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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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Sponsored by Vivian O'Nay

Fashion Sense, Knows No Age A Woman over 50 is fashionable, and discriminating in her taste...

This month BOOM! Is introducing a new fashion column from the ladies at Vivian O’Nay. They know the latest fashions for women over 50 and want to help you make your wardrobe match the new you as you age. Please share your thoughts with the ladies of Vivian O’Nay!

Spring is in the air at Vivian O’Nay! It’s time to ditch our heavy sweaters and dark fabrics for fresh, lighter pieces.

material which can be worn with dresses and skirts or a pair of jeans. These pieces are also great for layering. With cold mornings and evenings but warm afternoons coming this season, it’s easy to take off or add items as needed. The skirt Cindy is wearing showcases two trends in one- it is longer in length and the pattern shows off the popular tie-dye/ watercolor print.

This past fall and winter leopard and snake prints where everywhere you turned. Don’t expect this fad to disappear any time soon! Leopard has been updated to feature a more spotted style which is a bit more discrete than the traditional pattern. Both leopard and snake are being shown in pastel colors for Spring. We love the pastel linen look paired with white bottoms or as dresses. Comfortable lookalike fabrics feature raw edges around the sleeves and hemlines this year. Another new take on the fabric is through manufacturing the material in a cotton blend to have the same classic look we desire while being much softer than ever before. We are finding that ladies care as much about being comfortable as they do about being stylish- this trend encompasses both elements!

A few of the ladies at Vivian O’Nay will be bringing you a column each season and on special occasions to update readers on upcoming trends. Each month we will feature a different employee over 50 to highlight her own personal style combined with the trends which are “in” at the moment. This month Cindy James has curated Cindy James from Vivian O’Nay At Vivian O’Nay we always models basic pieces paired with bright a collection to help us do hear women say, “I can’t accessories. just that! In her free time, wear that- it isn’t for my Cindy loves to educate herself on the age group!”. Our aim is Basics are also latest fashions to better help her clients to empower women to very easy to at the store. Her experience makes her step out of their comfort pair with fun an expert at helping find the perfect zones. We don’t want accessories. outfit for any body type. everyone walking around These in miniskirts and crop additions are At Apparel Market it became very tops of course but we do typically more evident which items are about to be affordable than encourage people to try popular- you’ll see the same styles something new. apparel- have everywhere you look! For Spring we saw fun with it! long skirts, thin knit sweaters in muted Fashion is more about You can make colors (white, mint, peach, and denim), trying things on, seeing a look go any watercolor esque prints, breezy linen how you look, showing off direction you materials, and pattern mixing. In this Cindy’s look encompases three trends in one your personality, and going desire with outfit- long skirts, watercolor fabrics, and collection, Cindy is showcasing statement for things that really make simply putting lightweight cardigans. pieces mixed with some basic items. It’s you feel confident. Until on a few key important to invest in good basics which next time...feel your style. pieces. Statement earrings, shoes, and can be worn year after year and dressed handbags are specifically on trend for up or down. The basic silk shell and Visit Vivian O'Nay and find your fashion sense, Spring. If you’re afraid to branch out and cardigan (pictured) can be worn together they're located at 3500 Wetumpka Highway, wear animal print or stripes all overor separately to develop many different Montgomery, AL. You can call 334.290.5268 ease into the trend by wearing it as an looks. The cardigan in particular is very or visit www.vivianonay.com addition to your outfit instead of as one on trend because it is a lightweight knit of your main pieces.

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Senior Services Alabama Department of

The Census is coming! The Census is coming!

Our vision is to help society and state government prepare for the changing aging demographics through effective leadership, advocacy, and stewardship.

Taking part is your civic duty.

Completing the census is mandatory: it’s a way to participate in our democracy and say

“I COUNT!”

Your privacy is protected.

It's against the law for the Census Bureau to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify you or your household. By law, your responses cannot be used against you and can only be used to produce statistics.

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Hopefully by now you programs have heard that 2020 • Medicare Part B – part is a Census year. In of the Medicare health mid-March, the U.S. insurance program for Census Bureau will all people over 65, no mail a packet to every matter their income Alabama household. It One in 10 older adults will include information experiences some form on how to complete of abuse, according to your census form in one the Census Bureau. One of three ways: online, of the largest programs by calling a toll-free which receives funding number and completing based on census over the telephone, information is allocated or by submitting a for elderly people who traditional paper form. are suffering from abuse Commissioner - Jean W. Brown The census will ask basic or neglect, including questions about all the people living or maltreatment, lack of adequate food or staying at your address, such as names, shelter, or financial abuse. Funding for ages, birth dates, race, sex, etc. The adult day care, senior center lunches, information you provide through the home-delivered meals, protection and 2020 Census is private and will not be remedy from abuse — both physical and used against you in any way or for any financial — are all funded from statistics other purpose. It is against the law for produced by the Census Bureau. your information to be shared or used by any other agency. Farm Fresh Nutrition Program The Senior Farmers Market Nutrition You may be asking yourself why should Program provides low-income seniors you participate? And how is your with coupons they can exchange for information going to make a difference? eligible foods (fruits, vegetables, honey, Having accurate information on the and fresh-cut herbs) at farmers markets, number of people age 65 and older is roadside stands, and community important for local, state, and federal supported agriculture programs. Getting lawmakers. They will use 2020 Census healthy food is a key concern for lowinformation to determine how to spend income older people. These coupons billions of federal dollars annually on are distributed based on information public services for the next 10 years. obtained during the census. Everyone uses roads, hospitals, and emergency services; but some state and Employment Opportunities federal programs are specifically for older Another program that receives funding populations. based on census information is the Senior Community Service Employment The top three largest federal programs Program (SCSEP), a work-based jobthat use census statistics to determine training program for older individuals. funding all serve the older population: According to the SCSEP, two-thirds of • Medicaid – health insurance program participants are women, and almost for low-income people including those 65 half are from a racial or ethnic minority. and older Veterans and qualified spouses are given • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance priority for enrollment. Participants get Program – provides numerous nutritional work experience in nonprofit and public The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


agencies, including schools, hospitals, day care centers, and senior centers. An accurate census count will ensure that the state receives its fair share of funding for all these important programs. The distribution of $13 billion in federal funds, grants, and support to our state’s counties and communities is based on the census data. If this funding is reallocated to other states due to an inaccurate census count, the funding for these services will have to be made up in some way at the local or state level to prevent cuts. Representation in Washington DC In addition, every 10 years the results of the census are used to reapportion the House of Representatives, determining how many congressional seats Alabama receives. Alabama is currently at risk of losing one or even two congressional seats in the 2020 Census due to projected slow growth. Losing Congressional seats means a weaker voice for our state and our people at the federal level. It is essential that all Alabamians participate in the census to retain this vital Congressional representation. YOUR VOICE MATTERS! IT TAKES LESS THAN 6 MINUTES. FOR EVERY PERSON NOT COUNTED ALABAMA LOSES $1600 IN FEDERAL FUNDING. We all have a say in the outcome of the 2020 Census, and it can end with Alabama receiving its fair share of funding and fair Congressional representation. Complete and return your 2020 Census form. Don’t sit on the sidelines. Our state and its people are counting on you! For more information on the 2020 Census visit www.alabama2020census.com. For more information on ADSS contact your local AAA and ADRC at 1-800-AGE-LINE (1-800-243-5463). You can also find us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. We want to help in any way we can.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Census 101: What You Need to Know

It’s about fair representation. Every 10 years, the results of the census are used to reapportion the US House of Representatives, determining how many seats Alabama gets. We stand to lose one representative or even two without an accurate count. It's in the Constitution. The U.S. Constitution mandates that everyone in the country be counted every 10 years. The first census was in 1790. It’s about $13 billion. The distribution of $13 billion in federal funds, grants, and support to our state’s counties and communities is based on the census data. That money is spent on schools, healthcare, hospitals, roads, and other vital programs. Taking part is your civic duty. Completing the census is mandatory: it’s a way to participate in our democracy and say “I COUNT!”

Your privacy is protected. It's against the law for the Census Bureau to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify you or your household. By law, your responses cannot be used against you and can only be usedto produce statistics.

www.alabama2020census.com R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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A BOOM! FEATURE

Getting To Know You

EastChase Senior Living

Community Senior Life Rebrands former Elmcroft of Halcyon to EastChase Senior Living Community Senior Life (CSL), a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization based in Orange Beach, AL announced it has assumed ownership of Elmcroft of Halcyon in Montgomery, Alabama from Elmcroft Senior Living, a subsidiary of Eclipse Senior Living. Community Senior Life and its sister company, Sage Management, are the Southeast’s leading advisors on assisted living compliance and operations strategy. With over 20 years of experience and a proven track record of more than 50 perfect, deficiencyfree surveys, CSL brings senior living industry and policy and procedure expertise to the team in Montgomery.

Senior Living. Ginger comes to Community Senior Life with a wealth of knowledge and extensive background with seniors in Alabama. Originally from Auburn, she has been serving senior adults since 1998 working in Hospice, Home Health, and after obtaining her Assisted Living Administrators License in 2006, as an Administrator for Specialty Care Senior Living with East Alabama Medical Center and Somerby

“Community Senior Life had no immediate plans to expand its reach into Montgomery, instead, the short-term goals included continued expansion for our current campuses in Coastal Alabama and in the high growth markets of Huntsville and Atlanta, GA,” said Doug Warren, President & CEO of Community Senior Life. “However, our review of the community concluded that the building has great structural bones, is in a wonderful location, has strong loyalty amongst families, residents, and staff, and provides the chance to be a market leader in compliance and operational value. We are thrilled for the opportunity to include the city of Montgomery on the CSL map of senior living communities and excited to rebrand this community as EastChase Senior Living.”

Senior Living. “Creating a home for the residents that is a safe and inviting environment while offering quality care is my goal,” says Fletcher. “I’m excited to come into EastChase Senior Living and establish the type of community that my own mother would approve. My focus during the transition and for the future is to concentrate on excellence in service and compliance, enhancing care, and encouraging the utmost comfort for our residents.”

Community Senior Life named Ginger Fletcher as Executive Director of EastChase

The assisted living community at EastChase Senior Living provides a

home-like setting with private studios and suites. Our senior apartments offer residents privacy while only being a few feet away from a thriving community that has ample social, physical, educational, and spiritual opportunities. The memory care community is designed to improve the quality of life for those dealing with memory impairing conditions. The staff at EastChase seeks to provide residents with an experience that is tailored to their goals, abilities, and interests. We provide this care in a safe and supportive environment where residents can thrive. Community Senior Life is owned and operated by Community Health Systems located in Orange Beach, AL. CSL is a family of not-for-profit healthcarerelated organizations specializing in senior independent living, assisted living, and memory care communities throughout Alabama and Florida. Dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for an ever-growing senior population, each organization within the CSL family is committed to meeting the social, spiritual, physical, and financial needs of its residents through innovate services in safe and caring environments. “Community Senior Life and their sister company Sage Management are well known in the senior living industry of Alabama,” said Ginger Fletcher, “I’ve come to know this organization as a very positive role model in senior adult care and I’m proud to now call myself a member of such a team!” EastChase Senior Living, located at 1775 Halcyon Blvd. Call 334-396-1111 for more information.

Join the team at EastChase Senior Living along with the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, March 5, 2020 at 1pm for their Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting Event. 10 BOOM!

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BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

March 2020 Volume 10 Issue 7

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom C.S. Lewis

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

6 Fashion Sense, Knows No Age 8 Alabama Department of Senior Services 10 Getting to Know You EastChase Senior Living 14 Publisher's Column 18 “Swing into Spring 2020” Concert

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19 Venice, Tuscany, Rome 20 Dogs on Call Announces Spring Training Class

Features 22 Hoarding Hid This Artist’s Exceptional Work

26 Allow Your Parent to Accept Help Graciously

38 The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

48 Tango: Where Romance Is Ageless

24 New Opportunities at AUM OLLI 30 Come On In, The Water's Fine! Leigh Anne Richards

Departments 40 This and That Interesting Stuff

60 {12} Things For Active Boomers

34 If You Have The Privilege Of Being Seventy, Don’t Waste It!

58 Greg Budell MORNING GLORY

36 Know When to Hold ‘Em Ask an Elder Law Attorney

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40 Naturally Artful Festival @ Jasmine Hill 42 The Vann Vocal Institute 2020 FREE CONCERT 46 Opelika Songwriters Festival

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50 BOOM! Cover Profile 56 Healthy Transitions By Jeff Barganier 62 Herbal Infusions Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla 63 Route 66 & Grand Canyon

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Free Subscriptions @ w w w. r i ve rre gio n b o o m.co m BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, P.O. Box 6203, Montgomery, AL 36106. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2020 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

DON'T WASTE IT! Are you 70 years old yet? Well I am, just turned 70 January 31st. Prior to my 70th birthday I was told more than once, “just wait until you turn 70, something changes, you start to feel your age”. I don’t feel my age yet after celebrating my 70th birthday at one of the finest restaurants in Costa Rica, overlooking the valley surrounding the capital, San Jose`. In fact, I’m embarrassed sometimes because I don’t have any “old man” thoughts at all. I’m still doing what I’ve always done, haven’t lost my mojo and I don’t intend to start living in the “old man” lane of life.

The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers

Jim Watson, Publisher jim@riverregionboom.com

In this month’s issue one of our writers talked about the fact that if you get to be 70 years old, DON’T WASTE IT! By that she means embrace all your wisdom and knowledge and share with the world, start new conversations, mentoring, hobbies, causes…get after life. You are better equipped than many of the youngsters who try to make us irrelevant to their world, OK Boomer sound familiar? The fact is this is our world too and we have much to contribute, especially at 70…80 or maybe even 90, God willing. Don’t be denied the skills and talent you have been practicing for decades, use it or lose it!

Jeff Barganier Tracy Bhalla Greg Budell

Dawn Mitchell Marcy Goldman Jan Taylor Goings Carrie Knowles Rick Lauber Elizabeth Diane Mack Willie Moseley Peggy Myrick Raley L. Wiggins

Our cover profile this month is someone who started her restaurant when she was 58 and continues to serve great food, provide live music and once a month some Gospel music for us diners to singalong with. Jan Taylor Goings, owner of Jan’s Beach House on Eastern Blvd, just down from Sam’s Wholesale. has been successful because she loves what she does and she loves the people she serves every day, except Sunday. When we recently met with Jan to do our photo shoot, we had fun trying to count the number of Flamingos in her restaurant but we forgot our calculators so we had to stop. It was fun getting to know Jan and I think you’ll enjoy getting to know her too, the food and music are great too, be sure and check Jan’s Beach House out.

