the sensation of burning from the inside out. Finally, I scheduled a mammogram in Foley, Alabama. The Radiologist immediately sent me to Dr. Steven Kinsey that afternoon. Dr. Kinsey studied under Dr. Howard Snider from Montgomery, I had nothing but respect for both surgeons. My pathology report, dated January 22, 2010, revealed I had infiltrating and in situ mammary carcinoma with one mass pattern as

Lisa: I am Lisa: I a native of had been Pike Road, experiencing Alabama where fatigue, I grew up on numbing of Lisa with husband Jim Johnson Broad Acres my right arm Plantation and hand circa 1874. I am married to Jim Johnson as well as back pain for some time. I from Geneva County. We each have ignored all the symptoms. It was raining two children. I am blessed to be the outside, and I was rounding up horses mother of John Squire Lee and Harrison that had Barnett Lee. Squire, his wife Caitlin and gotten out. I daughter Hayden, live in North Carolina was soaking where he works on a plantation as a bird wet when I dog trainer. Harrison and his son David stripped my live in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Harrison is clothes in the owner of 3L Farms, LLC. I attended the laundry private and public school in Montgomery room. I ran County. After graduation I attended through the Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, house and transferred to Troy University before slipped, obtaining a B.A. in Communications from hitting the Auburn University. I had the privilege floor in the of serving on the board of the Easter bathroom Seals Foundation and Project Richard in front Broad Acres, Swearingen Family Farm, Pike Road, AL in conjunction with the Children’s

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ductal and the other as lobular. The carcinoma in situ, perineural invasion was full of joy and heartache. I learned standard medical protocol and treatment and lobular carcinoma in situ. This time a lot about cancer; mostly that it is BIG was discussed with all the options and I was angry, “I did not have time for BUSINESS. Again, I began to struggle percentages. I elected not to take the cancer”. Again, I listened to the standard physically actually saying to Jim at some chemotherapy recommended but agreed medical protocol for breast cancer point, “if I didn’t know better, I would to radiation with a few other suggestions added think my which trying to weigh all my options. Breast cancer was included removal had always been an option but back”. I boost never a guarantee, again I elected to based my radiation have a lumpectomy. Losing my Father assumption treatments to bladder cancer and Non-Hodgkin’s on the above Lymphoma, and my precious friend familiar normal Belinda Parker to breast cancer took my back pain protocol. joy. When battling cancer, you must put that I was At the on your armor and fight the good fight experiencing. time, I was of faith. God never disappoints, he led In December working me back to my joy even while enduring 2017 during full time more radiation. God is not finished with my yearly in the me yet! mortgage business BOOM!: Many Lisa's parents, Margaret and the late John Swearingen and breast cancer working survivors part time inputting data for Swearingen experience a Agency, LLC; while my father was also renewed sense battling cancer. I had no doubt that of purpose and God was in control and that he was not new goals… finished with me yet. My driving force how would was to be finished with my treatments you describe in time for my son Harrison’s high school this sense of graduation. God did not disappoint! My renewal in your desire to see my son graduate, watch life? Any advice them grow up and have families of their for the rest own, was my prayer. of us seeking Working and having a renewal? purpose was my best medicine. I did not Lisa: The first Daughter-in-Law, Caitlin Lee, son, Squire Lee, Lisa, have time to think and time I had and son, Harrison Lee concentrate on myself; cancer I was I had a job to do. I more at peace. As I stated earlier, the mammogram will never forget my second time I had cancer, I was angry it had 1-year Mammogram because “I did not have time.” I tried returned. in December; to hide my anger but did a horrible job The Head of NO CANCER WAS in retrospect. My attitude clouded my Radiology DETECTED! I drove health decisions and was destroying came into home music blaring, me from the inside out like another the room windows down; you cancer. My renewal came from one and said, could not slap the word, “SUBMISSION.” I finally submitted “you are a smile off my face. I got to God’s plan and not my own. My very blessed back to Montgomery advice for renewal is total SUBMISSION woman, and called my friend to all that God has for you. Life is still had Kim not Friend Vicki Lawrenson-Jarry meeting Lisa for the Celebratory dinner in December...the pearl! Vicki. We met for a journey even when you know what taken the dinner and one of your destination will be. I know it will be extra view I my oysters had a pearl in it. Oh, what a Heavenly! would never have seen it”. On January great day! I had the pearl put in a bezel 19, 2018 the pathology report revealed for a necklace. As seven years pass, life BOOM!: You are a farmer; whose farm invasive tubular carcinoma, ductal The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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is in Pike Road and has been in your family for generations. Please tell us how you became a farmer and why? How big is your farm and what crops/livestock do you produce? Is it an advantage or disadvantage to be a woman farmer? How difficult is the workload/ chores? What are some of the joys you get from being a farmer? What are some of the disappointments?

to the panhandle of Florida. I am so blessed having the honor of serving our nations farmers. Our main concentration is Alabama and the panhandle of Florida, but we are also licensed in Georgia and North Carolina. Crop insurance is purchased by farmers and subsidized by the federal government to protect against either the loss of their crop due to a natural or named peril or the loss of revenue due to declining commodity prices. Sunrise on the Broad Acres Farm

