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Come Worship with Us! Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m. Christian Education: 11:00 a.m. on Sundays and 6 p.m. on Wednesdays

Founded Upon God’s Word

Liturgically Joyful

At Christchurch, Holy Scripture serves as the final authority for our teaching and preaching. Indeed, over the course of three years, almost the entire Bible is read aloud and preached upon.

At Christchurch, worship involves the entire congregation, as we offer God praise, thanksgiving and adoration using worship traditions that can be traced back to the earliest days of the Church. Our worship is not designed to entertain us, but to honor the true “audience” of worship, the Lord!

Warm and Loving

Committed to Mission

By God’s grace and through His Spirit, the people of Christchurch enjoy the richness and joy of being a true family. We’d love for you to become a part of us! Regardless of who you are, you will always find a home at Christchurch.

The people of Christchurch respond to God’s Word by going out into the world proclaiming the good news of Jesus, and we joyfully serve as His hands and feet whether in places like Uganda and Guatemala or within Montgomery.

8800 Vaughn Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 www.christchurchmgm.net 334.387.0566


BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

June 2017 Volume 7 Issue 10

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom C.S. Lewis

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

3 Jackson Hospital’s Health News 8 Publisher’s Letter 10 Dating Coach: Are heels a game changer on dates? 12 Growing Camellias from Seed, Fran Copeland page 28

Features

14 Mobile Health and Boomers 38 Small Town Theatre The area of digital health is still in the “wild wild west” stage.

Across America, theatre-goers gather beneath the stars

16 Millennials, Technology, and Wealth Accumulation, Austin Barranco

46 Norm Crosby

“We all use the wrong word “that skinny dog looks emancipated””

Departments 20 This and That

Getting You “In the Know”

21 Have the time of your life at the hotel where Dirty Dancing was filmed 23 Helping Pet Lovers Travel

44 {12} Things

Special Events for Boomers

40 Greg Budell

25 Virtual Support Groups Help Grieving Spouses With Depression

GRADUATION DAZE

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28 BOOM! Cover Profile

COVER PROFILE page 28

33 Socialize to Keep Your Brain Sharp page 24

page 23

page 20

34 Are you eligible to receive this valuable VA benefit? Ask an Elder Law Attorney 36 CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS AWARDS

page 20

page 21 page 36

page 44

42 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: Bone Broth

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BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 3966 Atlanta Hwy, Box 266, Montgomery, AL 36109. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2017 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

Happy Father’s Day

The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com Jim Watson, Publisher

Contributing Writers Sandi Aplin Austin Barranco Tracy Bhalla Greg Budell

Lisa Copeland Fran Copeland George Goodwyn Leigh Anne Richards Wina Sturgeon Nick Thomas Raley L. Wiggins Kathy Witt

Cover Photography Jeri Hines Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

This month’s issue is packed with a variety of interesting stories and information that will make you laugh, smile and maybe even plan a trip. Let me first introduce you to our Cover Profile, George Goodwyn. George is the kind of man who will inspire you participate in life to its fullest and leave something for others to improve on. He is a community leader, entrepreneur and like many fathers, is proud of his children and grandchildren. George is an example of aging well and as he shares some of his life’s journey, he provides some insight on his aging well philosophy. I think you’ll enjoy getting to know George and sharing his story with your friends.

Kathy Witt is back with a travel story about the many outdoor theatres scattered in many parts of the country. I had no idea you could experience so much drama under the stars. Leigh Anne Richards continues talking about technology when she focuses on mobile health and us Boomers. It seems we will someday be able to diagnose some of our health problems by using our smart phones, that is of course if we can get smarter when it comes to our smart phones! If you’re a woman of a certain age, you probably fell in love with the bad boy dance instructor, Johnny Castle from the movie Dirty Dancing played by Patrick Swayze. Well you can relive some of those moments where the movie was made this summer as they celebrate the 30th anniversary. Guys, this is a romance opportunity! Also, this month we report on virtual support groups to help in the grieving process and depression. This could be the way we solve age old problems using an avatar and computer screen. Greg Budell’s column brings back some crazy high school memories involving his old buddy Dave, you may want to keep your clothes on for this one! Nick Thomas profiles Norm Crosby, the comic you’ll remember as the guy who always used the wrong words to describe something as if they were the correct words. There are many more good reads in this month’s issue including the importance of socializing as we age to keep our brains sharp. If you wanted to know more about Bone Broth, Tracy Bhalla discusses it in her Eating Smart column.

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

If you’re not a Digital & Interactive subscriber yet, please do me a favor and go to www. riverregionboom.com and sign up, it’s free. Please support our advertisers because they support and value the 50+ community. Thanks for sharing BOOM! with your friends and your comments with me, I love to listen. Happy Father’s Day!

Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Digital & Interactive

When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an

advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community”

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DATING Coach: I first started dating when I was in my mid 40’s. Back then; I was dressing like a suburban mom who sits in the stands watching her kids play sports. My outfits consisted of jeans and black t-shirts. They came from expensive stores, so I thought I was the bomb. To top my gorgeous outfit off, I wore Birkenstocks type sandals on my feet from Lands End. And I got to choose from 3 colors, black, beige and navy. What can I say; they were cheaper than the real Birkenstocks, so I splurged. Yes, I was a real fashion maven back then. NOT!!!!! When I was ready to date, I’d tear through my closet looking for something to wear. I’d try on every black t-shirt I owned with my jeans and fake Birkenstocks and not one said I feel like a sexy woman excited to date. I wasn’t getting a lot of second dates back then, and I’m sure my clothes weren’t exactly helping! It took me into my early 50’s to figure out you really want to go on a date feeling girly as in feeling soft and feminine. Want to know what part of your outfit will make you feel the girliest?

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Are heels a game changer on dates?

Heels. No worries, you don’t need the 6-inch variety to make you feel girly. Heels that are 2 inches in height can make a big difference in how you feel. Heels give off a totally different vibe in the way you walk and move than athletic shoes, Uggs or even some flats do. And men love heels on women. They think heels make you look sexy! Let me share a quick story with you about what I mean by all of this. A private client of mine sent me her profile pictures. She was wearing a slightly different version of my Mom outfit -- jeans, a long sleeve T-shirt, and cowboy boots. She told me guys weren’t noticing her online. Remember you have all of 10 seconds to grab a guy’s attention with your picture before he moves on to someone else. This 10-second window is why it’s so important you show the best you possible in any picture you post. My client and I worked closely together to boost her inner confidence by helping her get back in touch with how awesome she really was. And then something cool happened.

Her outside look began changing, as she felt better about who she was on the inside. She restyled her hair, went to a makeup counter and tried new makeup. She bought clothes like dresses, skirts, and heels that reflected her feminine side for the first time. She also had new pictures taken, and men were jumping hoops to meet her. Huge difference from the first pictures I saw because she was feeling great about herself on the inside and the changes she made on her appearance reflected that! Ok, so back to the original question. Do you have to wear heels for a date? No, but men do like it. What you do have to do is this; you want to feel great inside about who you are, or nothing you wear will ever feel right. Get your Inner Sexy on then wear clothes that reflect both the Inner and Outer Beautiful Sexy YOU. When you feel girly, you come across from that softer side of you. And as a result, like my private client experienced, men will jump hoops so they can meet you too! Lisa Copeland, “The Dating Coach Who Makes Dating Fun and Easier after 50!” Find out more at Findaqualityman.com (c)2017, Lisa Copeland, findaqualityman.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


HIGH

140 90

OR ABOVE

PRE-HIGH BETWEEN

121-139 81-89 NORMAL

120 80

OR LESS

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

KNOW YOUR NUMBERS Untreated hypertension can cause serious health consequences or death

prevention is key! • • • • • •

Reduce salt intake Eat more fruits and vegetables Don’t smoke Be physically active Maintain a healthy body weight Monitor blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol

www.adph.org/cvh R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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by Fran Copeland

Growing Camellias from Seed

A few summers ago, I noticed some balls growing on some camellias. They resembled green pecans. By fall, they really resembled pecans. The green pod had turned brown and opened. I searched the ground underneath and found some brown seeds that looked like small chestnuts. I checked the other camellias and found a few more that had pods, so I searched under the camellia for seeds. Altogether, there was a jeans pocket full. They sat in a bowl in my kitchen until after Christmas when I decided to plant them. I put them in several planters with moistened soil, covered them with plastic wrap, put them in my bathroom, which has a bay window with a southern exposure, and promptly forgot them.

wanted the seeds, he was welcome to them. Discretion being the better part of valor, I backed away and didn’t look again.

put some lightweight shelves in the bathroom. I filled the cups with moistened potting soil, put in at least one seed, covered it with soil, put on the lid, This past 79 germinated cups on porch and stacked fall, in them in 2016, the bathroom. My other plantings after collecting a BUNCH of seeds, had produced from 20 to 40 percent I didn’t want to damage them by germination in the planters. I hoped tearing them out of these would do as well. When I started planters. There should checking around the first of April, I be a better way – one One morning found over 20 had germinated. Over that wouldn’t require in the spring, the succeeding weeks, I found a total separating roots or something of 79 completely out of the ground dumping them on the green pushing and 30 with viable seeds, which should ground. What could the plastic continue to germinate. That’s 109 handle a relatively long wrap caught out of 207, or 53%!! WOW!! What root, require little or my eye. I a thrill! It seems like my winter 2017 no watering, provide jerked off the experiment worked. A few had grown easy access to plant? plastic and, enough to donate a dozen to the Voila! Tall Dixie cups! 207 Dixie cups in bathroom to my utter Master Gardener Annual Plant Sale If they germinated, surprise, in April. They were named “Camellia they would slide out several seeds had germinated and Surprise”, since I have no clue what or you could cut down the side of the the leaves were trying to escape. they are. cup and get the Altogether, about 30 – 40 germinated. plant out. Also, Fran Copeland, an intern in By the time, they appeared big enough the cups had lids the 2017 Master Gardener to survive outdoors, the numbers had which would serve Class, lives in Shorter. dwindled. I tried to get them out of two purposes. For more information the planters one by one, but the roots They would hold on becoming a master were too long. I dumped the planters the moisture gardener, visit www. capcitymga.org or email on the ground, which tore up a few, in the soil and capcitymga@gmail.com then planted them in a flower bed prevent messes behind some camellias where they from occurring 12 donated to plant sale would be protected from the sun and if the cups got freezing winds. Some are now about 3 knocked over in feet tall. Most died from neglect. the bathroom. In the fall of 2015, when I started to look for seeds, I heard a rattle under the largest camellia. If a rattlesnake

On January 16, 2017, I planted 207 16 oz. Dixie cups with seeds. My bathtub had been covered with slats and I

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Mobile Health and Boomers

Over the past few months, I have written my columns for the magazine on technology and Boomers. The first article was online personal training, last months was fitness trackers, and the last in the series is investigating will our baby boomer generation buy into mobile health. The information I have gathered comes from the California Healthcare Foundation so I will be citing information from there. Our baby boomer generation, because of its massive size and looming health costs, is prime focus of the digital health market. The oldest boomers are turning 70 and the youngest are still in their 50’s. The Boomer generation has resources so the technology developers like to hear that. This year (2017), the Boomers will control 70% of the nation’s disposable income. According to the AARP, the 50 + population has the greatest concentration of wealth of any generation and half of all boomers own smart phones. Here are some staggering statistics: • There are more than 76 million baby boomers- born between 1946 and 1964 • By 2029, boomers will account for a 73% increase in the age of the 65+ population. • Medicare spent $632 billion in 2015. This will increase at an annual rate of 1.5 between the years of 2014-2024. • Medicaid programs funded more than $80 billion worth of care for seniors in 2010. Interestingly, boomers are less healthy and more costly than previous generations. They are living longer but have more chronic diseaseshypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart diseases. The American Heart Association has reported that 37 million

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boomers will be managing more than one chronic condition by 2030.