Cover Photography Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom

There’s a whole lot more to read and relax with in this issue. We have a new fashion column this month for women over 50. The column will be a regular feature and is put together by the fashion ladies at Vivian O’Nay. They will serve your fashion needs and help you find the look that speaks to you. Nobody knows fashion like the folks at Vivian’s. Check them out and tell them you read about it in BOOM! We have a feature on the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band who have been around over 50 years and 50 years of practice makes you very good. Some of you may be planning to see them in concert this month at the MPAC so check out the feature article by Willie Moseley, he knows something about rock ‘n roll. Greg Budell shares his wake-up time and why, Greg is always sharing life and he is a refreshing voice of reality, I think you’ll enjoy this month’s column and while you’re at it share some Greg with your friends. There are plenty more good reads in this month’s issue so sit back and enjoy the reading experience, it was designed for you. Please consider our advertisers when you have needs, they’re all on the right side of positive aging and would love to do business with each of you. Please share your thoughts on this issue or any other ideas regarding BOOM! I love to listen. And remember if you're over 50, it’s a blessing to be alive, DON’T WASTE IT!

Jim 334.324.3472 cell/text

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Ancient Rome Exhibit Make plans now to attend

History Museum of Mobile, 111 S. Royal Street Mobile, AL 36602 I (251) 208-7569 I www.HistoryMuseumOfMobile.com

The History Museum of Mobile’s latest exhibit, Ancient Rome: The Empire That Shaped the World, brings to life the most incredible machines and technologies from ancient Rome for the first time in 2,000 years! From catapults, to gladiators, to the secrets of the incredible Colosseum, visitors can experience the Roman Empire’s most impressive machines of war and peace for a limited time in Mobile, Alabama. Traveling to Mobile all the way from Florence, Italy, this award-winning exhibition contains more than thirty interactive models that integrate science and history. Each piece is beautifully hand-crafted and fully functional – the result of six years of research, pouring over ancient Roman texts and blueprints. When the exhibition first opened in Rome, it was awarded the Italian President’s Gold Medal for Cultural Innovation, because it recreates machines and technologies that had been lost for over 2,000 years. At its height, the Roman Empire stretched from what is today England, east to Turkey, and south to Egypt and north Africa. In both war and peace, expanding the Empire required the

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invention of an extraordinary amount of technology. Pile drivers allowed the Romans to build bridges across rivers into enemy territories. Assault towers created a way to scale city walls and catapults hurled projectiles into enemy ranks. Then, to build over 250,000 miles of roads connecting the empire to Rome, engineers cut through hills, filled deep ravines, channeled water through aqueducts, tunneled mountains, and established a system of roads so enduring that many are still used today. Some of the exhibition’s most interesting machines don’t look all that different from those we use in the modern world. The sophistication of the Roman engineering resonates particularly well in Mobile, a port city known for building airplanes, constructing warships, and producing steel. In fact, some of the Roman

cranes look remarkable similar to those swinging in the Port of Mobile, just a few blocks from the History Museum. Allowing for a motor instead of oxenpower, it is the same systems of pulleys and levers that allow cranes to load cargo and drive commerce today. Handcrafted by the Artisans of Florence International, this exhibition Guests will be encouraged to explore the innovative machines “The History Museum is excited to be able to bring this remarkable exhibit from Italy to Mobile, and we’re grateful our partners AM/NS Calvert and the J.L. Bedsole Foundation have allowed us to do just that,” said Meg McCrummen Fowler, director of the History Museum of Mobile. This is a hands-on, interactive exhibit that allows visitors to discover such innovative machines that continue to influence the technologies of today. These machines don’t exist anywhere else in the world, and getting to experience them in Mobile is a rare treat. Visitors will be richly rewarding for touring an exhibition that explores the tactics, equipment, armor, logistics, war machines, and – above all – the empire that changed the world.

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Capitol Sounds Concert Band and Montgomery Recreators present their

The Capitol Sounds Concert Band and Montgomery Recreators will present their “Swing into Spring 2020” Concert on THURSDAY, March 12th, 7:00 p.m., at Saint James United Methodist Church, 9045 Vaughn Road in East Montgomery.

“Swing into Spring 2020” Concert supported by the City of Montgomery Parks and Recreation Department. The band was organized in 1972 and performs a wide variety of music, including marches, classical, patriotic, show tunes, jazz and swing. The membership represents a broad spectrum of backgrounds and new members are always welcome. Membership is open to all who have finished high school and want to continue playing in a concert band.

Two of Montgomery’s oldest performing organizations will be in concert together again on March 12. The Capitol Sounds Concert Band, organized in 1972, and the Montgomery Recreators Jazz Band, organized in 1974, will present a concert at St. James United Methodist Church. The Capitol Sounds will feature the “Overture to Colas Breugnon” by Dmitri Kabalevsky; “Symphony No. 3” (for band) by Vittorio Giannini, “The Chimes of Liberty March” by Edwin Franko Goldman, and “Tuba Tiger Rag” based on the Canadian Brass version. The Montgomery Recreators will also perform a set of classic Capitol Sounds Concert Band big band and swing favorites, which will The band provides an opportunity be sure to for musicians to enjoy a challenging have a little and rewarding experience to play Saxophones with Capitol Sounds something in a quality level concert band. This for everyone! organization is continuing the tradition The event is free and open to the public, of providing concert band music for but donations are always welcome. the many activities and occasions that take place in the capitol city each year. CAPITOL SOUNDS CONCERT BAND In addition, the band performs several The Capitol Sounds Concert Band concerts each year for Montgomery and of Montgomery, Alabama, is an allthe surrounding area. volunteer, non-profit organization

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The band is under the direction of John Jackson, who is in his 17th year as conductor and musical director. John is a native of Ozark, Alabama, and completed his Bachelor and master’s degrees from Troy University. John also serves on the board of directors for the Arts Council of Montgomery. For more information about Capitol Sounds Concert Band, please visit www.capitolsounds.org or contact John Jackson, Director, Capitol Sounds Concert Band, (334) 625-4661 or Email: capitolsounds@gmail.com. The Montgomery Recreators Dance Band was established in 1974 under the auspices of the Montgomery Parks and Recreation Department to provide an artistic outlet for persons interested in big band swing and to serve the local community. It is designed and organized to encourage the enjoyment of big band swing music by offering those qualified the opportunity to play in the Band and by performing in and for the community. The Montgomery Recreators Dance Band The Montgomery Recreators Dance Band was formed through the efforts of public-spirited individuals with a special interest in big band jazz. Membership in the Montgomery Recreators Dance Band is open to persons having the necessary musical and performance skills and the availability to participate.

The Montgomery Recreators Dance Band is by design a non-profit organization. As a general rule, members John Jackson, Director, are not paid for Capitol Sounds Concert Band performances, as the Band concentrates its efforts principally in support of charitable and community service endeavors. For more information please visit: www.montgomeryrecreators.com

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Easterseals Dogs on Call Announces Spring Training Class Animal Assisted Therapy programs are essential in providing hope and healing to humans across the United States. Locally, a dog therapy program has been providing these services for thousands of people over the last twelve years. Easterseals Dogs on Call (DOC)has approximately 50 trained teams that visit numerous hospitals, nursing homes, hospice appointments, children’s centers, and events throughout the year in the River Region. DOC has carved out a number of interesting venues over the years. For instance, DOC has been in partnership with the Montgomery Miracle League Baseball Program for over 8 seasons. The ‘Dugout Dogs’ provide a great deal of fun for the children and adults with disabilities who participate in the league. Many of the children love running bases with the dogs, while others simply enjoy their company in the dugout. It has been shown that therapy dogs can be quite effective in medical therapy settings. Professionals in disciplines such as Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Speech Therapy have used DOC dogs to improve the abilities of the patients in these particular fields. The presence of a certified therapy dog can make all the difference in the healing process. Starting March 31, 2020, the organization will begin Spring Training Class at Pet Supermarket.

Rosco @ Wesley Gardens

“Our first night is used to evaluate the dog’s temperament and obedience skill level. It is imperative that potential therapy dogs have a temperament that is gentle, patient, and friendly,” said Mark Vosel, one of the DOC trainers. “We will simulate many of the human behaviors we have experienced with our dogs over the years and determine if new dogs can continue with the classes”, Vosel noted. This includes activities like close hugging, loud noises, distractions and a few gentle pokes. Once the dogs pass the temperament testing, the owner and dog work together as a therapy team for 5 classes, including an obedience ‘midterm’. Upon passing the ‘midterm’, the teams start simulated therapy visits with medical equipment, distractions, and an abundance of human contact. Dogs must be at least one year old, have some basic obedience skills, and owners need to be at least 18 years old. All dog breeds are accepted, including mixed breeds. In fact, Vosel noted that DOC has certified dogs from Chihuahuas to Great Danes and everything in between. Upon completion of the classes, the team takes a final exam. At that point they are ready to complete their 3 ‘observations’ with a trainer in a real venue. “We feel very strongly about providing the best training we can for our students. In over 12 years, we have not had a single negative incident with our dog teams and it is due to great training and constant monitoring,” Vosel stated. While the training is challenging, the rewards are tremendous. Vosel’s dog Millie has served over 11 years and there have been many amazing moments. “I sit back and let her do the work. I come away more blessed than the people we visit,” said Vosel. Supporting Montgomery Miracle League Baseball

Spring classes will start on March 31 at 6PM at Pet Supermarket on Perry Hill Road. Anyone interested can just show up with their dog on leash. For more information on the class or our organization, visit our Facebook Page: DOGS on CALL, a program of Easterseals Alabama or our website: www.dogsoncall.com You can also email for more information at Info@dogsoncall.com. We look forward to seeing you at our Spring Training Class.

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By Elizabeth Diane Mack

Hoarding Hid This Artist’s Exceptional Work After my mother-in-law died, we discovered remarkable surprises

When my 78-mother-in-law, DeAnne Mack, died suddenly in 2018, the chore of cleaning out the Omaha, Neb. house she’d lived in for over 50 years fell to my husband and me. We weren’t looking forward to it. DeAnne, we knew, had been hoarding for decades. For my husband, the task of sifting through piles of his mother’s possessions — at first sight, mostly dime store junk and trash — unearthed long-held feelings of shame, embarrassment and anger. DeAnne’s hoarding had been a constant battle between the two of them for years. There was begging, threats and finally, punishment when my husband and his sister stopped visiting the home they’d grown up in.

the mountains of junk. As they worked, though, they began discovering handmade quilts in various stages, a few complete, most half-done.

A winning piece by talented quilter and artist DeAnne Mack

DeAnne fell somewhere north of a “Level 2” hoarder: a few rooms unusable; piles stacked on furniture; overflowing trash cans; rotting food; mild odors; evidence of insect infestation. And the stage of grief we experienced after her death mimicked her hoarding level. We were firmly stuck in Stage 2 — anger (laced with guilt). In the back of our minds, we always knew one day we’d be left to clean up the house. But we’d hoped DeAnne

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First one, then two, then four, and soon, a dozen. The bedspread-size quilts DeAnne had started lay unfinished in piles on floors. First-place ribbons from local quilt shows were pinned on many, tiny labels, “Handmade by DeAnne,” carefully sewn into back corners.

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might miraculously change before that day came. We didn’t understand that this just wasn’t possible.

And then, it turned out, there were more than just quilts.

The Remarkable Surprises Inside Her House

The first few days after the funeral, the family sifted through layers upon layers of trash, filling a large dumpster but barely making a dent in the house. Then, something incredible happened.

Some of DeAnne Mack’s fabric from the estate sale

A friend of my mother-in-law’s offered to bring in an estate sale team she volunteered for through the local Kiwanis chapter. Once we had the worst of the trash out, they began the slow task of sorting the salvageable possessions from

Many of DeAnne’s intricately detailed fiber art wall hangings lay buried on couches. They featured Asian geishas, Amish farm scenes, city skylines and hens and chicks.

A Hidden, Enormous Collection of Quilts and Paintings

While we knew DeAnne had belonged to several local quilt groups, we had brushed off her hobby as just another avenue for her hoarding. For Christmases and birthdays, she would often gift

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family with potholders, pincushions, table runners and other hand-made knickknacks, but the enormity of her “collection” was kept hidden. My husband felt with these “gifts,” his mother was just trying to move her junk into our house as hers overflowed.

We knew we wanted to see her work completed, and shared. As we collected the remnants of DeAnne’s artistic life, we slowly began the task of getting the unfinished quilts finished, hiring a quilter from one of her local groups to complete some and traded material to a church group to finish another.

law’s death, we displayed a few of her traditional quilts and fiber art wall hangings in a local quilt walk, with a sign, “In Loving Memory-DeAnne Mack” on each quilt. We had failed during my mother-in-law’s lifetime to appreciate her talents and hoped that by displaying her work, others would recognize them. On the day of the quilt walk, we strolled the gardens where DeAnne’s quilts hung on display, as admirers with white-gloved hands talked of her faux piped binding, intricate corners and appliquéd tops.

As the estate-sale team tediously worked their way through the house, framed watercolor and oil-acrylic We also got many of her paintings by DeAnne were This summer, we hope to have our own paintings framed. also unearthed from the public quilt walk that will include her DeAnne Mack’s family didn’t know she created beautiful quilts like this garage and basement. watercolor and oil paintings. Then, we invited extended Portraits of weathered barns and barbed family in to take one of DeAnne’s wire fences, windmills on open prairies Through this process, the complicated paintings or quilted pieces as a keepsake. and snow-covered landscapes soon filled feelings of shame and anger my husband And by summer, we had the first of an entire room. Faded business cards grew up with have transformed into two estate sales, billed as a “quilter’s saying “DeAnne’s Art,” some with prices acceptance and even pride as friends paradise.” handwritten in the corners, were found and strangers among the paintings. have recognized DeAnne had his mother’s amassed enough When we saw the art, my husband said immense artistic material to fill two his mother painted in his youth, but gifts. Her hoarding fabric stores. Some had long since laid down her brush and disorder was what quilts filled one taken up quilting as a new outlet for she had, not who bedroom — floor her obsessive spending and compulsive she was. to ceiling; larger stockpiling. pieces took up the Her heirlooms Turns out, DeAnne’s talent as a multitwo front rooms. Another of Mack’s hidden talents: painting serve as a The image of 200 faceted artist had been buried for years pairs of scissors graced the Facebook reminder that underneath it all lay a — literally. estate sale page. We laughed that gifted artist, even perhaps, a creative DeAnne must have bought a new pair of genius. Turning Our Anger Into Sorrow scissors when one became lost under the The more we uncovered, the more Source: www.nextavenue.org. Elizabeth Diane Mack piles of fabric. Finally, we could laugh. our anger toward my mother-in-law is an Omaha, Neb.-based journalist and freelance softened, evolving into sorrow, as we writer whose articles have appeared in First for came to appreciate the colossal talent The Quilt Walk in Her Memory Women, Capper’s Farmer, Out Here, Nebraskaland and numerous other print and online outlets. her hoarding had long overshadowed. The summer after my mother-in-

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New Opportunities at AUM OLLI

Join OLLI at Auburn University at Montgomery Spring is approaching, and, with its arrival, AUM OLLI members have some new opportunities offered as part of their membership. On March 14, 2020, AUM OLLI members can spend Saturday at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. Beginning at 10:30 a.m., they will have an introduction to the history of the theatre and its plans for future developments followed by a tour of the facility. After a lunch together, they will discuss Alabama Story, a play based on an historical event here in Alabama. They can then attend a performance of the play and participate in a post-show discussion of it. Members can attend either the morning or the afternoon sessions or both, but registration is required for both sessions. To register for the morning events, visit www.aum.edu/olli, and to purchase

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tickets for the matinee performance of Alabama Story, call the ASF box office 334-271-5353. Email Nancy G. Anderson at nanderso@aum.edu if you have any questions about the day’s activities. The 2020 spring and summer OLLI catalog is now available, online or in a print copy. New courses include an introduction to independent European travel, contemporary Middle East relations, computer classes, and authors talking about their books (a class sponsored by NewSouth Books). Repeated or continuing classes include: investigatory course on sports, zentangle, pine needle basket weaving, jewelry making, brain bowl, an introduction to exhibits at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, and dancing classes (line dancing and ballroom dancing).