Lisa: I am a farmer’s daughter which makes me a farmer by default so to speak. The only disadvantage of being women in the farming industry is that I am physically not as strong as a men. Farming teaches the value of hard work and provides real sweat equity. My favorite chore on the farm is bush hogging and cutting the grass. I can always look back and see what I have accomplished. My parents John and Margaret Swearingen started off as dairy farmers then moved to beef cattle, which eventually led into row crop farming. Farmers are the world’s biggest gamblers. They gamble on weather and commodity pricing to name a few. Most farmers, as you can imagine, have great faith and reverence for God. When they tell you, they are praying for you, you can count on it. Our farm, Broad Acres is approximately 1,055 acres, quite small by industry standards. Presently Cannon Farms from Tallapoosa County has planted 536.4 acres of cotton on our farm. BOOM!: You also own the Swearingen Agency, where you sell crop insurance to farmers. How did you become a Crop Insurance

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salesperson? What is Crop Insurance and how important is it for farmers to have it?

BOOM!: What is your relationship with technology? How does technology play a role in your farming and insurance business?

Lisa: Technology is a must in the crop Lisa: My father graduated from Auburn insurance business due to the need for University in Agriculture. He started data sharing to Swearingen Agency LLC and from the due to his need while government row cropping. He grew agencies. soybeans one year in The farming the late 70’s and army industry is worms destroyed the advancing crop. He mortgaged the technologically, farm to buy equipment, in an effort fuel, seed etc. Between to help the the army worms and farmers. no rain, he almost lost Farmers are everything. He began technologically his search for crop inclined with insurance which lead Broad Acres' Tiger Lake was used to film monitors Bassmasters fishing shows him to become an agent in tractors understanding its importance. Most that must be calibrated by farm, track banks will not fund a farm loan without and field. This technology helps them a crop insurance policy. The average cost determine such things as distance and to plant a crop ranges from $145.000 to area management which improves $620.00 per acre depending on the crop. efficiency and production accuracy. I became a Crop Insurance Agent to help my father after his cancer diagnosis. The BOOM!: Do you have a favorite vacation agency originated in Alabama expanding spot? Any travel dreams planned for the future?

Lisa's favorite time of day, Sun setting on the Broad Acres Farm

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Lisa: I frequently travel to the beach while calling on my clients in the panhandle of Florida. I no longer sun bath due to having “filled my radiation quota”. I have recently discovered Black Mountain in North Carolina where I am now licensed. I took my first vacation last year after my cancer treatments and now have “travel fever”. I have a list of places within the US that I pray I am blessed to visit in years to come.

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around. I jumped up waving my arms consists of mind, body and as Jim was waving his hat, they in turn spirit. My mindset will be waved with their wings and inverted to continue my journey of passing 3 more times! It was without a submission. My Body will doubt one of the highlights of my life, a Lisa: I am passionate consist of help from the personal air show! about the plight of professionals. Lynne Ellen the farmer. Without Kershaw, owner of Core Vibes, BOOM!: As you’ve aged, how have your them our society has a tried and true program priorities changed? and nation would for women with health not have been able conditions like mine. I am so Lisa: I have never been one that allowed to achieve many excited about the progress what others thought of me to influence of our greatest I have made in such a short me to a great degree. As I have aged, I accomplishments. period of time under her realize how precious life is and we are I will fight for the and Margaret Ann Huggins not promised tomorrow. My priority rights and sanctity instruction. Having a runner’s is to take as many people with me to of the farmers till my mentality has been to my heaven as I can. Some days I do a better last dying breath. detriment until Lynne Ellen job than others, but I keep on trying to said to me one day, “Lisa, you Lisa's Grandchildren exemplify God’s BOOM!: How do you do not have to hurt Hayden and David Lee unfailing love and like to relax and wind yourself working the fact that his down from a hard day in the farming out to develop a strong and plan is perfectly business? healthy body”. Her statement designed. On saved me from giving up. It other days, I Lisa: Every morning I wake up and watch will be a journey, by this time unfortunately the sunrise as it is the dawn of a NEW next year I pray my goals will miss the mark day. It’s full of opportunities, promise be achieved, stay tuned. My sometimes as and possibilities. To unwind I make a spirit is lifted with God’s word early as 8:05 a.m. point to watch the sunset every evening, through daily prayer and Instead of fighting often while walking down to Tiger Lake devotional. with each other on the farm. we should be BOOM!: What is it about fighting for each BOOM!: What do your future challenges living in the Montgomery/ other. We will look like? River Region area that you never be wrong like? when doing the Lisa: My cancer challenges consist of One of My farmers, John Deloach Right Thing! chemotherapy medications which have Lisa: I love our military won Farmer of the year!!!!!! caused Osteoporosis. I have Scoliosis presence in the River Region. BOOM!: Give us three words that which was in my lower spine but now As we see our military around town or describe you? includes my upper spine. Weight gain, hear the after burn of the military jets UGH! The joint, muscle pain and nausea, in the air it represents the sound of Lisa: Sinner- saved by grace, Blessed to name a few, have been daunting. FREEDOM as was told to me recently – way beyond what I deserve, FearlessI was advised at CTCA to never allow by a guest in my home. I couldn’t have because I believe that I can do all things compressions to my rib and spine due said it better myself. The “fly boys” flew through Christ that strengthens me. to the over the possibility farm one BOOM!: Do you have any hobbies or of Saturday other activities that grab your attention? fracture. afternoon. I was a Jim and I Lisa: To date I do not have a hobby, if I runner were in the did, I am sure it would have something but can house as it to do with agriculture. I love to dig in the no longer shook from dirt. stand the the after pounding. burn. We BOOM!: For someone who has spent My ran out to many years being a farmer and serving journey the yard farmers as your customers, could you going as they Kathy Bishop, Margaret Ann Huggins, Margaret Swearingen, Belinda Parker describe the kind of people who make up forward came back BOOM!: What are you most passionate about in your life?