Many consumers want to monitor their own health and avoid so much out of pocket costs. Today there are at least 100,000 self-care apps available for smartphones or tablets. Well known

care, and financial incentives encourage the support of lower cost substitutions for in person visits to hospitals and physicians offices. Physicians, especially the younger ones, appreciate the value of technology in health care. Rock Health research found that 73% of physicians believe that HIT (Health Information Technology) will improve quality of care in the longer term.

Fitness over Fifty

Here are some examples of ways that mobile health is enabling by Leigh Anne Richards lower cost substitutions in health care: • Substituting remote consultation for ER visitsEmergency room visits in many ones include apps for diabetics tracking parts of the US are soaring. Video of blood sugar, medication reminders, consultations are expected to reach 158 and activity encouragement. Mobile million per year by 2020. Doctors on technology can include both passive Demand, Teladoc, and American Well and active formats. Passive sensors can are some of the well-known programs. monitor physical movement, walking However, virtual visits result in more pace or diabetes blood sugar. Active prescriptions than face to face visits technologies require a user to actually according to Dr. Karen Rheuban, director apply the device for a problem such as of the Office of Telemedicine at The heart rhythm. Both types of technologies University of Virginia Health System. are going toward the evolution of self• Substituting self- care for remote care. consultation-Because technology is moving so fast, experts believe the Designers of mobile technology need creation of a device so functional and to take note of a few things that low cost that a layman can accurately might hinder Boomers from using the check his own vital signs. Charlotte technology. Boomers have a youthful Yeh of AARP services speculates that a attitude but they may not be as device like a tricorder could enable a physically adaptable or interested in new person to do an exam in the privacy of gadgets. their own home- not yet letting anyone know about the symptoms they might be • Eyesight- Vision changes happen. Farexperiencing. She envisions that being sightedness requires larger print with tied to a score which could be a curated contrast. Devices need to be readable in response, thus advising the consumer on both bright and dim light. what to do. • Hearing- impairment worsens 10% per • Substituting smartphone apps for decade remote and in person consultation. • Dexterity- arthritis in the hands It is almost a digital health cliché that impacts the ability to manage small the future of medicine is in your smart buttons. Tremors and Parkinson’s affect phone, and for lower income patients the ability to swipe, pinch, or touch with smart phones this could become screens. true. United Health Care launched an app for Medicaid recipients in 17 states. Providers have a powerful role in driving Interestingly the pilot saw patient the use of health technologies for selfengagement rates jump from 37% to The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


73%, while the number of ER visits per patient dropped from 7.14 a month to 3.45 per month. The area of digital health is still in the “wild wild west” stage. There is still an uncertainty for innovators, providers, and consumers. Interestingly, 51% of digital health startups fail within their first 2 years. The boomers themselves will be responsible for much of the utility of existing and new mobile health inventions. They will need to use the apps and gadgets consistently and pay attention to the results. Let’s remember that apps can only do so much, Charlotte Yeh of AARP services made a great point- “If you think about health outcomes, 20% is genetics, 20% is the health care delivery system, and 60% is lifestyle. Mobile health is interesting to ponder and envision just what the future of health care will look like in a few short years. Orlov, Laurie, “Baby Steps: Will Boomers Buy Into Mobile Health, California HealthCare Foundation, Oct 2015, pp.1-6.

Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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Millennials, Technology, and Wealth Accumulation

Brandt McDonald introduces his June guest columnist, Austin Barranco… From time to time, I will be introducing several of our advisors through this column. They will share personalized insights into financial markets, financial planning, and overall wealth management concepts. At McDonald & Hagen, we have a deep bench of talent that is eager to serve our firm’s clients and our local community. This month’s column is written by Austin Barranco. Austin entered the financial industry in 2014 after earning a degree in Finance from The University of Alabama, with a specialization in Insurance and Risk Management, he has also earned the distinction of a FINRA General Securities Principal held with LPL. Austin and his wife Maghen live in East Montgomery with their dog Chip. In his free time Austin enjoys college football, golf, and traveling the world.

Many of you are nearing the point in your life where your children (millennials) are beginning to spread their wings and fly. This could mean graduating from college, landing a job, or getting that first big promotion. For you, this means retirement is finally in sight. For your children, retirement preparation is just beginning. Their road to retirement will be vastly different than yours, and it is important for them to prepare for the lifestyle they want in retirement. Spending a career with one company until retirement used to be a widespread practice. You could work 30-40 years with the same company, build up a large company pension, and set aside additional retirement savings for yourself. The benefit is that you could generate three streams of income in retirement: your social security, your pension, and your personal retirement savings. Back then, it was common for a company to offer a defined benefit plan, commonly referred to as a pension, where regardless of the performance of the underlying funds, the company was still required to pay you the defined benefit upon retirement. So, the liability to make the payments fell completely upon the company, and not you. Unfortunately, this business model is unsustainable and defined benefit plans are much less common nowadays. Companies have replaced defined benefit plans with defined contribution plans, where the amount of income generated to the employee during retirement is determined by the amount of contributions the employee made during their tenure. Essentially, the employee pays for what they get. If they contribute the maximum to their defined contribution plan, then they will most likely have a comfortable retirement. If they fail to contribute to their retirement plan, then they may never be able to fully retire. Because of this change, millennials have less incentive to stay with a company for 30-40 years. In fact, a recent Gallup poll

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by yourself, while paying significantly less.

Financial Thoughts

with Austin Barranco

reported that 60% of employed Millennials would be willing to change jobs today, making them the most likely generation to “job-hop”. In addition, CNN claims that the average millennial will change jobs over 4 times before reaching their mid30’s. So, what does this mean for your children? This means they will not be able to rely on their employer to provide them with a comfortable retirement, and must take saving, planning, and growing their retirement into their own hands. So, if pensions and social security are gone by the time millennials retire, then they must come up with an alternative plan to retire comfortably. For most millennials, this means sacrificing short term luxuries in order to maintain a regimented savings plan. Millennials are frequently being stereotyped as an entitled generation who expect to enjoy the finer things in life, but avoid the challenging work and sacrifice that is required to get there. As a broad accusation, this may not be terribly off target, and technology is the leading cause of this generational shift. For example, in 1980 you would consult an attorney if you wanted to form an LLC and begin doing business. The attorney would draft your LLC’s articles of organization, file the necessary paperwork with the state administrator, and then refer you to a CPA to file your tax paperwork with the IRS. This process could take six months or more. Then the attorney and CPA would send you an expensive invoice for their hourly services. Fast forward to 2017: Now we have LegalZoom and TurboTax. In less than 30 days you could accomplish these tasks

Our generation doesn’t appreciate the knowledge and experience of business professionals, because we have technology to rely upon. When we don’t know the answer to a question, we Google it. When we are sick, we check WebMD before consulting a doctor. When we take a road trip, we use the GPS on our phones instead of a map. To millennials, seeking professional advice is not our first choice in finding a solution to a problem, technology is. I call this trend “millennial logic”. In some cases, “millennial logic” can be a life saver, but in other cases it can be detrimental. Take for example a person who experiences minor chest pain, but rather than go to a doctor they consult WebMD, and self-diagnose a minor cold. Three weeks later, the level of pain increases to a point where they are hospitalized with walking pneumonia. Now they are out of work for 2 weeks and have hefty medical bills to pay, because they did not consult a professional. This same type of “millennial logic” applies to wealth accumulation and financial management. As a Financial Adviser, my friends frequently ask me for investment advice. Usually a friendly conversation over a coffee turns into, “Austin, what are your ‘hot stock picks’ right now?”. They tell me they are learning how to trade with Scottrade or E-Trade and want my professional advice. When I ask them what their investment objectives are they usually say something like, “Make a ton of money as fast as possible!”. Unfortunately, this is not an investment objective. This is a problem: just because you can trade on your own, doesn’t mean that you should. You should consult a financial adviser in a professional setting, not gamble your hard-earned money on a stock tip you received over a cup of coffee. Would you perform your own root canal, or go to a dentist? Would you represent continued page 18

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yourself in court, or hire an attorney? Would you replace the brake pads on your vehicle, or go to a mechanic? Most people do not have the skills necessary to complete these tasks on their own, and would benefit with the help of a professional. Financial management is no different. I would encourage you to talk with your children about seeking professional advice when planning for their financial future, but if they are still determined to invest on their own, then give them these general guidelines. 1) Establish a goal: A goal should not be, “Make a lot of money”. A goal should be quantifiable and tangible, for example, “I would like to retire at the age of 63 with a monthly income of $5K. If I save $1,000,000 by the time I turn 63, then I can make $60K per year ($5K/Month) if my rate of return is 6%.” This is a specific goal that your children can work towards, and hold themselves accountable if they are getting off track. 2) Create a savings plan to achieve that goal: Let’s say they are 23, and want to reach a principal of $1,000,000 by the time they turn 63. This means that they will have 40 years to reach their goal. One way to reach this goal would be to save $500 per month for the first 10 years, $1,000 per month for the next ten years, and then $1,500 per month for the last twenty years of their career. If they invested

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these savings, and could generate an annual return of 5%, then their principal investment could approach $1.4 million by the time they turn 63. 3) Determine investment objective and allocate assets accordingly: Now that they know their goals and have a plan in place, they can select an investment objective based on their risk tolerance. The younger they are, the more appropriate it is or them to assume risk (equities, options, etc.). As they grow older, it is wise for them to reduce their level of risk and volatility by considering investments such as Bonds, ETFs, and CDs. Millennials can access vast amounts of information by simply touching their iPhones, and more often than not this is huge advantage; however, when it comes to planning for retirement, I would highly recommend seeking professional advice. That way, when is it time for your children to walk away from their career, they can retire with the lifestyle they hope to have.

individual. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and may not be invested into directly. The economic forecasts set forth may not develop as predicted and there can be no guarantee that strategies promoted will be successful.

Austin Barranco, Financial Advisor

© 2016 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.

Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager www.mcdonaldhagen.com Direct comments and questions to bailey.worrell@lpl.com or 334.387.0094

These are hypothetical examples and not representative of any specific situations. Your results will vary. The hypothetical rates of return used do not reflect the deductions of fees and charges inherent to investing. This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized legal or tax advice. We suggest you discuss your specific legal or tax issues with a qualified legal or tax advisor. Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber’s or others’ use of the content.

Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA & SIPC. Investment advice offered through McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor, and separate entity from LPL Financial.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any

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i

This & tHAT

The SummerNight Downtown Art Walk

The SummerNight Downtown Art Walk is an arts festival that transforms downtown Auburn into its very own arts district, featuring the work of local and regional artists, live musicians, street performers, great food and children’s activities. Each year, the Auburn Arts Association, City of Auburn, Jan Dempsey Community Arts Center (JDCAC) and Auburn Downtown Merchants Association host this event to highlight the many talented artists in our community in addition to promoting our unique downtown area. During this event, downtown merchants and restaurants remain open after regular business hours and people of all ages are encouraged to take advantage of this great opportunity to shop, dine and relax while enjoying the arts in downtown Auburn. Artists have works on display and live musical entertainment is provided. Make sure to bring your children too as they have an opportunity to participate in arts and crafts, as well as enjoy other attractions that change each year! Don’t miss out on this great, familyfriendly experience in downtown Auburn! This year’s SummerNight Downtown Art Walk will kickoff with a The Electric Rangers...Join us Friday, June 9 at Toomer’s Corner to hear starting line party and parade beginning at Pebble Hill! what is sure to be a foot-stomping performance by this talented group. Individuals, local organizations and local groups are invited With music kicking off at 6:15 p.m., the Electric Rangers, will provide and can show off their creative side with costumes and listeners with both original songs and cover performances. participate in this exciting new addition to SummerNight! Friday, June 9th, 6-10 pm. For more info visit www.auburnsummernight.org.