There is also a variety of Bonus Opportunities. The spring term potluck lunch is scheduled for Monday, April 13, from 12:20 – 1:20 p.m. Lunch programs include presentations about a trip to China, Jasmine Hill Gardens, photography, and B-western movies – something for everyone! These programs are included with AUM OLLI membership, but we do ask for registration. To participate in these events, if you are not an OLLI member, join OLLI and register today! View more details about AUM OLLI – membership, fees, and the online catalog – by visiting www.aum. edu/OLLI or contact Brittany Thomasson at 334-244-3804.

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How to Allow Your Parent to

By Rick Lauber

Accept Help Graciously 7 Ideas to Allow Your Parent to Accept Help Understanding and accepting parental resistance is a good start. If you expect a battle, try these ideas to lead to a peaceful truce. These tips change can shift the conversation from "giving help" to "accepting help."

How can we help someone in need who doesn’t want any help? How do you allow your parent to accept help graciously, and preserve their pride and dignity? How do I deal with a difficult parent? These are some of the most often asked questions from well-meaning family caregivers. If you feel trapped in a power struggle, try not to take it personally. Understanding Parents' Resistance to Help Your aging parent may resist or refuse help for VALID REASONS, such as: I Habit. Your parent(s) could decline your outstretched hand out of habit. They’ve always fended for themselves, so why stop now? I Pride. Asking for help may signal their physical or mental decline. Asking one's

children for help is a stronger signal of decline, to some people. I Privacy. Is your aging loved one a private person by nature? Talking about one’s own health can be very personal, and seniors may choose not to share. I Cost. Your mother or father may feel the the expense unnecessary, or burdensome.

1. Let the person achieve something on their own. Even tying shoelaces can be tricky. Limited vision, reduced hand-eye coordination and stiff joints can make the routine difficult. If several attempts are unsuccessful, say something like, “I’ll get those laces tied for you”. 2. Reframe questions to statements. In the previous example, if you asked the question “Can I tie your shoelaces for you?” you may well hear “No.” Letting the person try, and then "pitching in"

This article is sponsored by Home Care Assistance, for more info visit ò www.homecareassistance.com

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


may be more productive. You could also replace lace-up shoes with Velcro closure shoes. These are easier to tighten and release. Again, don’t ask if you can replace a senior’s shoes. Confirm the shoe size and get a new pair. 3. Approach your parent with a united front. My two sisters and I used this tactic when we decided it was high time for Mom and Dad to stop driving. While it was challenging to talk to our parents about driving, we were successful. There were three of us us saying the same thing and echoing each other’s words. We explained that we worried about them both if they were behind the wheel. Mom and Dad could not argue our concern and agreed. 4. Provide viable options when requesting anything. With my own parent's driving, an alternative was for a family member to drive them where they need to go. Our parents could also use a seniors' driving service, such as GoGoGrandparent, call a taxicab, or catch public transit. 5. Go slow and start early. Accept the fact that some changes may be a long time coming. Start with small offers of help and grow from there; chances are better that you will be successful. The earlier you begin these conversations, the better. 6. Take your time with anything new. Book one day of home care assistance first as an experiment rather than five days. By offering less, it’s harder for someone to refuse. This can get your foot in the door and you can work up (and add more) from there. 7. Involve a doctor. If the resistance remains too much, call for back-up! Parents may fight tooth and nail against their adult children. These same seniors are often open to a doctor’s recommendations. If you’re having problems convincing Mom and/or Dad to accept help, contact their doctor. Book an appointment for Mom or Dad to see the doctor under any pretense. Let the doctor discuss those awkward topics, instead of you. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Master Gardener's Perspective

By Dawn Mitchell

The Little Garden on the Side of the Road OK, it’s 1960 and I’m at my Nanny and Granddaddy’s house and of course I was allowed to stay up as late as I wanted, or at least as late as they stayed up. You know, you learn a lot about a man after 8:30 pm, my at-home bedtime. My granddaddy always had time for me (I guess most like to remember it that way, but he really did MAKE the time). We played dominoes, real dominoes, not the kind you order out. We ate ice cream sundaes that my Nanny piled high with made to order toppings. “We” made turkey yelpers; he was known for calling turkeys and he had the beards to prove it! This little stroll down memory lane has caused me to digress, and if you’re still reading, thank you! I’m beginning my fourth class as an intern in the Master Gardner program through the Montgomery County Extension Service and I’m loving every second of it…so glad to be retired, but that’s ANOTHER story, and I’m finally learning just how little I know about gardening. I love to plant flowers, some are actually from SEEDS, and watch them grow and grow as I water and water and water AND water. You see, my Nanny could throw a stick in the yard and up would come roses and daffodils and parsley, and she could drop a leaf in her “homemade” potting soil, she knew just how much perlite and vermiculite was needed for every African violet, bromeliad, fern, you name it…all to become blue ribbon worthy. I’m not quite sure how this

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curiosities. “We” would fill out the order form for these weird specimens and we’d check the post office box every day anxiously awaiting their arrival. I’m quite sure I’d lost interest or maybe even forgotten and I don’t remember the planting, but I will never forget what came out of that garden!

green thumb was handed down to my Daddy, her son-in-law of ALL things, but he had her passion for gardening in the yard when it was a hobby and not the vegetable gardening that we depended on when I was growing up…those vegetables taste better every time I think of them. Back to Granddaddy and his after-hours hobbies. He loved to plant and harvest a backyard garden, that is, when he wasn’t playing dominoes with his buddies at the drug store. So, he would spend some of those “after 8:30 pm hours” pouring over the Burpee Seed Catalog, looking for vegetables that he’d either never heard of, seen and/or definitely never eaten. We would laugh at the “guaranteed” results…doubting that we’d ever see such! It was the unusual he was looking for-the challenge of growing but more the fun he would have showing off these

Remember, it’s 1960…no one had ever heard of or seen or eaten spaghetti squash…it’s 1960…mission accomplished. I have no idea how my Nanny figured out how to cook it without Pinterest, or googling “Healthiest Way to Prepare Spaghetti Squash”. There’s a good possibility that bacon grease was somehow involved…remember, it is 1960. The most memorable for me was the yard long, yes, YARD LONG, green beans. Just one could make a good mess of beans. And they were longer than I was tall!!! Just to be sure “we” measured them all before they were shown to my Granddaddy’s buddies. I inherited the green thumb, ‘kinda’, but I have really big (long) shoes to fill. Most of the 2500 folks in town can attest to seeing some crazy things come out of that little garden on the side of the road. My granddaddy had confirmed that Mr. Burpee was a man of his word…plant it and it will grow. Lots of other interesting vegetables made it to our table in 1960, but it took the 21st century to convince the masses that they were edibles. Dawn Mitchell, a Master Gardener of Class 2018, lives in Montgomery. For more information on becoming a master gardener, visit www. capcitymga.org or email capcitymga@gmail. com.

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Written By Guest Columnist, Peggy Myrick

Come On In, The Water's Fine!

Water exercise classes are held in the deep or shallow end of a swimming pool, and because of their low-impact format, are suitable for virtually every fitness level. Water classes go by many names: Aqua Aerobics; Swimmercise; Aqua Fit; Hydronastics; Aqua Express; Aquacize; and the list goes on. Whatever the specific name of the class, all of them have many overlapping physiological and psychological benefits to offer their participants. If you've not yet experienced water-based exercise, then come on in, the water's fine! It's a fine way indeed to help you achieve your fitness over fifty goals.

The Older Adult Population vs. The Benefits of Water Exercise As we age, many of us are challenged by physical and/or emotional ailments that compromise our ability to exercise safely and pain free, if at all. Some of us struggle with painful and stiff arthritic knees, hands, or hips; our range of motion and flexibility are becoming more and more restricted; we may suffer from loneliness, depression, anxiety, or great loss; and we stumble over obstacles more easily. We seem to be forever recovering from some illness, injury, or surgery. Over time, our various maladies could have a negative cumulative effect on our activities of daily living and threaten our physical independence. To add insult to injury, many of us put on unwanted pounds

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because of the lack of, or decrease in, exercise.

more resistance than air. Because of viscosity, submerged body movements are resisted in ALL directions. Your muscles Numerous research studies exist that agree develop and become stronger as you work on several physiological and psychological against the persistent resistance that water benefits for people who regularly participate provides. 3. Flexibility Exercises: Flexibility is defined as the ability of limbs to move at the joints through a complete range of motion. (2) In order to maintain flexibility, the joints must regularly be taken by Leigh Anne Richards through their full range of motion. The effects of gravity are reduced in water so joints can be moved through their full range of motion in water exercise—several of these benefits without excess joint stress. In water, we can are discussed below. slowly improve our flexibility which carries 1. Aerobic Exercise: Aerobic (or the added benefit of decreasing our injury cardiovascular) exercise is defined as brisk risk. exercise that gets your heart pumping; your 4. Balance Training: Did you know that if vascular system delivering oxygenated blood we don't practice our balance, we will lose to your working muscles; and your breathing it? The aquatic environment is an excellent rate elevated.(9) Water exercise easily arena for training balance. The buoyant meets this definition and examples include and viscous properties of water provide walking, running, cross-country skiing, and support for your body that assists with jumping jacks all performed in the water. balance. Being surrounded by water reduces Sustaining aerobic exercise longer than 10 or eliminates the fear of falling because minutes involves your cardiovascular system the water will not allow you to fall, it will and can improve your heart health and support you through all your exercises. lower your blood pressure. (9) Additionally, since the water is constantly 2. Muscle Strengthening Exercises: Water moving and pushing on your body to some workouts increase muscular strength and degree, it increases your balance challenge muscular endurance by using the resistance in safe surroundings. A few examples of of the water. Water is more viscous or training your balance in water include “thicker” than air and provides 12 times walking on a “Balance Beam,” standing on

Fitness over Fifty

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


one foot in a “Yoga-inspired tree pose,” or playing “red-light-green-light.” 5. Mobility Issues: In water, a person experiences two opposing forces; namely, the downward vertical force of gravity and the upward vertical force of buoyancy. Buoyancy depends on the depth of immersion of the body. Exercising in water reduces the load, stress, and impact on your spine and joints. This means that people who are unable to tolerate land-based exercises because of painful joints, mobility issues, or excess weight, can comfortably walk and perform other exercises in water. 6. Rehabilitation Friendly: Due to water's buoyant property, water exercise is excellent for post-surgery and post-injury rehabilitation because of the reduced pressure and impact on compromised joints and/or muscles. 7. Great for the Core and the Spine: A water workout promotes gains in core strength and core stability for better spinal health. Vertical alignment of the body with flotation belts in the deep end allows for maximum core recruitment and core training and encourages decompression of the spine. 8. Increased Circulation and Reduced

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Joint Swelling: Hydrostatic pressure {water pressure exerted equally on all surface areas of the body at rest} increases circulation and reduces swelling of inflamed joints. It acts like an oversized compression sleeve for the entire immersed body, helping to relieve muscle aches and stiffness. Hydrostatic pressure also puts pressure on the rib cage so breathing while immersed in water helps

to improve respiratory function. 9. Promotes Weight Loss: Water exercise can help you trim down. Caloric expenditure in water is comparable to landbased exercise. Studies show that a typical 60-minute water aerobics class burns about 400-500 calories. Keep in mind, however, that a participant does have to work during class to obtain optimal caloric burn---talking for most of the class won't burn as many calories . 10. Friendly and Fun: Participating in a water exercise class provides a place to socialize with your peers and to make new friends. It also promotes support and encouragement from others and to others. An aquatic environment is conducive to relaxation and stress reduction. Exercising in water is just plain fun. . . it brings out the Kid in all of us! To learn more about water exercise classes contact your local YMCA or summer only classes, area country clubs. Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General ManagerMetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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by Carrie Knowles

If You Have The Privilege Of Being Seventy, Don’t Waste It! Seventy is the new outspoken. Speak up!