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our quality farming community? How important are famers to our society? What makes farmers happy?

greatest creations. When my father was alive, we were discussing crop insurance policy decisions with Mack and Scott Pruitt of Pruitt Farms in Talladega County. Their Back in the Day farm equipment at Broad Acres farm is nestled in a valley surrounded by mountains, it is Lisa: My father was an only child and breathtaking. My father and Mr. Mack used to refer to the farmers he had were bantering back and forth. I asked the privilege of serving as “his band of Scott, “what if anything makes Mr. Mack brothers”. He was right. Farmers are a smile?”, Scott looked at me sternly and band of brothers to each other. Their said, “rain Lisa, rain”. To this day I love word is their bond. There is a farmer in the rain! Farmers and Ranchers make Alabama that has been fighting cancer and was unable to plant, spray and harvest his crop. The farmers around him took their time, personal equipment and resources to plant and harvest his crop never asking for anything in return. I am honored and proud to say that one of my clients was a majority contributor. Farmers are people of faith, they aren’t pretentious, have hearts of gold, and are Lisa with husband Jim Johnson no doubt one of God’s

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up only 1.3% of the employed in the US. Although, agriculture provides more than 24 million US jobs in all kinds of industries. The average US farmer feeds 155 people as well as produces about 40 percent of the world’s corn, using only 20 percent of the total area harvested in the world. Wrights Produce at the farmers market, for example, where do they get their delicious fruits and produce from to sell to local restaurants and to the public? FARMERS. Simply put, without our farmers, we would have no food or clothes. We should all stop and think just how important farmers are to our way of life. So, when you can, thank a farmer and offer a prayer for all of God’s blessings on their work. We want to thank Lisa for sharing her story with us in this month's cover profile. We especially appreciated her hospitality by inviting us out to do our cover shot on the farm. Thanks also to her husband Jim for the extra chores getting ready for the photo shoot, we appreciate the effort :) You can reach Lisa at swearingenagency@gmail.com . As always thanks to Shellee Roberts from Total Image for her great work on our cover photos, especially Lisa! If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to Jim Watson at jim@riverregionboom.com Read all of the BOOM! Cover Profiles at www.riverregionboom.com/archive/

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Cheese

Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

What is cheese made out of? Real cheese, that is, not American or Velveeta (heaven help me). One single ingredient - Milk!

The word cheese is derived from a Latin word "caseus” which means to ferment. However, the more modern meaning comes from the word “chese” which is from the ancient English meaning “product derived from sour milk.” Cheese is a consumable by-product of milk which is made by coagulating milk into solid form. “Cheese is a dairy product derived from milk that is produced in a wide range of flavors, textures, and forms by coagulation of the milk protein casein. It comprises proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep.” https://en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki The official list of Velveeta ingredients, on the other hand, is as follows: Milk, Water, Whey, Milk Protein Concentrate, Milkfat, Whey Protein Concentrate, Sodium Phosphate, Contains 2% or less of: Salt, Calcium Phosphate, Lactic Acid, Sorbic Acid, Sodium Citrate, Sodium Alginate, Enzymes, Apocarotenal, Annatto, Cheese Culture. Argh! What are we eating? And more to the point, WHY??? When there are so many delicious and varied eat cheese options, why oh why are we as a culture so committed to eating fake cheese? (“American” cheese has a very similar ingredient profile to Velveeta, by the way.) Neither Velveeta nor American can legally even be called cheese, their official name is “pasteurized prepared cheese product.” Yum (not!). Because Velveeta and American have so many additives, it is illegal to label either as “cheese” in many countries, including America. According to the FDA, when a product contains more than 51% additional ingredients, it is no longer itself. (51%!!!) Processed cheese product is NOT cheese. Velveeta doesn't even require refrigeration, which quite frankly scares the heck out of me – what kind of preservatives are in there?? – OMG. I have to tell you, that before moving to Alabama, I had never

heard of Velveeta, and I am proud to say that I have never bought it, though I am sure I’ve unknowingly sampled it at an event or two. The question that still springs to mind is “why?” I am sure that cost comes into it, somehow, but as with most things isn’t it better to buy a good quality product and use less of it, than to buy complete rubbish? All processed foods are bad for you – every single health department in existence agrees on that. So why would you use an overly processed cheese product with goodness knows what chemical additives in it, when there are so many delicious real cheeses out there? And Velveeta and American are so bland that you need a mountain of it to get any flavor profile; in comparison, using a good sharp cheddar you would only need an ounce or less, so that more or less rules out the cost aspect. Ounce for ounce, real cheese is better value – you need far less of it to get a much better cheese flavor; the fat content is about the same but because you're using less your calorie count and fat intake are significantly reduced; by eating real cheese you get the added benefits of extra vitamins and minerals but you don't get all the bad added additives and preservatives. I’d call that a win. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average American consumed about 15 pounds of American cheese in 2017, compared to nearly 22 pounds of non-American cheese. And its Italian cheese that reigns supreme, data from the USDA shows. Thank goodness for that at least – no Italian would be seen dead eating processed cheese! (Please do not make the mistake of thinking that Parmesan is Italian either. It is merely a Kraft processed “copy” of Parmigiana Reggiano, the real Italian cheese.) Those official figures DO show however that approximately two fifths of all our “cheese” consumption is processed (fake) cheese. Scary.