New Therapy for those with Alzheimer’s and Dementia Country Cottage, a local assisted living and memory care community in Montgomery, Alabama, opened their Snoezelen Room on May 11th. “Snoezelen” comes from the Dutch verbs “snuffelen” (to seek and explore) and “doezelen” (to relax). A Snoezelen room is an area dedicated to multi-sensory therapy. It is designed to help residents to relax and explore. Snoezelen Rooms have been used since 1970s to help treat children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. These rooms are now being built to help seniors with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Proponents of Snoezelen Rooms say the rooms can help to regenerate some brain functions. These rooms are specially designed to help residents learn, ask questions, and communicate better through sensory stimulation. Researchers say that seniors who have used these rooms in the past have showed improved mood, higher self-esteem, and a better ability to express themselves. For more information about Snoezelen visit www.snoezelen.info or Country Cottage visit www. cottageassistedliving.com or call 334.694.6295.

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Have the time of your life at the hotel where Dirty Dancing was filmed Fans of the iconic 1987 film “Dirty Dancing” can bask in the nostalgia and relive memories this summer at Mountain Lake Lodge, one of the primary filming locations for the movie. The Lodge is hosting four special Dirty Dancing Weekends, June 23-25, July 28-30, Aug. 25-27 and Sept. 15-17. Fans will be immersed in movie memories by participating in the many themed events over the weekend. A film location tour, scavenger hunt, a showing of the film on the Kellerman’s lawn, lawn games just like the movie, a dance party at the actual gazebo - transformed to replicate the movie theme, and tons more dancing all weekend (film character dress encouraged). The big finale is a professional dance performance on Saturday evening. “We are so excited to celebrate the 30th anniversary of ‘Dirty Dancing’ with our guests who love the movie as much as we do,” said Heidi Stone, general manager of Mountain Lake Lodge. “We could not be more proud to be a part of this beloved film’s history, and we are looking forward to sharing with guests where Baby and the rest of Houseman family stayed, danced and loved in our beautiful resort.” Just in time for this summer, Mountain Lake Lodge has added new amenities and upgrades to the resort. Over the past four years, the resort has made significant improvements to this historic getaway for families, conferences, family reunions and weddings. “Guests will find modern amenities mixed with movie nostalgia at today’s Mountain Lake Lodge,” added Stone. “We are committed to sustaining this historic and beloved mountain resort for many generations of movie fans to come.” Dirty Dancing weekend packages include breakfast, lunch and dinner, a walking tour, scavenger hunt, group dance lessons and more. For more information or reservations, visit www.mtnlakelodge.com. Located in the heart of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, part of the Appalachian Mountain Range and the center of a 2,600-acre nature preserve, Mountain Lake Lodge is the ideal place for families, friends, couples and groups to relax amidst nature’s bounty. The lodge continues to add family fun events throughout the year to sustain the property and legacy of Mountain Lake.

Capital City Master Gardener Association Presents Lunch & Learn 2017

Capital City Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2017 the 1st Wednesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. We meet at the Armory Learning Arts Center, 1018 Madison Avenue, Downtown Montgomery. Mark your calendars June 7th, Selecting & Caring for Roses – Gloria Purnell, Birmingham Rose Society and July 5th, Name that Tree – Patrick Cook, Alabama Forestry Commission. For Fore information, please contact the Montgomery County Extension Office 334.270.4133. Also visit www.capcitymga.org

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River Region Volunteers Honored Hundreds gathered at Montgomery’s Trinity Presbyterian Church Thursday for the 2017 Volunteer of the Year Awards to honor volunteers for their incredible gifts of service and ongoing efforts to improve the lives of others. Cosponsored by the Junior League of Montgomery, HandsOn River Region initiated the ceremony 43 years ago after its first year in operation to publicly recognize the outstanding service provided by community volunteers. Shannon Ammons, Executive Director of the Alabama Association of Nonprofits, was keynote speaker, and WSFA’s John O’Connor served as Master of Ceremonies. Nominated by the Montgomery Area Council on Aging (MACOA), Sarah Spear was the recipient of the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award. Mrs. Spear is a stalwart volunteer who has served the Central Alabama Red Cross, Cancer Wellness Foundation, MACOA and Medical Outreach Ministries. “Let Sarah know there’s a need and she’s your woman, neighbor and friend”, states MACOA’s Donna Marietta, “Sarah is selfless and always willing to contribute her time and talents to the greater good of Montgomery’s citizens.” Others honored were: Gretchen Sippial, a generous supporter and Docent at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, was named Volunteer of the Year in The Arts for Center: Sarah Spear. Clockwise from top left: Gretchen Sippial, Lee High School AFJROTC, her contributions as Museum art instructor, gallery leader, William Robertson, CeCe Tyus, Food Bank Faves, Virginia White First Impressions staff and fundraiser. Virginia White was named Senior Volunteer of the Year for developing and running Baptist East’s Teddy Bear Program which provides the family of every baby born at Baptist with a handmade keepsake teddy bear adorned with the newborn’s footprints. Carolyn “CeCe” Tyus, recipient of the Adult Volunteer of the Year, lives the mission of Mothers Against Drunk Driving in honor of her son Renota who was killed in 2008 by a drunk driver. William Robertson was named Youth Volunteer of the Year for his involvement with Dream Court where he coaches tennis to those with special needs. Food Bank Faves received the Adult Group Volunteer of the Year Award for their weekly commitment to the Montgomery Area Food Bank where they’ve provided over 450 hours of service sorting and organizing donations. Lee High School Air Force Junior ROTC was awarded the Youth Group Volunteer of the Year in recognition of the 2,000 hours of service they have provided to coordinate over 40 community events including food drives, school clean ups and youth mentorship activities. HandsOn River Region mobilizes volunteers and connects people, information and services to meet local needs and build a strong, caring community. To learn more, visit www.handsonriverregion.org or call 334.264.3335.

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Helping Pet Lovers Travel TrustedHousesitters, a service attracting millions of seniors worldwide that can save on pet care and travel just in time for the summer vacation season. UK-based TrustedHousesitters is a global community of pet lovers helping each other travel the world by connecting pet owners with a network of verified pet sitters. The affordable subscription model of $119 per year for unlimited pet sits and trips is the first of its kind in the U.S. Unlike a home rental or traditional pet care service, no money changes hands between members. People join the site not to make money, but because they love pets and they love to travel. More than 50% of TrustedHousesitters 500k members worldwide are over 55 and retired. Here’s why: * Retirees on a fixed income can enjoy FREE, unlimited accommodations worldwide! Imagine staying in a flat in London, apartment in San Francisco, or a chateaux in France for FREE. * Widows and widowers will often stop traveling because they lack companionship. TrustedHousesitters removes that loneliness barrier for members who enjoy the companionship of a four-legged friend of their choice (cat, dog, horse, goat and more!) on every vacation. * FREE in-home pet care (as opposed to typical cost of boarding an animal, which ranges from $20-$100++ per night). The easy-touse site frees pet owners from worry and, as a result, members travel three times more than the average pet owner. * And Happier Pets: Vets agree that pets are happiest and healthiest when kept at home. * Over the past six years, TrustedHousesitters has saved pet owners and travelers an estimated $218 million in pet care and travel costs. For more information visit www.trustedhousesitters.com

MANE Adult Camp

MANE is having Adult Camp the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd of August from 8-12. This years adult camp will be focused on becoming a more confident horse person and leader in and out of the arena. Guest trainer Taylor McIntosh will be joining the staff to help teach about listening to the horses body language and more! Some horse experience is required for this year. We only have 12 spots available. Cost is $150 for all three days. Reserve your spot today! Call 334.213.0909 or email equine.director.mane@gmail.com

The Side by Side Singers are dedicated to sharing music to keep our minds strong. Music can improve our mood and boost cognitive skills. We invite those living with Alzheimer’s or dementia and their care-partners to join us for 8-week sessions each Tuesday, 1:00-2:00 pm at First United Methodist Church in Montgomery. The music we sing ranges from Sinatra to Elvis. photo by Mickey Welsh/Montgomery Advertiser

SIDEbySIDE singers singers

Please contact Jack Horner at ivortickle@aol.com or Laura Selby at 834-8990 for more information. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

NO FEE, PLEASE JOIN THE FELLOWSHIP!

First United METHODIST CHURCH

2416 W. Cloverdale Park Montgomery, AL 36106 334.834.8990 www.fumcmontgomery.org

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Ann Karst is the Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award Winner Ann Karst was honored by Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School as the 2017 Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award winner for her service to the school. The Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award was established by the Harbin family and is awarded by the school to recognize those selfless individuals who have significantly served Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School and exemplified its values in their lives. The 21st recipient of the Harbin Award, Ann Karst has served Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School in a variety of ways throughout the years. The mother of three alumni, her contributions include volunteer driver, team Mom for all sports her daughters participated in, Advisory Board member, finance council member, PICE committee member and golf tournament volunteer, and faithful PTC volunteer at all campuses. When called upon, she always says yes. As Dr. Michael Karst, daughters Megan ’13, Ashley ’15 and Ann an active member of our community she has not only helped by giving her time and energy on campus - helping to raise money through Partners In Catholic Education (PICE) or assisting with fundraisers and most recently our Capital Campaign, but also as the co-founder of the MCPS prayer warriors, keeping our faith in the forefront as a vital part of support for our school and the larger community. She has been an active participant in the school for over 17 years, with a wonderful attitude and selfless spirit she is forever a cheerleader for Catholic and the importance of a Catholic education. Ann is a great example of a true benefactor, as a past parent and continued friend; she continues to show up, do the work, be the advocate and helps to make Montgomery Catholic all that it is! Ann is married to Dr. Michael Karst, they are the parents of Elizabeth ’12, Megan ’13, and Ashley ’15.

Notes on Aging Gracefully 1. I changed my car horn to gunshot sounds. People move out of the way much faster now! 2. I didn’t make it to the gym today. That makes five years in a row. 3. I decided to stop calling the bathroom the John and renamed it the Jim. I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning. 4. Last year I joined a support group for procrastinators. We haven’t met yet. 5. I don’t need anger management. I just need people to stop irritating me! 6. When I was a child I thought nap time was a punishment. Now, as a grown up, it feels like a mini vacation. 7. My people skills are just fine. It’s my tolerance of idiots that needs working on. 8. If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would’ve put them on my knees. 9. The kids text me “plz” which is shorter than please. I text back “no” which is shorter than “yes.” 10. I’m going to retire and live off of my savings. Not sure what I’ll do the second week. 11. Even duct tape can’t fix stupid ... but it can muffle the sound! 12. Why do I have to press one for English when you’re just gonna transfer me to someone I can’t understand anyway? 13. Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advice.

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Virtual Support Groups Help Grieving Spouses With Depression As the U.S. population ages, it’s estimated that half of women older than 65 are widows, while one-sixth of men of the same age have lost their spouses.

“Group members often shared things like: ‘Right now I’m crying at my keyboard, and I would never do this in person, but because I feel like there’s this anonymity, I can break down, while my avatar looks perfectly fine,’” Knowles said.