Old is hot. Hot flashes. Hot ticket. Hot. Being old and hot is in the news. In “Younger Longer: Can We Age Better? Or Even Stop the Process of Aging? (“The New Yorker” May 20, 2019), Adam Gopnik raises an interesting question: What if modern medicine and aging research could hold the clock steady on being middle aged, thereby allowing us to get older without growing old? Think of being seventy or even eighty without worrying about climbing a flight of stairs or apologizing for “a senior moment.” On May 16, 2019, the “New York Times” published two articles in the Styles section about aging with style: “Polishing the Silver” by Ruth La Ferla and “Take That Graying Mane and Add a Burst of Fun” by Crystal Martin. Both articles made growing old and going gray sound like an invitation to a dress-up party. I’m all for getting older with a little style in my step. For the first time in my life, thanks to the miracle of double cataract surgery, I can see well enough without glasses to artfully apply eye shadow and draw on a smooth bit of eyeliner. And you better believe I intend to fancy on some makeup every day for the rest of my life. It looks great. Makes me feel a touch glamorous and, most importantly, well armored to go out into the world and have my say. You see, getting older, is no longer the voice-silencing, invisibilityinducing sentence it used to be. Seventy is about more than feeling and looking good. Seventy is the new outspoken. And, it’s about time. Seventy is a privilege. It’s a gift. It’s about

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won’t be hard. Have coffee with them. Talk. Listen; especially listen. Offer support, direction, whatever is needed. It’s that helping hand thing and it works. When was the last time you had a conversation? A real one that mattered? This is your chance.

time we embraced that gift and used our years of making mistakes while doing some things right to be something better, do something bigger, and live larger, as though we don’t have enough time left to do anything else. You think being seventy is hard? Try being eighteen. Can you imagine? Have you ever known such chaos? Such uncertainty? The stock market is bobbling at every tweet and tariff. Unemployment is up, then it’s down. Getting a college education costs more than ever before and many are left paying off student loans for decades after graduation, making it impossible to get ahead, buy a house or start a family. There’s climate change riding the winds of terrifying hurricanes, tornados and flooding rains. There are whispers of war here, there, everywhere. School shootings…and guns…don’t get me started. Too much is happening for us to be silent…and those of us lucky enough to be seventy have the protection of age to speak up. It’s time for us to step up to the plate, be the elders, the wise ones, the ones who have lived long enough to speak truth to power. It’s time to find new ways to “act your age.” 1) Be a mentor. Find someone who can use your expertise, your help. It

2) Pick an issue. Dealer’s choice. The environment. Politics. School lunches. Classroom size. Money for the arts. Guns. Voting rights. Climate change. Transportation. Health care. Pick one; then, do something about it. Now. 3) Find a new hobby. It doesn’t matter whether it’s baking cakes, planting a garden, building birdhouses or writing poems. Share what you love with someone. That’s how we build stronger communities. Make new friends. Create a kinder world. 4) Take care of yourself. Exercise even if you have never exercised before. Exercise your body, and your voice. Be strong. Be focused. Raise a little hell. Have a little fun, and don’t ever think for a minute that there’s nothing you can do to change things. You’re seventy or maybe eighty or, hallelujah! Ninety!! You’re not old. You’re one of the warriors. All those years of living have prepared you for this chance to make a difference. Step out, step up, and speak up! You’ll be surprised who is waiting to hear what you have to say. This article first appeared on www.psychologytoday.com for more about author Carrie Knowles, www.cjanework.com/about-carrie

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney

By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

Know When to Hold ‘Em

When I was in college the No-Limit Texas Hold ‘Em fad was sweeping its way through the dregs of ESPN2 and other cable “sports” networks. It even found its way into my circle of friends, which I found irritating since I wasn’t interested in having a seat at that table. Personally, I’ve always been a gambling agnostic—I don’t particularly have a problem with other people gambling if that’s how they choose to spend their money. I understand that for some, the competition and the little rush they get from winning a big hand is exciting. What I could never understand, what I will never understand, is the appeal of watching other people play poker on television. To each his own. Plenty of people have made analogies about life and card playing. Perhaps the best known example is the Kenny Rogers tune, The Gambler and it’s hook which I’m confident, after you read this article, will be stuck in your head for at least the next several hours: You got to know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘em / know when to walk away, and know when to run. / You never count your money, when you’re sittin’ at the table / They’ll be time enough for counting / when the dealin’s done. Since this is an estate planning and elder law column, I’ll do my best to see what we can learn about planning your estate from a classic country song.

Know When to Hold ‘Em. Sometimes the best thing you can do is to do nothing at all. Consider this: leaving an inheritance to someone who doesn’t have the tools to manage it can lead to disaster. For example, leaving a teenager even a relatively modest amount of money, without any strings attached, can be a recipe for disaster. Likewise, loved ones may be ill-equipped to handle an inheritance due to substance abuse problems, or even gambling problems. Sometimes the best thing you can do for someone you love is to leave them an inheritance in a way that benefits them, without giving them unfettered access to money that may only exacerbate

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their problems. Consider a testamentary trust provision to protect your heirs from themselves.

truth. We have no way to know who will be alive at the time we die, or what kind of property we will own at our deaths. We may have more property as the result of Know When to Fold ‘Em / Know When successful investments, inheritance, or even to Walk Away. Sometimes you’ve got a the lottery (in another state, of course). On bad hand, and you’re sitting across the the other hand, we may have much less table from someone you can’t bluff. Time property due to poor investments or due to to cut your losses and fold. In my line of the cost of a nursing home stay (currently about $6,000 per month) or some other Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop financial pitfall. As a Wednesday, March 18: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm result, your at 322 Catoma Street downtown Montgomery. This educational estate plan must include workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, contingencies trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate for dealing administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce with these ups and downs. and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid

Attend Free Workshop

qualification. Registration is required. Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com. business, I sometimes have to counsel clients who, after much angst and heavy thought, decide to disinherit one or more of their children. For whatever reason, the relationship between the parent and child has deteriorated to the point where the parent feels as though leaving that child an inheritance would not be appropriate. This is part of my job that I do not relish, but the fact is that sometimes it is the right thing to do under the circumstances. When a parent has tried everything they can to encourage a wayward child to change their ways, cutting their inheritance may be the last best way to get their attention. Don’t Count Your Money While You’re Sittin’ at the Table. Most people assume that everyone in their family will die when they are “supposed to.” That is, they assume that their children will outlive them, that their grandchildren will outlive their children, and so on. Most people also assume that they’ll die in pretty much the same financial condition as they are in on the day that they create their estate plan. Nothing of course could be further from the

Consider for example that the day you wrote your will you had $220,000 in the bank. Your will leaves a gift of $20,000 to your church, and splits whatever is left between your four children. Ten years pass, and your health declines. After a long stay in a nursing home, you pass away with only $15,000 left in the bank. In that case, your church would receive $15,000, and your children would receive nothing. While leaving it to the church is a good and noble thing to do, it probably wasn’t what you intended when you drafted your will. But, by assuming you know what you will have when you die, your children wound up with no inheritance at all. You never know what hand life will deal you, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a strategy before you ante up and turn your cards over. You have to know when to hold ‘em . . . Raley L. Wiggins Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com 322 Catoma Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, www.redoaklegalpc.com

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

Half a century of eclectic music

By Willie Moseley

The legendary Nitty Gritty Dirt Band has now been purveying its unique style of music for over half a century, and the group’s founding guitarist, Jeff Hanna, recently went on the record with River Region BOOM! regarding the band’s long history.

“Those were written by songwriters we really admired,” Hanna said of the hits. “’Bojangles’ was written by Jerry Jeff Walker, ‘Some of Shelley’s Blues” was a Michael Nesmith tune, and “House at Pooh Corners” was written by Kenny Loggins, back when he was starting out.” Band members were still known to play jug band instruments on selected concert songs, as exemplified at a concert at Troy State University, where they opened the show with a rousing version of “Foggy Mountain Breakdown.”

The NGDB was originally known as Will the Circle be Unbroken, a triple-LP a “jug band,” and collaboration between the Nitty Gritty Dirt was founded “… Band and legendary country and bluegrass in 1966, in Long musicians, was recorded in Nashville in Beach, California,” August of 1971 and released the following The “classic ‘70s” lineup of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Left to right, John according to Hanna. year. Participants included Mother McEuen, Jeff Hanna, Les Thompson, Jimmy Ibbotson, Jimmy Fadden “We were six guys Maybelle Carter, Roy Acuff, Doc Watson, songs on it, and we changed directions.” who all played guitar, but we went with and Earl Scruggs, among others. other instruments. A jug band uses a jug, of The band briefly broke up, and Hanna and course, as well as acoustic instruments and The monumental recording sessions also erstwhile NGDB bandmate Christopher unusual or homemade instruments. I also included acclaimed performances by Darrow played in ended up playing a washboard, which was talented but somewhata band called the a lot of fun.” obscure fiddler Vassar Corvettes. They Clements. On one song, recorded two singles Jackson Browne was also a founding Clements unexpectedly produced by Michael member of the NGDB. He departed after a threw in the signature Nesmith of the few months, but the singer/songwriter kept passage from the musical Monkees, and also in touch with his former bandmates over theme of television’s backed up Linda the decade. Dragnet police drama. Ronstadt. As the band’s acclaim increased, they “Wasn’t that great?” When the NItty Gritty appeared in movies in the late Sixties, Hanna said of the Dragnet Dirt Band regrouped, including Paint Your Wagon. ad lib. “It doesn’t get any the membership better than that!” The band’s “breakthrough” album was consisted of what “Paint Your Wagon was a musical Western,” 1970’s Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy. has become known Hanna recounted, “and had Clint Eastwood The album was considered as the “classic Seventies” lineup of Jimmy and Lee Marvin. We enjoyed playing ‘Hand to be a milestone in American music Fadden (drums and harmonica), Jimmy Me Down That Can o’ Beans’.” history, and in 2005, Will the Circle be Ibbotson (guitar), Les Thompson (bass), Unbroken was added to the National multi-instrumentalist John McEuen (fiddle, Hanna also recounted the transition of the Registry of the Library of Congress. banjo, mandolin, guitar, keyboards) and band to a “country rock” outfit that played Hanna (guitar). electric instruments. Hanna was also appreciative of how the Early 1970 saw the release of what would chronicle of the album was detailed on the be their breakout album, Uncle Charlie “We’d been together for a couple of years,” recent “Country Music” PBS documentary & His Dog Teddy, produced by McEuen’s he said, “and had been doing concerts with by Ken Burns. One of the more memorable brother William. The album pulled its songs bands like the Jefferson Airplane. Then images from the presentation was an from numerous genres of American music, the Byrds’ Sweetheart of the Rodeo was in-the-studio photograph in which Hanna and begat three hits, including the band’s released in 1968. It had some tremendous was seated opposite and slightly below signature song, “Mr. Bojangles”.

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Maybelle Carter. He confirmed that his countenance as he gazes at the matriarch is indeed reverential.

on quickly when the project was being organized.

“A couple of artists weren’t “One of my actually able favorites,” he to make said of the rehearsals,” photo. he said, “because Amid it was personnel September changes in the and latter half of everybody Hanna (right) gazes at greatness during the August 1971 Will the the ‘70s, the was on the band became Circle be Unbroken recording sessions. From left, the iconic musicians road. They are Maybelle Carter, Merle Travis, and Pete “Oswald’ Kirby. known as literally came Photo by William McEuen. simply the Dirt out on the Band for several years, and marketed such day of the show. And this wasn’t just a hits as “An American Dream” with Linda ‘guest list’—these were all folks who had Ronstadt on harmony vocals, and “Make A impacted our careers on a personal or Little Magic”, vocally assisted by Nicolette professional level.” Larson.

Hanna averred that his favorite personal moment from the show was singing “Paradise,” which the band had never recorded, with Prine. The Ryman concert has been released on CD and DVD as Circlin’ Back (NGDB Records). Jim Photoglo, who has had musical success in his own right, signed on to play bass for the fiftieth anniversary tour in 2016, and he still occupies that slot. Following that tour, the band experienced more personnel changes. Ross Holmes joined the band on fiddle and mandolin, and Hanna’s son Jaime was added as a guitarist. The younger Hanna already had recording and touring experience, and he’s added a fresh facet to the band’s sound. “He’s a better player than I am,” Jeff said with a laugh. In their career of a half-century, the NItty Gritty Dirt Band has been nominated for Grammy awards nine times, and has won three.

Specializing in keyboards, Bob Carpenter joined the band in 1980 and got off to a fast start as a co-writer of “Make A Little Magic.” Carpenter is still onboard after forty years. Hanna moved to Nashville in 1985 and still resides there. 1987’s “Fishin’ in the Dark” was another keystone hit, and is still a concert favorite. Other country hits have included “Long Hard Road (The Sharecropper’s Dream)” and “Modern Day Romance.” The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band endured through the decades, and continued to release acclaimed albums, including two sequels to Will the Circle be Unbroken in 1989 and 2002.

The present day lineup of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band includes, left to right, Bob Carpenter, Jim Photoglo, Ross Holmes, Jaime Hanna, Jimmy Fadden, Jeff Hanna. Photo by Glen Rose

The overall concept of the concert was to present distinctive re-workings of previous material, abetted with appropriate contributions by special guests.

The band celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 2016, and as a precursor to such a milestone, the NGDB presented a retrospective concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville in September of 2015. Guests included frontline artists such as Vince Gill and Alison Krauss, as well as songwriters the band has revered for Released in 2016 as a CD and DVD, Circlin’ Back decades. Hanna noted documented a one-of-a-kind concert recorded at that participants signed the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Legendary tunesmiths who performed included John Prine, Rodney Crowell and Jackson Browne. Not surprisingly, Jerry Jeff Walker sauntered onstage to join the band on “Mr. Bojangles.” Former band member Jimmy Ibbotson also returned for two songs.

As for the upcoming performance in Montgomery, Hanna was informed that the venue was across the street from the Hank Williams Museum.

“We’ve recorded so many of his songs— ‘Hey, Good Lookin’’, ‘I Saw The Light’, ‘Jambalaya’, others—it’s easy to see why we think he was one of greatest singer/ songwriters ever,” he said. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band will perform at the Montgomery Performing Arts Center on Thursday, March 19. Author/lecturer WILLIE G. MOSELEY is the Senior Writer for Vintage Guitar Magazine and is presently working on his fourteenth book.

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Naturally Artful Festival @ Jasmine Hill On March 6th and 7th, Jasmine Hill is hosting the Naturally Artful Festival to build community and allow visitors to experience the arts and connect with nature. There will be hands on art activities, a chance to dig in the dirt, presentations by artists, and a live theatre experience. We'll have art on exhibit, painters at work in the garden, live poetry writing, and live music from local artists. Our resident fairies will be delighted with activities in our Fairy Garden. On Saturday, we will unveil our brand new Healing Well and Blessing Blue Yonder Tree. The young and young-at-heart can enjoy music and movement in the garden and hear stories about outdoor adventures, tiny home living, plastic free lifestyles, and more. For tickets and details visit www.jasminehill.org/naturally-artful-festival.html

Congressman Trey Gowdy to speak at Faulkner’s Annual Benefit Dinner Faulkner University announced former Congressman Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, as the speaker for this year’s Faulkner Annual Benefit Dinner during a press conference held on Tuesday. President Mike Williams revealed the news on Montgomery’s campus. “Congressman Gowdy was entertained as a potential member of the President’s legal team for the impeachment proceedings, so he’ll have a lot to say that is relevant to what Montgomerians are talking about and thinking about as we think about the future of our nation,” Williams said. Since it began more than 40 years ago, Faulkner University’s Annual Benefit Dinner continues to be a longstanding tradition and a red-letter event on the social calendar for Montgomery and the River Region, selling out to nearly 2,000 guests. This year’s Benefit Dinner will be hosted at the Renaissance Hotel and Convention Center on October 1. Over the years, Faulkner has brought renowned politicians, journalists, athletes, coaches, comedians and astronauts to speak in Montgomery. Gowdy will bring his political experience as a member of Congress while also serving on the Judiciary Committee, Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Intelligence Committee, Education and the Workforce Committee and Ethics Committee on current issues from Capitol Hill to the River Region for what will be an exciting night. “We have hosted the Annual Benefit Dinner for years and have attracted renowned thought-leaders to speak in Montgomery to address timely and relevant topics,” Williams said. “Faulkner strives to bring provocative speakers who would not ordinarily be introduced to our citizens here to talk about these topics.” For tickets call 334.386.7257, or visit www.faulkner.edu/gowdy.