There are many other countries with similar or higher levels of overall cheese consumption, but they are all countries in which processed cheese does not exist – Denmark, Iceland, Finland, France being the top four. According to Bloomberg, the US government started tracking cheese data in 1975, and the past two years (2016 and 2017) mark the highest average consumption since then. On top of that, in 2016, Americans apparently consumed twice the amount of domestic cheese eaten in 1980. And, it looks like our cheese habit is only going to keep growing, as artisan cheese was one of the National Restaurant Association's top predicted food trends for 2017. It is certainly true that there are more and more small independent cheesemakers around and that can only be a good thing. Real cheese can have many health benefitsa good source of calcium for bones and teeth; many vitamins and trace minerals that do not exist in processed cheese – iron, potassium, magnesium, cobalamin, vitamins D and B, for instance. Lactose intolerant options are also available, such as goat cheese (Velveeta actually has over four times more lactose than cheddar cheese so should definitely be avoided if you're lactose intolerant!) So, my advice to you is this, next time you reach for that block of Velveeta or American, please reconsider and try a cheddar or gruyere, a nice goat cheese or buffalo mozzarella. So many options I could go on for a whole other article, but I’d rather you just went to see Michael at the cheese counter in Whole Foods. Tell him I sent you ;-)

Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com You can also visit Tracy’s blog

at Tracybhalla.com, Continuing obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using skincare products myself for over RiverRegionBoom.com 2019 my BOOM! October Thetheir River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine 50 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have.


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Beech Mountain

Travel Experiences with Jeff Barganier

The Peak of Fun and Hospitality

T

here’s a ski-village in North Lees-McRae College with impressive Bernie Knepka and staff greeted us like Carolina so high students—many long-lost friends. On the counter was a up and friendly international—who jar with sign indicating a local fund-raiser that it’s best described would make our visit for “Sharon” who was in need of a new as the peak of fun a joy. From Banner kidney; so, we made a contribution. and hospitality. It’s a Elk, Beech Mountain Bernie showed us to our reserved parking playground with many is just minutes away. space behind the store and then to our recreational activities cozy well-appointed condo. To Cindy’s throughout the year “This looks like a delight, the TV seemed to have only one from mountain biking to Hallmark movie,” channel—Hallmark! After a movie, we concerts to mile-highCindy commented as headed up the street to Beech Mountain yoga. Beech Mountain we arrived amid an Grill, a casual upscale restaurant with is also the highest Arctic blast of frigid wonderful atmosphere and featuring ski destination in the air and overcast skies. American fare. (Their meatloaf is Eastern U.S., offering Nevertheless, the amazing!) This popular nightspot was skiing, snowboarding, resort community slammed with patrons as we departed. ice-skating and tubing. was quite beautiful The temperature outside was about In February 2019, and lively. The thirteen degrees but lots of lights leftover with western resorts gleaming-white slopes from Christmas gave the little town, under 7 feet of snow of Beech Mountain population 322, a festive glow. forcing many to close, Resort towered Cindy and Jeff Barganier we decided to drive to over the town and Next morning, after a delicious breakfast Beech Mountain. It was an adventure that skiers descended like ants zig-zagging at Fred’s Mercantile, we determined to exceeded our expectations and produced over a white napkin draped down the dress warmly for the slopes. I began with fond forever and ever memories. mountainside. We stopped at the Visitors my scuba skin—it’s what goes under your Center where Director of Tourism Kate scuba wetsuit—followed by wool socks, Having departed late in the day, we Gavenus gave us a friendly briefing on thick water-proof pants, 2 long-sleeve stopped for the night in Greenville, local restaurants, the ski resort, a map, T-shirts and a fleece. When we arrived at South Carolina. The Comfort Inn and and shared some Suites at 831 Congaree Road gave us a stories about the area. fantastic rate of $72.25 that included a Then we headed to hot breakfast. The hotel was clean, wellour accommodations a managed and, best of all, smack-dab in few doors down in the the middle of great restaurants, including guest quarters of the a Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse next door. An mountain’s beloved upscale movie theater was close by, too. gathering place, Fred’s The following morning, we soon exited General Mercantile. the interstate and crisscrossed rural North We actually arrived Carolina, pausing at Rutherfordton where on the exact day “In God We Trust” is inscribed over the of the store’s 40th Rutherford County Courthouse door. Anniversary. It has Chartered in 1787, the town features been closed ½ day some attractive shops and many historic in its 40 years of homes and churches. We proceeded operations! One can Mansion in the Sky, Beech Mountain north to higher and higher elevations, buy almost anything eventually arriving at scenic Banner Elk. at colorful Fred’s. They also serve the the ski-resort’s equipment rental counter, The town’s crown jewel is the quaint I added a water-proof coat. Cindy dressed best breakfast on the mountain. Manager