Support groups have proved to be a helpful resource for those dealing with grief, but for older individuals, obstacles such as geographic location and physical immobility can sometimes make it difficult to attend support groups in person. An effective option for older adults, according to new University of Arizona research, might be an online virtual reality support group that allows widows and widowers to interact in real time with mental health professionals and other bereaved people, via a computergenerated avatar. Lindsey Knowles, a graduate student in clinical psychology at the UA, set out with her colleagues to test the effectiveness and acceptability of two web-based support resources for older adults who have lost a spouse. In a study of 30 widows and widowers older than 50, some were assigned to be part of a virtual reality support group twice a week, while others instead were instructed to do once-weekly readings from a grief education website. The same topics — including physical health, mental well-being, sleep, dating and parenting, among others — were addressed in both the interactive virtual group and the static online readings. In follow-up assessments at the end of the eight-week study period and two months later, researchers found that participants in both groups showed improvements in stress, loneliness and sleep quality, but only participants in the virtual reality group showed selfreported improvement in symptoms of depression. “One of the best treatments for depression is behavioral activation,” Knowles explained. “People who are depressed, or have more depressive

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In follow-up assessments, participants in the virtual reality group said they felt as if they were in a real room during the sessions, with real people who were going through similar experiences.

symptoms, often remove themselves from their environment and from doing things that provide positive reinforcement and give them a sense of value. Showing up for a group twice a week — even if it is virtual — is a way for them to engage in the world that they haven’t been.” Researchers used the online platform Second Life to create a private virtual living room in a seaside cabin, where small groups of three to six people could gather. Participants, who all had lost a partner in the last one to three years, chose avatars — or animated figures — to represent them in the space. Then, from the comfort of their own homes, they communicated with one another by typing in a chat program. In the first hour-long virtual support group meeting each week, Knowles’ co-author, UA assistant professor of psychology Mary Frances-O’Connor, presented on a grief education topic by typing to those in the room. O’Connor previously had found virtual support groups to be an effective tool in her work with caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Knowles moderated the second hourlong meeting each week, in which participants got to know one another and share their personal stories, often delving into feelings they might not be comfortable expressing in person.

“There’s something to be said for getting into a group and showing up for that group every week, as well as being able to share your experience in a validating and normalizing environment,” Knowles said. Those in the other study group — the ones assigned to do weekly readings from a grief education website — did not show improvement in depression. However, like the support group participants, they did report better sleep and less stress and loneliness after the intervention, which means the website could still be an effective tool for those who are grieving. It also requires fewer resources than a support group, which needs a dedicated moderator, Knowles said. Overall, both interventions were well received by participants, Knowles said. Future studies should consider how the effectiveness of virtual support groups and educational websites compares to that of in-person groups and the simple passage of time, Knowles said, noting that the aging population makes this as an especially important area of research. “With the graying of America that is happening, we expect that more people are going to be widowed as baby boomers age,” Knowles said. “Losing a spouse is a huge life transition and a profoundly stressful event. All of us will experience different types of grief in our lives, and having accessible resources that are evidence-based is really important.” R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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This & tHAT World War II Quilts Many American women made warm and attractive quilts to honor and benefit US soldiers during the period 1940-1945, either as outright gifts or as raffle items to raise money for the war effort. This book reflects extensive original research of newspaper and magazine articles of the era, and authenticates the patterns and designs available to quiltmakers, anchoring the quilts historically in time. Color photos and descriptive text identify many patriotic quilts made for donation to the Red Cross and organizations such as Bundles for Britain. When possible, original patterns and designs that inspired the quilts are included. The quilts can now be interpreted from factual and objective perspectives, enhancing their historic and emotional importance. Formore information visit www.schifferbooks.com

HandsOn Volunteers Needed

Cycling for Sight is a 20-mile, 45-mile, 65-mile and 100-mile fun ride to benefit the Montgomery Lions Club Community Foundation charities. The ride commemorates Helen Keller, a native Alabamian who courageously challenged Lions Club members to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness”. Volunteers are essential to make this a fun, safe event for the hundreds of participating cyclists. On June 22 and 23, the Thursday and Friday before the event, volunteers will check in pre-registered cyclists and distribute participant packets. On Thursday, the sign in table will be set up inside Academy Sports & Outdoors at 8610 Eastchase Parkway. On Friday, the sign in table will be set up under an awning in front of Montgomery Multisport at PepperTree Shopping Center and will be moved inside the store in the event of rain. On Friday, June 23, from 4:00 - 6:30 pm, volunteers will deliver supplies to the rest stops and set them up for Saturday morning. On Saturday, June 24, volunteers will assist with the following tasks: 5:00 am - 7:30 am - Set Up and Host Breakfast; 7:00 am - 11:00 am - Rest Stop Shift 1; 11:00 am - 3:00 pm - Rest Stop Shift 2; 3:30 pm - 7:00 pm - Rest Stop Shift 3 & Clean Up. The race begins and ends at Blackfinn Ameripub at Eastchase and will take place rain or shine. Visit www.handsonriverregion.org to register today!

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No Nursing Home For Us

Are You A Renovator?

No nursing home for us. We’ll be checking into a Holiday Inn! With the average cost for a nursing home care costing $188.00 per day, There is a better way when we get old and too feeble. I’ve already checked on reservations at the Holiday Inn. For a combined Long term stay discount and senior discount, it’s $59.23 per night. Breakfast is included, and some have happy hours in the afternoon. That leaves $128.77 a day for lunch and dinner in any restaurant we want, or Room service, laundry, gratuities and special TV movies. Plus, they provide a spa, swimming pool, workout room, lounge and washer-dryer, etc. Most have free toothpaste and razors, and all have free shampoo and soap. $5 worth of tips a day you’ll have the entire staff scrambling to help you. They treat you like a customer, not a patient. There’s a city bus stop out front, and seniors ride free. The handicap bus will also pick you up (if you fake a decent limp). To meet other nice people, call a church bus on Sundays. For a change of scenery, take the airport shuttle bus and eat at One of the nice restaurants there. While you’re at the airport, fly somewhere. Otherwise, the cash keeps building up. It takes months to get into decent nursing homes. Holiday Inn will take your reservation today. And you’re not stuck in one place forever -- you can move from Inn to Inn, or even from city to city. Want to see Hawaii? They have Holiday Inn there too. TV broken? Light bulbs need changing? Need a mattress replaced? No problem . . . They fix everything, and apologize for the inconvenience. The Inn has a night security person and daily room service. The maid checks to see if you are ok. If not, they’ll call an ambulance . . . Or the undertaker. If you fall and break a hip, Medicare will pay for the hip, and Holiday Inn will Upgrade you to a suite for the rest of your life. And no worries about visits from family. They will always be glad to find you, And probably check in for a few days mini-vacation. The grandkids can use the pool. What more could I ask for? So, when I reach that golden age, I’ll face it with a grin.

Join Landmarks Foundation and the Historic Neighborhoods Coalition for a Renovators’ Happy Hour! See a major renovation in progress and meet the fearless folks who are bringing this Capitol Heights home back from the brink. Free to Landmarks members, $10 non-members. Pay at the door or register online at www.landmarksfoundation.com Refreshments will be served.

Hospice of Montgomery’s Kentucky Derby Annual Benefit More than 500 guests and donors recently gathered in their “Derby” best for Hospice of Montgomery’s Kentucky Derby Annual Benefit fundraiser at Montgomery Country Club. The event, chaired by Julia Wilson, was a fun-filled afternoon affair with a VIP pre-party, post-position horse draw, exclusive silent auction, hat contest, funny money gaming tables, hors d’ oeuvres, music, fabulous prizes and, of course, viewing of the Kentucky Derby! Funds raised at the annual benefit help provide counseling and bereavement services to families, community education seminars, and care for terminally ill patients, regardless of their ability to pay. Hospice of Montgomery is Alabama’s first hospice and the only independent, nonprofit hospice care provider in the River Region. They have been providing services for patients and their families in our community for over 30 years. For more information contact Hospice of Montgomery at 334.279.6677 or visit www.hospiceofmontgomery.org

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

George Goodwyn, Community Builder This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is George Goodwyn, a longtime resident of Montgomery who has made a difference in our community. From the founding of Goodwyn Engineering Company, which is now Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood, Inc. to his role in helping to create Leadership Montgomery, George Goodwyn is by all accounts a community builder. Like so many leaders, he is the kind of man you want to hang around with, hoping to find out how he keeps producing his one of a kind optimism for life and work. George has made countless contributions to the quality of life in the River Region and as the youngest 80 Something we’ve ever met, he will continue to help us build for the future. Of course, being the wise man that he is, George credits much of his enthusiasm and zest for life to his lovely wife, Charlotte! George recently shared some of his story with us and we think you’ll enjoy getting to know him as much as we did.

Charlotte and George Celebrating his 80th Birthday!

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc?

After serving as company commander in Germany, I joined Goodwyn Bridge Company as vice president and engineer. In 1966, I started Goodwyn Engineering Company, which is now Goodwyn, Mills, and Cawood, George and Charlotte Inc.

George: I was born in Montgomery, AL on March 8, 1937. I graduated from Lanier High School in 1955. I later attended the University of Alabama from 1955-1959. I obtained my B.S. in Civil Engineering. I later attended Harvard Business School.

I have lived in Montgomery all of my life except for three years when I served in the U.S. Corps of Engineers in Germany.

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My wife, Charlotte, is a landscape architect. We have been married for thirty-one years. Prior to marrying Charlotte, I was married to Winifred Lightfoot, and we had three children: George Jr., Philip, and Winnie.

BOOM!: You are a co-founder of Goodwyn, Mills and Cawood architecture and engineering firm, one of the largest privately owned firms of its kind in the Southeast. GMC places a strong emphasis on making communities better through the work they do and the way their employees serve. How did this emphasis on community evolve at GMC? George: There is nothing more rewarding than being a design engineer and being part of developing communities from visualizing through construction. The thing I miss most in retirement is working with and mentoring so many talented young people and being a part of their development. One of the smartest things Don Mills and I did was to sell our stock and turn the company over to the current leadership. When I started Goodwyn Engineering Company, I was doing twenty-five dollar surveys. Today The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


GMC has issues from getting out of control. Many lines. As one of the depth of these graduates serve on the various the community of talent to boards of the city. leaders who successfully helped start develop and Envision 2020 was an outgrowth of Leadership manage fifty Leadership Montgomery. Lynn Beshear Montgomery, million dollar has led the networking in the five please share projects. county area to address many of the your perspective When issues identified by the communities. on how this thinking The current focus is mental health. community back at the organization has beginning BOOM!: Many people as they age improved the of GE in are experiencing a renewed sense of quality of life in Otto, a special member of the family, the 1960s, I purpose, new goals, or new careers, Montgomery? enjoying a ride to the beach remember how would you describe this sense of Where do we go that I was renewal in your life? Any advice for the from here? continually praying to God to send me rest of us seeking renewal? work when I did not have anything for George: I my employees to do for the next week. George: I was asked to I was also praying that I would receive was sixty-two comment on a check in the mail, so I could make the years old Leadership payroll. When I look back, God blessed when I sold Montgomery us. We never were without work, and my interest which I had I always had sufficient funds to make in Goodwyn, the privilege payroll and pay the bills. I am a strong Mills, and with Solomon believer that there is order in this Cawood. I Seay, Mike world because God is in control. God was young Jenkins, and has blessed me and continues to bless enough and Lanny Crane Goodwyn, Mills, and Cawood. had the ability to start in to become the 1980’s. An architectural, engineering, and more involved Besides being George with grandsons Thomas, Carter, Cullom, and George, Jr. environmental design firm’s opportunity in Real-estate one of the is dependent on the positive growth Development and home building with initial board members, I was a member of the communities it serves. It is my son George Jr. I also had the time to of class 8. I am thankful for the African important that all of the GMC team be more active in various boards. The American friends that I know and participate in their communities various key to staying healthy, I believe, is to respect. I value these relationships and organizations stay active and face challenges every find great and day. Have a reason to get up and get comfort in leaderships. going. being able to discuss any BOOM!: What are you most passionate issues with BOOM!: You about? them. There once equated are over a Leadership George: Networking to visualize a thousand Montgomery better life for all. Montgomery has a graduates in “as a small, transitioning population that provides Montgomery bright light” the opportunity to demonstrate to the that have that helped world how we all can be productive had the same build the and work together on a multi-cultural experience. foundation basis. Montgomery is known for being They have – along the capitol of the Confederacy and worked with other in later years being the birthplace together to organizations of civil rights. Montgomery can also keep some – for working show the world what is possible community George with granddaughters, Alison and Gwin at the beach across racial The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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through communication, visualization, cooperation, and developing trust. We can be a positive example for the world.