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Montgomery Youth Orchestra Conductor Celebrated

Maestra Yvonne Collins is in her 30th season as Conductor of the Montgomery Youth Orchestra. To celebrate this important milestone, the Montgomery Symphony League held a very special Valentine membership luncheon honoring Ms. Collins on February 11, at the Montgomery Country Club. The highlight of the event was a surprise performance by former Montgomery Youth Orchestra member Jessica Meuse. Ms. Meuse is a successful performer and recording artist. She performed two songs for the gathering, "Landslide" and "Rio Grande," an original composition by the artist. Ms. Meuse is an American Idol Final Four winner. Songs from her 2018 album "Half-Hearted" have reached more than eight million streams. Jessica's first instrument was a violin. The Slapout, Alabama, native auditioned for the Montgomery Youth Orchestra, got a position and, during her high school years, worked her way from the back to the front of the youth orchestra violin section. She credits Ms. Collins and Montgomery Youth Orchestra Conductor Yvonne Collins the Youth Orchestra with having a huge positive influence on her life and and special guest Jessica Meuse her music. Montgomery Youth Orchestra conductor Yvonne Collins is both a violinist and a pianist and she is the Montgomery Symphony Orchestra’s Principal Second Violin. A native of Chattanooga, Tennessee, Maestra Collins attended Tennessee Tech University where she studied conducting with Robert Jager. She has performed with the Chattanooga, Albany and Auburn symphony orchestras and founded Joyeux Musique, a local string trio. She is a member of the Eastmont Baptist Church Orchestra and plays regularly with Frazer United Methodist and Woodland United Methodist churches. MYO is comprised of approximately 70 young musicians from public and private schools throughout central Alabama who have a love of classical music and a desire to improve their skills while performing in an ensemble. The Montgomery Symphony League works to promote and increase the public’s appreciation and knowledge of music by providing educational activities for youth and adults of the River Region. For more visit www.montgomerysymphony.org

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Free to the Public The Vann Vocal Institute 2020, 13th Anniversary Season Public Events- Thursday March 12: Celebrity Recital. This year marks the Vann Vocal Institute’s 13th Anniversary Celebration! Internationally acclaimed operatic tenor David Cangelosi, who serves as the Institute’s Artistic/Program Director, is bringing a world-renowned guest faculty of operatic artists to join him at Huntingdon College. These esteemed faculty members will perform their annual ‘Celebrity Recital’ on Thursday March 12, 2020 (7:00 p.m.) Ligon Chapel-Flowers Hall, Huntingdon College. Featuring performances by David Cangelosi, Maestro Steven Crawford, Sam Handley, Rena Harms, Yasuko Oura, Mary Phillips, and Richard Troxell. This concert is free and open-to-the-public. The Vann Vocal Institute is a program of the Montgomery Symphony Association. Visit our website at www.montgomerysymphony.org/programs/vann-vocal-institute/ or call our office at 334.240.4004 for more information.

Free Subscriptions @ w w w.rive r re gio n b o o m.co m 46th Annual River Region Volunteer of the Year Awards

Nominees for the Volunteer of the Year awards run the gamut from high school students who read to children at Common Ground Montgomery to seniors answering phones at Jackson Hospital. None of them seeks the spotlight, but all of them are contributing to their community through time given to others. HandsOn River Region is accepting nominations for the 2020 Volunteer of the Year through March 12. All nominees will be recognized and receive a certificate and gift during the ceremony on April 23 at Trinity Presbyterian Church. For more than 40 years, this ceremony has become the region's largest volunteer recognition event, honoring individuals and groups who give their time and talent to improve their community and the overall quality of life. HandsOn River Region and the Junior League of Montgomery host the awards celebration each year during National Volunteer Week in April. Awards are presented to outstanding individuals and groups whose efforts have made a positive impact on the River Region. Thanks to event sponsors, a $300 cash contribution will be made on behalf of each recipient to the nominating nonprofit agency. To nominate your outstanding volunteer visit www.handsonriverregion.org/voy-nomination-form

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HCA Caregiver of the Month Valerie Davenport Mrs. Valerie Davenport has been a member of our company for a year or so now. During this time, she has gone over and beyond in the role that she holds. She has shown kindness, compassion, empathy, professionalism and teamwork. She pays very close attention to details and makes her client her top priority. Her details are relayed in a precise, to-the-point manner and she communicates them to both the staff and other caregivers that she works with. She not only treats her client as a client but gives him the same love and respect that she would give to her own family member. Valerie’s love for what she does shows on the inside and out. She radiates a ray of sunshine in her appearance and is always upbeat and bubbly. Thank you Valerie for all that you do and all that you have done in making this journey a success!! For more information visit www.homecareassistancemontgomery.com

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Much Ado About Blue and Gray Colonels Ball On December 21, 2019 the 70th Annual Blue and Gray Colonels Ball presented twenty-five lovely freshmen collegians to Montgomery society with a dazzling presentation showcasing the artistic talents of many. Over the past 10 years the ball has supported an Artist-inResidence program, selecting a local artist to paint “live” throughout the evening. This year Montgomery artist Julia Wallace, known for her exquisite depictions of female figures in her paintings, was given the honor and wowed spectators with her lovely work though out the evening. To the delight of all in attendance, talented dancers from the Alabama Dance Theatre Ballet beautifully performed “Waltz of the Flowers” and “Juliet’s Variation from Romeo and Juliet.” Also, under the direction of ADT’s Artistic Director, Kate Seale Smith, debutantes with their escorts were taught and executed the Presentation Dance perfectly. Each lovely debutante wore beautifully unique white formal ball gowns, long white gloves, glistening Her Majesty Roma Million Pirnie with grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Maddox and Mr. tiaras and carried bouquets created by the talented Jerry and Mrs. Robert Mitchel Pirnie III (not pictured Grandmother Mrs. Karen Worley Funk) Thrash of Rosemont Gardens. Owner of Mobile’s I Do Bridal Boutique, Bonnie Carter, repeatedly consulted with this year’s queen Roma Million Pirnie before unveiling an immaculate gown that reflects the sweet nature of the queen while encapsulating the grandeur that royalty commands. The gown blurred the lines between vintage and modern, combining the elegance of a traditional ball gown as envisioned by a young Roma years ago, with the whimsical and fashion forward side of this year’s Queen. In addition to her exquisite ivory gown, white Italian leather gloves and the majestic Blue Gray Colonels Queens crown, Roma wore lovely floating pearl and white gold earrings and necklace given to her by her grandparents Bruce and Cathy Maddox to commemorate her reign as the 70th Queen of Blue and Gray Colonels Ball. Queen Roma and her father, Commander Robert Mitchel Pirnie IV mesmerized the audience with a beautifully touching Italian style waltz, choreographed and taught by Alabama Dance Theatre’s Artistic Director, Kate Seale Smith. Looking eye to eye, the father daughter duo confidently executed an elegant and flowing Italian waltz to the music La Valse Champagne by Patrick Doyle, Roma’s The Debutantes of the Blue and Gray Colonels Ball favorite composer. Roma’s love of Doyle’s music stems from his pieces featured in her favorite movie Much Ado About Nothing (1993), which was filmed in Italy. The audience’s applause was notable as Commander Pirnie twirled and dipped his daughter. Dancing to her favorite composer made the waltz with her father especially meaningful. The duo’s Italian waltz was a creative selection subtly complimenting this year’s Italian theme – The Splendor of Venice. In recognition of Blue and Gray Colonels support of the arts in Alabama as well as Queen Roma's appreciation of and continued participation in the arts while attending Rhodes College, this year preceding and immediately following the presentation in the Montgomery Performing Arts Centre, all guests of the ball enjoyed musical pieces selected by Queen Roma, showcasing works by Patrick Doyle. The festive celebration continued in Alabama Ballroom of the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel with music performed by the New York based Peter Duchin Orchestra, which has been the tradition at the Blue and Gray Colonels Ball each year since 1979. Peter Duchin and his Orchestra

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Chicago in Concert Hailed as one of the “most important bands in music since the dawn of the rock and roll era,” the legendary rock and roll band with horns, Chicago, came in at #4, the highest charting American band in the chart’s history, in Billboard Magazine’s recent Top Bands And Duos. And Chicago is the first American rock band to chart Top 40 albums in six consecutive decades. Chicago have toured every year since the beginning – they’ve never missed a year. The original four band members are Robert Lamm on keyboards and vocals, Lee Loughnane on trumpet and vocals, James Pankow on trombone and Walt Parazaider on woodwinds. The band line-up also includes Wally Reyes, Jr. on drums, Keith Howland on guitar and vocals, Lou Pardini on keyboards and vocals, Ray Herrmann on sax and flute, Neil Donell on vocals, Brett Simons on bass and Ramon “Ray” Yslas on percussion. Chicago will be performing at Jemison Concert Hall at the Alys Stephens Center in Birmingham April 18, 6pm. For tickets and info visit www.alysstephens.org/events/chicago/

Pike Road Community Yard Sale Benefiting the Pike Road Lions Club Spring-like temperatures are already sweeping through Central Alabama, and it’s time for spring cleaning, too. All are invited to participate in the Pike Road Community Yard Sale – whether as sellers or shoppers – which will be held at Pike Road Town Hall (9575 Vaughn Rd) from 7 – 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 28. The 2020 Community Yard Sale will be the 10th annual event, a community favorite that brings a great crowd and nearly 80 vendors to Town Hall each spring. In addition to shopping and selling, the Pike Road Lions Club will provide breakfast and snacks for purchase and music from a local DJ. Vendor spaces may be reserved beginning on March 2, and each $25 reservation fee goes to the Pike Road Lions Club to benefit their service initiatives and charities. More info at www.pikeroad.us

Alabama Department of Archives and History Offers Genealogy Workshops

This spring, the Archives is offering half-day genealogy workshops on third Saturdays in March and April. Individual workshops are $30 for the public and $20 for Friends members. Saturday, March 21 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, Tracing Your African American Ancestors. This workshop features guidance for navigating potential research roadblocks and will address challenges specific to African American genealogical research. Saturday, April 18 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm To the Census and Beyond This workshop will reveal everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the census and then some, including creative search strategies that will add new dimensions to your family tree. For more info call or email, 334.353.4712, sarah.mcqueen@archives.alabama.gov

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Master Gardener Associations Presents Free Lunch & Learn Programs

Someone’s Grandchild Needs Your Support

Capital City Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 1st Wednesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Armory Learning Arts Center, 1018 Madison Avenue, Downtown Montgomery. Mark your calendars, March 4th, Landscape Design, Renee Thompson, ACES and April 1st, Shade Gardening, Mary McCroan, Advanced Master Gardener. Autauga County Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 1st Thursday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 610 Fairview Avenue, Prattville 36066. Mark your calendars, March 5th, Let’s Learn about Hostas, Bionca Lindsey, Master Gardener and April 2nd, Backyard Tomatoes, Mallory Kelley, Horticulturist, ACES. Elmore County Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2019 the 2nd Tuesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. They meet at the First Presbyterian Church, 100 West Bridge Street, Wetumpka 36092. Mark your calendars, March 10th, Gardening With Climate Change, Lee & Amanda Borden, Adv. MGs and April 14th, Invasive Plants, Nancy Lowenstein, Professor, AU. For information, please contact the Montgomery County Extension Office 334.270.4133. Also visit www. capcitymga.org.

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Opelika Songwriters Festival First and foremost, the OSF has confirmed many of the best touring singer songwriters on the national circuit – all distinctive, unique and compelling including The War & Treaty, Shawn Mullins, Dark Water (Kristian Bush from Sugarland), Mindy Smith, Sarah Lee Guthrie (yes, Woody’s granddaughter, Arlo’s daughter). Leigh Nash (Sixpence None the Richer), Dan Navarro, Chris Stills, Steve Poltz, Kim Richey, Sugarcane Jane, Charlie Mars, Jeff Black and many more. For a full listing of confirmed artists, go to www.opelikasongwritersfestival.com. If you have never dropped into downtown Opelika, you now have a great reason to do so. Ten venues have been turbocharged with great sound systems to create intimate listening rooms with true character. The entire downtown has been organically and beautifully restored. Original cotton warehouses are now a small batch distillery, breweries, boutiques, galleries, a vinyl record store, one of the top ten wine bars perhaps in the world, excellent restaurants…. I could go on. Come March 27th-29th and experience it first hand.

Titus New Home Baptist Church to Host Road to Redemption This Easter season travel the road through Jerusalem as if you were in ancient Israel when the greatest man who ever lived walked the earth. New Home Baptist Church will once again host Road to Redemption on Sunday, April 5, 2020 from 3–5 p.m. at the corner of Sewell and Spigener Roads in Titus, Alabama.This family event takes travelers on a mini tour, featuring reenactments of the final days of Jesus’ life on earth through to His resurrection. Walk the road that Jesus travelled beginning with Palm Sunday and meet characters who take you inside the scriptures as you experience the Triumphal Entry. Travelers will also learn about the Last Supper, pass by the garden at Gethsemane, visit Barabbas in his jail cell, meet a Roman guard who was part of Jesus’ crucifixion detail, and finally, experience the power of the empty tomb and Jesus’ resurrection. Upon arrival, travelers will join others to form small groups and along with their travel guide, journey through six destinations. At each destination, travelers will experience powerful moments that surrounded the death and resurrection of Jesus. These Bible experiences are sure to stir the emotions in travelers of all ages. Groups will begin their journey every 20 minutes starting at 3 p.m., with the last group beginning at 4 p.m. It will take each group approximately one hour to journey through all destinations. This free event is open to one and all. So please plan to join us—and invite your family, friends, and neighbors—to experience the power of the Road to Redemption and enjoy the refreshments and other fun planned. If you would like to request a specific tour time in advance, please email your name, preferred time, and number in your party to newhometitus@yahoo.com, or by phone at 334.567.0923. On-site registration the day of the event will also be available.