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accordingly. We slogged outside in heavy ski-boots, lugging skis and poles, looking 50 pounds heavier, like confusedold-boomers; then realized the temperature had vastly moderated and we were sweating profusely beneath all the nylon, cotton and wool. As younger skiers zipped by us, we struggled to make it to the lift—the 2-seater mind you, not the 4-seater, because the 4-seater goes all the way to the top; and Cindy protested going too far too fast. It took me 15 minutes to get a helmet and googles on her head, whereupon, she began to exclaim, “I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe!” I sweet-talked her onto the 2-seater to the top of the bunny slope where she promptly fell getting off the chairlift and was prostrate on her back for several minutes like a helpless turtle. It reminded me of that commercial: “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” I helped her up and we skied down without incident. Then, while Cindy returned her equipment and went looking for someone else to socialize with, I took the 4-seater all the way to the highest point where I reveled in the amazing view and snapped some great photos. (And, by the way, I discovered a bar perched at 5,506 feet with excellent craft beer.) I hasten to add: we could

not have accomplished any of this without the kind attention of the gregarious young staff of Beech Mountain Resort, many of whom were also students or recent graduates of Lees-McRae College. They walked us through the equipment gathering process, lugged half of our stuff around for us and catered to our every need. Later, they even came to our table at lunch to check on us. I found myself in deep conversation with these young people about some of the secrets of staying married 40 years—like keeping a sense of humor— and other such topics of interest to them. Many thanks to Tiffany, Meggin, Tegan, Marlisa and others whose names I didn’t catch. They worked in concert to make our visit fun, fabulous and memorable.

for the kiddos and the place is plastered with memories from families who left pizza-plate messages on the walls.

That evening we dined at the Famous Brick Oven Pizza, a family-oriented pizza restaurant with the best crust on the planet. It’s almost worth a trip to Beech Mountain just to experience FBO pizza! Tell them I sent you. There’s a game room

www.Fredsgeneral.com

Our last day, we dropped the condo keys off at Fred’s Mercantile. I handed them to a pretty lady behind the counter. “You’re Sharon!” Cindy said, recognizing her photo on the fund-raising jar. “Yes, I am,” she replied with a smile. We prayed for her briefly. “So, how’s it going?” Cindy asked. “Well, I just got back from the Mayo Clinic. I’m trying to keep my body strong, hoping they’ll locate a suitable donor soon. Meanwhile, I’m blessed to have a great job where I meet wonderful people like y’all,” she said. Wow. God bless Sharon. She’s one of the many reasons Beech Mountain is the peak of fun and hospitality! Go see for yourself!

For more information visit: www.Beechmtn.com www.Beechmountainresort.com www.Famousbrickoven.com www.Beechmountaingrille.com

Jeff S. Barganier is a freelance writer and manages Cindy Barganier Interiors LLC in Pike Road, Alabama. (www.cindybarganier.com) He travels far and wide upon the slightest excuse for something interesting to write about. Contact him at Jeffbarganier@knology.net. Follow him on Instagram #jeffbarganier.

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Tinseltown Talks By Nick Thomas

An Ernie Kovacs Centennial

Opening last summer in Jamestown, New York, the National Comedy Center will launch an exhibition honoring comedian Ernie Kovacs beginning with a Festival on August 7-11 (see www.comedycenter. org).

She says Kovacs worked himself and the crew hard, beginning at 6 am on Sundays and working through the next day until 1 am.

Ernie Kovacs - provided by Josh Mills

“I've had conversations with Monty Python’s Terry Jones who grew up in Minneapolis and he said that in Eisenhower's 1950s America you just didn't see anything like Ernie Kovacs,” recalled Mills. “You see Ernie’s influence on that show.”

“Unlike other comedians of the day who started on radio and basically put three walls up and created a TV show, Ernie did something different,” said Josh Mills, whose mother (Edie Ernie Kovacs and Jolene Brand Adams) was married to Kovacs at the time of his death. “Ernie had a cockeyed perspective of the world that few comedians have matched, a very surreal and offbeat way of looking at comedy.” This was most evident in Kovacs’ TV shows which were broadcast on several networks throughout the 50s and early 60s in various versions and formats. They often featured innovative skits written by Kovacs which inspired later TV comedy formats.

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In one memorable 1961 skit introduced by the cigar smoking Kovacs, Brand played a weather girl seductively reading the forecast. “Yeah, that one was famous,” she said, laughing. “I watched it a while back on YouTube and wondered how it got by the censors!”

“It’s the centennial of Ernie’s birth this year, so a great time to recognize this influential comedian,” said Laura LaPlaca, the Center’s Director of Archives. “The Kovacs’ exhibit will remain until summer 2020.” Though he died tragically in a single car accident at just 42, Kovacs would leave his mark on comedy for decades. Like other pioneers of early television in the 50s who were exploring its boundaries such as Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, and Steve Allen, Kovacs pressed it further by satirizing and lampooning the new medium.

including my husband (George Schlatter) when he produced Laugh-In,” explained Brand. “When I worked on Ernie’s show he began writing little scripts just for me which were really nice moments.”

After Kovacs’ death, Edie Adams married photographer Martin Mills, Josh Mills’ father, so the younger Mills never knew Kovacs personally.