Presbyterian Church was planning to start a church in East Montgomery. Ida Bell Young agreed to furnish a site for the church. Ida Bell Young, Bill joseph, Gene Parsons, and I met on her property South of Vaughn Road to In life I have found that choose the site. In the discussion Ida we all agree on 95% of the Bell Young suggested that we should issues but let the 5% label build a community where we wanted and separate us. I hope to live. After selling my interest in someday we all learn to GMC, I started putting several pieces put aside the 5% and work of property together to create Grove together to make the 95% a Park with partners Jim Scott and ALFA reality. Insurance. Charlotte is a landscape BOOM!: How do you like to architect and supervised all of the It’s harvest time at The Grove Park Farm relax and wind down from a street design and landscaping. Grove challenging day of work? Park is a true 300 acre private gated community that owns all its streets. George: I look forward to returning The development includes walking George: I love the size of Montgomery. home and discussing the day’s events trails, parks, indoor You can get with Charlotte. Charlotte’s perspective pool, gym, and anywhere in is very important. We all need to have club house. Oak ten minutes. someone we trust that helps us to keep Grove Inn is an Montgomery has our values right. independent and a rich history that assisted living home. continues today. BOOM!: Do you have any favorite places We are working The city leadership to travel? Any travel dreams planned? on the plan and is working very hard approval for a SCAFF to attract industries George: Charlotte and I have had the building. Charlotte that would provide opportunity to take several special trips. spends part of her more economic We have taken three trips to Africa. time ensuring Oak opportunity. All of I think the tent safari was the best. Grove Inn meets Montgomery must Several family members were on the trip her standards. She take ownership of with us and that made it special. makes sure the the MPS systems maintenance is and work together BOOM!: What’s your best advice on being kept up to to address the aging well? date, decorations causes of our crime reflect the season, rates. George enjoying one of his favorite George: Staying involved in church, and furniture is hobbies, gardening community, family, and perhaps a updated. She also BOOM!: Grove second career can keep you youthful. stays in touch with the residents. She Park was a dream that became a Also, stick makes sure that local ownerships does “neighborhood of with your make a difference. friends” just off exercise Young Meadows program! BOOM!: Give us three words that Road. Would you describe you? please share how BOOM!: What you as an engineer is it about George: Discipline, energetic, and and your wife living in the networking Charlotte, a Landscape Montgomery/ Architect made this River Region BOOM!: Do you have any hobbies or dream come true area that you other activities that grab your attention? for the families of like? What Montgomery? do we need George: I enjoy gardening. In the winter George with granddaughter Winnie Marion more of? I plant kale, onions, carrots, and lettuce. George: Trinity In summer it is tomatoes, eggplant,

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Family celebration of George’s 80 birthday

peppers, and cutting flowers. It is fun to harvest and share what you have grown. BOOM!: Your son, George Goodwyn Jr. owns Goodwyn Building, which recently won the 2017 Builder of the Year award from Alabama Power. How has your son put your talents to good use in operating his thriving home building business? George: George Goodwyn Jr. and I are partners in Goodwyn Building Company that specializes in starter homes. Philip Goodwyn is also a member of the team and enjoys success in sales. Alison Goodwyn, George Jr’s daughter is in charge of marketing. I enjoy watching them work together and seeing the company prosper. I assist George Jr. in evaluating property for development into residential lots. George Jr was awarded 2017 Builder of the Year by

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George Jr., Alison Goodwyn and George

Alabama Power Company which is a huge accomplishment. I am very proud of my children and grandchildren. BOOM!: You and your wife, Charlotte, have shared many years together, what are some of the special ingredients to your successful marriage? George: Charlotte and I just celebrated our 31st anniversary. As we get older the years seem to fly by us. Charlotte and I enjoy a true partnership. I depend on her to make any projects we do look good. She depends on me to be sure it works (water runs downhill). I think that for a marriage to be successful both parties must feel needed and respected by the other. I thank God every day for Charlotte.

Fathers day with Sarah and George jr , Charlotte and George, Philip and Michelle Goodwyn

We want to thank George and Charlotte for sharing their time in puttting together this month’s BOOM! Cover Profile. If you want to learn more about George visit www.goodwynbuilding.com , www.gmcnetwork.com, www.groveparkliving.com and www.oakgroveinn.org. As always, thanks to Jeri Hines and Haley Kintner, from Total Image Portraits for the professional cover photo of George. If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to jim@riverregionboom.com

Read all of the BOOM! Cover Profiles at www.riverregionboom.com/archives

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DON’T IGNORE THE WARNING SIGNS!

Dryness of the Mouth

Blurred Vision

Frequent Urination

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Extreme Thirst

Headaches & Fatigue

Hunger

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Socialize to Keep Your Brain Sharp As they get older, many folks start withdrawing from in-person socializing. They withdraw and start surfing the net or watching more television; going outside less and less as they age. Sitting most of the day with little or no human contact is not only bad for the body, but it’s also terrible for the brain as well. If your only contact with others is via a device, you will miss out on keeping your brain and senses sharp. There is a lot missed when your only contact is virtual. Even Skyping isn’t the same. When you’re actually sitting or standing next to other humans, you see the almost subconscious flickers of emotions on their faces that appear for less than a quarter of a second. You sense their ‘aura,’ which you may like or dislike or feel neutral about. None of this comes over as well on Skype, or even during a phone conversation, and it doesn’t come over at all when texting. That’s why socializing in person is so important. In person, there’s also a human-to-human type of bonding based on odor. All humans have a personal odor, just like other animals. Thoroughbred horses smell differently

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

from field-horses, and each of those will also have a different personal scent. The human nose is an amazing thing. It can sense many different odors of which we humans are not consciously aware, but which help us to survive. However, a dog’s world is much richer with odors. Note the bloodhound, which can follow the trail of a single person and is used by law enforcement to track a wanted person, even though that person may not have passed that way recently. Humans have about six million odor receptors in their noses. Dogs have about 300 million, which is one reason why they sniff each other. When we keep company with other humans, it helps our brain grow because our senses _ sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell, each have receptors that send collected information to the brain. The brain is like a muscle; use it or lose it. As the brain gathers data from the senses, it ‘learns’ how to perceive more accurately. This doesn’t happen very much while watching television or surfing the internet.

those who have little of it. Someone who hangs out with other humans, either as a member of a club, in a bar, or even a senior center; will know how to converse and still stay aware of conversations going on around them. Their social skills will usually be fairly sharp. While that doesn’t mean those skills are always congenial, it does indicate that their brain works more quickly than someone who has little social contact. Interacting vocally with other people also helps speed up word recall, because you’re not in the world alone with your own thoughts. You have to respond to conversational cues with others. Thus, your brain gets more data by socializing, which helps keep the brain from slowing down as you get older. That’s something we all certainly want as we age. Wina Sturgeon is an active 55+ based in Salt Lake City, who offers news on the science of anti-aging and staying youthful at: adventuresportsweekly. com. She skates, bikes and lifts weights to stay in shape. (c)2017 Adventure Sports Weekly www.adventuresportsweekly.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

It’s easy to spot those 55+ who have frequent human contact, as opposed to

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney

By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

Are you eligible to receive this valuable VA benefit? One of the privileges of serving our country during a time of war is the potential eligibility for VA Pension benefits. These benefits are particularly valuable for veterans over age 65 who have large medical expenses, including prescription drugs, treatments, and even assisted living or in-home care. Recently, the VA has quietly taken action to attempt to reduce the number of Veterans who can qualify for these benefits by changing the rules.

While there is no specific formula to calculate what is excessive, the older the applicant is, the fewer assets they can have before they will be considered excessive. Many veterans are incorrectly informed that they cannot ever qualify for these benefits, but often that information is not entirely correct. Sometimes a veteran or surviving spouse may qualify after undertaking some estate planning with an attorney. While attorneys cannot charge veterans to prepare or submit a pension application, a VA Accredited attorney can assist veterans by evaluating their case and making recommendations regarding future qualification.

to be so under the proposed regulations. However, the proposed rules cap the “reasonable lot area” that the home sits on at 2 acres, a limit that does not exist under current law. Rural veterans will of course be treated unfairly under this rule. The VA also hopes to impose a Medicaidstyle penalty against veterans who have transferred property within 3 years before applying. Currently, no such penalty exists.

These VA Pension benefits are generally To illustrate: A married Veteran applies available to wartime Veterans (and their for VA Pension with an aid and attendance surviving spouses) who meet certain criteria. allowance. The monthly benefit he is trying Before 1980 the Veteran must have served to qualify for is $2,120. During the past 3 at least ninety (90) days of active duty, with years, the Veteran contributed $10,000 to at least one day being during a “wartime The Wounded Warriors Project, a nonprofit But as mentioned above, these rules may be period” (as set by Congress). After 1980, organization. He also gave his only child about to change. the Veteran must have generally served at $1,000 on each birthday the past 3 years. least twenty-four (24) months of active duty, with at least one day As a result of the being during a wartime period. In charitable contribution addition, the Veteran must not have the cash gifts to Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop and been dishonorably discharged. her child ($13,000 total Wednesday, July 26: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm in 3 years), this Veteran A Veteran must also be “disabled” would be penalized for at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This in order to receive this benefit, but 6.13 months when he educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins anyone over age 65 is automatically applies for VA Pension covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living deemed “disabled” for purposes of under the new rules. wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, determining eligibility. Of course, If this same Veteran bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care permanent and total disability at any was not married, the age also meets this requirement. penalty would be even and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. If the Veteran or surviving spouse longer—11.3 months. Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at has additional medical needs, then During the penalty www.redoaklegalpc.com. additional monetary allowances the Veteran would not may be awarded, like an “aid and receive his benefits. attendance” allowance. This penalty would apply to all transfers, The proposed VA rules changes include unless the Veteran could present evidence creating a one-size-fits-all number for The Veteran must also meet certain financial that a transfer was the result of fraud, determining the maximum amount of net requirements. The Veteran must not have misrepresentation or other bad act in the worth a veteran can have in order to qualify, income in excess of the current maximum marketing or sale of a financial product. currently $117,000 (adjusted annually for benefit amount. However, “income” for inflation). In addition, the proposed rules VA purposes is determined after deducting If you know a veteran or the surviving would include income in the applicant’s any unreimbursed out-of-pocket medical spouse of a veteran with substantial net worth calculation. In other words, if expenses. So, for example a veteran seeking unreimbursed healthcare costs, now is the a Veteran has assets worth $117,000 and a $1,700 monthly benefit, who receives time to investigate whether they may qualify receives an income of $2,000 per month, $2,500 in monthly income, but has $3,000 in for this valuable benefit. After all, it may the Veteran’s “net worth” is calculated at assisted living and prescription medication about to become much more difficult. $117,000 + $24,000, which is well over the expenses, would have an income for VA “net worth” limit allowed. Raley L. Wiggins purposes of zero. Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com A primary residence, whether or not the In addition to the income cap, the current 312 Catoma Street, Suite 150, Montgomery, AL 36104 claimant resides there, is an excluded asset law provides that a veteran or surviving www.redoaklegalpc.com for calculating “net worth” and will continue spouse cannot have “excessive” assets.