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Montgomery Zoo and Mann Wildlife Learning Museum Celebrates Its Volunteers at Annual Volunteer Appreciation Day The Montgomery Zoo and Mann Wildlife Learning Museum held its annual Volunteer Appreciation Day on Saturday, February 22, 2020. “Volunteers are crucial to the success of our facility. We are able to accomplish major projects in just a few hours thanks to the thousands of people who give their time each year whether helping to clean the museum, landscaping projects, painting or helping with our many events throughout the year,” Melanie Golson, APR, Marketing and Public Relations Manager explained. The program included the presentation of several awards to those who have dedicated their time and talent to support the Zoo’s mission of educating the public about conservation, protecting our wildlife and the importance of zoological facilities. Bill Brounstein, Sally Jenkins, Walt McNeely and Robert Turner were each presented a Certificate of Appreciation for their countless hours of service during 2019. The Zoo presented a new award, the Volunteer of the Year award. This award will be given to a volunteer who has served the Zoo consistently for five years or more. The 2019 Volunteer of Mary Davis (left) receiving Montgomery Zoo Volunteer of the Year the Year award was presented to Ms. Mary Davis. Ms. Mary, as she is known Award with Melanie Golson, Montgomery Zoo's Marketing and Public Relations Manager around the Zoo, has volunteered for events like ZooBoo and Zoo Weekend for the past four decades. When asked why she started volunteering at the Zoo and why she continues to do so long, Ms. Davis said, “I started because I was new to Montgomery and wanted to find a way to meet people. I continued because the Zoo became my family and family supports each other.” The Zoo announced to attendees that the award would be perpetually known as the ‘Mary Davis Volunteer of the Year’ award. Due to health reasons, Ms. Mary has had to retired from her volunteer career but her impact on the Zoo, its staff and animals will go on for generations to come. To sign up to volunteer for either event contact the Zoo at 334.625.4930 or email zooinfo@montgomeryal.gov.

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By Marcy Goldman

Tango: Where Romance Is Ageless

Especially for those over 50, tango offers exercise and social connection Sometimes you can pinpoint an exact moment that changed your life. In my case, it was an ad in the local newspaper that simply said: Free Tango Lesson. Barely divorced and rudderless, a single mother of three sons, I took a leap of faith and went. The moment I stepped on the dance floor I knew I wasn’t in Kansas anymore. Lured by the seductive Argentinean tango music, I still wanted to flee but instead I was quickly netted in the vortex of my tango journey. Leap ahead two decades and not only am I still captivated by tango, but now I’m an ambassador. To me, tango is one of the last bastions of true romance and it’s particularly welcoming to those over 50 who have the maturity to appreciate tango’s moody, yet warm ways and who enjoy the dual benefits of exercise and social connection. Tango is Accessible for Everyone To be clear, Argentinean tango is slow and gentle and not to be confused with the more theatrical ballroom tango. Pretty much anyone can dance this tango. If you can walk, you can tango. In fact, even if you can barely walk, you can still tango. One friend of mine has Parkinson’s and MS, others have replaced hips or knees, one is legally blind and has a cane and they all come to tango because, aside from its seductive reputation, tango heals body and soul.

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Sherry, a slender woman in her early 50s from Montreal, is the sightchallenged dancer who comes by Uber and with a cane. She said, “I first came to tango because it was better than focusing on other, less positive things in my life. I soon forgot everything else in my life and became addicted to the music and the warm social friendships that develop.” Jay, a 50-something housewares rep also from Montreal, said, “If Dancing With the Stars can make 60-something ex-football players into dancers, then anyone can dance tango!” When I began tango, my physicality was intact, but tango was still a healer. Newly single at 42, I was thrust into a new life without familiar moorings and tango revealed itself as a welcoming oasis. For one thing, at tango class, if you register on your own (as most people do), you’re given a partner. Tango studio organizers maintain an equal ratio of men to women or in a non-gender bias ratio in terms of equal proportion of leaders and followers. In a class, you regularly switch partners

so as to better learn the steps with anyone. Accustomed to dancing and relaxing with many different people, my cobwebs of self-consciousness were magically dusted away. Tango also insisted I abandon my oft-told divorce tale, since you can’t really talk about profound things as you dance. Consequently, you are kept totally present. Power of Connection But I also noticed something else at tango that is probably at its core: it both awakens one’s primal need to be touched or held or it slakes it — it is the safest sex I know, as well as an evergreen, never-ending romance that begins with each new set of dances. Each new partnership is a threeminute relationship that brings another experience of communication. To an outside observer, the physical connection appears sensuous, but it is truly about that baseline human resonance. That is something we

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all crave. And once experienced, it breeds an addiction to more of the same, which explains why, as Paul (a documentary filmmaker from Montreal) said, “Tango, for most people, is once or terminal.” Michel Cyr, who works in economic development in Montreal, agreed: “Tango is the only dance I know that allows two strangers to experience such a deep emotional connection in just a few seconds”. Adds Jennifer, 57, a graphics artist from Montreal: “You never really know someone until you dance with someone. But once you connect to something in them that connects with something in you, that is beyond a casual chat and it’s an intimate conversation. Once in the embrace, a barrier is breached and there’s always the possibility or surprise of resonance. You never know who it will happen with.”

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Many of the tango dancers I’ve spoken to emphatically agree about the abrazo (the embrace) which is as unique as their fingerprint. Find a perfect or simpatico embrace and while this might not be a new relationship, you’ll experience an intimacy of human accord that has an innate gravitational pull. Andrea Shepherd, a tango teacher and yoga teacher who owns Mon Tango studio in Montreal with her husband, said, “Tango looks so intense to outsiders and it is, but it’s not sexual. It also allows you to let go mentally and have these unique, if brief, connections with different people. That keeps me coming back, plus I am always improving my skill level.” The Tonic of Tango In a time where Face Time is anything but, and couples sit in Starbucks communing with their smart phones, disconnection is the malaise of the times. In contrast, there’s the tonic

of tango which defies today’s socioculture. (As a bonus, just browse stories extolling the virtues of dance and aging and add 10 health points). But tango’s best kept secret is its sweet spot: it offers egalitarian romance music, movement and other warm bodies and has no age or time limit. It is unequivocally inclusive and embracive and (and this is no small thing) it will never quit you. The moment someone says, “Shall we dance?” your heart sprouts wings and your soul comes home. So you might not meet your second spouse at tango, but you’ll reacquaint yourself with your original soulmate (you!) and fall back in love with life. You’ll be swept away to a world where you morph into something other than yourself or better yet, remember just who you are. And that is more than worth the price of admission. Marcy Goldman is a Montreal-based professional chef, cookbook author and writer. She’s the creator of Better Baking and a contributor to such publications as the Washington Post and Medium. Source: www.nextavenue.org

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Jan Taylor Goings, Flamingos All Around This month’s cover profile is an entrepreneur in the hospitality business, Jan Taylor Goings. Jan is the owner of Jan’s Beach House on Eastern Blvd, just 2 blocks from the Sam’s Wholesale entrance. Jan has been running her restaurant business for 8 years, she caters to BOOM! readers with great food, from the beach and from the grill. Jan also supports the live music scene in the River Region by offering live music 6 nights a week. Jan is a Christian and she welcomes many Sunday School groups for lunches and dinners. One thing that Jan has done that is unique to the River Region is she sets aside one evening each month and invites David Brewer and Walt Hines to bring their gospel band to play a variety of Christian music and singalong. It is a special night of fellowship and Jan encourages folks to drop by for a very special kind of worship. When we recently started talking with Jan about being our cover profile, we could tell she loves what she does and the family atmosphere she has created over the years at Jan’s Beach House. We had a great time getting to know Jan and we think you will too, please share with your friends and don’t forget to enjoy the food and live music, nothing else like it!

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc? Jan: I was born 65 years ago at Saint Margaret’s Hospital right here in Montgomery to my wonderful Parents, Bill and Ruth Taylor. I am the youngest of four siblings (Alan Taylor, Kay Morris and Rick Taylor) and we grew up downtown at a time when kids could safely walk downtown and spend the day exploring our great city. My father was a sign painter and my grandfather was a picture framer and their little shop was right behind our house on Wilson Street. My grandparents lived with us and our house was full of love and fun. We attended Frazer Memorial Methodist Church when it was located downtown also. I was blessed to be raised in a very loving close knit family and my parent’s Christian faith continues to guide me and my siblings in all that we do. When I was in the sixth grade my family bought a house in Prattville so then I attended Prattville Junior High School and graduated from Autauga County High School in 1972 and made many lifelong friends there. I never miss a class reunion and love to reconnect and reminisce with my old girlfriends. I attended Troy State University where I studied the field of social work and

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also became a Little Sister of the Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. That was one of the best times of my life and I’m still very close to many of my

brothers in the fraternity. I graduated in three years and Jan Taylor Goings, began working owner Jan's Beach House as a social worker in 1976 at the Autauga County Department of Pensions and Security doing Child Support Enforcement. After a successful run there I was selected to help start a statewide program called Medical Support Enforcement. During this time I had to take a part time job

bartending to supplement my Income and that’s when I discovered that I loved the hospitality business and loved it way more than I enjoyed being a social worker. This didn’t make my parents happy for a very long time but in the end they were both very proud of me for pursuing what I loved and felt like I was meant to be doing in my life. I certainly have used my social work degree over the years in dealing with customers! I met the love of my life, Lawson Goings, when I was 39 years old and we married several years later which meant I became stepmother to three precious children. What a blessing they have been to my life. At the time we decided that we wouldn’t try to have a child of our own and I’ve never regretted that decision. Especially since my dear Lawson passed away suddenly in 2009 from a heart attack. It was the worst time in my life and if it hadn’t been for my faith and the support of my family and friends I don’t know where I’d be today. He and I were co-managers of a restaurant that was supposed to open the day he passed away so I wasn’t even sure I could go on as the manager without him. But I The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


knew I had to do it for him! He always wanted us to have our own restaurant and this was our opportunity to try even though we didn’t actually own the restaurant, Young Barn Pub, but only managed it. Several years later I decided to move on and open my own place. I opened Jan’s Beach House Grill in 2012 and have never looked back. What a ride!!

I don’t really think there are any secrets to running a successful restaurant but I would say I have two reasons I believe Jan’s has stayed a favorite in Montgomery for seven years now. The first is to choose the right staff and the second is to be on site as much as possible. I have some amazing employees who work together as a team and all my managers act like Jan’s is part theirs by the way they put their heart BOOM!: You are the and soul into their Jan with her children and grandchildren Christmas 2019 owner of Jan’s Beach jobs. I have a very House Grill located at 850 Eastern hard working front owns Sinclair’s East Restaurant Blvd. Please share with our readers and back of the for advice and guidance, and Jan with her Mama celebrating how you got started in the restaurant/ house group of I’ve called on both of them for Jan's birthday 2016 bar business? What are some of the employees and I occasional catering equipment challenges of being a woman owned am very proud of the work they all do. loans. They are both excellent examples restaurant/bar? What are some of And as for the front of the house staffing, to follow as are my friends, Steve your secrets to running a successful I tell people all the time that I don’t hire Sommer, who owns Sommer’s Place here restaurant/bar? anyone that isn’t “Sweet” because I only in town and my other friends, Lewis and want happy, Jan: Over the positive course of my people working in representing the restaurant our business I’ve restaurant. worked at some great BOOM!: What places like makes Jan’s Igor’s, The Beach House Madison Hotel, so unique? Hillwood Café What do your and Down customers say Jan's other rescue, precious Penny the Street about Jan’s Café. I would on social reviews and in person? say that my Jan receiving the gift of a lifetime mentor Is my Jan: What makes Jan’s Beach House Grill on her 65th birthday. It's now the Jan's beautiful rescue, Shana relaxing sweet friend, unique is the family atmosphere. Our biggest Pink Flamingo in the River in the back yard Region sitting in front of Jan's Gail Royal, many regular customers are like one Beach House. Named after Jan's who still owns Down the Street Café big happy family and love to meet new mom, "Mrs. Ruth" because her and we remain best friends to this day. people and bring them into the fold. We mom always wanted her to have a She’s been there for me time after cater to a mostly 50 and older crowd BIG Flamingo out on the street in front of her restaurant! time when I needed her and shown me with our great live music and fantastic that a woman can make a success of food so lots of folks make our place their anything she attempts. She is also a very “place to be” several nights a week. Our Karen Mashburn, who own The Capitol compassionate Christian woman who happy hour group of friends are very Oyster Bar. We are all supportive of one never misses an opportunity to lend a close, and I’ve known most of them since another and I feel like we would all do hand for someone in need. I have also I got into the business when I was 21 anything for each other. called on my friend, Johnny Sullivan, who years old, so we watch out for each other The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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and stay in touch through all of our ups and downs. If we don’t see someone for a day or two, we’re quick to call and see what’s going on.

by coming every month and many of our regular customers and various other church groups from all over Montgomery enjoy their music. I encourage Sunday

Jan: I am most passionate about my faith, my family, my friends and my restaurant—in that exact order.

BOOM!: How do you like to relax and Another thing wind down from a hard day’s work? that sets us apart is that we have Jan: I love spending time with my friends. great live music When I get off work I enjoy sitting down five out of the six with them and we all enjoy meeting nights a week that new people too. If you sit at the bar at we’re open. There Jan’s and you’re a new customer you’ll are many talented soon be greeted by some of my friendly musicians in the regulars. They’re awesome. I also like to tri county area go home and enjoy my back yard and and they love spend time with my two rescue babies. I playing for us love dogs and for years have had two at because we are a time. I believe in having two because non-smoking and I’m at work so much and if I only had our music starts one fur baby he or she would be alone. early and ends My babies now are Shana and Penny Jan's Beach House Christmas Party 2019 early. Like I said and I got both of them at local shelters. earlier, we cater I always encourage people to find their School parties to book their dinners on to an older crowd who don’t want to be pets there because there are so many the nights they’re performing so they out late. who need homes. can eat and listen to the band playing spiritual tunes. BOOM!: Describe how your Christian BOOM!: What are some of your favorite faith impacts your business? How did travel experiences? Favorite vacation I was brought up by parents who truly you come up with the idea of having the spot? Any travel dreams planned? believed that Sundays were for only two Praise Music once a month? things-Church and Family. Both Mama Jan: Obviously I love the beach! ANY and Daddy have gone to be with the Lord Jan: I was raised in the Methodist church BEACH! I normally go to the Orange but up until I and still attend Frazer. In 2007 I attended Beach area lost my Mama a spiritual retreat called the Walk to but I’ll go at age 94 we Emmaus and it was a major turning point anywhere rode to church in my life. The experience deepened my I’m invited! together and faith and brought a whole new family Walking on then went back into my life who helped tremendously the beach over to her when I lost my dear Lawson. After very is therapy house so that long hard working days at Young Barn to me. I’ve all of my family Pub I would come home to a mailbox been to the could get full of encouraging cards from friends Bahamas and together and in the Emmaus family, some that I had Cancun but visit. After we never even met but they knew about I’m perfectly lost Mama we my loss, would write kind words that happy just moved our helped me to get through the worst right down Sunday visits time in my life. In the next few years I south at our Jan recently celebrating Mardi Gras to my sister’s met a group of gentlemen who attended Alabama house. Playing with the little ones every a similar spiritual walk called Paseo beaches. But I won’t say that I wouldn’t Sunday is a true blessing in our lives. The and attend Christ Church. They started LOVE to go to Hawaii one day!! restaurant is closed on Sundays and I having their reunion group lunches at proudly display on the door that we close the restaurant and one of the guys, Walt BOOM!: Do you have time to be involved so our employees can attend church and Hines, asked what I thought of having in community, civic or other activities? spend time with their families. the Praise band from their church play at Jan’s once a month. That was one of Jan: I work six days and nights a week, BOOM!: What are you most passionate the best decisions I ever made. Their so I really don’t have time for civic or about? church members totally support them community activities. However, I do what

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


I can through contributions of food and fund raising for organizations or people who need help. Since I opened the restaurant I participate in the Salvation Army Red Kettle drive by putting a kettle at our cash register. I also donate dishes to the Montgomery Area Council on Aging every year when they have the event to recognize their many volunteers. Zoobilation is a cause that I’m very passionate about because Montgomery has a wonderful zoo, and this is a big yearly fundraiser for them. Over the years of my working in this business I have made so many close friends who are musicians and have had life threatening illnesses. I held a fundraiser here for one of my close college buddies, Ben Massey, when he was battling cancer. Unfortunately he lost his battle and went on to be with the Lord. Recently I made a big basket with all sorts of wine and goodies to be raffled off at a fundraiser for my dear friend, Tommy Beavers, who is battling a major health issue and can’t work at this time.