“It was just cheaper to keep us going into overtime rather than coming back another day for a new set up,” she said. “And Ernie would do everything – setting up the camera shots and working out technical problems. But he had a joy about his work and his creativity. He was a delightful and really sweet man to work with.” In addition to the exhibit, which contains Kovacs memorabilia provided by Mills who is the executive for the Kovacs estate, a new CD – “The Ernie Kovacs Album: Centennial Edition” – was released in July for the centennial (see www.erniekovacs.com). “It's basically some of Ernie's best-known bits with six bonus tracks never before released digitally,” said Mills.

National Comedy Center - provided by NCC and Steve Neilans

But Jolene Brand did. “Ernie influenced many entertainers

“His work still resonates 60 years later because it's not topical,” added LaPlaca. “It's experimental and still innovative. The National Comedy Center’s museum environment is an excellent way to highlight his contributions to the history of comedy.” Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at Montgomery, Ala, and has written features, columns, and interviews for over 650 newspapers and magazines. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

“You’re Leading a Charmed Life, Mister” "A true story from the Greg files"

When I delivered my Grandpa’s eulogy in the winter of 1992, I noted the amazing changes he observed in his lifetime. Not long before he passed, we’d gone deep into the Chicago countryside for lunch. Along the way he asked me to pull off on the shoulder of the 2-lane road we were driving near Dixon, Illinois. As we stretched our legs, he pointed to the late summer corn running tall and endlessly alongside the road. “Right there”, he said, “was where I saw my first air-e-o-plane in 1911”. He would have been 5 years old at the time. Wow. That was such a benchmark moment he could point to a specific cornfield to recall the biplane buzzing amazed people who’d never seen anything but a bird in the sky. He lived to see us walk on the moon. On that drive, he was similarly amazed at the cell phone I used to call Miami to check on my daughter. No wires. No plugs. I wanted him to say hello to his great granddaughter but in the suburbs of Chicago’s suburbs I couldn’t get a connection. “Damn!”, I protested. Grandpa, in his infinite wisdom said, “if that’s the biggest problem you have, you’re leading a charmed life, mister”!

I felt foolish. He was right. First world problem. I thought about that moment when a recent news story revealed a study of TOP TEN most annoying minor inconveniences we deal with today, a quartercentury later . . . a.k.a., "first world problems."

of everything due to arrive that day, “Informed Delivery Digest”. Now you can be disappointed by your mailbox without having to wait for the postal carrier to arrive. I’d like to know how they get pictures of all your mail collected into an email so fast. Maybe the USPS has a Fotomat (remember them?).

2. Calls from unknown numbers Here are the top or telemarketers. ten with some Remember when perspicacious most homes had commentary. one land line shared by multiple 1. A spotty households? This is Grandpa- who at 86, drove 1200 miles from internet Telemarketers Chicago to Ft. Lauderdale to hold his granddaughter. connection. couldn’t get An amazing guy. Sure, losing through! If the our connection to the world can phone was in use, any other inbound be frustrating, Then I think back to caller got a busy signal. In BOOMer searching for a pay phone that actually homes getting to use the phone required worked, or paying an extra dime for an strategy. Privacy was non-existent until AIR MAIL stamp that might push the the advent of the 20-foot chord and arrival of a snail mail letter up by one ultimately, wireless land lines. All calls full day, and it’s not so bad. Real mail, were “unknown” in those days. You an envelope containing a note featuring answered at your own risk. actual thoughts expressed in legible penmanship, is so rare that it has become 3. Forgetting a password. special. I still walk out to the mailbox I have 48 different accounts and services every day but the surprise is gone. USPS requiring a password. It would make now sends me a daily email with photos sense to have one password for all, but

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management

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NO! I get clever when I create them thinking “I’ll remember this one”. Thirty days later I’m going through a process as simple as a mortgage application to reset them because I did forget. I’m taking a week off in December to do nothing more than create and establish a uniform password for everything. A week should be enough time, no? Life was simpler when Password was a TV game show hosted by Alan Ludden (married to the still-surviving at press time Betty White!). 4. Your phone battery dying. This would happen less frequently if I knew which apps on the phone were killing the battery. The chargers I have strategically placed around the house and in the car cost more than the actual phone. This phenomenon needs to be investigated by the government. Batteries were so much easier when it was A, AA, C & D (“D” meaning “dead”- they’d last a day or two then leak an acid that could give you Phantom of the Opera Face if you touched it. This may be one instance where today is better. 5. Waiting for a train or bus that's running late. A bus? A train? What are those (in the River Region anyway)?

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6. Paying extra for luggage on a flight. OMG. Reason number 4,724-A why my next flight will be my cremated remains on a plane to Florida. How did airlines survive until they started charging for a suitcase? Won’t do it. Nope. I am grounded. 7. When your computer needs to "update" too often. My laptop is rude. It doesn’t update anything. I visit web sites and am told in no uncertain terms “WE NO LONGER SUPPORT THIS BROWSER”. I can now access about 4 web pages. The solution is buying another laptop with programs designed to be “unsupported” before the warranty expires. Back in the day, “update” meant sharpening a pencil 8. Having a hard time finding the end on a roll of tape. This was a problem then and it is a problem now. That's why gifts I give are sealed with duct tape. Never a problem finding the edge. 9. Running out of phone data. This is the reason the Little Black Book still has value. Plus, unlike your call phone, if it falls in the toilet there’s a chance you can salvage the handwritten data.