Attend Free Workshop

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Only 5% of potentially eligible Americans over 65 are receiving a valuable VA pension benefit . . . are you one of them? FREE EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP

Estate Planning, Asset Protection & Medicaid Eligibility

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Join local attorney Raley L. Wiggins to discuss wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting your assets, bankruptcy, divorce & remarriage, nursing homes, long term care and medicaid qualification.

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By Sandi Aplin

Art & Soul

CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS AWARDS Eight Special Alabamians Honored

Gail Andrews

Chuck Leavell

Eddie Floyd

Dr. Art Bacon

Dr. Don Noble Jake Landers Cheryl Morgan Mayor Todd Strange

The Alabama State Council on the Arts honored eight outstanding Alabamians at the Celebration of the Arts awards ceremony on Wednesday May 24th at 7:30 in the evening. The event took place at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. The event was free and open to the public, but reservations and tickets were required. The evening began with Al Head, Executive Director, welcoming us and introducing our Governor Kay Ivey. (I have attended many of these award presentations over the years and the only other Governor I remember attending and speaking was Governor George Wallace and he spoke from his wheel chair). Governor Ivey congratulated all the 2017 award recipients and reminded us of the precious gift, philanthropist Red Blount gave the City of Montgomery and the State of Alabama, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival. Laurie Weil shared the Festival is the sixth largest in the world. We are so lucky we live in Montgomery, Alabama.

Kay Ivey, Governor

This year’s recipients are:

Gail Andrews, Birmingham-Johnnie Dee Riley Little Lifetime Achievement Award

Andrews has served as the Director of the Birmingham Museum of Art since 1996. She has overseen several groundbreaking exhibitions and helped establish the Birmingham Museum of Art as an important presenter of works rarely seen in America.

Eddie Floyd, Montgomery-Alabama’s Distinguished Artist Award

Floyd is an American soul-R&B singer and songwriter, best known for his work on the Stax record label in the 1960’s and 1970’s including the number-one R&B hit song Knock on Wood. Floyd was born in Montgomery, Alabama, but grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He founded the group The Falcons.

Dr. Art Bacon, Talladega-Governor’s Art Award

Dr. Bacon is known by many as an artist, educator and scientist. However, art has always been his passion. People are Bacon’s subjects of choice, especially, older and neglected people whose experiences show in their faces.

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Chuck Leavell, Tuscaloosa/Dry Branch, GA-Governor’s Arts Award

Leavell is a world-renowned musician, who was a member of the Allman Brothers Band during the height of their 1970’s popularity. He is a long time touring member of the Rolling Stones and has also toured and recorded with Eric Clapton, George Harrison, Gov’t Mule and John Mayer.

Cheryl Morgan, Birmingham-Governor’s Arts Award

Morgan is an architect and retired professor of architecture from Auburn University. She has three decades of teaching and working with various architectural programs. She recently retired as Director of Auburn’s Urban Studio in Birmingham. Morgan practiced architecture and urban design in the San Francisco Bay Area for over eight years.

Dr. Don Noble, Tuscaloosa-Governor’s Arts Award

Dr. Noble is the host of APR’s book review series as well as host of Bookmark which airs on Alabama Public Television. A widelypublished scholar specializing in American and Southern literature, Dr. Noble received the Eugene Current-Garcia Award as Alabama’s distinguished literary scholar for the year 2000. Dr. Noble’s book reviews air during Morning Edition and feature works primarily by Alabama writers.

Jake Landers, Tuscumbia-The Alabama Folk Heritage Award

Landers is a well-respected bluegrass musician, singer and songwriter whose career spanned more than five decades. He played for several years as a member of the Dixie Gentlemen. During this time, they recorded five albums which contained almost 20 songs either written or co-written by Landers including Soldier’s Return and Your Heart Tells the Truth.

Mayor Todd Strange, Montgomery-The Special Council Legacy Award

Strange became the 56th mayor of the City of Montgomery in 2009. Prior to becoming mayor, Strange served as chairman of the Montgomery County Commission for nearly five years, he served as former president, CEO and co-owner of Blount Strange Automotive Group, prior to that he was director of the Alabama Dept. of Commerce and helped to bring major industries to Alabama, including Hyundai Manufacturing Facility in Montgomery. There were Performance Tributes given for each recipient and this year they were over the top. Thank you, Barbara Reed, Public Information Officer for the Alabama State Council on the Arts for all your help with information about this wonderful event. Council Chair, Dora Hanson James of Opelika reminded us; “All the world is a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and entrances, and one man in his time plays many parts.” William Shakespeare “ As You Like It” Act II, Scene VII

Dora Hanson James

Sandi Aplin, Director of Gallery One Fine Art A freelance writer living in Montgomery, AL. sandiaplin@aol.com or galleryonefineart.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Travel Trending with Kathy Witt

Small Town Theatre

as big as all outdoors

Edgar Allen Poe gets light-hearted in Pioneer Playhouse’s production of “Tell-Tale Farce.”

Hoopskirts swirling across the stage. Soliloquies spoken amidst the ruins. Black powder rifles booming and smoking. In small towns across America, theatregoers gather beneath the stars on a summer’s evening for productions that are as colorful, charismatic and captivating as only live outdoor theatre can make them. “It is one of those experiences that gives you chills,” says Johnny Warren, managing artistic director of “The Stephen Foster Story,” opening its 59th season in Bardstown, Kentucky. “Full cast on stage filling the night sky with their voices _ in this case belting out ‘My Old Kentucky Home.’ If you can bring yourself to look away from the breathtaking costumes, you’ll see the stars twinkling in the night sky. It’s unforgettable.” Get your ticket and take your seat. The sun is about to go down, the curtain up, and the magic begin. ON THE BOARDS IN THE EAST All the world’s a stage and, in Ellicott City, Maryland, a historic town verily bursting with charm, that stage is the scenic ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, an elegant finishing school for young women in the 1800s. Here, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company puts

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The ruins at the Patapsco Female Institute are the perfect setting for summer Shakespeare productions.

on summer productions from the bard’s canon. “The juxtaposition of the historic, serene setting and Greek revival architecture with the energy of the performers is truly something special,” notes Sarah Kurtanich, Howard County Tourism’s director of marketing. This year, the company brings a maelstrom, mystery and magic to the ruins, June 16 through July 23, with “The Tempest.” The setting lends itself beautifully to a picnic dinner on the lawn assembled from nearby merchants. Pick up an oven-fired pizza from the River House Pizza Co., a bottle of wine from The Wine Bin and chocolates from Sweet Cascades. All are within easy walking distance of the ruins. Although Cooperstown, N.Y., is more synonymous with baseball than musical theatre, this small village of 2,000 hosts an ambitious lineup every summer of this and opera productions. In fact, Glimmerglass Festival sells over 35,000 tickets to visitors from around the world for its breathtaking productions. Mainstage shows and events take place in the Alice Busch Opera Theater, a 914seat venue with large sliding walls that are opened prior to performances and at intermission to show off pristine Otsego

The driving force behind the longevity of “The Stephen Foster Story” is the music of Stephen Foster.

Lake. Many Second Stage performances take place in the Pavilion, the open-air space next to the theater. This summer, the season includes new productions of Gershwin’s “Porgy and Bess,” Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!,” Donizetti’s “The Siege of Calais,” and Handel’s “Xerxes.” Mainstage events also include performances of Derrick Wang’s one-act comic opera, Scalia/Ginsburg, and two worldpremieres: the youth opera, “Robin Hood,” and “Stomping Grounds,” a hiphopera written entirely in verse. For Opening Night, a themed dinner is planned. “Dinner in Charleston” is a catered dinner featuring crab cakes, jambalaya, Carolina sweet potato mash and other goodies. Visitors can picnic on the grounds, enjoying fine wines, specialty wraps, sandwiches, salads and desserts available at concession stands, or by pre-ordering a Black Cat Cafe gourmet picnic. OFF-OFF BROADWAY IN CENTRAL KENTUCKY With a little planning, it is possible to design a long theater weekend to catch a different show in Bardstown, Harrodsburg and Danville. Located in the rolling hills of central Kentucky, these are some of the state’s most historic towns, not to mention among its smallest and prettiest. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Bardstown is home to Kentucky’s Official Outdoor Drama, “The Stephen Foster Story.” Presented June 10 through Aug.12, it tells the story of the “Father of American music,” who wrote 286 works in less than 20 years, including “Oh! Susanna,” “Camptown Races” _ and, most famous of all, “My Old Kentucky Home.” All are belted out in a showy spectacle that also features over 200 colorful costumes and a full-scale replica paddlewheel that rolls onto the stage. Shows take place in the amphitheater located on the lush grounds of My Old Kentucky Home State Park. (“Disney’s Beauty and The Beast” is also on this summer’s schedule, Thursdays and Saturdays, July 6 through Aug. 5.) Steps from the amphitheater is stately Federal Hill, an exquisite 19th-century mansion filled with priceless artifacts that belonged to the home’s original owners, the Rowans, relatives of Stephen Foster. Pre-theatre dinner at Kurtz’s gives a flavorful taste of Kentucky with scratchmade signature specialties fried chicken, skillet-fried cornbread and biscuit pudding topped with bourbon sauce. Onsite concessions offer hot dogs, nachos and other snacks plus a variety of beverages, including wine slushies and, Bardstown being the Bourbon Capital of the World, Heaven Hill Bourbon. Drive one hour to downtown Harrodsburg to see outdoor theatre in a replica fort setting, commemorating the first permanent settlement west of the Allegheny Mountains, in Old Fort Harrod State Park. The Ragged Edge Theatre Company produces two shows each summer. The musical, “Brigadoon,” is presented June 8 to 10 and 15 to 17, and original signature production, “James Harrod: The Battle For Kentucky,” staged annually and replete with aforementioned booming rifles, takes place Thursdays through Sundays, July 6 to 29. Two-year-old ham, beaten biscuits, yellow-leg fried chicken and corn pudding _ all rhapsodized over by pioneering critic Duncan Hines back in 1949 _ are still on the menu at Beaumont The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Inn, a recent recipient of a James Beard America’s Classic award. Kentucky’s oldest Southern country inn (marking its 100th anniversary in 2019) plates a delectable dinner that pairs beautifully with both productions. In nearby Danville, the enchantingly rustic Pioneer Playhouse is Kentucky’s oldest outdoor theatre and a time capsule of 1950s summer stock theatre where John Travolta, Lee Majors, and Bo Hopkins have played the boards. The summer season kicks off June 9 with fan fave “Death by Darkness,” whose setting is Mammoth Cave in 1842. The lineup continues with “Drinking Habits,” “Guarded” and “Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery,” and concludes with “Elvis Has Left the Building.” Dinner takes place at 7:30 and is announced by the ringing of the Old Danville Firehouse Bell. The menu is home-grown Kentucky with pork or chicken barbecue, parmesan-roasted potatoes, coleslaw, farm fresh sides and homemade pie. Miss Charlotte, the wife of playhouse founder Col. Eben Henson, sings folksongs on the patio during dinner; afterward, guests can wander through vintage Main Street, an onsite assemblage of 19th century storefronts featured in an episode of the History Channel’s “American Pickers” series. PLAN YOUR VISIT Visit the individual websites below for show and ticket details. For accommodations information, visit the tourism websites noted. Bardstown, KY, www.visitbardstown.com; Stephen Foster Drama Association, www.stephenfoster.com. Combo tickets are available that include the show and a tour of Federal Hill (aka My Old Kentucky Home). Cooperstown, NY, www.thisiscooperstown.com; Glimmerglass Festival, www.glimmerglass.org. In addition to musical theatre and opera, this year’s festival includes appearances by Stephen Schwartz, the award-winning composerlyricist of “Godspell,” “Pippin” and “Wicked,” on July 21, and author, humorist and NPR personality David Sedaris on Aug. 21.