Jan: I still live in the house that Lawson children yet. They all live down in the and I bought when we first married in Mobile area but we are very close and I Dalraida. We don’t refer to put in a pool them as my when the stepchildrenchildren were THEY ARE MY little and I love CHILDREN! it when my They have a entire family wonderful and friends mother and come over to stepfather cook out and but they let play with kids me share and grandkids them and for Jan with her grandsons at the restaurant 2018 in the pool. I that I am so have a huge back porch so if it’s raining appreciative. we still have a great time just hanging out and playing Tiki toss. I’m extremely BOOM!: What is it about living in the close to my nieces and nephews and Montgomery/River Region area that you they’ve all enjoyed bringing their like? What do we need more of? children to my house for holidays or Jan: I love Montgomery and I’m so proud of all that’s been done to make our city a destination city instead of a place to drive through and not stop. What I would love to see is more people coming together instead of growing apart. We are all God’s children and should try harder to support one another and love one another as Jesus taught us to do.

The American Red Cross is an organization I A view from Jan's garden, one of her favorite things to do, gardening! have always supported just to get together. My grandchildren, by being in the Taste of the Garden’s Nathan and Law, call me “Jammie” which Fundraiser every year. My sister, Kay, is the name my oldest daughter came retired from the Red Cross so I have up with when I told her I didn’t want to always had a place in my heart for them take away from the names of the “blood” and what they do in our community. grandmothers. I love it! Speaking of children-my oldest is Brandy and she’s A few years ago, I started a campaign married to Michael Williams. They have to raise as much money as we could for one precious son, Nathan, who was born the Orsi family who is the family from 3 months after Lawson passed away. He Wetumpka whose father killed their was so excited that Brandy was having mother, sister and then himself. We his first grandchild that it broke my heart raised $5,000.00 to help them to start a that he never got to hold him. My second new life with their grandparents. oldest child is Julia who has an adorable little boy named Law. Then my youngest BOOM!: How do you like to spend time is Glynn Lawson Goings III (Trey) and with family? What is your grandparent he and his wife, Alicia, don’t have any name? Favorite activities to do with your grandkids? The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM!: As you’ve aged, how have your priorities changed? Jan: My priorities haven’t changed a whole lot over the years but after losing Lawson and getting all the support I got from my family and friends, I started making sure that I tell them on a daily basis that I love them. I feel so blessed and want everyone in my life to know that I love and appreciate them. BOOM!: Give us three words that describe you? Jan: Loyal, Caring and Fun-loving. BOOM!: Do you have any hobbies or other activities that grab your attention? Jan: I love gardening. When we moved into our house the backyard was nothing but grass and fruit trees. After we put the pool in I started little by little landscaping the yard myself. Saturdays are the only

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day that I don’t go to work until the afternoon so I can almost always be found in my backyard fussing with my flowers. I have tried to do a tropical theme all around the pool but I never turn down a plant that a friend wants to give me. No matter what kind it is. I love them all. BOOM!: With nearly 4,000 likes/ followers on Facebook, you have a big presence in social media, how important is social media to the success of your business? Jan: Social media has played a tremendous role in our success. We keep our Facebook page updated and many of our regulars decide what they’re going to eat before they ever come in. We post our live music schedule so folks can come out when their favorite band is playing. All the travel websites have also been instrumental in creating a loyal customer base for us also. BOOM!: If you weren’t operating your unique restaurant/bar...what kind of work would you be doing? Any dream jobs? Jan: If I wasn’t in the restaurant business I’d love to work at a nursery. I have a friend who owns Fitzpatrick Greenhouses and every time I go see him to purchase

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plants I think about how I’d love to do what he does. BOOM!: Many people as they age seek new experiences, a renewed sense of purpose, new goals, even new careers, how would you describe this sense of renewal in your life? Any advice for the rest of us seeking renewal? How do you view the idea of retirement? Jan: Since I opened the restaurant at 58 years of age, I don’t really think much about retirement. I love what I do and everyday brings new challenges and experiences. My oldest brother, Alan, tried to retire a few years ago and couldn’t handle it. He’s pushing 80 and still sells furniture at Haverty’s in Tuscaloosa because he loves to work. He and I are very much alike so I can’t see me not working either—for a very long time. Every morning when I get out of bed, I thank God for my family, friends and this great restaurant. I’ve learned to live each day to the fullest and never let my past mistakes slow me down or get in my way. We learn something new every day of our lives and if we don’t, we’ve stopped living life the way we’re supposed to. I would say that the experience of opening this restaurant and the joy I get from my customers has given me somewhat of a sense of renewal. There’s a huge difference in

working for someone else and owning your own business and there was a time in my life that I wouldn’t have had the confidence to try this venture. My faith in God, and my wonderful family and friends have always been supportive, they cheered me on. You can’t ask for more than that in life. I am very blessed. We want thank Jan for sharing her story with us in this month's cover profile. We especially appreciate the opportunity to see that many flamingos at one time! If you want to reach out to Jan, go eat at Jan's Beach House on the Eastern Blvd or enjoy dinner and drinks with live music. You can also check out Jan's Facebook page for all the upcoming meals and music for the week. Visit www.jansbeachhousegrill.com. A special thanks to Shellee Roberts at Total Image Portraits for making this month and other cover shots the best they can be, you can check them out at www. totalimage.com. If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to Jim Watson at jim@riverregionboom.com. Read all of the BOOM! Cover Profiles at www.riverregionboom.com/archive/

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Travel Experiences with Jeff Barganier

Healthy Transitions Ryan Stewart left his lucrative law practice to join wife Genevieve in a Pilates studio she started after resigning her employment with a bank. They were inspired and confirmed in what others viewed as radical career changes after reading my book How Prayer Helped Me Escape the Corporate Rat Race. They became a husband/wife team—not unlike Jeff and Cindy Barganier—and never looked back. Cindy and I couldn’t resist driving to Homewood, Alabama to take a personal Pilates class with the Stewart’s after learning they had been inspired by the book. Ryan and Genevieve make the most engaging husband/wife team. It hasn’t occurred to me yet who Genevieve looks like—just crazy healthy and, consequently, drop-dead beautiful. Her soul-mate Ryan, on the other hand, is clearly Mel Gibson. It’s, like, not every day one gets turned into a pretzel by Mel Gibson. It actually feels pretty good. Immediately, the stretch releases a sort of Shangri-La feeling in my lower back. Shangri-La is that mythical place where youth is restored and pain banished. But the profound relief one feels from proper stretching isn’t make-believe. Like founder Joseph Pilates said: “You’re only as old as your spine feels.” The Stewart’s met in the gym at the apartment complex where they were

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Ryan and Genevieve Stewart

both living at the time. Ryan was a tax attorney living a stressful life of long days humped over paper. I can relate. His years in law school, tax school and law practice, took a toll on his spine, causing scoliosis and arthritis. Genevieve was a banker, a job that didn’t really light her fire. What she did love was Pilates. “I loved Pilates from my first session. I just loved the mind control over muscle and how I felt energized, centered, and powerful in a completely different way than any other workout or therapy I had tried. Pilates is holistic and serves the mind, emotions, spirit, and body. Ryan got interested in Pilates after visiting the studio and experiencing relief in his spine from arthritis; and getting leaner and healthier in his core. Pilates has enhanced my marriage because I can share it with my husband. It is very special to be able to share your passion with your spouse. Especially now, being pregnant, I love working with Ryan one on one in private sessions. He puts his hands on my belly

and helps me breathe and feel my core properly in the exercises. I know we’re preparing for far more than just strong abdominals. We’re preparing for labor and delivery. He will be the best breathing coach ever and help me stay stable, strong, and safe. He also shines such a bright light wherever he goes. Being in his positivity always helps uplift me and my Pilates practice. We liked (Jeff’s) book because it spoke to us relative to our corporate world experience. We had full-time jobs in the banking and legal world and got burned out. We yearned for work that fed our souls and helped others. Now, we work together and can help other people feel good every day. The feeling of helping others is the best reward of our job. The book helped us remember that there are others out there who have stopped fighting the rat race, choosing, instead, to give and work from their hearts. It also gave us confidence to take the leap of faith that we could leave the ‘security’ of a full-time job, trust in our innate talents and abilities, and let God fill in the rest. We do our part and trust the rest to Him. So far, the results have been amazing and our studio has never been busier! We just celebrated our tenth anniversary and look forward to the next decade! We will be writing and creating digital content to share our method with the world and help people see how much power they have within their deep core.” The Stewart’s have created their own signature method—the G Method. “It’s unique in that it truly focuses on the individual and incorporates all elements of the mind/body connection. We don’t just perform exercises at our studio. We liberate the spine and energy inside the cells. We assist in removing blockages that prevent the free flow of energy in The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


the body. Releasing and letting go is equally important to balancing the body as strengthening and conditioning. Balance is the body’s true nature, so our method simply helps one return to it through a combination of release work and Pilates.” One of their clients owns and runs a

Hanna, demonstrating Can Can

successful trucking company. In his mid-60s, he was convinced his time was up and retirement imminent…until he found Pilates. After a few sessions, he reported feeling that “spontaneous zest and joy for living” that founder Joseph Pilates touted. After a few weeks, he made a complete turnaround, choosing to stay plugged into his business, saying, “I’m amazed

that I don’t hurt after a workout. Other times, I always hurt and it didn’t make me want to continue. Here, when I finish a session, I have so much energy and feel great!” “Pilates has changed my life in countless ways,” says Genevieve. “The most important one to me is in my self-esteem. Pilates has helped

Ryan instructing

me love myself deeper and fuller and really connect with my body. When I can feel my deep core, connect with my breath and control my muscles, it’s impossible to feel weak. After a session, I always feel uplifted, strong and healthy. The physical benefits to me are just an added bonus. It’s my mind, spirit and emotions that get the most balance.”

It’s never too late to start Pilates. Indeed, the Stewart’s have a client who is 80! And Ryan says they’re seeing more and more older men in their practice today. I’m sold, too! Marital bliss, career bliss, health bliss...what more can one ask for? Pilates? It ain’t exactly a Greek island. But its wonderful benefits might inspire you to visit one. Montgomery

Hanna demonstrating front push ups

has several studios: CoreVibes Studio at Hampstead; Club Pilates on Zelda and Vaughn; Hotworx at Peppertree on Halcyon Park Drive. Check them out!

Note: Ryan and Genevieve recently welcomed “Jack” into the world—6 pounds, 15 ounces.

Jeff S. Barganier is a freelance writer and manages Cindy Barganier Interiors LLC in Pike Road, Alabama. (www.cindybarganier.com) He travels far and wide upon the slightest excuse for something interesting to write about. Contact him at Jeffbarganier@knology.net. Follow him on Instagram #jeffbarganier.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

MORNING GLORY

By Greg Budell

"A true story from the Greg files"

someone’s out-of-control behavior they knew a competitor would pick him up and pay more in a heartbeat!

2020 marks my 5th decade in the radio business. For most of these years, I’ve been a morning radio host. The question I’m asked most frequently is “what time do you have to get up for that job?”.

When my party spiraled out of control, I chose rehab because I couldn’t take it anymore- not my employers. When I finally made the long overdue trip to rehab, I was scared you-knowwhatless. I thought being in a chemically altered state led to the creative, abstract humor that became my radio brand.

My reply is “2:22AM”. People understandably react with horror to that number. I wouldn’t trade my schedule for anything! It wasn’t always that way. There was a time when I could party until 3 or 4AM on a weeknight, and still get by on an hour’s sleep to make a 6-10AM show. That was then. When 10AM came along it was home for the day to recoup. Big money. 5-hour workday. What a life! It took time and consequence to negotiate those hours into a state of manageability. It was amazing how much easier that schedule became when a trip to rehab ended the party. I picked morning radio because that’s where the big money has always been.

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The staff ruined that delusional thinking on the first day!

Greg grilling in the dark, 4:30 AM!

Morning people got the “star” treatment. Years ago, being a “bad boy” (partier) was part of the persona required for the job. Booze and drugs made it easy to be bad. Notoriety was good for ratings! Believe it or not, being the “Peck’s bad boy” was good for job security in those days. If a radio station had enough of

“Look what you’ve accomplished working in a fog. Imagine how great you could be if you lifted the fog!”. There was no arguing the point. Sure enough, my career really took off after 6 weeks of hard-core rehab. Something else happened during that process. Instead of dreading the early wake up, I embraced it. I don’t have to wake up at 2:22. That time just works. I was so undisciplined

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earlier in my life that my boss once issued a memo demanding a phone call if I was “as much as one second late” any morning. I haven’t been late to work in 30 years! I wake up at 2:22 because I love that time of day. It is SO wonderfully quiet, broken only by the heavy breathing created by the greatest invention in the last 50 years- the automatic coffee pot. It starts brewing at 2AM so if I’m up a few minutes early, no problem. People with regular hours may have time for a cup at home, or worse- snake through a Starbucks drive through for a Frappa Mocha Lattachino (or some other complicated beverage). Plain Folgers works fine for me. Its mountain grown! Every day, I make breakfast for Newstalk 93.1 morning show partners Rich Thomas and Jay Scott. Rich and I usually exchange a text before 3AM to make sure neither one of us is dead (hey- you never know), and discuss menu options. If it’s steak or sausage, I light up the grill on my patio- making me the only maniac in Montgomery grilling in his pajamas at that hour. I love it. My patio has lights, though vision is a little tricky before daylight. A high-power flashlight helps make sure nothing gets burned. I have yet to cremate an innocent piece

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of meat! Plus, there’s nothing like the feeling of accomplishment experienced when triumphantly holding up a perfectly grilled steak outside on a 25-degree morning dressed in my Florida Marlins pajamas.

buddies whose company I genuinely love- and we get to tell you how awful the traffic is on your commute. At 9AM, you’re starting your workday and I, after all the rush hour wrecks are cleared, sail home for a snack and a nap!