10. Not having enough leg room in a car, or on a flight. We live in a world where each generation is bigger than the previous, and businesses try to cram our bigger butts into a tighter space to make more money. If I can’t watch a show or game from an aisle seat I don’t go. In piecing this list of First World Problems together, I couldn’t help but wonder what Millennials and Gen-Xers will be complaining about in 30 years. “My thought transmitter chip was corrupted, and they need to go in and replace it”? While the memories of “THEN” are sweet, I’ll add this final thought. I’m glad to still have NOW to complain about! Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, Roz, and dogs Hershey and Briscoe. He’s been in radio since 1970, and is marking 12 years in the River Region in 2017. He hosts the Newstalk 93.1FM Morning Show with Rich Thomas, Jay Scott & Emily Hayes, 6-9AM Monday-Friday. He returns weekday afternoons from 3-6PM for Happy Hour with sidekick Joey Clark. Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

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Daisy’s Senior Moves & Transition Services, LLC Now Serving Older Adults and Their Families The National Association of Senior Move Managers® (NASMM) is pleased to welcome Daisy’s Senior Moves & Transition Services, LLC as its member. “On behalf of NASMM, I am pleased to welcome Daisy’s Senior Moves to NASMM’s family of premier Senior Move Management providers,” said Mary Kay Buysse, NASMM’s Executive Director. “As a member of NASMM, Daisy’s Senior Moves is bound by a pledge of integrity, committed to best practices in client services, business operations, safety and ethics and is dedicated to continuing professional development.” Daisy’s Senior Moves was founded in January, 2018 in Millbrook, Alabama and services the Montgomery Alabama River Region. Daisy’s Senior Moves offers full service solutions to assist older adults and their families with the often-stressful transition that comes with relocating or can assist clients who would rather “Age in Place”. Some of the services that Daisy’s offers are: planning and organizing for the move, developing customized floor plans to help clients determine what will fit in their new residence, downsizing and sorting, profitably disposing of items not needed, arranging for shipping and storage, scheduling and overseeing movers, professionally packing and unpacking, and completely resettling the client at their new home. “Once in a while, if you are very lucky, you have an opportunity to devote your time, energy and talents to a purpose in which you ardently believe. For me, these things came together in the creation of Daisy’s Senior Moves and I am excited to serve my clients and their families with my passion for helping others.” said Julia Maher, Owner. To learn more visit www.daisyseniormoves.com

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October 2019

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

First Friday Cruise-Ins Lower Dexter, Downtown Montgomery Fridays, October 4, 5:30-7 pm Come out for the 2019 Lower Dexter First Friday Cruise-ins! The lower block of Dexter Ave. will be closed off once the featured vehicles are in place. Numerous restaurants and food trucks will be open including Alabama Sweet Tea Company, Momma Goldberg’s, FRIOS Pops, Prevail Union, Cuco’s Mexican Café and others. Interested in showing your car? Apply at www.LowerDexter.org. Join us for some free family friendly fun on Lower Dexter! Call 334.273.0313 for more information. For more info visit www.lowerdexter.org/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Alabama National Fair Garrett Coliseum and fairgrounds October 4-14, all day

Mark your calendars now for this Montgomery tradition at the Garrett Coliseum and fairgrounds, October 4-14! Enjoy more than 60 thrilling rides, food, information and commercial booths, livestock competitions and more. All performances are free with the purchase of a general admission ticket. This year BELL BIV DEVOE and RODNEY ATKINS will be appearing. The Alabama National Fair is a project of the Kiwanis Club of Montgomery. The Kiwanis Club has donated over 8 million dollars to area charities as a result of the Alabama National Fair. For more information, call 334.272.6831 or visit www.alnationalfair.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Sunday, October 6th, 7-9 pm Singer, songwriter Jamey Johnson returns to Montgomery, AL for his 8th Annual Homecoming concert. Johnson, along with the Nikki Mitchell Foundation, are proud to welcome to their stage country singer, songwriter, actor, and record producer Toby Keith. In addition to the exciting lineup announcement, the concert is moving to Riverwalk Stadium, home of the Montgomery Biscuits. Jamey Johnson along with his guests Toby Keith, Randy Houser, Lee Brice and more will take the stage on October 6th, at 7pm, in downtown Montgomery. Tickets to the show are available in person at the Montgomery Biscuits box office or online at www.ticketreturn.com. Prices range from $20 to $40. For more information, call 615.982.6802 or visit www.jameyjohnson.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Annotated Pickett’s History of Alabama Alabama Department of Archives, Downtown Tuesday, october 8th, 12-1 pm On Tuesday, October 8 at 12:00 p.m., author James P. Pate will present a book talk on The Annotated Pickett’s History of Alabama: And Incidentally of Georgia and Mississippi, from the Earliest Period at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH) in Montgomery. Admission is FREE. First published in September 1851, Albert James Pickett’s History of Alabama is one of the most notable publications on the state’s history. For more information about the book talk, call Alex Colvin, 334.353.4689. More Information on Website: //archives. alabama.gov/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Holiday Market The Multiplex at Cramton Bowl October 9-12th, all day

Cloverjam Block Party East Fairview Ave, Cloverdale Saturday, October 5, 5-8 pm

The ORIGINAL CloverJAM is back! We are partnering with our closest friends along East Fairview Ave. to give you the block party of your fondest memories. Block party along East Fairview Avenue between Moe's + Bud's Live music Complimentary face painting Braid bar by Vital Beauty Bar Food + bev specials and more. For more info visit www.facebook.com/ events/2977158815691425/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Jamey Johnson’s 8th Annual Homecoming Riverwalk Stadium