Danville, KY, www.danvillekentucky.com; Pioneer Playhouse, https://pioneerplayhouse.com. Combination dinner/show tickets and showonly tickets are available. Ellicott City, MD, www.visithowardcounty.com; Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, www. chesapeakeshakespeare.com. If planning to picnic, purchase a ticket for a table for two or one of the picnic tables. Harrodsburg, KY http://harrodsburgky.com; Ragged Edge Community Theatre, www. raggededgetheatre.org. Learn more about Old Fort Harrod and its signature show here: http://friendsoffortharrod.com. Here are more chances to see live outdoor theatre amidst beautiful surroundings this summer: I Appomattox, VA Wolfbane Productions, www.wolfbane.org I Cedar City, Utah Tony Award-winning Utah Shakespeare Festival, www.bard.org I Cherokee, NC Cherokee Mountainside Theatre, www.cherokeehistorical.org/theatre.html I Frankfort, MI Lakeside Shakespeare Theatre, www.lakesideshakespeare.org/lst I Garden Valley, Idaho Starlight Mountain Theatre, www.starlightmt.com I Ivins, Utah Tuacahn Amphitheatre, www.tuacahn.org I Marin County, CA Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre on Mt. Tamalpais, http://mountainplay.org I Medora, ND Theodore Roosevelt Medora, Foundation http://medora.com/do/entertainment/ medora-musical I Portland, OR Willamette Shakespeare (performances at wineries), www.willametteshakespeare.org I Staunton, VA Oak Grove Theatre, www.oakgrovetheater.org I Vienna, VA Wolf Trap, www.wolftrap.org Author, travel and lifestyle writer, and travel goods expert Kathy Witt feels you should never get to the end of your bucket list; there’s just too much to see and do in the world. She can be reached at KathyWitt24@gmail.com or KathyWitt.com. (c)2016 Kathy Witt Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

GRADUATION DAZE I’m sure glad May is over. There was so much that could have gone wrong with 2 graduations on the family calendar. The month began with a 1300 mile driving round trip to South Florida to watch my daughter, Janelle, receive her degree in Graphic Design from Florida Atlantic University. May ended with my treasured stepson’s launch (with a 31 ACT!) from Churchill Academy.

Naked swimming is also the main reason I remember a guy named Dave Schulz. I will never forgive him, either.

Shandor “Tex” celebrated with Tom and Carolyn Woodling (“Mommy the Swami” of radio fame!)

Everything went well! As I proudly watched Shandor “Tex” receive his diploma at Churchill’s inspirational ceremony, I thought of my own high school graduation- and the most celebrated moment from that June night long ago. “I WON’T HAVE TO SWIM NAKED ANYMORE!!!!” Yup! That’s how we did it in Chicago public high schools. I have told this story on the air everywhere I’ve worked and listeners always react the same. “You’re kidding”.

“You’re making that up!”. Nope. It’s true- and it made me nervous for 2 years before I even spent my first day at Chicago’s Bogan HS.

June 2017

Sometime in the summer after 6th grade, Dave- who was going to be a freshman at Bogan, told us the PE regiment included a swim class...

High school presented enough danger to a freshman. There was the perpetual fear of getting “bennied”- when an upperclassman would grab you in the hall and spread lip stick over your faceor hang a “kick me” sign on your back. We’d heard about this long before Dave’s NUDE SWIMMING announcement. I wondered if I could convince my parents that high school was not all that necessary. So, beguiled by ignorance and naiveté, I began worrying about that first week of PE at Bogan a full two years before I set foot in the joint. I was opening my 7th grade Christmas presents, and somewhere in the room an elephant was trumpeting- “MERRY CHRISTMAS. AND IN 18 MONTHS YOU’RE GOING TO BE SWIMMING WITH A BUNCH OF NAKED GUYS’. No escape. Dave Schulz, now the neighborhood high school big shot, faced a crowd of anxious 7th and 8th graders at the end of his first week at Bogan.

We all knew that. Bogan was the newest school in the city and in those days, a high school with a pool was a big deal. It was his next sentence that struck fear in my heart-

“What was swim class like?”, we asked, gripped by red-level teen angst.

“And guys swim in the nude”.

“No way”.

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moving forward.

Dave was the oldest kid in my baby-boomer neighborhood. As the elder statesman, Dave was the guy who prepared us for the rites of passage

Wow. The breaking news spread around quickly.

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I thought it was a joke and a bad one at that. Naked? Why?

Graphic Design grad Janelle Budell and fiancé Ryan Martinez

Dave suggested it was a health code situation.

“Ah, no big deal”, said Dave. “After a few minutes, you don’t even notice everyone is naked”. Not good enough!

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For 2 long years, at some level, the specter of swimming naked lingered somewhere in my mind, until finally, the Day of Dread arrived. There were about 50 guys in each PE class and we assembled in the locker room. We sat there, probably all nervous about the same thing- and the bell rang. Our PE teacher, an ex-marine badass named Mr. Curtin had yet to arrive. Minutes passed, and after a while, all I wanted was to get it over with. Then, from the rear of the locker room, a shrill whistle blew, making our ears ring as shrillness ricocheted off the metal lockers.

In fact, I now understand the Chicago Public School system had ended the nude swimming policy many years ago. Today’s Bogan students have to walk through metal detectors and worry about surviving something far more sinister than a swim class with naked students.

ESSENTIAL OILS

By the way, the aforementioned Dave Schulz also attended the same college I applied to- and once again, being 2 years ahead of me, I sought his experienced, advanced wisdom. “Dave, I have to take 2 years of a foreign language. Which one is the easiest?”.

“Clothes off, and in the pool area- NOW”, he snapped.

“Try German”, he said. “I hear that’s pretty easy”.

Dave was right. There were so many naked guys the anxiety quickly passedand my attention was diverted to something more urgent- a chlorine smell that was searing my lungs! I’m amazed any of my classmates and I are still alive. No germ, no fungus could survive in that chlorine terrarium. Long after the class- and the anxiety was over, I could still taste chlorine. Today’s EPA would have shut the school down.

So I did.

The only trauma the entire 4 years was an afternoon when some idiot ticked off Mr. Curtin, and he punished all of us- making us “duck-walk” on our knees around the entire perimeter of the pool. It was horrendously painful; knees on tile- and in today’s world would probably become a sensational child abuse story. Really, I’m all for discipline but that was sick.

A NEW LOOK AT

Can anyone translate “If I ever see Dave Schulz again I’ll kick his butt!” into German? I got through it. At least we got to take the class with our clothes on. “Guten Tag!”

Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, Roz, and dogs Hershey and Briscoe. He’s been in radio since 1970, and is marking 12 years in the River Region in 2017. He hosts the Newstalk 93.1FM Morning Show with Rich Thomas, Jay Scott & Emily Hayes, 6-9AM Monday-Friday. He returns weekday afternoons from 3-6PM for Happy Hour with sidekick Joey Clark. Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

to learn more visit my website

jimwatson.myzija.com

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management

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Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Bone Broth

Ok, so we all know that chicken soup – homemade, of course – is purported to have great health benefits, particularly for colds and flu, but did we ever stop to wonder WHY? Answer – BONE BROTH!

The University of Nebraska Medical Center conducted a study to find out exactly what was in bone broth that made it so beneficial for colds and flu. They found that the amino acids that were produced when making the stock (hours of simmering the bones) actually reduced inflammation in the respiratory system and improved digestion. Other studies have been done since which show that bone broth actually has multiple health benefits, including boosting the immune system, providing joint pain relief, protecting the gut and promoting healthy skin. One key thing to point out here (and I think you knew this was coming…) is that the store-bought versions are just not the same as homemade! Boxed and canned broths and stocks are commercially available, and you can purchase organic and free-range meat broths; however, these watery stocks pale by comparison to both the nutrient density and flavor of homemade bone broths. These commercially prepared broths are often highly processed, not to mention, expensive! You can make a pint of homemade broth for just pennies; you’d be paying at least $5 for organic grass fed store versions. Besides, what else were you going to do with those chicken carcasses, soup bones and veggies going bad in your fridge?? Also, most store-bought broths are not actually “real”, they are a laboratory produced copy using meat flavorings, such as MSG (monosodium glutamate) – also a recognized neurotoxin, i.e. something that you should be avoiding like the plague! So why are real, grandma style bone broths so good for you? Well, to start with they are extremely high in protein

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and collagen as well as being rich in calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and other trace minerals. Perhaps even more importantly, the minerals in broth are easily absorbed by the body. Bone broth even contains glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (if I’d know this, I wouldn’t have forked out $90 for supplements for my dog’s arthritis pain!) Drinking a cup a day of good quality bone broth – or using it in your cooking if you can’t face drinking it – will provide you with the many benefits, but if I could stress just three, they would be these: 1) Heal and seal your gut Too many people today suffer from “leaky gut syndrome”. A cup a day of broth will seal those pesky little intestinal holes and solve that problem for good. The gelatin helps seal the holes which also helps cure associated issues such as chronic diarrhea, constipation and even some food intolerances, such as to wheat and dairy. It is also recommended as a preventative measure as gelatin is proven to be beneficial in restoring gut lining strength and helping with the growth of probiotics in the gut. 2) Protect your joints Bone broth is one of world’s best sources of natural collagen, the protein found in vertebrae animals — in their bones, skin, cartilage, ligaments, tendons and bone marrow. All the parts of the animal that we don’t usually eat. As we get older, our joints naturally experience wear and tear, and we become less flexible. Taking glucosamine supplements to help with joint pain has been common knowledge for years, but unlike expensive pills, bone broth also includes a host of other goodies that help keep your joints happy, healthy, and pain-free. The chondroitin sulfate in bone broth has been shown to help prevent osteoarthritis. 3) Maintains healthy skin Bone broth is a rich source of collagen.