I’m not a rich person (financially, anyway) but there’s one feature in our house that makes me feel that way- a garden tub. It’s surrounded by a wide tile rim, so after filling it with hot water to soak away the BOOMer aches and pains, I put my laptop up there and browse the world. This part of the morning is paradisiacal. It’s an especially daring method for an accidentprone person like me- assembling material for a morning show next to a tub full of water. Amazingly, I’ve avoided electrocution, or drowning my laptop.

50 years in radio. 15 years in the River Region. 35 years ago, this month someone loved me enough to pull me away from a coke-lined mirror and I haven’t seen or wanted a flake of that poison since.

After gathering material for the show and getting dressed it’s time for the “commute’, which at 5AM, is a breeze. What would normally be a 15-minute trip during business hours is half that. No one else is on the road so every light turns green (automatically triggered) and the drive is hassle free. While I appreciate the convenience, I am cautious. At the time I go to work, there are 2 types of drivers on the road- people on their way to a job or people who just pulled one. I try not to share an intersection with anybody. The easiest part of the morning is the actual radio show. I get to hang with

It’s amazing how beautiful every morning is when the fog has been lifted. If you have a comment on this column, email me at gregbudell@aol.com. It’s still fun to hear from new people! Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, Roz, and dogs Hershey and Briscoe. He’s been in radio since 1970, and has marked 15 years in the River Region. He hosts the Newstalk 93.1FM Morning Show with Rich Thomas, Jay Scott & Emily Hayes, 6-9AM Monday-Friday. He returns weekday afternoons from 3-6PM for Happy Hour with sidekick Joey Clark. Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

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March 2020

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA

Festival of Tulips at the American Village American Village, Montevallo, AL Through March, every day, weather permitting The field of over 100,000 tulips, with replicas of some of America’s most historic places as a backdrop, creates a one-of-a-kind photo opportunity, so bring your camera! As the only you-pick tulip field in the region, visitors can take home armfuls of beautiful blooms. Tulips will be $1.50 each, bulb included. The Festival of Tulips at the American Village will be open Monday-Friday 10-4, Saturday 10-4, and Sunday 12-4 beginning in early Spring, and continuing through March (depending on weather and bloom time). The Village advises that you check their website (www. americanvillage.org) and Facebook page to find out the exact date the tulip field will open. American Village is located at 3727 Highway 119. Montvallo, AL. For more info visit www.americanvillage.org

WETUMPKA, ALABAMA

Simple Sundays Jasmine Hill Gardens and Outdoor Museum, 3001 Jasmine Hill Rd. Wetumpka, AL Sundays, 1-4 pm

On Simple Sundays, we offer a variety of activities in our beautiful garden spaces for people of all ages. Each week will be different as friends enjoy art making, music playing, gardening workshops, kid games and more. Every week, we'll host a yoga instructor at 2:00, so bring your mat and join us in the sunshine! Pack a picnic and stroll our pathways to enjoy the flowers and sculptures under our majestic trees. There is so much to discover as our amazing hilltop changes with every season. We look forward to seeing you along with your friends, family and butterflies! Admission $10.00 – Adults, $8.00 – Military & Senior Citizens, $6.00 – Children ages 3-12, FREE – Children 2 and under. www.jasminehill.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA ALABAMA STORY ASF-Octagon Stage March 5-22

America. In Montgomery, Alabama, a gentle children’s book stirs the passions of a segregationist senator and a no-nonsense librarian. A contrasting story of childhood friends — an African-American man and a woman of white privilege who are reunited in Montgomery that same year — provides private counterpoint to the public events of the play. Political foes, star-crossed lovers, and one feisty children’s author inhabit the same page to conjure a Deep South of the imagination. Octagon Stage | 2 hours, plus intermission. Recommended ages 12+. For tickets www.asf.net

PIKE ROAD, ALABAMA

Pike Road Arts Council's 9th Annual Art Market Pike Road Town Hall (9575 Vaughn Rd) Sarturday, March 7, 9-4 pm

Call your friends for the Pike Road Arts Council's 9th Annual Art Market on Saturday, March 7th from 9 am - 4 pm at Pike Road Town Hall (9575 Vaughn Rd). This event is free to enter and features artists and artisans from the River Region and beyond. A local British Car Club will be showcasing their cars in the parking lot outside Town Hall during the event. Those interested in learning more can contact the Town of Pike Road by visiting www.pikeroad.us, calling 334.272.9883, or emailing info@pikeroad.us.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

44th Annual Zoo Weekend Montgomery Zoo Saturday and Sunday, March 7-8, 9-6 pm daily

During this two-day event the Montgomery Zoo is transformed into a amazing carnival like atmosphere for everyone from two to 92, with two stages of entertainment, games, rides, bouncy houses, giant inflatable slides, pony and camel rides, petting zoo, animal encounters, Montgomery Fire Department’s Smoke House, Montgomery Police Department K-9 Unit, live animal presentations, concessions, baked goodies, and more. Special appearances include Zoobeedoo, Big Mo, McGruff the Crime Dog, 501st Legion Vader’s Fist Star Wars characters, and the characters from Lisa’s Party Palace. Zoo Weekend is our biggest fundraiser of the year. All proceeds from this event will be contributed to the construction of a new reptile facility with its featuring animals including the critically endangered, Indian Gharial, Komodo Dragon, and King Cobra. For more vist www.montgomeryzoo.com

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CALERA, ALABAMA

St. Patrick's Murder Mystery Dinner Theater Corbin Farms Winery March 13-14, Friday, Saturday, 6:30 pm

Come join us for a St. Patrick’s Day themed murder mystery dinner theater on Friday, March 13th or Saturday, March 14th! This event will begin at 6:30 and end around 9:30. Plan to arrive at 6:30 and stay for the entire event! We will be serving some Irish favorites at Seamus O'Malley's Pub as well as great wine! Our menu is as follows: 1st Course: Irish Pub Salad and Irish Soda Bread, 2nd Course: your choice of entree *make your entree selection when purchasing your tickets* - Shepherd's Pie- Bangers & Mash- Baked Chicken with mashed potatoes and green beans, 3rd Course: Irish Cream Brownie Trifle. 21+ ONLY event. Tickets are $52.55 and include a 3 course dinner, 1 glass of wine, an evening of fun, Eventbrite fees, taxes, and gratuity! For more info visit www.corbinfarmswinery.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Nitty Gritty Dirt Band MPAC, Downtown Montgomery Thursday, March 19, 7:30 pm

With a refreshed lineup and newfound energy, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band remains one of the most accomplished bands in American roots music. Following an extended 50th anniversary tour, the ensemble grew to a six-piece in 2018 for the first time since their early jug band days. The group now includes Jeff Hanna (acoustic guitar, electric guitar), Jimmie Fadden (drums, harmonica), Bob Carpenter (keyboards), Jim Photoglo (bass, acoustic guitar), Ross Holmes (fiddle, mandolin), and Jaime Hanna (electric and acoustic guitar). All six members also sing, and when their voices merge, the harmonies add a powerful new component for the legendary band. And with the fatherson pairing of Jeff and Jaime Hanna, the band carries on a country music tradition of blood harmony. For tickets visit www.mpaconline.org.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA SLE Rodeo Garrett Coliseum in Montgomery, AL

March 19-21, 8-8 pm This rodeo will have more cowboys and cowgirls who competed in the National Finals Rodeo than any other rodeo within 200 miles! The 2020 SLE Rodeo will be held March 19-21 at Garrett Coliseum. The rodeo coming to town means more than just buckin’ broncos, barrel racing and burly bulls. Whether it’s the parade downtown, the Stick Horse Rodeo or the Western Festival, there’s something for everybody to enjoy. Tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster. For more info call 334.265.1867 or visit www.slerodeo.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Awaken, River Region Worship Gathering Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium March 28th, 6-7:15 pm The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Our first Awaken night of 2020 is March 28th, from 6pm-7:15pm, and is coming up soon. Please plan to be with us, and invite anyone you can! --Philippians 2:1 So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, 2 complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. for more visit the Awaken facebook page.

ENTERPRISE, ALABAMA

Piney Woods Arts Festival (A Juried Arts & Crafts Show) Enterprise State Community College Saturday and Saturday, April 4th & 5th

The 46th annual Piney Woods Arts Festival takes place April 4 (9 am – 5 pm) & April 5 (12 – 4 pm), on the running track of Enterprise State Community College. One of the oldest juried arts and crafts shows in the area, Piney Woods features original art and crafts by approximately 100 artists, a children’s fun center, food and entertainment. Special events include a Civil War Living Display and the Weevil City Cruisers Car and Truck Show (Saturday only across campus from the arts festival). On Friday, April 12, the Piney Woods Arts Festival is partnering with 321 Films, which will present the Mountain Tales Film Festival, the first ever film festival in Coffee County. Admission is free. For information, call 334.406.2787 or visit www. CoffeeCountyArtsAlliance.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

16th Annual Autism Crawfish Boil Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium April 4th, 12-4 pm The BEST crawfish boil in the GUMP along with live music and cold beverages will happen Saturday, April 4, 12 – 4 pm at Montgomery Riverwalk Stadium. All proceeds are donated to assist with Autism programs provided by Easter Seals Central Alabama for families in the River Region. These programs include Autism diagnosis which is costly and difficult to receive here in Central Alabama. Autism affects 1 in 88 children... Easter Seals is one of the premier organizations to get help for your loved ones! Early diagnosis is a must for these children. We hope you will help us by supporting this event. Tickets are $35. Ages 3 10 are $10. VIP tickets are $75. Tickets can be purchased on eventbrite. For more information, please call 334.262.0080. For more info visit www.autismmudbugball.org/

SANDESTIN, FLORIDA

Sandestin Wine Festival The Village of Baytowne Wharf, Miramar Beach, FL 32500 April 16 – 19

The 34th Annual Sandestin Wine Festival will take place April 16-19, 2020. The Sandestin Wine Festival has been named the “Best Annual Event” by Destin Magazine, and is known as the Best event in the Visit South Walton Beaches Wine and Food Festival area. The Sandestin Wine Festival at Baytowne Wharf brings an opportunity for discovery. Four days of unique events open up a wide range of experiences from attending wine dinners with celebrity chefs, participating in preview events throughout the year, and taking part in wine tastings that showcase hundreds of wines. www.sandestinwinefestival.com

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Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Food for Eyesight 3) Macular Degeneration – no known cause but often linked to aging, diabetes and UV light. Bilberry can help slow down the degeneration process by preventing free radicals from damaging the macula and also by strengthening the capillaries in the retina – in fact, this is one of bilberries best known strengths!

I have been reading a great book – “Dr Duke’s Essential Herbs” by James A. Duke, Ph.D. Duke is a fully qualified and respected botanist who worked for the US government for many years in that capacity. He is now retired and lives in Maryland, but what I like about his book is how clear and well written it is and how it explains both the chemistry and in layman’s terms how herbs and plants can help our bodies heal. Now I’m sure we all grew up being told that if we ate our carrots, we would be able to “see in the dark” or at the very least have good eyesight. Indeed carrots are packed with beta-carotene and other carotenoids, the precursors of Vitamin A. Vitamin A is essential to make the visual pigment in our eyes, but it is not only found in carrots, but also in any red, yellow or orange fruit or vegetable – think bell peppers, cantaloupe, yellow squash, etc.

known as Whortleberry, Black Whotles and Bleaberry. Due to the fact that they are more plentiful in Europe than here, they are more widely known for their powers to help vision there too. In fact, in WW2 the British sent their pilots off on night flights after giving them bilberry products to eat/drink so as to improve their night vision.

What you may not know is the power of the Bilberry! In fact, you may not even have heard of a bilberry, it being a small shrub that thrives in England, Scandinavia and Siberia; in fact it grows wild on the hillsides where my family lives in England and I remember well going with my Grandma with a basket and picking the tiny little dark berries which she would later make jam out of.

1) Cataracts – basically a clouding of the eye’s lens. Two significant studies have shown that taking bilberry extract and vitamin E can arrest the progression of cataracts – in 90% of cases!!

Dr. Duke says they are the same size as a blackcurrant, but I remember them being even smaller! Either way, they are very tiny. Smaller even than your wild blueberries (which are a LOT smaller than the cultivated ones.) It is also

Billberry can be used to treat a variety of vision problems:

2) Glaucoma – basically a build up of fluid pressure within the eye. A combination of bilberry, vitamin C and rutin has been found to lower the pressure within the eye and keep the eyes healthy. The vitamin C and rutin help lower the pressure and the bilberry compounds – anthocyanosides – retard the breakdown of the vitamin C thus allowing it to protect your eyes for longer.

4) Poor night vision (cue RAF) -As you age your pupils don’t dilate as well as they used to, so working or driving at night becomes more difficult. Bilberry can help compensate for that by increasing rhodopsin production within the eye. Rhodopsin is a pigment in the retinal rod cells, the cells used for night vision. 5) Retinopathy – a gradual visual deterioration caused by reduced circulation in the blood vessels that supply the retina, common in diabetics. Bilberry helps strengthen blood vessels leading to the eye, improving circulation to the retina, thus enabling it to function better. Studies have shown that 400mg of bilberry extract per day reduced the tendency toward eye hemorrhaging in retinopathy patients. If you think you may want to try a bilberry supplement, aim for a daily dosage of between 320 to 480mg. There are no known contraindications with any other supplement or prescribed drug. You can sometimes find bilberry leaf teas – be careful with those as too much of the leaves can be toxic, but you can eat as much of the fruit as you want! If you can find bilberry jam, it is truly delicious!

Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com You can also visit Tracy’s blog

at Tracybhalla.com, Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using skincare products myself for over 2020 RiverRegionBoom.com BOOM! March Thetheir River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine 62 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have.


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Profile for Boomer Communities

BOOM! March 2020