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www.jlmontgomery.org

Mark your calendars for the 31st annual Holiday Market! The festivities begin with Prancer's Preview Party on October 9th, followed by three full days of shopping from October 10th - October 12th! The Multiplex at Cramton Bowl, 220 Hall St., Montgomery, AL. For more information call 334.288.8816 or visit

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Painting with a Twist Common Bond Brewers, Downtown Montgomery Thursday, October 17th, 6:30-8 pm Common Bond Brewers and Painting with a Twist have partnered together for another evening of painting and pints! Picture yourself in the taproom painting the beautiful painting seen on this page while you enjoy some great local craft beer. Relax The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


and drink with us through this innovative collaboration! Your evening will consist of painting a class taught by PWAT's professional artist and bartenders and staff from Common Bond taking care of your drinks. Outside food and non-alcoholic drinks welcome. In our classes we use acrylic paints on 16x20 canvas and provide step by step instructions. Most of our guests have no painting experience and are just looking to have a fun date night, girl’s night out, or come alone and meet someone new. Buy your tickets today! We expect to sell out. Tickets are $35 per seat. Call 334.676.2287 for more information or visit www.commonbondbrewers.com/calendar/2019/10/17/paintingwith-a-twist

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Riverwalk Wine Festival River Walk, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, October 19th, 3-6 pm

Don’t miss the Riverwalk Wine Festival at Riverfront Park on Saturday, October 19, 2019 from 3-6pm. This event will include wine tasting from 10 different distributors representing over 100 wineries. Admission is $30 per person and will include: Etched commemorative wine glass, discounted wine purchases from participating local wine shoppes, Food Vendors, Live music. Discounted tickets for a special Harriott II Wine Cruise. NO outside alcohol per ABC Guidelines. For more information, call 334.625.2300 or visit www.funinmontgomery.com

MENTONE, ALABAMA

Mentone Color Fest Mentone Brow Park Saturday/Sunday, October 19-20, 9-5 pm

Colorfest has been a Mentone tradition for over three decades! Hosted by the Mentone Area Preservation Association (MAPA), Colorfest features the talents of regional artists and craftsmen, as well as local musicians. Situated at Mentone’s Brow Park along North Cool Street, Colorfest captures the spirit of fall. For more info visit www.mapamentone.com/colorfest2019.html

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Murder Mystery Dinner In The Alley Alley Station Ballroom, 130 Commerce Street, Downtown Thursday, October 24th, 6-8:30 pm

Don Carrasino and the Murdered Mobster...someone killed the Don's right hand man. When everyone in The Joint is a crook, killer, mobster, or gang-member it may be hard to figure out who whacked him. Releasing your inner super sleuth, you will piece together the clues, interrogate potential suspects, and solve the crime.

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Doors open at 5:30pm. Ladies get “Dolled Up”, and Gentlemen grab your fedoras, dressing to impress in your best 1940s ‘gangster’ finery. Attire is welcome, but not required. Join us for a fabulous night raising funds for a great cause! Call 205.823.3818 or 1-800-433-8002 or www. eventbrite.com/e/ahifs-montgomery-regional-board-presents-ahif-inthe-alley-murder-mystery-dinner-experience-tickets-66105050987

SANDESTIN, FLORIDA

7th Annual Sparkling Wine and Holiday Lights Baytowne Wharf at Sandestin Saturday, November 16th, 4-6 pm

On November 16th, 2019, Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort and Sandestin Wine Festival will kick off the holiday season with our 7th Annual "Sparkling Wine and Holiday Lights" event from 4-6 pm. Sparkling Wine and Holiday Lights will take place on the beautifully decorated streets of Baytowne Wharf and feature more than 30 champagnes and delicious appetizers at featured Village restaurants. The event will end with the first tree lighting of the season and Baytowne Wharf's choreographed light show, 12 Nights of Lights. For more info visit www.baytownesparklingwinefest.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in Concert MPAC, Dowtown Montgomery Thursday, March 19th, 7:30 pm

With a refreshed lineup and newfound energy, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band remains one of the most accomplished bands in American roots music. Following an extended 50th anniversary tour, the ensemble grew to a six-piece in 2018 for the first time since their early jug band days. The group now includes Jeff Hanna (acoustic guitar, electric guitar), Jimmie Fadden (drums, harmonica), Bob Carpenter (keyboards), Jim Photoglo (bass, acoustic guitar), Ross Holmes (fiddle, mandolin), and Jaime Hanna (electric and acoustic guitar). All six members also sing, and when their voices merge, the harmonies add a powerful new component for the legendary band. And with the father-son pairing of Jeff and Jaime Hanna, the band carries on a country music tradition of blood harmony. The Montgomery Performing Arts Centre at Renaissance Montgomery 201 Tallapoosa St, Montgomery, Alabama 36104. www.mpaconline.org

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Profile for Boomer Communities

BOOM! October 2019  

Montgomery, Prattville, Wetumpka, Pike Road, Millbrook, Tallassee Alabama's 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM! October 2019  

Montgomery, Prattville, Wetumpka, Pike Road, Millbrook, Tallassee Alabama's 50+ Lifestage Magazine