Collagen helps form elastin and other compounds within skin that are responsible for maintaining skin’s youthful tone, texture and appearance. Many expensive anti-aging creams claim to contain collagen. It’s what skin loses as it ages. Many people also report a decrease in cellulite when consuming foods and supplements containing collagen, since cellulite forms due to a lack of connective tissue, allowing skin to lose its firm tone. Bone broth also contains potassium and glycine, which support both cellular and liver detoxification. If you’ve ever done a “De-Tox” program, you will know that your skin reaps the benefits, revealing that youthful glow once more. Now you have all the information you need, here’s how to actually make your own broth. Start with all ready cooked bones – from that chicken you roasted for Sunday dinner for example. And don’t be afraid of adding in small amounts of the meat, ligaments, skin, etc. Put it in a pot and cover with water. Add whatever vegetables you have that need using up, onion, carrots, leek, garlic, celery and a couple of bay leaves and/or other herbs for flavor. Black peppercorns if you wish. A tablespoon of apple cider vinegar if you have it. Make sure the whole lot is just covered with water, then bring it to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for at least 8 hours, up to 24 hours. When it’s ready the ones should crumble when squeezed between your fingers. Strain the liquid to remove all the pieces of vegetables and bone, etc. Drink or use in your daily cooking. It will keep in the fridge for up to a week or you can freeze it in amounts that you can just take out and use. Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com You can also visit Tracy’s blog at Tracybhalla.com, Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using their skincare products myself for over 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

June 2017

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June 2017

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Sounds of Summer Concert Series on Thursdays The Shoppes at EastChase, near Gap Thursdays during June, 7-9 pm The Shoppes at EastChase is hosting the Sounds of Summer Concert Series on Thursdays during the month of June! Enjoy live music from acts like River Dan, Jason Givens and The Wanderers, Los 5, The Talismen, Aaron carter. Sounds of Summer is a free family-friendly event. The concert will take place from 7pm - 9pm near Gap. Food and drink vendors will include Frios Gourmet Pops, Alabama Sweet Tea Co., Blackfinn Ameripub and That’s My Dawg. For more information, call 33.279.6046.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Montgomery Humane Society Friends for Life Pet Photo Contest

a combination of magic and common sense, she teaches the family how to value each other again. Mary Poppins showcases some of the most memorable songs ever sung on the silver screen or stage including “Chim Chim Cher-ee,” “Jolly Holiday,” “A Spoonful of Sugar,” and “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!” Recommended ages four and up. For more information, call 334.271.5353 or visit www.asf.net. Alabama Shakespeare Festival, One Festival Drive Montgomery, AL 36117

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Capitol Sounds Concert Band Presents “Summer Spectacular” Concert Saint James United Methodist Church Tuesday, June 6th, , 7 pm The Capitol Sounds Concert Band will present “Summer Spectacular” Concert on Tuesday, June 6th, 7:00 p.m., at Saint James United Methodist Church on Vaughn Road in East Montgomery. A highlight of the concert will be a tribute to the legendary songwriting duo of the Beatles, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, aptly titled “A LennonMcCartney Portrait”. The event is free and open to the public, but donations are gladly accepted and will go towards performances for our upcoming 2017-18 season, including our Children’s Concert. For more information about Capitol Sounds Concert Band, visit www.capitolsounds.org.

ALEX CITY, ALABAMA June 1st - July 28th The 19th Annual Pet Photo Contest kicks off on June 1st, 2017 when we will begin accepting photo submissions of your pet. You can enter online at www.montgomeryhumane.com and submit your picture (the file should be 3300 pixels by 2550 pixels or 11″ X 8.5″ at 300 dpi). When taking the picture make sure it is at the highest resolution. All entries will be placed on our website and you may vote for your favorite entries online. Each vote costs just $1, with the top 83 animals earning a place in our 2018 “Friends for Life” calendar. Get your friends, family co-workers to vote for your pet!

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Disney’s Mary Poppins ASF-Alabama Shakespeare Festival July 5-July 23rd, various times

The “practically perfect in every way” nanny returns to the ASF Festival Stage! Young Jane and Michael have sent many a nanny packing before Mary Poppins arrives on their doorstep. Using

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Alex City Jazz Fest The Amp on Lake Martin Strand Park, Alexander City June 9 & 10, 6 pm

Join us for Lake Martin ‘s biggest musical event of the year! The 27th Annual Alexander City Jazz Festival is scheduled for June 9-10, 2016. The free two-day event will be held at Strand Park downtown Alexander City on Friday night and Lake Martin Amphitheater on Saturday. The lineup for the 27th Annual Alexander City Jazz Fest is now complete! The fun starts at 6:00 pm on Friday night in Downtown Alexander City at Strand Park. Jazz funk drummer-led The Sofia Goodman Group kicks things off, followed by American musician and singer-songwriter,Randall Bramblett. American folk Durham, North Carolina-based rock band, Delta Rae closes out Friday night. Saturday night kicks off at 6:30 pm at The AMP on Lake Martin with shadowood. Straight from New Orleans, The Stooges Brass Band follows with singer-songwriter, Paul Thorn closing out the night! For more info on the performers and time visit www.alexcityjazzfest.com The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


PRATTVILLE, ALABAMA

Creekwalk Concerts Prattville Downtown Behind City Hall Tuesdays, June 13th and 27th, 7pm The City of Prattville will present the popular Creekwalk Concert Series on the second and fourth Tuesdays of June and July. These concerts will feature local and regional bands performing by the beautiful Autauga Creek behind City Hall and the Police Station. Concerts are free and open. Food vendors available, but concert goers can visit some of the local restaurants or bring picnic baskets. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and enjoy a the magnificent Prattville sunsets. Concerts start at 7pm. For more information, contact the Special Events office at 334.595.0854 or visit www.prattvilleal.gov.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Juneteenth Rosa Parks Museum-Downtown Montgomery Saturday, June 17th, 9-3 pm Juneteenth is the oldest known commemoration of the ending of slavery in Texas, but is used to mark the overall ending of slavery in the United States. We are blocking off Montgomery Street between Lee and Molton for our first annual Juneteenth celebration. This free event will have local food and merchant vendors, performances, and free tours of the museum. Come celebrate with us! For more information, please call 334.241.8615 or visit www.facebook.com/events/403539403336878 Rosa Parks Museum, 252 Montgomery St Montgomery, AL 36104

BREWTON, ALABAMA

The 36th Annual Blueberry Festival Jennings Park, Brewton, AL Saturday, June 17th, 8 am - 3pm

The 37th Alabama Blueberry Festival will be from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in historic downtown Brewton. The festival features arts and crafts, cookbooks, blueberry bushes, crates of fresh blueberries, blueberry ice cream, a food court, festival T-shirts, a children’s section, live entertainment all day and an antique car show. For more information, including directions to the festival, call the Greater Brewton Area Chamber of Commerce at 251.867.3224, or visit www.brewtonchamber.com

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Local, It’s All About Alabama Alys Stephens Center-UAB Saturday, June 17th, 5 pm

The fourth annual celebration of everything local. Join us on June 17th to “Celebrate All Things Alabama”! Enjoy shopping with interesting Alabamians from farmers to artists, hip food trucks and even original Alabama musicians. We will be bringing some of Alabama’s most loved local musicians to the ASC’s Engel Plaza to kick off summer. LOCAL is the perfect event for families and anyone who loves to call this great state home. Free! For more info visit www.alysstephens.org/events/local The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

PINE MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA July 4th Star Spangled Beach Party Callaway Gardens Saturday, July 1st-Tuesday July 4th

The celebration begins early and lasts well into the night at our annual July 4th Star Spangled Beach Party at Robin Lake Beach. Highlights include beach activities, Aqua Island, Paddle Boats, Flying Trapeze, Rock Climbing Wall, Spider Jump, Miniature Golf, Table Tennis, shuffleboard, Giant Checkers, Giant Chess, Xcelerator Water Slide, Roadster Pedal Karts, Chickadee Choo Choo Train; live music, the FSU Flying High Circus and our annual Fireworks Extravaganza. Be sure to pack plenty of red, white and blue for this All-American Weekend! For more details visit www.callawaygardens.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Experience Legendary Coaches MPAC-Downtown Montgomery Tuesday, August 15th, 7pm

Leaders that built the foundation of the modern game by leading with Integrity, implementing unique strategies, and battling every Saturday, week after week, year after year. These Coaches won the hearts of millions, experienced thrilling victories, and painful defeats. Their legacy lives on, not just in their players, but with every fan that cheered alongside or against them. Join Pat Dye and Gene Stallings live to hear the stories and relive the legacy! For more info visit www.mpaconline.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band MPAC-Downtown Montgomery Saturday, September 16th, 8pm The Black Jacket Symphony offers a unique concert experience by recreating classic albums in a live performance setting with a first class lighting and video production. A selected album is performed in its entirety by a group of hand-picked musicians specifically selected for each album. With no sonic detail being overlooked, the musicians do whatever it takes to musically reproduce the album. Following the album and a brief intermission, the Black Jacket Symphony returns to the stage to perform a collection of greatest hits by the evening’s artist. The Black Jacket Symphony returns to Montgomery for its most ambitious show yet—a celebration of the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”! Released in June 1967, “Sgt. Pepper” is still widely referred to as the most influential rock album of all time. For more info visit www. mpaconline.org or www.blackjacketsymphony.com R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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Tinseltown Talks By Nick Thomas

Malaprop Master, Norm Crosby We all use the wrong word occasionally – “that skinny dog looks emancipated” – but comedian Norm Crosby molded a career from such humorous grammatical gaffes known as malaprops.

traveling the country in the early ‘60s as the opening act for Robert Goulet before branching out on his own.

“Although I had a good job as an advertising manager for a shoe company in Boston, I liked to fool around with comedy,” said Crosby from his home in Los Angeles. It was the 1950s, and Crosby began visiting small, local bars and clubs on weekends to try his hand at standup. “I would watch the Ed Sullivan show and borrow a few lines here and there from guests like Red Buttons and Buddy Hackett to create a routine,” he explained. “Then I started getting invited to do political functions like the governor’s birthday ball or mayor’s dinner.” At one event, he bumped into E.M. Loew, owner of the popular Latin Quarter nightclub in New York City. “He liked my work and invited me to do a week there. I told him I’d think about it.” While adapting the jokes of others worked for occasional regional performances, Crosby knew he would need original material to perform in a major city. Then he remembered the owner of a club in Springfield, Mass., where he sometimes appeared. “The guy would hit on the singers and

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Crosby soon became a frequent guest on TV talk and variety shows, including Dean Martin’s, and subsequently was a perfect choice as a regular roaster on the hugely popular Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts of the ‘70s, writing lines like: “Wilt Chamberlain is an insulation to young people all over the world. Wherever he appears, after every game the kids give him a standing ovulation.” dancers,” recalled Crosby. “The club was 90 miles from Boston, so some of the girls stayed at hotels during their engagements whereas others would commute each day.” When the club owner took a fancy to one cute girl, Crosby remembers him asking for help. “He said ‘find out if she is staying over or is communicating,’” chuckled Crosby. “I knew that wasn’t the right word, but it was funny. So I starting playing around with the idea of malaprops and that’s how my signature act evolved.” Crosby soon found audiences appreciated his style of satire, appearing for 18 weeks at the Latin Quarter and retiring from his advertising job. After a glowing newspaper review by the powerful gossip columnist Walter Winchell, Crosby signed with the William Morris agency and spent 3 years

Crosby continued with a busy schedule in the following decades, and was the Los Angeles co-host of the Jerry Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Association telethon for over 25 years, until Lewis was unceremoniously dumped from the annual event in 2011. In later years Crosby, who turns 90 in September, performed at casinos, Friars Club roasts, and cruise ships. “They all still seem to enjoy my style.”

Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at Montgomery, Ala., and has written features, columns, and interviews for over 600 magazines and newspapers. Nick can be reached at www.getnickt.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

June 2017

BOOM!

47


free mammograms and pap smears If you are age 40 to 64, have no insurance and a low income, you may qualify for a FREE Mammogram and Pap smear.

With you every step of the way from FREE SCREENING to FREE TREATMENT For more information, call toll-free 1-877-252-3324 adph.org/earlydetection

BOOM! June 2017  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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